John Legere responds to Binge On criticisms with new open letter

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Last week, John Legere went on defense for Binge On, posting a video and hosting a Twitter Q&A following criticisms of the service. Now he’s rounding things out with an open letter that attempts to clarify the two biggest questions that many folks have regarding Binge On.

In his letter, John Legere says that Binge On uses “proprietary techniques to attempt to detect all video, determine its source, identify whether it should be free and finally adjust all streams for a smaller/handheld device.” This is in response to a recent EFF report that says that T-Mobile simply detects if the incoming file is a video and throttles the speed to 1.5Mbps, forcing the content provider to adapt. The EFF says that it was told by T-Mobile that the carrier doesn’t do any optimizations beyond reducing the bandwidth for the video stream.

Legere also explains why T-Mobile decided to make Binge On opt-out rather than opt-in, the other common complaint with the service. The CEO says that it strives to make all of its customer services “ON” so that users don’t have to hunt for the switch to activate a service on their own. “Can you imagine the disappointment, if people saw our TV commercials about Binge On, then went to watch 10 hours of video expecting it to be free, and only THEN learned that they needed to go into their settings to activate this new benefit?” Legere also says that Binge On is very pro net neutrality because customers can turn it on and off at their will.

Finally, Legere apologizes for offending the EFF and its supporters with his remarks during his Twitter Q&A. He reiterates that T-Mobile wants to sit down with the EFF and discuss Binge On at length.

The two most common complaints about Binge On are about throttling and the fact that it’s automatically enabled for customers. His open letter doesn’t really seem to shed much new light on how Binge On works, instead just saying that T-Mobile detects the video and its source and then adjusts the stream. He also continues to push hard that customers don’t need super high resolution video on their phones and that 480p is enough for a phone screen.

As for Binge On being opt-out rather than opt-in, Legere argues that a regular carrier would make Binge On opt-in and hope that customers wouldn’t activate it. However, critics of Binge On could argue that activating Binge On for everyone just means that some folks won’t know that it’s on, which means less of a load on the network. Perhaps T-Mo could have made Binge On opt-in and then communicated to consumers how to turn it on or made the switch easier to find.

What do you think of John Legere’s latest defense of Binge On?

Source: T-Mobile

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  • I Don’t Tech-No, Satisfaction

    Good job T-Mobile and John for being transparent as well as for apologizing for the remarks toward the EFF.

    As a company (and CEO), you may not agree with others but you must remain professional at all times.

    • John Doe

      Good on him for the apology but he DID NOT say ANYTHING new so still no transparency. Maybe, he should ask Neville Ray to write a technical post as to what T-Mobile is doing with videos on its network if he is incapable of doing it himself.

  • Adrayven

    I don’t mind that it’s on by default. That makes sense, and figured as much this was why they did it that way from the start. Most users would never know they could avoid getting charged. Can you imagine the class lawsuits if it was off by default? It would come back and bite them in the @$$ with people complaining they burned up their DATA because T-Mobile didn’t turn on a new feature that would give data for free or 3x less usage (lower 480p). heh

    Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

    The only thing they could have done better was to push awareness of the new feature better. I don’t know about anyone else, but I expected to see some SMS texts about BingeOn, directing people to check it out. Never happened.. Thats the only real fail I have seen concerning the release of the new service.

    • kgraham182

      T-Mobile doesn’t charge overages remember, so what class action lawsuit.

      • turtle6988

        I received an e-mail about it before it went active. Not T-Mobile’s by fault if people do not read there e-mails

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          I got the txt and email plus I read all about it when it was announced there’s no excuse for ignorance

        • John Doe

          I did not get it and I am on an unlimited plan. -_-

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          I did plus I read from tmobile a website along with news sources

          Ignorance is not an excuse

        • John Doe

          It is not ignorance. Many companies were warned against having opt-out programs like this by regulatory agencies including Google before. It is known that having opt-out programs is bad because it puts the burden on the user to do all the UNNECESSARY research especially after they have already signed up to an advertised plan without Binge On and agreed to a ToS agreement.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Ignorance indeed

          Not only did they say it’d be enabled by default when it was announced the bitching about that didn’t start til 2 months later

        • John Doe

          Yeah, because people realized what was going on by Youtube and the EFF. If T-Mobile would have asked each person in that “text” they sent out if they want it or not there wouldn’t be a huge outcry.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          How is that not ignorance?

        • John Doe

          Yes but you are blaming them for their ignorance. It is like blaming rape victims because they were wearing too revealing clothes so they should have known better.

          The burden is not on the customer/victim to follow every announcement the company makes. Other companies like Google and Apple, once they change anything in their ToS agreement; they ask users to agree to it again but T-Mobile changed theirs to include Binge On and did not ask users to agree to it again.

          And the matter of the fact is we are still all very much ignorant on how Binge On works because T-Mobile isn’t being transparent about it.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          rape victim and ignorance of this are two wholly different things idiot

          the burden is on the consumer. there is also a thing called personal responsibility. You are just one of the sheep in this country get educated

        • John Doe

          Wow, jumping to insults now I see.

          While I think that rape is an extreme analogy, it is not all that different. You are blaming the victim for irresponsibility rather than blame the criminal for the crime. In this case, T-Mobile broke the Net Neutrality laws by throttling and they are the criminals. And you are saying there is an option to turn it off and it is not T-Mobile’s problem that people are ignorant. Which is the same in rape cases; criminals use the issue of consent to get away with it.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Still do not see an argument here

          Only excuses

        • John Doe

          They are valid complaints.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Ignorance is not a valid complaint.

          Plus the bitching started months later get real have some personal responsibility

        • John Doe

          Like I said before you can’t blame the customer for being ignorant.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Yes one definitely could

        • John Doe

          No, especially from a company like T-Mobile that prides itself for listening to its customers and being consumer friendly.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Don’t give a shit

          Your ignorance is not anyone’s issue but your own

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Wife and I both did and we are on the 2 for 100 plan

        • John Doe

          My family and I did not and we all have unlimited.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          I see however before we got the text and email I read about it so I do not get how your ignorance is their problem

        • John Doe

          Because they said they sent out texts and didn’t, also the texts they sent out were useless and did not require any customer interaction whatsoever.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          can you retype that so people can understand?

        • John Doe

          Really? -_-

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          yup please try your hardest thanks

        • John Doe

          I think it is pretty understandable. I do not need to have perfect grammar on the comment section of a blog.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Not about grammar it’s about your post being nonsense

        • John Doe

          what is nonsense about it exactly?

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          All of it

        • John Doe

          Thanks for that /s

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          You still have yet to make a valid point give up dude

        • John Doe

          I have. You are just too biased to see through your magenta colored shades.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          There is no bias with ignorance

        • John Doe

          You are biased.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Please explain how that is biased

          However if bias to you means not supporting ignorance then you can call it that if you want. Ignorant kid

        • John Doe

          If you don’t know how biased you are then I can’t help you. If you don’t think that T-Mobile did anything wrong with Binge On or anything negative then nothing I say will change that.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Also means you don’t have anything

          Go to sleep come back when you have something to say

        • John Doe

          You are the one that asked.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          and again you provided nothing

        • John Doe

          then don’t ask if my answers are insufficient for you.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          I dont get this country. No other carrier is doing anything remotely close to this. The people get this awesome gift but bitch cuz they didnt get what they want?

          Its like those spoiled brats they get the BMW M3 they wanted but bitch about its the wrong color etc lmao

        • John Doe

          You are right you don’t get this country so move to China.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          After you perhaps they have a carrier over there that gives you what T-Mobile does and what you want

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          Ignorant

        • John Doe

          Whatever

        • Ascertion

          Probably because you’re the primary line on the account. The rest of the lines didn’t get the text/email.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          My wife got the same email and txt

      • PC_Tool

        Because once you burn through your data, it’s nigh unusable. No overages, sure – but effectively no connection either.

        • John Doe

          Then that user can join Binge On and watch video for free from partner sites. But Email, messaging, etc. are still usable after you finish your high speed data.

        • PC_Tool

          Have you ever hit the cap?

          “still usable after you finish your high speed data.”

          No; it’s not what I would consider usable by a long shot. Much of the time, not even Gmail will load.

          This is from personal experience.

        • John Doe

          From mine it is very much usable. I have several lines on my account and one of those like comes with only 1GB of data and I could still load up gmail and even reply to Facebook messages after i reached the limit.

    • Sectime

      Exactly why Apple is being sued for turning WiFi assist on by default. I don’t blame Tmoble at all, a little geek rage vs lawsuits.

  • kgraham182

    If BingeON could detect video and tell the app to play the lowest quality that would be great but it senses video than throttles you to 1.5Mbps. That’s where the EFF, others and I have problems with this feature.

  • davidofmidnight

    and John finally starts acting like an adult.

    • Adam

      I was getting sick of him acting like a presidential candidate.

    • John Doe

      I keep hearing from customers that they love it – but have recently heard from some others (many of whom have never even tried Binge On, and simply have a different agenda) that they don’t like it.

      Unfortunately, he still took a subtle jab at customers with valid complaints. There is no conspiracy here John, the EFF doesn’t have a secret agenda and the other carriers want to do exactly what you are doing with Binge On so they are out too. Maybe it is the illuminati then.

  • Rob H.

    It should have been off for unlimited customers on both T-Mobile and metropcs, and on for customers with data buckets, IMHO.

    480p is probably fine on phones with 720p screens like the budget phones T-Mobile and etc carries. But I notice most videos in 480p on my Nexus 6, I could tell too when I had my Nexus 5.

    Good to see Legere making amends.

    • Acdc1a

      It’s not bad but noticeable on the Nexus 6
      As much as I tether I keep it on despite my unlimited plan.

    • Mike

      Only reason I see to keep it on with unlimited data is for the unlimited tethering and a free vudu movie each month

  • Medion

    They can’t say that it’s easy to turn off when they say that the whole point of being opt out was that it’s too hard to find the on/off switch.

    That’s the logical fallacy with their argument.

    • John Doe

      LMFAO, Thank you!

    • Yes they can say that, and it makes sense. Many (not all) people who want BingeOn turned on are less tech-savvy types without unlimited data, and who can’t tell the difference between HD and 480p on a phone screen, and who don’t whine on Twitter and read tech blogs. They probably saw a random BingeOn commercial or heard it through word of mouth. They sign up so they can get this great “unlimited video streaming” they heard about, it’s much easier if they don’t have to opt in. Your average soccer mom/dad/grandma/grandpa would require a support call to Tmo just to even understand the My Tmobile app nevermind go into a menu and opt in to something. These customers streaming a bunch of video and then burning their data bucket in a week because they didn’t know they had to “opt in” would cause a far bigger customer dissatisfaction headache for Tmo than all of the entitled armchair net neutrality experts combined.

      Meanwhile, anyone commenting on this article is capable of opting out of BingeOn in 5 seconds flat. Minimal effort. So just do so and forget it, sheesh.

