Jeff Binder, former Layer3 TV CEO, has left T-Mobile

jeff-binder

Following T-Mobile’s purchase of Layer3 TV last year, Layer3 TV CEO Jeff Binder joined T-Mo to lead the carrier’s new television effort. Now he’s officially moved on.

Jeff Binder left T-Mobile on May 1st, the carrier has confirmed. T-Mo told Light Reading that Binder helped to launch TVision and now he’s planning to return to entrepreneurship. The news of Binder’s exit was reportedly shared with T-Mobile employees during a town hall meeting this week.

Now that Binder has moved on from T-Mobile, SVP Robert Gary will become the general manager of T-Mo’s Home & Entertainment division. We learned through a leaked memo earlier this week that Matt Staneff is now overseeing the marketing team for Home & Entertainment as well as T-Mobile, Metro by T-Mobile, and T-Mobile for Business, and T-Mo today confirmed that change as well.

When one company acquires another, we often see execs stick around for a period of time and then leave to do their own thing. In this case, Binder joined T-Mobile as part of the Layer3 TV deal and then stuck around to help integrate Layer3 into T-Mo and get TVision off the ground. Now that TVision Home has launched, Binder is off to do his own thing.

Source: Light Reading

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  • Fabian Cortez

    But they’ll create jobs with the Sprint merger…

    • Trevnerdio

      Because he chose to leave, this is for some reason T-Mobile’s fault? If he finished a project and was no longer needed in that role, I’m sure he could’ve chosen to do something else. He probably just didn’t want to be at the company any longer, wanted to pursue other interests.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Because he chose to leave, this is for some reason T-Mobile’s fault? If he finished a project and was no longer needed in that role, I’m sure he could’ve chosen to do something else. He probably just didn’t want to be at the company any longer, wanted to pursue other interests.

        Mergers don’t create [net] jobs.

        • Trevnerdio

          In the short term, no. In the long term, I don’t see why they wouldn’t.

  • MissedCall

    He cashed in. Good for him.

    • BobbieDooley

      That was the original goal; and he along with his investors made it work.

      But speaking from a pure technology perspective, even with double the licensed spectrum of their closest competitor, offering services like ISP, fixed home phone,internet and TV is going to be tough.

      When Charter announced earnings, last week, they stated that their median residential cable internet consumes 400GB per month.

      Even if Legere is correct in testimony to Congress and saying his cost per gigabyte is dropping by a factor of 2 or 3, Nevill needs to scale it to a factor of about 7 to adequately compete with a offering of a cable provider.

      The alternative of course is throttling and caps, and perhaps queueing content for download during off-peak times- such as 2am so it doesn’t compete with Netflix buffering.

  • KeepU

    Does anyone know why this reminds me of AOL/Time Warner?

  • alfonzso

    Funny how bloggers have to repeat themselves to improve SEO. Usually you can sum it up in one sentence.