T-Mobile deployed more 600MHz and 700MHz LTE upgrades over the last two weeks

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Jealous of those folks in Miami that recently got 5G and 4G upgrades? T-Mobile has some more good network news to share today.

T-Mobile has upgraded hundreds of low-band LTE cell sites over the last two weeks. This includes 600MHz and 700MHz upgrades.

Some of the cities included in this round of upgrades are Anaheim, CA; Asbury, NJ; Canton, OH; Gresham, OR; Norfolk, VA; and Oklahoma City, OK. We’ve got the full list of cities that received low-band LTE upgrades available below.

  • Anaheim, CA
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • Pomona, CA
  • Colorado Springs, CO
  • Greenwich, CT
  • Stamford, CT
  • Milford, DE
  • Selbyville, DE
  • Anthony, FL
  • Chipley, FL
  • Clewiston, FL
  • Fort Myers, FL
  • Jacksonville, FL
  • Kenansville, FL
  • Tampa, FL
  • Macon, GA
  • Woodstock, GA
  • Boise, ID
  • Chicago, IL
  • Oak Brook, IL
  • Cumberland, MD
  • North Dighton, MA
  • Howard City, MI
  • Rose City, MI
  • Princeton, MN
  • Festus, MO
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • Asbury, NJ
  • Belmar, NJ
  • Bergenfield, NJ
  • Keyport, NJ
  • Plainfield, NJ
  • Scotch Plains, NJ
  • Vineland, NJ
  • Brooklyn, NY
  • Corinth, NY
  • Hammond, NY
  • New York, NY
  • Ridgewood, NY
  • Roslyn Heights, NY
  • Blanch, NC
  • Charlotte, NC
  • Chocowinity, NC
  • Huntersville, NC
  • Matthews, NC
  • Winston Salem, NC
  • Canton, OH
  • Oklahoma City, OK
  • Gresham, OR
  • Bushkill, PA
  • Chambersburg, PA
  • Hanover, PA
  • Leola, PA
  • Lititz, PA
  • Mercersburg, PA
  • Saint Thomas, PA
  • Sugar Grove, PA
  • San Juan, PR
  • Chesnee, SC
  • Nashville, TN
  • Corpus Christi, TX
  • Eagle Pass, TX
  • McAllen, TX
  • Mission, TX
  • Rio Grande City, TX
  • Temple, TX
  • Provo, UT
  • Fairfax, VA
  • Norfolk, VA
  • Stuarts Draft, VA
  • Baggs, WY

Source: Neville Ray (Twitter)

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  • Sharti24

    What manufacturer makes the 5G NR antennas? Ericsson or Nokia?

  • Trillville Will

    I’m glad to see that Macon, GA is on the list. Now T-Mobile just needs to head on over to Milledgeville and install some low band infrastructure on all the towers here. That’s all that’s really holding the network back from being as good as the other major carriers. That low band is so crucial here to have a great network. I believe y’all can make it happen if y’all really want to.

    • Sharti24

      How’s sprint been treating you? You on their $35 plan

      • Trillville Will

        It’s actually pretty darn great while inside native coverage but if you’re not then you will suffer from those atrocious roaming agreements. I’m currently on unlimited basic since the $35 wasn’t available during the time I joined.

  • Glenn Gore

    Now when is T-Mobile going to add more 5G sites? It’s now going on 2 months since the first wave was turned on, so when is more coming? And by the way, side note, from what I have seen so far, over a variety of locations and states, 5G over Band 71 is not too impressive.

    • GeoGuy17

      Most of the expanded coverage and B71 upgrades are likely adding 5G capable gear. It is just that the 4G expansions mean more to more people so that is advertised a bit more (outside the marketing for nationwide 5G network). As you noted, 5G over B71 is not a huge jump. The big jump comes with mmWave which is not good for mobile situations due to the signal being easily blocked.

      • Glenn Gore

        This was one of the first places in the country to get Band 71, almost 2 years ago, but we didn’t get 5G in the first round. It really doesn’t matter much because we’re getting 140-160 Mbps with LTE+. That’s plenty of speed to do anything I would ever need to do. I am quite happy with that, it shows that T-Mobile is fully utilizing their spectrum, fully deploying the equipment and provisioning it with adequate back-haul to support it.

        I have been to places where I have seen that sort of LTE and only gotten 12Mbps with 5G, so I question what they are doing in during these early days. I would assume they are not devoting much capacity to 5G since as you say, there aren’t many devices around to use it, but that is a little harsh, to drop to that low a level.

        I have absolutely no delusions that millimeter-wave will ever be deployed here in my 50,000 population city, from anyone, be it T-Mobile, AT&T, or Verizon. MM is pretty much a Top 20 dense/urban market thing, and in reality, this is just my opinion, I think it’s pretty much useless in its present form anywhere, urban or rural. No one wants something that can only be used outdoors, and only in an absolutely direct-line to a transmitter, that’s just ridiculous, it just does not suit how people use their devices in the real world. And I have not seen anything yet about just exactly how any of the carriers have come up with any sort of plan on how to make it usable indoors. Nothing. Maybe later on, but in its present form, millimiter-wave 5G is a non-issue for me.

        • marque2

          I think mm wave is more for home internet. You would have a small antenna on the outside of your house which would be attached to an internal receiver which would convert the signal to WIFI and lower frequency cell bands within your home.