    • PC_Tool

      They did not say “it’s too hard”. Try again.

      • Ascertion

        “We don’t like to make customers dig around to find great new benefits.”

        This implies that the menu, to the general public knowledge, is hidden, or hard to find.

        • PC_Tool

          If you want it to, it does.

          The button is 3 clicks away once you log in. If that’s “hard”, then I don’t know what to tell ya. Life’s gonna be pretty rough for ya.

        • Ascertion

          Then you should take it up to Legere for implying and making it obvious that they’ve hidden the toggle. While you’re at it, you can tell him that his customers they “should give up and fade away” since they can’t press “3 clicks.”

        • PC_Tool

          ” While you’re at it, you can tell him that his customers they “don’t deserve to be on Earth” since they can’t press “3 clicks.””

          Odd. I cannot seem to find what you quoted anywhere in my response. Way to go off the rails there, bud.

          The only people trying to paint this is difficult are, well, folks like you.

          Nice try.

        • Ascertion

          Odd. You disregarded everything else I said to make a point that I’ve already edited prior to your post. My initial quote wasn’t even far off from your other post, and it still had the same “PC_Tool” touch to it.

        • PC_Tool

          ..and you missed the point entirely.

          Even after going back and editing…

          Point being: If humanity was really as stupid as the people here seem to want to imply, humanity wouldn’t be here.

          In other words: It’s easy to turn off. Very easy. So easy, in fact, the very fact we still exist means we’re capable of grasping the concept.

          Capiche?

        • John Doe

          In other words: It’s easy to turn off. Very easy. So easy, in fact, the very fact we still exist means we’re capable of grasping the concept.

          It should not have been on in the first place.

          “But the best option would be to make Binge On opt-in (instead of opt-out), with clear disclosure that opting in will throttle all video traffic. Many of T-Mobile’s customers don’t realize that Binge On has this unfortunate side effect―especially since T-Mobile has buried the fact that Binge On throttles all video in their fine print. If T-Mobile were to be clear with its customers that enabling Binge On meant all of their video would be throttled, and then ask them whether or not they wanted to opt in, then they could obtain meaningful customer consent.”
          -EFF

          “Reducing data charges can be good for users, but it doesn’t justify throttling all video services, especially without explicit user consent,”
          -Youtube

        • PC_Tool

          Thanks.

          Obviously, I don’t share your opinion.

          Fact: It’s really easy to turn off, your opinion notwithstanding.

        • John Doe

          You don’t have to share my opinion but it does not mean that it is wrong just because it is easy to turn it off does not mean it is the most consumer friendly way to do it.

          The most consumer friendly way would be to have it and ask people to join.

        • PC_Tool

          Would it? Sounds like another opinion.

          Maybe it’s more consumer friendly to enable it by default so that the majority of users don’t have to do a thing; and the few who want to turn it of…can. Very easily.

          Yeah. That sounds right. Less effort all around.

          It’s all about perspective.

        • John Doe

          No that does not sound consumer friendly. If you want something then you go a get it but if you didn’t know it was there or wanted it in the first then don’t shove down their throat.

          Google a few years back had a program that collected user location data without their consent. It was turned on by default and they made the same argument to the FCC that they wanted to make easier for their users but the FCC fined them and forced them to make it opt-in. Because opt-out programs put the burden on the consumer to do the research and figure out out to leave the program instead of opt-in where the burden is on the company to advertise the program to the consumer and ask them to join.

          So yeah the FTC, Youtube, and the EFF agree that opt-in is much better but apparently your opinion is better than mine somehow.

        • PC_Tool

          “your opinion is better than mine somehow.”

          Yes. It is. (in my opinion)

          Thanks for noticing.

          Other than contradicting and name-dropping, you’ve not shown you’ve given any thought to the matter at all.

          “Because YouTube and the EFF agree with me.” isn’t an argument. The leading minds once thought the world was flat and the sun revolved around the earth. I suppose you’d have agreed with them as well (and YT/EFFaren’t even close to “leading minds”).

          You say, “shoved down their throat”, which is all nice and dramatic and emotionally charged, but hardly a reasonable or rational argument.

          No-one is being forced to do anything. They don’t even have to make a choice. They can carry on as if nothing has changed, they can seek to enjoy any benefits they deem worthwhile, or they can disable it. It’s all easy, and it’s all up to the user.

          You, on the other hand, would rather spend countless hours whining about it. If you could post an original thought on the matter, I might actually put some stock in your “opinion”…especially if it came without the melodramatic flair.

        • John Doe

          They turned it on without customer permission. Which is super easy to get they could have sent a text to ask every customer if they wanted it on with a yes or no reply.

          If you could post an original thought on the matter, I might actually put some stock in your “opinion”…especially if it came without the melodramatic flair.

          I don’t care what you think about my opinion Lmao

          Also this is my opinion I have been saying this before the EFF even published its report (check my comments on previous articles here on Binge On) and I submitted an FCC complaint way before the EFF ran their tests and proved that T-Mobile throttles all video content. No one would have known about what T-Mobile is doing with Binge On without Youtube and the EFF’s help.

        • PC_Tool

          “they could have sent a text”

          The same kind of text your kind seem to be claiming wasn’t enough to tell them the program existed and that they could opt-out?

          “I don’t care what you think about my opinion Lmao”

          …and yet here you are – arguing endlessly with anyone who doesn’t share it. Yeah, you couldn’t care less. Sure.

          “I submitted an FCC complaint”

          I bet that makes you feel special. I’m sure the FCC will put as much stock in your complaint as I do.

        • John Doe

          “your kind”? wow I see you have now graduated to insults…congratulations.

          I for one did not receive that “text” and many of my family and friends did not. And from what I understand it just told them they have binge on but not “that they could opt-out”. It would have been more consumer friendly and easier to ask if they want it on in that said text that was sent to “everyone”.

          “I bet that makes you feel special. I’m sure the FCC will put as much stock in your complaint as I do.”

          No but they will if many more submit complaints and Youtube’s and the EFF’s complaints certainly only helps mine and encourages other to submit complaints.

        • PC_Tool

          “your kind” is an insult?

          Nah, bro. Calling you a moron, imbecile, idiot, ignorant twat…those would be insults.

          Feel free to take your pick.

          Best of luck with all the whining.

        • John Doe

          Yeah it is an insult.

          Thank you.

  • Guest 2

    If there was no Binge-On/Data-Maximizer and Music-Freedom/Unlimited we would have seen an extra GB or 2 of data on our plans.
    Is that simple. But I guess we prefer the bull’s.

  • CSR2

    i understand the opinions on both sides of the debate, but in the end in this letter he is 100% right, can you imagine taking 50 calls from different people about how they didn’t know how to use it but used the data then saw the commercial, they thought it was free to stream etc etc. Only in reference to the opt in / out argument , hiding what the technology does is no good though anyway we look at it.

    • Mal

      There could be 50 calls from different people wondering why their network connection is so bad all of sudden This actually happened. At least there are more than a few people on the Internet asking what happened to their connection.

      I think T-Mobile should add an option to not throttle non-partner connections when Bing On is enabled.

      • Christopher Olson

        Binge on doesn’t have any noticeable effect on network speeds that the consumer would even tell. The only thing that gets effected is video files and if anything they buffer faster but as far as your connection goes it will be the same with binge on active or inactive. Any slow down with the user’s speed is coincidental.

        • John Doe

          Really? Playing a severely buffering Youtube video in HD is not enough for the consumer to tell?

        • Acdc1a

          That user would have had to be smart enough to force that video into HD resolution otherwise Youtube would automatically optimize…your argument is silly.

        • John Doe

          Smart enough? LoL its in the settings you don’t need to be “smart” to change the quality settings from 480P or lower to 720P and higher. Youtube automatically selects a resolution based on the amount of bandwidth available but it can be changed quite easily.

          But I guess everyone is stupid. /s

        • calvin35

          They can tell. T-Mobile is just counting on the fact that a single user won’t do it enough to rise to the level where they would be motivated to call and complain.

  • C M Hurlburt Jr

    The problem I have is that it also slows video downloads, so a video that may take a few moments at the normal speed now take a lot longer.

    Downloads have nothing to do with Binge on so why are they being restricted to slow speed since they count to your data plan anyway it makes no sense to slow them.

    • Kim

      Your are right but it is interesting you are downloading video on your phone. It is just probably bad implementation or they did expect or foreseen that and just detect any video.

    • PC_Tool

      It’s an issue with detection. They don’t or cannot differentiate “streamed” vs. “downloading” – all they are seeing is that it is video.

      • C M Hurlburt Jr

        They have a whitelist of partners they do not count usage for streaming, so they are inspecting the files and where it is from to know.

        If they have that set up then they could fully implement it to allow downloads and streams from sites not part of Binge On whitelist.

        • PC_Tool

          So you know it’s “just a whitelist” and there’s absolutely nothing on the provider’s side that needs to be done to allow this to occur?

          Wow.

          Where have you been all this time? The EFF would really love to talk to you since you apparently know exactly how it’s done. /s

        • John Doe

          But that is the point NO ONE knows EXACTLY how it is done because T-Mobile is not being transparent about it.

        • PC_Tool

          No-one but you and SirStephenH, apparently… /s

          T-mobile is not going to tell AT&T, VZW, or Sprint how they are doing it…but you expect them to tell you.

          Bravo.

        • John Doe

          Youtube, EFF, Many tech sites and blogs and many customers. But good job trying to downplay it LoL

        • PC_Tool

          I can play that game too.

          Good job parroting the masses. You can never be wrong when you’re only repeating what you heard someone else say.

        • John Doe

          If you agree with them then why not?

          You obviously agree with T-Mobile on this…”You can never be wrong when you’re only repeating what you heard someone else say.”

        • C M Hurlburt Jr

          Sorry I confused you with a PC term, a whitelist is a list and in the case of TMobile they most likely have a list of companies or sites that the are not going to count as data for a customer. The list would make it easier for them to market Binge On.

          Since at the moment it would be easier for TMobile to keep track of sites or companies they are not counting data (because of the low number at the moment) that is referred to as a whitelist.

          Now for TMobile to know not to charge data they would have to know what is being steamed or downloaded and the only way would be to inspect what the data is and that was mentioned by the EFF if you read their release and even when the file name was changed or over a secure connection speed was restricted. I believe EFF know the term whitelist since they have used the term blacklist before.

          Since they have the whitelist then they there is no reason to restrict downloads from companies or sites not part of Binge On which count as data.

          Unless you are telling me they have no way of tracking where something is steamed or downloaded from because that would make Binge On useless then.

        • PC_Tool

          No confusion. I know what a whitelists are.

          It is not that which amused me. You seem to think that all this takes for T-mobile is making a list of allowed “sites”. That is what I find hilarious.

        • C M Hurlburt Jr

          You seem to think that TMobile lacks the ability to track where the downloads or streams are coming from and what the data is so the could be able to throttle and that is kind of sad.

        • PC_Tool

          So you jumped from me finding it humorous that you seem to think all it takes is a list to claiming I’ve said they don’t have lists.

          Huh.

          Do you hear voices too? Do they tell you to make these ridiculous posts/claims?

        • C M Hurlburt Jr

          You had a problem with me about my not liking that TMobile is throttling my downloads and controlling my use of data which at the moment I or customer service could not disabled.

          Also, your the one that implied TMobile does not have the ability to tell what data is being downloaded or from where, for billing purposes.

          Finally you made the comment that EFF did not know about whitelist and who they should hire.

        • PC_Tool

          Your reading comprehension could possibly use some work.

          1) I had no “problem” with your not liking T-mobile “throttling” and never commented on how you felt about it. My original response was merely suggesting an explanation for the video downloads. I was not attacking you, but rather trying to offer an explanation. (silly me…)

          2) I made no comment re: billing and I most certainly claimed they could tell what was being downloaded (video). The issue you seemed to be having was that they are not differentiating between streamed and downloaded – which a “whitelist” isn’t going to solve if they want to keep it enabled for both partnered and non-partnered sites. The “list” would change daily and never be 100% accurate (which they would be crucified for as well).

          3) I said nothing of the sort re: the EFF. You’re really bad at making assumptions. Let me explain: The EFF asked T-Mobile how they optimized. T-mobile wasn’t giving. Since you seemed to believe you had all the answers, I suggested you should contact them. That was a bit of sarcasm on my part.

        • C M Hurlburt Jr

          My issue is where it is being downloaded from and not what, if it is not part of Binge On it shouldn’t be throttled and what the data is makes no difference.

      • SirStephenH

        It has nothing to do with detection. It’s just an excuse to throttle as much data as possible.

        • PC_Tool

          Cool story, bro.

      • John Doe

        Well then if they can’t detect the difference between streamed vs. download then they should not be “optimizing” or sorry throttling it.

  • Alan

    I wonder what it’s like working with John Legere. He probably cusses everyone out before thinking about what’s actually going on.

  • DJRaffi

    T-Mobile should program the new My T-Mobile app to allow for users to toggle the Binge-On feature on and off from the users phone. That way we have the freedom to conserve data when we want and also freedom to watch videos in full HD when we want. This tweak will make the Binge-On feature more of a convenience and less of a chore to access from their desktop portal.

    • JBLmobileG1

      I have said this everywhere. Make a widget too!

  • Mo

    I’m thinking that JL got a call from a heavy jitter at Duchcia Telecom telling him to chill out and act right.

  • John Doe

    The CEO says that it strives to make all of its customer services ‘ON’ so that users don’t have to hunt for the switch to activate a service on their own. ‘Can you imagine the disappointment, if people saw our TV commercials about Binge On, then went to watch 10 hours of video expecting it to be free, and only THEN learned that they needed to go into their settings to activate this new benefit?’

    This is a total bullshit argument. T-Mobile could easily ask every single customer if they want it on. They send text messages when you run out of data so they can absolutely send those customers a message telling them they can “stretch their data bucket”. Just like you sent a SMS to customers about Binge On and expected them to understand it and know how to turn it off then I am sure you can give them the benefit of the doubt and just aske them with that SMS if they wanted it on.

    I keep hearing from customers that they love it – but have recently heard from some others (many of whom have never even tried Binge On, and simply have a different agenda) that they don’t like it. Well you know what? That is completely OK too.

    Really? You haven’t had a single T-Mobile customer complaint that had Binge On activated by default and were forced to use it on their unlimited plan? Well CHECK your inbox because there is at least one FCC complaint from me.

    Binge On is a FREE benefit given to all T-Mobile customers.

    But not ALL customers get the benefits. Customers with less than a 3GB plan will get throttled AND have the data counted against them. Also Unlimited customers HAVE NO USE for this whatsoever.

    We don’t like to make customers dig around to find great new benefits — that is something a traditional carrier would do when they really hope you, the consumer, won’t take any action.

    Again, really? Well why don’t you block charged international roaming by default? And why would you have your unlimited plan customers to dig through menus to get rid of it? you must REALLY HATE unlimited plans. (If you can’t handle it then DO NOT SELL IT)

    keep eliminating pain points

    Unfortunately, this mostly eliminates T-Mobile’s pain point not the customers’.

    We use our proprietary techniques to attempt to detect all video, determine its source, identify whether it should be FREE and finally adjust all streams for a smaller/handheld device.

    This STILL DOES NOT explain how T-Mobile “adjust all streams”. We need the Technical details. These are our videos you are meddling with after all.

    “The FCC Should Investigate
    In the meantime, if T-Mobile doesn’t change its behavior then it’s up to the FCC to follow up. After all, the net neutrality rules aren’t just words on a piece of paper—they’re regulations meant to protect Internet users from precisely this sort of abuse of power by ISPs. We believe the FCC should regulate lightly, but our research suggests this is a significant consumer harm that runs afoul of well-established open internet principles. The FCC can and should step in and hold T-Mobile accountable.” -EFF

    • calvin35

      Excellent post. The more Legere talks the more upset i get. I pay $80 a month for my unlimited data and for one extremely frustrating day T-Mobile took that away from me and had me completely throttled and watching spinning circles all day. I actually feel like T-Mobile should pay me back for that day where they were charging me for unlimited data at the same time they were throttling me.

      • John Doe

        Imagine the millions of customers that have unlimited plans and are not getting what they are paying for because they had Binge On activated when there was no need for it in the first place on those plans. Disappointing.

        It is also interesting how the argument that he used in the post about turning it on for all customers by default has been reiterated multiple times on this blog before in the comments. If he reads these comments then maybe he should respond since we know he can because he has before and has a Disqus account.

        • calvin35

          I’m really considering leaving T-Mobile over this. Binge On is nothing more than an attempt to throttle as many unlimited users as possible, and that’s it. Everything else is a distraction.

        • John

          Me too. I’m on a group plan and we use a lot of data, so I need to think about this very carefully. But I’ve heard that sprint has gotten a lot better over the past year.

      • Ascertion

        For $80 unl plan, that’s $2.67 a day before taxes. I doubt it’s even worth mentioning for them to reimburse you a day of service…

        I do believe that ALL lines should have gotten the text notification and perhaps even a toggle via text commands (ie: Text BINGEON OFF or ON to Tmo per line, etc.) Instead they hid the settings in the menus and didn’t notify most people of what BingeOn even was, except for some primary lines.

    • frankinnoho

      I have Unlimited, and I do not remember appointing you to make statements on my behalf. You are absolutely WRONG when you state that unlimited customers have no use for this.
      First, as a general point, it makes more band width available for everyone. Let’s not kid ourselves. People were watching videos in any case, so how much bandwidth do you think might have been wasted serving 1080p video to an iPhone 5c or some other low end phone.
      Second, unlimited is not “unlimited”. After 22mb, some people in certain areas may be subject to congestion throttling. If limiting the kids youtube to 480p forstals the congestion throttling, then great.
      Third, Binge On works over tethered connections, and NO ONE has unlimited tethering. Take your TV Stick with you when you travel, and don’t worry if the hotel wifi sucks, or worse, cost an arm and a leg. Just tether the stick to your phone. No worries.
      Fourth, small beans, but you get a credit for a video on vudu.
      So, more then a few reasons an Unlimited customer might appreciate Binge On.
      And seriously, what would you do with the “details” on how they throttle/optimize the video?
      Finally, T-Mobile has done you a favor by eliminating contracts. If all this just to much for you to take, you are free to leave at any time and go to ATT or Verizon or Sprint. I’m sure ATT or Verizon will be willing to indulge your unlimited 4K viewing habits. And as for sprint, well, their max speed is the same as throttled, but you can get unlimited.

      • Drewski

        Wrong Bro. After hitting 22gb of data, does not meant its no longer truly unlimited data. It just depends on where you are located at that particular to where whether or not if you will fall right into the congested tower area enough to have your whole Truly Unlimited Data Speeds slowed down at that particular time there.

        • frankinnoho

          Are the Sprint trolls back. You just said I was wrong, and than rephrased what I said as if its a revelation… Think much? And congestion throttling is not a hypothetical for me. It has happened several times. And yes, I could wait several hours until the congestion eases up and be back to full speed, but what good is that, if several hours later I’m asleep. Point is, after you hit 22 gb the ability to use the data can be hit or miss. If binge on reduces the congestion in the area to the point that throttling isn’t required, then it’s a good thing for me. YOU are WRONG to state that that is wrong.

      • John Doe

        I have Unlimited, and I do not remember appointing you to make statements on my behalf. You are absolutely WRONG when you state that unlimited customers have no use for this.

        Where did I mention you in my comments? I am referring to the program here, it gives unlimited customers free data for some videos and throttles all their videos at the same time thus it HAS NO USE on an unlimited plan. If YOU like it then great you can go and opt-in for it but don’t force everyone else to opt-out…commonsense here.

        First, as a general point, it makes more band width available for everyone. Let’s not kid ourselves. People were watching videos in any case, so how much bandwidth do you think might have been wasted serving 1080p video to an iPhone 5c or some other low end phone.

        So because it makes more bandwidth available to you its okay to throttle everyone without getting their permission first? You are already paying for unlimited so the carrier must honor that except in congested areas T-Mobile does not need to manipulate data and play deceptive tricks to offer you more bandwidth. Like I said above if they can’t handle unlimited then they should not sell it or they should buy more spectrum to support it but do not interfere with everyones videos and charge new customers more for unlimited at the same time.

        Second, unlimited is not “unlimited”. After 22mb, some people in certain areas may be subject to congestion throttling. If limiting the kids youtube to 480p forstals the congestion throttling, then great.

        Unlimited IS unlimited. You still get the maximum bandwidth available even if it is lower in congested areas you still DO NOT get ARTIFICIALLY reduced bandwidth. Congestion occurs from having too many people in one location. THAT IS NATURAL and it is fine (the only way T-Mobile would fix is by buying more spectrum or raising the prices). Now if you throttle people (artificially reduce bandwidth) on unlimited plans then THAT IS NOT unlimited. If a city gets a lot of traffic jams on a certain highway then they add more lanes and make it bigger but they do not slow down a certain type of car to speed things up. LoL

        So, more then a few reasons an Unlimited customer might appreciate Binge On.And seriously, what would you do with the “details” on how they throttle/optimize the video?

        Because the details matter LoL optimizing a video by selecting a lower resolution is one thing but throttling a video to force it to a lower resolution is a totally different and ILLEGAL thing.

        Finally, T-Mobile has done you a favor by eliminating contracts. If all this just to much for you to take, you are free to leave at any time and go to ATT or Verizon or Sprint. I’m sure ATT or Verizon will be willing to indulge your unlimited 4K viewing habits. And as for sprint, well, their max speed is the same as throttled, but you can get unlimited.

        “I do not remember [T-Mobile] appointing you to make statements on [their] behalf.”