        • Glenn Gore

          Ultra high-speed 5G provided by millimeter wave spectrum is supposed to be for self-driving cars, telemedicine uses, mobile 4K video, mobile MMORPG gaming, every pie in the sky thing the carriers can think of, it seems, but with the crippling limitations of millimeter wave in the real world and the not-much-better-or-worse-than-LTE of low-band 5G, I just don’t see how any of that is more than a pipe dream. No one really needs a gigabit home internet connection, at least I don’t. Some people have them via cable modem, but the real utility escapes me. I’m not a gamer, that is probably the main use case.

        • marque2

          Would still need an external antenna on the automatic car. Glass can stop mm waves and they would have to install a heck a lot along the freeways for these dreams to work.

          I think those prognostications are 5g hype – sorta like when popular mechanics tells us we will have flying cars in ten years and mag-lev trains running across the country so fast they will put planes out of business. I bought my first popular mechanics 40 years ago and am still waiting.

        • Glenn Gore

          Yes, I don’t have much hope those cars are any closer now than they ever were, LOL.

          The main thing people cite when they list the benefits of 5G is latency. Almost instantaneous data and response time. While that may be true, if you can’t get the signal to the customer (millimeter wave) or the signal doesn’t have functional capability (low-band), what good is that fast latency time? I don’t hear people talking about any of that when they are reporting and reviewing other carriers’ 5G.

          I can just imagine what a highway would look like equipped with millimeter-wave 5G. A transmitter of some form every little bit so that constant contact would be maintained with EVERY 5G-equipped vehicle. And what are you going to do when a semi blocks the signal from a car in a lane next to it? Are there going to have to be transmitters on both sides of the roadway, and above it as well? The scenario is nightmarish and completely non-feasible . Hype for sure.

  • MrT

    Installing things in Los Angeles, Brooklyn, New York, etc, doesn’t help my rural living life. At this rate, our only hope is Musk’s satellite Internet. I can’t live like 200 years until my area gets covered by T-mobile. Sigh. :-( I wish they would, but I see little to no chance…

    • Iphart

      So are you talking about home Internet or cell phone service?
      For cell phone service Just switch to Verizon and pay a little more for good coverage.

      • MrT

        Talking about both. We have only cell service here, with like 1 bar. I wish we would have T-mobile in the area, but their closest antenna is like 100-150 miles away. :(

        • Trillville Will

          Man that sucks bro.

        • Brandon

          Where do u live?

        • MrT

          Rural Mich.

        • Brandon

          I just wish that T-Mobile had a boat load of money to upgrade and add coverage all around the USA.

        • MrT

          They want to merge with Sprint, and that would be a big deal for everyone, but for some reason like 15 states trying to block their merger. So it’s a difficult situation. They are in court for like a month now, but nothing happens, they are just arguing there…

      • MrT

        Yeah, we have Verizon, It costs like 45. I have to pay 45 a month (540 a year) for using the phone only ONCE a month. T-mobile had a deal with Verizon, throttling coverage or something, I paid 2 dollars for that (prepaid card), but it worked only for like 4 months, then it was over. I guess they stopped working together.

        • riverhorse

          Check out the Visible subreddit. Verizon prepaid only $25 monthly.

  • steveb944

    I don’t recognize some of those FL cities, so this was a push for the boonies.

    • marque2

      Probably a good thing – TMobile still needs help in the boonies. I am least satisfied with TMobile when I am on road trips.

  • marque2

    I think I will wait until 2021 for my first 5g phone.

    • riverhorse

      Or ’22.
      We’re not saturated with 4G yet, i don’t see how 5G can do it. Unless if carriers will also add some bandwidth from LEO internet satellites.

      • Clevenger23

        by adding a lot of 5G n71 Band in the 600 Mhz to cover 5G out for long distance. even with it being slower, the n71 band allows you to have multiple connection to that tower which is how they are making up for the slowness that is normally caused by the lower bands, or if there is LTE that you can connect to they will connect you to the n71 band and whatever LTE is nearby to give you the better speeds.

        • riverhorse

          Do you think this will be fairly quick, able to blanket everywhere, won’t have significant glitches- including individual models interfacing with it?
          If it works right, especially when traveling, I’d pay whatever. I’m leery of a years long rollout though.
          But the future is real promising eventually- when also factoring in government release of 6ghz wave, WiFi 6x, LEO satellites.
          What might not be able to keep up is computers patched for all vulnerabilities- a gaming rig is needed nowadays to browse with many tabs open.

  • Clevenger23

    They really hate Indiana. Signal really needs some help across northern Indiana. So freaking spotty I have to keepy work phone that is on AT&T with me just to have if I need to make calls while driving

    • marque2

      That might change with the Sprint merger. Sprint has a lot of towers that are not conflicting with TMobile towers. I would imagine TMobile wouldn’t get rid of all of them.

      • Clevenger23

        I am keeping my fingers crossed because Sprint has great LTE in the areas here that tmobile is lacking. i know they are waiting, but if the merger is denied then i am stuck waiting on them to come back to this area.

    • Jason Caprio

      According to RootMetrics, T-Mobile is dead last in every category except Network Speed (3rd place) in Indiana state level rootscore. AT&T and Verizon are king in your state. It’s 2020, T-Mobile had YEARS to meet or beat Verizon and AT&T and I’m not seeing it happening any time soon. T-Mobile is an urban carrier and always will be. They are excellent in cities, and spotty in rural areas.