        I am a T-Mobile customer. I am not your customer. If T-Mobile wants me to go they can say it themselves. But in the words of John legere: “Who the F are you” to tell me which carrier I should or should not be with?

      • rtechie

        > After 22mb, some people in certain areas may be subject to congestion throttling. If limiting the kids youtube to 480p forstals the congestion throttling, then great.

        Node congestion affects you no matter what, it’s related to the number of people using the tower simultaneously. The 23GB cap (that’s what it is) only affects YOU and YOUR consumption. If you use more than 23GB in a month, you get throttled, exactly like if you use more that 10GB on a 10GB plan.

        > Take your TV Stick with you when you travel, and don’t worry if the hotel wifi sucks, or worse, cost an arm and a leg.

        This simply isn’t worth $15 a month unless you travel every month. And you have to admit that’s a niche market.

        > And seriously, what would you do with the “details” on how they throttle/optimize the video?

        He might be a network engineer for a video provider. But even just for personal users, knowing that information might help you optimize Binge On on your home network (assuming you were using it for tethering, as you suggest).

        > And as for sprint, well, their max speed is the same as throttled, but you can get unlimited.

        Sprint’s unlimited plan works EXACTLY the same way as T-Mobile’s, it’s got a 23GB cap.

        • frankinnoho

          Congestion throttling is not a cap. Caps cut you off for the balance of the month. Congestion throttling slows you down for usually only a few hours.

          Some hotels charge 15 buck a day for wifi… some have free wifi, but the speeds are such crap it would make Sprint blush.

          And as to the details, if, IF, he were an actual network engineer, he might have some clue as to what was going on would have been far more specific in his question, not blundering around like a bloviating politician demanding answers.

          No… Sprints unlimited plan does not work exactly the same as Tmo’s.. Tmo’s usually is faster then 1.1mbs, at least around here.

    • PC_Tool

      “But not ALL customers get the benefits. Customers with less than a 3GB plan will get throttled AND have the data counted against them. Also Unlimited customers HAVE NO USE for this whatsoever.”

      Derp…one has to wonder if you know how this works at all…

      Folks with under 3GB plans will benefit from using 3x less data for video.

      Unlimited users get a free monthly rental and unlimited tethering for video.

      • John Doe

        But like I said it will still count towards their data so all it does is throttle all their videos…guess what? the user can already do that themselves they can watch 480P videos only themselves so there is no benefit. Those benefits for unlimited users do NOT outweigh the negatives (having all your video throttled) and it most definitely should not have been on by default.

        • PC_Tool

          “But like I said…”

          You mean just now?

          “the user can already do that themselves they can watch 480P videos only themselves so there is no benefit.”

          …other than not having to do it, and being able to do it on services that automatically determine your definition? Yep. No benefit at all (if you ignore all possible benefits)

          “Those benefits for unlimited users do NOT outweigh the negatives”

          Well that’s only, like, your opinion, man.

          But hey, I get that you don’t want it. So hey – turn it off. Problem solved. Have a great day.

        • John Doe

          But not ALL customers get the benefits. Customers with less than a 3GB plan will get throttled AND have the data counted against them. Also Unlimited customers HAVE NO USE for this whatsoever.

          Learn to read the comments you are replying to.

          …other than not having to do it, and being able to do it on services that automatically determine your definition? Yep. No benefit at all (if you ignore all possible benefits)

          WHAT?
          I should not have to turn it off in the first place. This throttling without explicit customer permission. It should have been opt-in.

          So yeah it is my opinion as an Unlimited customer. It is also Youtube’s opinion as the biggest video streaming service on the plant. And it is the EFF’s opinion as the biggest digital rights consumer advocacy group.

        • PC_Tool

          “Learn to read the comments you are replying to.”

          Not only read ’em. Quoted ’em. Thanks for the reminder, though.

          “It should have been opt-in.”

          Repetition will definitely convince me. You bet. /s

          …and do you actually believe I am unaware of Google’s or the EFF’s stance on the issue>? Or that if they couldn’t convince me, you somehow could?

          Nah, bro. But go ahead and keep trying while spreading all that misinformation about “no benefits”. Good stuff.

        • John Doe

          But hey, I get that you don’t want it. So hey – turn it off. Problem solved. Have a great day.

          I was replying to that comment you made if it is me repeating myself then so what.

          …and do you actually believe I am unaware of Google’s or the EFF’s stance on the issue>? Or that if they couldn’t convince me, you somehow could?

          I am not trying to convince you of anything, you are the one that replied to my comment remember. I am just giving my opinion here if you want to agree with it then great if you don’t then that is fine too.

        • PC_Tool

          So we’re just calling lies “opinions” now, are we?

          There are benefits to Unlimited users using Binge On. That is a fact. This would be the opposite of the claim made in your first post, or “opinion”.

          You may be of the opinion that those benefits are not enough for you to keep it turned on. That’s fine. Turn it off. It’s really easy to do.

          But claiming they don’t exist only proves you can’t discuss the topic and remain reasonable.

          Have fun with that.

          But that’s just like, my opinion, man.

        • John Doe

          There are benefits to Unlimited users using Binge On. That is a fact. This would be the opposite of the claim made in your first post, or “opinion”.

          Where did I say there are NO benefits to Unlimited users? I said the benefits do not outweigh the negatives and thus there is no use for it… so I clearly think there are benefits
          These are not “lies” these are opinions and I know the difference between the two.

          That’s fine. Turn it off. It’s really easy to do.

          Like I said, again, “I should not have to turn it off in the first place. This throttling without explicit customer permission. It should have been opt-in.”

          You have your opinions and I have mine expect mine are in agreement with the EFF, Youtube, and many tech blogs “But that’s just like, my opinion, man.”

        • PC_Tool

          “Unlimited customers HAVE NO USE for this whatsoever.”

          First post. I even quoted it in my first response to you.

          Yes, yes. If the EFF, youtube (and countless sites trolling for page-hits) say it is, it must be. /s

        • John Doe

          No it is unto the FCC to determine what “must be” and for everyone else to voice their opinion which is what many are doing.

        • PC_Tool

          *laughing*

          Well, you have the right to voice your opinion. You can even spread your lies.

          Enjoy.

        • John Doe

          No lies here just opinions but Thank you.

        • PC_Tool

          Ah yes, I forgot. When you lie, it’s just an “opinion”.

        • John Doe

          you obviously need to look up the definition for lie(noun) and opinion(noun).

          Good luck using the dictionary for the first time…its eye opening :)

        • PC_Tool

          Riiight.

          So you actually believe that you speak for all unlimited customers?

          I guess it’s not a lie if you’re delusional or ignore reality.

        • John Doe

          I am speaking about the program and how it affects all customers especially unlimited customers including me. I don’t speak for anyone and have not mentioned anyone by name. If you want to say what you want then good, go ahead but I won’t allow you or anyone else to silence my opinions on this subject and the FACTS that were proven by the EFF and Youtube:
          1) T-Mobile enrolled everyone in this program without getting there explicit consent.
          2) T-Mobile is not doing any optimizing but rather throttling all video content.

        • PC_Tool

          So you don’t lie, you don’t speak for all customers, and yet…

          “Unlimited customers HAVE NO USE for this whatsoever.”

          …you spew that crap.

          (And you expect anyone to take you seriously…?)

          Have a nice day.

        • John Doe

          I am not saying that customer do not want it or they should not have…I am saying they have no use for as my opinion. If you don’t understand the difference between those two statements and why one seems like I am speaking on someones behalf and the other is me evaluating a service that was forced upon them then you are full of crap.

          If you don’t want to read my “crap” then don’t, I am not forcing you to and If you do not agree with what I have to say then don’t, I am not forcing you to.

          But my opinions are written here and whoever wants to read them can. Now you can go ahead and enjoy a service that T-Mobile turned on (on your behalf) without asking and enjoy your hypocrisy.

        • PC_Tool

          “Unlimited customers HAVE NO USE for this whatsoever…”

          “…but I’m not saying customers don’t want it”

          *laughs*

          Ahhhh, JD. Keep it coming, man. Too funny.

        • John Doe

          It is funny because you don’t understand the different between giving an opinion on the use of something and saying what a group of people thinks about it but all of that does not matter.

          The Important issue here is T-Mobile throttling all videos without the explicit consent of users.

          I can do this all day :)

        • PC_Tool

          I’ll even break it down for ya.

          Opinion on the use of something:

          “Gee, I don’t find this useful at all.”

          Saying what a group of people thinks about it:

          “These people have no use for this.”

          No, I think I have a pretty clear idea of the difference. But thanks, anyway. Keep up the pathetic excuses and rationalizations.

          “But this other thing I said is important…”

          Uh-huh. Redirection. Clever.

          You must be in damned good shape with all the backpedaling you’ve been doing here. Don’t worry; I’d never expect you to admit you lied or were wrong in any way. (Now that would be delusional…)

        • John Doe

          The only person that is backpedaling here is John Legere after making a fool of himself.

          What you are arguing about DOES NOT MATTER because it is not the issue and it is not back peddling because I did not start it you did. You are using that to try and change the topic from the real issue at hand but you can go do that I will keep on repeating myself and protesting this consumer unfriendly program that T-Mobile forced upon users.

          Binge On is a program that throttles all video streaming and download WITHOUT explicit customer consent.

          That is the truth, the lies are what T-Mobile is saying…they DO NOT optimize anything all they do is throttle.

          When you want to discuss Binge On and how it is against the law and unfriendly to consumers you know where to find me.

          And Like I said before, I will say what I want and you can’t do anything about it. :)

        • PC_Tool

          “You are using that to try and change the topic”

          You really should go into comedy, man. That’s money, right there. Claiming a response to a direct quote made by you in your first post is “off-topic”. Classic. That’s just awesome stuff right there.

          Back to reality: Had your original post been only about throttling without user consent I’d likely have ignored it completely.

          Luckily for us, you replied in that post to several statements made by T-Mobile/Legere. One of those had to do with the benefits to users.

          Your response to that statement was a flat-out lie (or at the very least a gross misunderstanding of the topic you were attempting to discuss).

          I’ve been calling you on it ever since.

          I suppose you could just admit it, but apparently you’d rather dance around it, redirecting the topic, and now trying to change history; claiming you’re only discussing throttling and nothing else is important. (if it wasn’t important why did you respond to it initially?)

          Another attempt to deceive? …or are your ridiculous attempts to defend that statement just getting that pathetic?

          “…you know where to find me.”

          Yep. Lying, misleading, and making absurd justifications for it all on Betanews TMonews.

        • John Doe

          Your response to that statement was a flat-out lie (or at the very least a gross misunderstanding of the topic you were attempting to discuss)

          And what was that lie exactly?

        • PC_Tool

          Oh…my…God…

          I’m dying. you cannot possibly be serious.

          You really haven’t been paying attention?

          Let’s see: five posts up, seven posts up and so on and so on all the way up to the first response by me after your initial post. I lost count how many times I’ve quoted it for ya.

          Take your pick. I’ve only spelled it out several times already.

        • John Doe

          Well quote me then. You keep saying that I am spreading lies about the program so quote the lies that I have been spreading.

        • PC_Tool

          “Well quote me then. ”

          I have. Every time you’ve asked up to the last request. Hell, it’s in my first response to your original post. It’s the only thing I quoted, ffs.

          Scroll up, genius.

        • John Doe

          I never asked you to quote me before but you clearly think that I am lying and I have no idea what you are talking about so either quote me or move on.

        • John Doe

          Betanews? You don’t even know what site you are on…LMFAO

        • PC_Tool

          Ya got me. I’ve been busy.

          (See? I admit when I make a mistake. Maybe you could try that someday.)

        • John Doe

          I will when I make a factual error but these are my opinons and facts gathered from tests conducted by the EFF and statements made by Youtube.

        • rtechie

          > There are benefits to Unlimited users using Binge On.

          Yes, but you haven’t mentioned them. There is no truly unlimited plan on T-Mobile, the “unlimited” plan has a 23GB cap. So just like people on a 3GB capped plan, “unlimited” users get the benefit of Binge On traffic being excluded from the cap.

          If you combine that with tethering, in theory, it does make “unlimited”/Binge On attractive for home use if you can put up with the 480p resolution and throttled bitrate.

          I think VERY FEW T-Mobile customers intend to use Binge On this way.

          It doesn’t save T-Mobile customers one dollar because getting a cheaper 3GB or 5GB plan and a $35 a month cable modem, and they’d have much higher quality streaming. Travelers are almost certainly better off with hotel WiFi, even if they have to pay for it.

          And T-Mobile has a lousy coverage in rural areas that can’t get cable modems or DSL, so “unlimited”/Binge On won’t benefit people in rural areas.

        • PC_Tool

          “ut you haven’t mentioned them.”

          I have, not that I should need to. I would expect users commenting on this plan to at least have some knowledge of it.

          “There is no truly unlimited plan on T-Mobile”

          You really need to stop with this one.

          “T-Mobile has a lousy coverage in rural areas”

          I live in a farm town with “drive your tractor to school” days. We get LTE. T-Mobile has lousy coverage in some areas. it has great coverage in some areas as well.

          …but if you need to focus on the few scenarios (some of them BS) where people won’t benefit in order to suggest it’s bad (because apparently if it doesn’t benefit everyone, it’s bad.), I guess that’s your prerogative.

        • rtechie

          Here is the ONLY thing you claimed was a “benefit”:

          > Folks with under 3GB plans will benefit from using 3x less data for video.

          Binge On is absolutely not required to do this. Any user can easily do this by reducing the quality of the video manually in the app.

          But as I said, Binge On is very slightly more convenient that that so there is a tiny benefit for people using tethered T-Mobile connection for home internet (and are willing to put up with inferior quality).

          > You really need to stop with this one.

          T-Mobile’s “unlimited” plan has a 21-23GB soft cap. That is a fact. Read the fine print on your damn contract.

          Source:

          https://www.tmonews.com/2015/06/21gb-soft-cap-quietly-added-to-t-mobiles-unlimited-4g-lte-simple-choice-plans/

          > I live in a farm town with “drive your tractor to school” days. We get LTE.

          This experience is not typical. T-Mobile’s relatively poor coverage is not my “opinion”, it’s an absolute fact driven by the FACTS that T-Mobile does not have as many towers as Verizion and AT&T and T-Mobile has inferior frequency bands for TLE and wireless in general that make it more difficult for T-Mobile’s signals to penetrate walls (for example). Again, these are facts proven by physics. If you want to deny them, you are denying the reality of both RF physics and materialism in general.

      • rtechie

        > Folks with under 3GB plans will benefit from using 3x less data for video.

        I think he’s talking about prepaid plans that don’t get Binge On.

        > Unlimited users get a free monthly rental and unlimited tethering for video.

        There is no “unlimited” plan on T-Mobile. The T-Mobile “unlimited” plan has a 23GB cap. i.e. It’s exactly identical to the 10GB plan except with a 23GB cap.

        • frankinnoho

          It is unlimited, there is no cap. I myself have occasionally used as much as 50gb on a single line. What there is is a congestion mode, and it works like this: At times of peak demand, you’re data use will be throttled IF your account is over 22gb for the billing month. Once the congestion is over, in my experiance a few hours, speed and usage return to normal.
          In the past, when I have been throttled, it’s never been more than a day or two. I’m not thrilled when it happens, but it’s not unrereasonable. You are not cut off from using data, and I don’t recall even being throttled down as far as 2G. It’s been more like 300kbs or so. Email, chat, text and web are still there, just slow.
          It’s not the end of the world to occasionally read a book or go outside or chat IRL. And it definitely ain’t a cap!

          Of course, if you where an actual Tmo customer, you might have known that before running your suck!

        • PC_Tool

          There is no hard 23GB Cap. I’ve gone over 23GB often.

          If you have to lie to make a point, it’s probably not worth making.

          The 10GB plan is a hard limit. The 23GB bit is only on congested towers and only if you’re in the top percentages of of data users.

          That’s a difference. The opposite of being identical.

          Thanks. Have a great day.

        • rtechie

          > The 10GB plan is a hard limit.

          No, it isn’t. There are no “overage” charges on T-Mobile. After 10GB your traffic is de-prioritized, just like with the unlimited/23GB plan.

          Here’s a quote directly from the web site:

          All Simple Choice Plans include unlimited data on our network. Learn how your unlimited data and high speed 4G LTE data work together to keep you connected with no data overages—ever.

          https://www.t-mobile.com/cell-phone-plans.html

  • Guest 2

    I say T-Mobile, software providers, hardware providers and video content providers should join together to provide a video quality switch on our phone’s quick settings. Where video content providers know what our video setting is on our phone’s and deliver that quality: from 240p all the way to 1080p.
    Then you can, honestly, call it: Video Freedom.

  • George

    Every new program will come with some hiccups here and there so its important that John acknowledged this in a civil way, no cuss words lol.

    • calvin35

      Enabling it for unlimited users was not a hiccup. That was cold and calculated. As i type this there are millions of unlimited users that are being throttled and don’t even know it. I hope the FCC questions T-Mobile as to why they changed Binge On from opt-in to opt-out as it’s my understanding that the program was originally presented as if was going to be opt-in and then something changed.

      • Guest 2

        All Simple Choice plans promise “high speed” and “full speeds available up to data allotment”.
        It’s not even a matter of opt-in or opt-out.

      • Yeah, that text and email they sent explaining exactly what was going on sure was cold and calculated.

        People saying they never got the text or email remind me of the kid in the class who claims he “never got” the permission slip come the due date.

        • SirStephenH

          …except that A LOT of people DIDN’T receive texts or emails…

        • Michael S

          Perhaps those lots of people are not primary account holders? I am not so I didn’t get a communication, BUT my primary did.

      • Happy Camper

        I’m unlimited, “throttled,” and I like it. Shortly after BingeOn came out (and I forgot to turn it off), I was traveling for work and watching SlingBox on my iPad tethered to the hotel TV. After an hour, I realized that I hadn’t turned on wi-fi and was using the iPad’s data plan, streaming video at good quality for at least an hour. Since I was at the beginning of my billing cycle, I was horrified that I had just burned through much of my monthly data allotment for my iPad on day 3 of the billing cycle. Turns out, BingeOn applies to my tablet, which is using the “Match My Data” plan. So for $10/month, I get 5GB of data (Match My Data is a misnomer for unlimited customers!), but with unlimited streaming from Netflix, Amazon, and my SlingBox, which represent about 80% of my data usage (5% YouTube, 15% email and browsing). Oh, and they’re not charging me extra for this (and it looked fine on the hotel TV). Oh right, and it’s still cheaper than VZW or AT&T, and far better customer service. I suppose if I really start to feel somehow cheated by this, I could just turn off BingeOn for no extra cost by clicking three times. Somehow I’m not feeling screwed here…

      • Michael S

        I prefer binge on because apps like ESPN, HBO Go, some YouTube channels, etc want to send me the highest quality possible on my fastest 4G lte network service. Very irritating just for my Note 3 screen and I hated them for it. Now I have no problems because of binge on.
        Eventually we’ll run out of bandwidth right? Might as well start efficient usage behavior now.

        • rtechie

          The “defense” for Binge On’s default opt in was that users can (when the web site is up) easily disable it. YOU could have easily lowered the quality settings in ESPN, YouTube, etc.

        • Michael S

          Maybe newer versions have come out, but ESPN HBO Go do not. YouTube does have the setting, but I find that certain big name channels are able to ignore them like all the late night shows, for instance. These always come across as 1080p :/

        • Michael S

          I don’t have settings for hbo, espn, and other network apps like nbc, abc, etc. These apps don’t seem to give the fawks about monthly data limits. YouTube has settings but high profile channels, I’ve noticed, completely ignore them. Most irritating. Oh well

  • Guest

    But, from the little facts I know, indeed some people are benefiting from it
    and people who complain may ruin it for them, while they have a choice to just
    opt out. Just like you complain about having parties at work and you don’t have
    to participate, but your complain ruined for others. I mean is this really that
    big of a deal? Or people just really trolling? Att next plan don’t save money
    for people as it claim but no one is complaining and many other crap out there
    to complain about and many you cant even opt out. Verizon raise $50 on grandfathered plan and how is it grandfather when the value is changed. Compare to many other it is nothing. I dont think they are doing this to save bandwidth per say, if they are it would be very naive. With 64m customers lets be conservative and say 70% are on none unlimited and 30% is on limited. With 10% of each side knowing about it that is more than double on the non-unlimited side knowing and like to abusive or at use it at will or just arbitrary. I dont think it will offset that too much to go through the trouble. This is very conservative and the unlimited guys are usually more tech-savy, therefore actually likely to know about it. I mean you can try just question your concerns before going outrage. If they didn’t do anything illegal you can’t really do anything about it. I really think it is not that big of deal to get so crazy over it.

    • Acdc1a

      I’m going to send the complainers a bill for $600 annually (the amount I saved by ditching ComShaft) if they end BingeOn.

      • Thorhand

        I’m going to match that and send them $600 from the dividends I’m earning from purchasing stocks in Kleenex

  • frankinnoho

    Who’s really complaining about this? Is it T-Mobile customers? Or is it bloggers looking for ‘clicks’ with sensational headlines? If it’s T-Mobile customers, I should think if they know enough details to complain, they know enough to turn it off. Well then, stop being such a friggen child and just turn yours off.
    If it’s bloggers looking for clicks, well, Tmo is just going to have to ride it out. Seriously, from day one BingeOn said all video was going to be downgraded. Call it throttled if you want (and click baiters sure want!), but it should definitely have come at no surprise. Especially to all the bloggers going gaga over this. I mean, if they are as friggen smart as they claim to be, they must have read the press material from the original announcement! So why they faux outrage? Clicks.
    T-Mobile should pull all advertising dollars from all blogs crying about this. I mean, it makes no sense to spend money advertising on The Verge if they are tearing you apart over nothing more then clicks.

    • Adam

      I am on the basic plan, but never get close to using all my high speed. I turned Binge off because I want as much of the video as possible to buffer while traveling. You never know how fast the connection will be on the next tower I hit.

      • frankinnoho

        You seam to have found the supposed impossible to find off switch, so good for you. If you don’t like what Binge On does, just turn it off. Simple!

  • PC_Tool

    Made it easier to find?

    It’s three clicks once you’ve logged in. If this is “hard”, humanity just needs to give up and fade away.

  • As an unlimited customer, I can say that if BingeOn were opt-in, I would never have activated it…ever. As it stands, when it kicked in, I received a text and an email, and I decided to let it go just out of curiosity. Last night, I watched the college football national championship game, over 4 hours of content, continuously and without any buffering whatsoever. I was using a Note 4 at the time, and the resolution looked absolutely fine, clear, and crisp. I would never have been able to do that prior to BingeOn. Having frequently streamed video, I can confirm that, for me, about 25-50% of the time, it would buffer like crazy, rendering some things nearly unwatchable. More often than not, when it came to movies or shows, I would hope I could find a download link to circumvent possible buffering. I’ve been using BingeOn since it’s started now, and there is almost never any buffering anymore, certainly not like it used to be. What’s more is that I also have the option of watching contents on my tablet without chewing up its limited data, which is pretty fantastic. I’ve already watched a handful of football and basketball games on it and I haven’t been hitting my monthly limit with the tablet like I used to. BingeOn has been a great service for me.

    • calvin35

      And it does have its benefits for limited users. Unfortunately, the only way that those limited users can benefit from the program is by making the program opt-out and including unlimited users, most of whom who don’t visit tech sites and still don’t know they are being throttled. Some may know somethings not right but they don’t no what. T-Mobile had to come up with a way to make Binge On mean an overall data drop for them.

    • John Doe

      That does not make it right for T-Mobile to turn it on for everyone without their EXPLICIT permission. T-Mobile has many other avenues of curbing that congestion before Binge On, like allocating more spectrum to a certain congested area or raising prices or building a setting in their app to detect when video is being played and ask you to if you want to save data by turning on Binge On. But Throttling WITHOUT explicit consent so you can watch your video without buffering is not a good enough reason for me and hopefully not for the FCC.

      • That does not make it right for T-Mobile to turn it on for everyone without their EXPLICIT permission.

        What do you mean? Is it not legally right or morally right? Or is this just your opinion? When TMO increased your tethering allotment, was it also not right since it was done without your permission? When Verizon increases the prices on grandfathered plans, is it also not right since it is exercised without the users’ permissions?

        You seem to believe that TMO owes you something, but as a non-government entity, it doesn’t have to do anything to satisfy you. The number one mistake that John Legere made was interacting with consumers and pretending to care. His responsibility rests solely with making the company he is running profitable. Period. It just so happens that many of those changes are novel and make for a more competitive marketplace, which indirectly benefits the consumer.

        Now, if you want to make this a net neutrality issue, and argue “rightness” from that angle, then unless you work for a relevant government agency like the FCC or are a lawyer actively involved with this, you’re just giving us your opinion and presenting it as fact. We’ll just have to wait and see how the FCC rules.

        But Throttling WITHOUT explicit consent so you can watch your video without buffering is not a good enough reason for me and hopefully not for the FCC.

        This is no different from changing the speed limit down a stretch of road. When you see the sign and continue driving, you’re giving your consent to follow the law so that you can continue using the road. Likewise, when you receive an email or text about a change in service and continue using that service, you’re implicitly giving your consent. Consent doesn’t need to be explicit. If you’re unable to call customer service to talk about the issue, then you’ve got far greater problems than BingeOn.

        • John Doe

          LMFAO this is the comment section of a blog. IT IS ALL OPINIONS HERE…get over yourself. When you change prices is fine because it is stated in the ToS agreement but throttling all video streams and downloads is not and is ILLEGAL because it breaks the BRIGHT LINE RULE.

          This is no different from changing the speed limit down a stretch of road. When you see the sign and continue driving, you’re giving your consent to follow the law so that you can continue using the road.

          Yes but that speed limit applies to EVERYONE expect emergency services. What T-Mobile is doing is like applying a speed limit to only Big Black SUVS on that stretch of road. It is against Net Neutrality laws because it does not treat all services EQUALLY.

          …you’re implicitly giving your consent. Consent doesn’t need to be explicit.

          You absolutely need to be given explicit consent in certain situations and it is up to regulators to determine what those situations are. Having the program as opt-in instead of opt-out is TRUE customer choice not what John Legere is touting.

        • LMFAO this is the comment section of a blog. IT IS ALL OPINIONS HERE…get over yourself. 

          So you’re admitting that you’re just offering your opinion? Good. I’m glad we got that out of the way. You have a tendency to voice it strongly and present it as fact. At least you’re aware that it’s not.

          When you change prices is fine because it is stated in the ToS agreement but throttling all video streams and downloads is not and is ILLEGAL because it breaks the BRIGHT LINE RULE.

          Except you’ve conveniently left out the most important word, which is that this is optional. Good one.

          Yes but that speed limit applies to EVERYONE expect emergency services. What T-Mobile is doing is like applying a speed limit to only Big Black SUVS on that stretch of road. It is against Net Neutrality laws because it does not treat all services EQUALLY.

          This has absolutely nothing to do with the analogy and is completely missing the point. The only point being made is that there is such a thing as implicit consent and it is being used in this situation.

          You absolutely need to be given explicit consent in certain situations and it is unto regulators to determine what those situations are.

          You’re right, and this situation isn’t one of them. You’ve given no reason to suggest otherwise either except an emotional one (i.e. “My feelings as a customer are hurt if I’m not given a choice to opt-in”). Luckily for you, you also have the choice to switch service providers. Good luck with that.

          Having the program as opt-in instead of opt-out is TRUE customer choice not what John Legere is touting.

          I’m sorry that you’ve been mislead by rhetoric and falsely believe that this is some kind of democratically controlled, consumer-run company. It’s not. Their viability in the marketplace, their profit margins, their shareholders’ interests, their future livelihood, will always, every single time, trump your desire to have a feature or a choice. The sooner you realize that, I suspect, the happier you’ll be in this regard.

        • John Doe

          Except you’ve conveniently left out the most important word, which is that this is optional. Good one.

          The Clear Bright-line rules DO NOT mention any exception for programs that are optional it simply does not matter that it is. They ban “…conduct that is not outright blocking, but inhibits the delivery of particular content, applications, or services, or particular classes of content, applications, or services.”

          This has absolutely nothing to do with the analogy and is completely missing the point. The only point being made is that there is such a thing as implicit consent and it is being used in this situation.

          But your analogy was simply wrong and the rules over government entities are NOT the same as the ones over private entities. We have regulators that regulate private entities accordingly.

          You’re right, and this situation isn’t one of them. You’ve given no reason to suggest otherwise either except an emotional one (i.e. “My feelings as a customer are hurt if I’m not given a choice to opt-in”). Luckily for you, you also have the choice to switch service providers. Good luck with that.

          Well just like you just voiced your opinion. I BELIEVE that this situation IS one of them so does Youtube and the EFF but I am sure yours out weighs all others, “Good luck with that” /s

          I’m sorry that you’ve been mislead by rhetoric and falsely believe that this is some kind of democratically controlled, consumer-run company. It’s not…The sooner you realize that, I suspect, the happier you’ll be in this regard.

          I don’t care about how the company is run or if they listen to their customers or not. We have internet groups like the EFF that fight for our rights and we have regulators hired by lawmakers that were democratically elected to look after our rights and stop companies from breaking the law and take advantage of their customers. which in this case T-Mobile is in clear violation of the FCC’s Net neutrality rules and the EFF agrees with me. The sooner you realize that your rights as a consumer in this country is protected and looked after by regulator agencies, “…I suspect, the happier you’ll be” that companies can’t push you around like you are just a big bag filled with cash.

        • The Clear Bright-line rules DO NOT mention any exception for programs that are optional it simply does not matter that it is. They ban “…conduct that is not outright blocking, but inhibits the delivery of particular content, applications, or services, or particular classes of content, applications, or services.”

          Nor does it expressly prohibit it, and so it does matter. Since you, the consumer, are in total control of how your content is delivered to you, I fail to see the problem. If you don’t want delivery inhibited, then turn it off. It’s really not that difficult, and it was explained via email.

          But your analogy was simply wrong and the rules over government entities are NOT the same as the ones over private entities. We have regulators that regulate private entities accordingly.

          You are quite skilled at making bare assertions and quickly following those with red herrings. Please take a step back and explain how the analogy does not demonstrate that there is such a thing as implicit consent.

          Well just like you just voiced your opinion. I BELIEVE that this situation IS one of them so does Youtube and the EFF but I am sure yours out weighs all others, “Good luck with that” /s

          Now you’re sidestepping my request to give me a reason beyond an emotional one. I guess I have to give you credit since you did give me a different reason. Too bad appealing to YouTube and the EFF though is little more than appeal to authority and doesn’t really advance the conversation in your favor. So again, why is this a situation where explicit consent is required?

          The bigger problem here is your inconsistency. Either it’s a violation of the bright line rule or it’s not. If it is, then BingeOn should not be allowed AT ALL, regardless of opt-in or opt-out, in which case you should be advocating for its elimination altogether. If it’s not, then the difference between opt-in altogether opt-out is trivial, boiling down to a matter of opinion, in which case, it doesn’t matter how TMO decides to implement a feature for they will do it in a way that’s best for them as a company. Opting in or opting out does not change whether it’s a bright line rule violation. So what are you exactly fighting for, net neutrality or consumer choice? It’s certainly not both.

          I don’t care about how the company is run or if they listen to their customers or not. We have internet groups like the EFF that fight for our rights and we have regulators hired by lawmakers that were democratically elected to look after our rights and stop companies from breaking the law and take advantage of their customers. which in this case T-Mobile is in clear violation of the FCC’s Net neutrality rules and the EFF agrees with me. The sooner you realize that your rights as a consumer in this country is protected and looked after by regulator agencies, “…I suspect, the happier you’ll be” that companies can’t push you around like you are just a big bag filled with cash.

          Again, what “right” is being violated? It’s easy to sling that term around and deliver these speeches filled with buzz words, but you’ve still failed to explain how you’re using the word “right” and how it’s being suppressed or abused. This issue has no bearing on any rights that I as a consumer am currently entitled to, and do there’s nothing to protect, except maybe protection from my own failure to learn how to turn a feature on or off.

        • John Doe

          Nor does it expressly prohibit it, and so it does matter.

          YES IT DOES. It specifically says in the rules that it “BANS” them. It does not matter if it is in the users control or not. It BANS them regardless.

          Please take a step back and explain how the analogy does not demonstrate that there is such a thing as implicit consent.

          My analogy is closer to what T-Mobile is doing because it doesn’t treat all services equally like you wouldn’t treat all cars equally on a highway. Like I said, private companies are regulated differently and have different laws that govern them. The standard of implicit consent given to a government entity is not the same given to a private one.

          So again, why is this a situation where explicit consent is required?

          Because like the case with Google a few years back collecting location data in a program called Buzz the users did not give explicit permissions for that and Google was found to be wrong even though it says in there ToS agreement. T-Mobile customers in this case I can speak about people around me that have T-Mobile (Its the FCC’s Job to ask T-Mobile for the correct stats and my job to complain to the FCC) DO NOT know what Binge On is or how to turn it off which is why this should have been required to have explicit user consent especially for unlimited customers that do not need to have their videos throttled.

          The bigger problem here is your inconsistency. Either it’s a violation of the bright line rule or it’s not. If it is, then BingeOn should not be allowed AT ALL, regardless of opt-in or opt-out, in which case you should be advocating for its elimination altogether…So what are you exactly fighting for, net neutrality or consumer choice? It’s certainly not both.

          Why not both? There is no inconsistency here. T-Mobile failed to get explicit customer permission AND it breaks the net neutrality laws. The FCC is not a court, it does not follow all of its rules or imposes it on everyone.There is a gray areaW It assess the situation and sometimes they can give companies a pass and others not. Tom wheeler said that he would keep an eye out on programs like Binge On this shows that he knows it is in a gray area and unless there is public outcry he will give it a pass. It is really not that hard to understand. Maybe I am not explaining it well enough but please visit the EFF’s site they explain very well.

          This issue has no bearing on any rights that I as a consumer am currently entitled to, and do there’s nothing to protect, except maybe protection from my own failure to learn how to turn a feature on or off.

          The net neutrality laws are CONSUMER PROTECTION LAWS set in place after more than 4 million citizens voiced their opinions to the FCC to draft it. These are my rights that are being violated and John Legere has said they are not in violation because you could choose leave the program (this is his reasoning and the only thread he is hanging on) but like I said it is opt-out which is not TRUE customer choice.

          This maybe hard for you to understand but bare with me here. The only way the FCC will act on this issue is if it gets a lot of attention from the public. So if I do not voice my opinions (I know a word you hate) and complaints then the FCC won’t care. If the EFF did not conduct their test to figure out that T-Mobile is throttling ALL video then no one would have found out because T-Mobile does not say how exactly it optimizes video and the reason for the secrecy is because is breaks the law. So I will shine a light on these deceptive programs not only as a T-Mobile customer but as a person who believes 100% in the open internet and the drafted net neutrality laws. I stand with the EFF and agree with their assessment of this program.

        • YES IT DOES. It specifically says in the rules that it “BANS” them. It does not matter if it is in the users control or not. It BANS them regardless.

          Please find me any source where it mentions that optional services are specifically banned.

          My analogy is closer to what T-Mobile is doing because it doesn’t treat all services equally like you wouldn’t treat all cars equally on a highway. Like I said, private companies are regulated differently and have different laws that govern them. The standard of implicit consent given to a government entity is not the same given to a private one.

          Let me know when you decide to address my point with the original analogy that I used. Otherwise, have fun shifting goal posts. Of course, if you’re arguing that there is no such thing as implicit consent between a private company and a consumer, then you’re totally off the mark. As soon as you walk into a privately run establishment, you are implicitly consenting to abide by the rules and regulations of said establishment.

          Because like the case with Google a few years back collecting location data in a program called Buzz the users did not give explicit permissions for that and Google was found to be wrong even though it says in there ToS agreement. T-Mobile customers in this case I can speak about people around me that have T-Mobile (Its the FCC’s Job to ask T-Mobile for the correct stats and my job to complain to the FCC) DO NOT know what Binge On is or how to turn it off which is why this should have been required to have explicit user consent especially for unlimited customers that do not need to have their videos throttled.

          el oh el. (A) This is not even remotely analogous to Google collecting location data without explicit permission. Nice try. A feature has been added to your account, you’ve been notified about that feature, and it’s clear how you can toggle it on/off. (B) Because the people around you do not know how to toggle it on/off or do not know about it, it doesn’t follow that TMO has acted inappropriately. That speaks more about the people with whom you surround yourself than it does TMO. If they “do not know what Binge On is,” then they obviously do not check their e-mail or text messages or make any active effort to understand their services.

          Why not both? There is no inconsistency here. T-Mobile failed to get explicit customer permission AND it breaks the net neutrality laws. The FCC is not a court, it does not follow all of its rules or imposes it on everyone.There is a gray areaW It assess the situation and sometimes they can give companies a pass and others not. Tom wheeler said that he would keep an eye out on programs like Binge On this shows that he knows it is in a gray area and unless there is public outcry he will give it a pass. It is really not that hard to understand. Maybe I am not explaining it well enough but please visit the EFF’s site they explain very well

          Because the two are inconsistent. If you can’t follow the logic, I can’t help you. I’ll try to help one last time.

          (A) If it’s a net neutrality issue, then it should be discontinued.
          (B) If it should be discontinued, then consumer choice is irrelevant.
          :. If it’s a net neutrality issue, then consumer choice is irrelevant.

          Opting-in does not change the fact of whether or not it is a net neutrality issue. Pick one side of the fight, but not both. Instead, you’re saying that it’s a net neutrality issue AND consumers should be given the choice to opt-in. If it really is a net neutrality issue, then the choice to opt-in does…not…matter.

          The net neutrality laws are CONSUMER PROTECTION LAWS set in place after more than 4 million citizens voiced their opinions to the FCC to draft it. These are my rights that are being violated and John Legere has said they are not in violation because you could choose leave the program (this is his reasoning and the only thread he is hanging on) but like I said it is opt-out which is not TRUE customer choice.

          Neat. You still haven’t explained what rights those are. Keep going though. I grabbed the popcorn a few posts back and I’ve got plenty left. Optional programs are not violating any rights that you think you have.

          This maybe hard for you to understand but bare with me here. The only way the FCC will act on this issue is if it gets a lot of attention from the public. So if I do not voice my opinions (I know a word you hate) and complaints then the FCC won’t care. If the EFF did not conduct their test to figure out that T-Mobile is throttling ALL video then no one would have found out because T-Mobile does not say how exactly it optimizes video and the reason for the secrecy is because is breaks the law. So I will shine a light on these deceptive programs not only as a T-Mobile customer but as a person who believes 100% in the open internet and the drafted net neutrality laws. I stand with the EFF and agree with their assessment of this program.

          *yawn*

          Keep on my caped crusader. Keep on. Meanwhile, guess what I’ll be doing? Watching some video on my 32″ screen that isn’t buffering at all.

        • John Doe

          Please find me any source where it mentions that optional services are specifically banned.

          I already quoted the Bright-line rules, you can go and read it on the FCC’s site if you want (I can’t post links here). The FCC band any program that throttles services it does not mention anything about it being optional because it does not matter they are not allowed in the first place.

          Let me know when you decide to address my point with the original analogy that I used.

          I already have but you don’t seem to get it and I can’t help you further hopefully others who read this will have a high enough IQ to comprehend it.

          (A) This is not even remotely analogous to Google collecting location data without explicit permission. Nice try. A feature has been added to your account, you’ve been notified about that feature, and it’s clear how you can toggle it on/off.

          How is that not analogous? That is EXACTLY what google did people had the option of turning off the location gathering feature through a toggle in settings but they were still reprimanded by the FTC.

          Because the two are inconsistent. If you can’t follow the logic, I can’t help you. I’ll try to help one last time.
          (A) If it’s a net neutrality issue, then it should be discontinued.
          (B) If it should be discontinued, then consumer choice is irrelevant.
          :. If it’s a net neutrality issue, then consumer choice is irrelevant.

          What did I say that makes them inconsistent. I never said that the program should be discontinued. Just because it is a net neutrality issue does not mean it should end, LIKE I SAID there is a gray area that the FCC operates in and they allow certain programs to pass without approval like wifi calling for example you need FCC permission and T-Mobile never got it but Verizon and AT&T did but the FCC didn’t reprimand T-Mobile or sprint.
          Then we get to the second issue of opt-out, if the program does not get discounted then it should be opt-in so if the FCC gives the program a pass, the FTC can look into the consumer choice issue. These are different issues with different regulatory protocols. Again, no inconsistencies here.

          you’re saying that it’s a net neutrality issue AND consumers should be given the choice to opt-in. If it really is a net neutrality issue, then the choice to opt-in does…not…matter.

          I am saying that this program throttles videos which is against Net neutrality and it is opt-out which is against consumer choice. T-Mobile says it optimizes the videos but the EFF has found that to be untrue. If T-Mobile changed the program so it does in fact optimize videos and not throttle them then it would be okay with the FCC laws but then we have to tackle the issue of opt-out. You can’t tackle one with out the other in that case.

          You still haven’t explained what rights those are.

          I have these are the net neutrality laws that were passes that ban throttling which T-Mobile has been found as doing by the EFF. These are laws created to protect the consumer (me) and T-Mobile broke those laws of an open internet with all services treated equally. Obviously it is not the case with T-Mobile because videos aren’t treated equally.

          “Because the record overwhelmingly supports adopting rules and demonstrates that three specific practices invariably harm the open internet — blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization — this order bans each of them, applying the same rules to both fixed and mobile broadband internet access service.”

          Keep on my caped crusader. Keep on. Meanwhile, guess what I’ll be doing? Watching some video on my 32″ screen that isn’t buffering at all.

          Great, I hope you enjoy it. I will have my voice heard until the FCC responds which should be soon since they have a meeting with carriers on the 15th about this issue.

        • frankinnoho

          Bla bla bla… talking points…. real people, real customers, don’t talk in talking points mode… that’s the realm of contractors and shills. Get lost.

        • John Doe

          Lmao, I could say whatever I want and I don’t have to prove to you that I am a T-Mobile customer. It doesn’t even matter if I am a T-Mobile customer because this issue affects every mobile carrier customer since it opens the door for other carriers to create similar programs (Verizon and AT&T are working on it) unless the FCC steps in. If you don’t care for my opinion then don’t read it but thank you for your response.

        • frankinnoho

          No, you don’t have to prove thing… what you say, how you say it does all vetting that is required… and it all points to you being full of crap.

        • John Doe

          Okay good for you. I’ll let my “crap” speak for itself.

        • rtechie

          > If you don’t want delivery inhibited, then turn it off.

          “Binge On” is not optional based on the standard way that term is used in English.

          “Opt out” services are not “optional” because they’re applied to everyone by default. In order to be “optional” something must be “opt out”. This is how these terms are used in English.

          Besides which, the FCC rules don’t explicitly allow for optional services. It doesn’t matter if consumers want “Binge On” or not.

        • Really? Do you have the “option” to turn this feature on or off? If you don’t, then I would suggest contacting customer service. If you do, then I ask as a follow up question, “What is the adjectival form of ‘option’?” That’s right, it’s “optional.”

          Furthermore, you were notified in advance that this feature was being added and it was explained to you how to toggle it on/off. It doesn’t get more optional than that. When I shop at a store and they ask for my phone number only to send me a text a week later about a promotion, indicating how I can opt-out of future text messages, it was entirely optional. (A) I didn’t have to shop there or give them my phone number (just as you didn’t have to sign up for TMO), and (B) I was given the option to opt-out of that form of communication. The only way it wouldn’t be optional is if that option wasn’t on the table. The crazy thing is that this wasn’t done in secret, which makes TMO better than the department store. They let me know in advance via marketing that it was happening and they let me know as soon as it happened exactly how to opt-out. It’s really not that difficult.

  • Mike

    What would be really great is if Tmo would stream over roku or chromcast and not charge for data. Then I could truly get rid of Comcast

    • frankinnoho

      You can, just tether the Roku to the phone… as long as it is Binge on compliant, it’s free.

      • Mrm

        But you would easily notice the lower resolution on a large HDTV screen.

        • frankinnoho

          Really? Wow… maybe you should just get regular internet service then. Binge on will let watch free, but 480p. Without binge on, you’re viewing, high res tho it maybe, will be limited to your tethering allowance. Pick your poison.

        • Acdc1a

          480p doesn’t look bad on my 65″ 4K TV. It doesn’t look like 4K, but it’s perfectly serviceable. Considering I got to drop my $50 monthly ComShaft bill I’ll take it.

        • Ascertion

          I wish everybody’s standards were like yours. Most people buy a 4K TV to use ONLY 4K content. Haha

        • frankinnoho

          Then you must have regular internet service then. So what is you’re concern with binge on?

        • Ascertion

          I was just making an observation. I personally have never streamed a 4K clip to a TV or phone. The most I use is 1080p.

        • calvin35

          You need to get your eyes checked.

        • Acdc1a

          To determine what serviceable is? You’re an idiot.

        • calvin35

          And if you think that 480p doesn’t look “bad”, your word not mine, on a 65″ 4K TV then yes, you do need your eyes checked. I suggest you go immediately, and please have someone else drive.

        • frankinnoho

          Or, a shill turking for sprint?

        • SirStephenH

          Yes, it is VERY noticeable if you have even decent eyesight but it can be handy if it’s your only choice.

    • SirStephenH

      You can tether your Chromecast to your phone. I’ve been doing it a lot lately at my buddy’s house because their WiFi doesn’t reach to their back room. “480p” looks bad on a screen of any size but it fills a need. The zero rated tethering is the only “good” thing about Binge On for me.

  • kamikaze

    If this was turned on to benefit customers by saving their data allotment and not make them accidentally burn through it, why was it also turned on for unlimited plan customers? And why would T-mobile turn it on for business lines?

    The fact of the matter is turning BingeON reduces datastash max caps, which is in fact a liability for T-Mobile. And reduces network load. It’s not for the benefit of ALL customers, definitely not all the ones for whom it was turned on without a choice.

    • frankinnoho

      Then turn it off cry baby! The pathetic whine around here is getting annoying. You’re not under contract…. you’re free to choose any service you wish… if you feel slighted, if you feel you’re not getting what you paid for, you’re free to leave.

      • kamikaze

        it’s not about me or whether it’s turned on/off for me.. it’s about JL making up excuses to hide the actual reason for BingeON and it’s less known side-effects.

        • frankinnoho

          First it was supposed net neutrality, then choice, now it’s alleged concealment… are you just another sprint troll or what?

        • kamikaze

          It’s all of the above, nothing has changed… only T-mobile’s response to this has evolved.

        • Thorhand

          Then go find a lending agency, buy spectrum, build towers, invest in an infrastructure, build your own network, hire the most transparent and net-neutrality sensitive CEO, divulge all your internal business practices to the public, offer unlimited data to everyone on your network no questions asked, and seems like you’d be able to finally sleep instead of stressing about what JL says these days.

        • maximus1901

          he’s a ceo. get it through your head already.
          his job is to take as much money from you as possible.

        • kamikaze

          of course he is a CEO and he has a job… now don’t let anyone fool you for a second that at night he’s batman trying to fight for the common consumer against the evil overlords and.. oh .. he tried doing that already…

          JL portrays this as a benefit to all customers and “innovation” via “proprietary” technology when it’s regular throttling. There are definite downsides to this, and I’m pointing them out. That and him being a CEO or making money is mutually exclusive and unrelated.

        • frankinnoho

          So, it’s not really about Binge On, it’s about your beef with John Legere. Is this Marcelo Claure?

    • Acdc1a

      Simple…when tethering it doesn’t use your data. You also get a free movie rental monthly. I’ve dropped ComShaft at home because of this feature…and the 480 on Netflix does not look terrible on my 65″ TV…looks especially awesome for free!

      • kamikaze

        when tethering VIDEO at reduced resolution it won’t use your data… not tethering in general. And why would this be a benefit for business users?

        • frankinnoho

          Ok, if you’re a business user, what the frak are you doing watching youtube? GET TO WORK!!!

        • kamikaze

          you sort of proved my point, then why would video streaming be zero rated for business users without any approval from the account manager?

        • Acdc1a

          Really easy if you’re using a pooled data plan…and a lot of businesses are.

        • kamikaze

          I didn’t understand, a lot of businesses benefit from video tethering? I would assume if video tethering was of importance to the business, they would rely on having a regular data plan for it rather than use BingeON.

        • Kim

          First, they benefit because they can get a lower tier data but watch video as much as they like without getting throttle for other needs. I can’t imagine what kind of company would rely on video stream much. Even so, they probably dont require high quality. If they do require high qualiity and video streaming then no carrier could really promise smooth and no buffering experience. Mobile internet is not your most stable source and tmobiile dont have the best stability as you should know. So if the company is relying on video that much it i not really a blinge on issue because it could suffer buffering regardless and I dont think any company wants that kind of uncertainty. The company should think twice, may get wifi or local content.

        • frankinnoho

          Sprint trolls go home

        • Jo

          Well, there are a lot of business that do make use of YouTube and Internet video in general…

        • kamikaze

          If what you said were true, it would also be likely that a lot of those businesses who make use of Youtube and Internet most likely wouldn’t be doing it at 480p and wouldn’t be reliant on BingeON for their video streaming needs.

        • frankinnoho

          Well, if you are business which requires it’s employees to use youtube over their phones, I should think the plans you provided for them should have adequate bandwidth for the task. In any event, Binge On will not prevent them from watching the video….. AND IT CAN BE TURNED OFF!!!!

        • Adam

          My company requires Youtube/stretching breaks for meetings over an hour.

      • calvin35

        Since T-Mobile could already identify when users were tethering, please tell me why you think it is that T-Mobile didn’t, at the very least, only enable Binge On for unlimited users when they were tethering? Don’t bother, I’ll answer my own question, it’s because T-Mobile wanted to throttle as many unlimited users as it possibly could. Binge on is a direct attempt to throttle as many unlimited users as possible and anyone who can’t figure that out is simply blind to the obvious.

        • John

          Yes. Everything about Legere’s communication this past week has been dishonest. I’m amazed that anyone would defend him; its so obvious he is being a scumbag.

      • anehlo

        480p is acceptable to you on a 65″ TV? I guess to each his own.

  • todd

    Sounds good to me! Like him now, again. Thanks John…What’s the next notch up after 1.5?

  • peharri

    The apology to the EFF is a very good step forward.

    I still would criticize Legere for the lack of openness. As a web developer, I can tell you the lack of information, and the constant protest they’re not throttling when all independent tests say they are, makes it impossible for people like me to deliver video in a form that means we can be sure it’ll be streamed in a way that’s Binge-On friendly.

    Yes, we need the information. It shouldn’t be proprietary, and it needs to be public because everyone needs to know what they need to support, not just developers who somehow have control over the whole stack (which is virtually nobody outside of Netflix or YouTube)

    • Ordeith

      you call that an apology?

    • John

      Yes! Any method for signaling the site to degrade video quality should be done in a fully transparent and standardized way!

  • Guest 2

    I have a question:
    What happens when you have Binge On on, you are tethering and multitasking, with one of the tasks being a video play or download?

    • Acdc1a

      I have that answer…the non video is full speed.

      • Guest 2

        Are you sure of that?
        I mean, according to T-Mobile Binge On only affects the video streams, but since we learned that they’re throttling to achieve the “optimization”, the question is, are they throttling just the video files or the whole data connection?

        • Kim

          Good question, you sound very curious. I have a question for you are you a T-Mobile customer? If so, and you are so curious to find out why don’t you test it out for yourself because anything people say you maybe question anyways why don’t to find out for yourself.

        • kgraham182

          Once video is detected the whole downlink is throttle to 1.5Mbps. There’s no way for T-Mobile to limited speeds from one website than have another website have maximum speed concurrently at the moment. That would take software at the device level.

        • Ordeith

          but due to T-Mobile’s insistence on embedding the invasive Carrier IQ software in all of their Android handsets they DO have the software on the client in most cases.

        • Acdc1a

          If you are a T-Mobile subscriber, test it for yourself.

        • frankinnoho

          That’s the thing, though…. are they a Tmo subscriber? Or are they just shills in a boiler room somewhere spouting off what ifs and hypotheticals ad nauseam.

        • John

          I’m still a tmo suscriber, though I’m looking at sprint. I’m pissed, and i think its pathetic that you push this idea that we are shills.

    • SirStephenH

      When Binge On is on ALL video (except video that’s sent encrypted and/or over UDP) is throttled to 1.5Kbps while using cellular data. It doesn’t matter if you’re downloading it, watching it on your phone, or streaming it on a tethered device, it’s all treated the same. All other data is sent at full speed.

    • DStudio

      Somebody here (responding to a recent, related article) said the non-video task got slowed down signficantly too if multitasking concurrently with a video stream or download. Not necessarily to only 1.5Mbps per task, but still significantly – so it warrants testing if you’re concerned.

      • Guest 2

        According to the EFF report (eff dot org) even “Non-Video Downloads” are throttled, although slightly compared to video files. But I don’t see a specific test made for multitasking. I was also looking at the Binge On page at T-Mobile dot com, and found nothing about it there.

        • DStudio

          I believe it was a tmonews reader who’d tested a non-video download concurrent with a Binge On video download or stream. As I recall running (or maybe it was downloading) the video caused much more that 1.5Mbps slowdown on the concurrent non-video download.

          It should be easy to test yourself. I probably would, except right now T-Mobile has my online account settings so messed up I can’t even get to the Binge On toggle to turn it on and off at will (Maybe next time I call they’ll get it straightened out).

      • Acdc1a

        The other tasks are not slowed. I ran Speedtest and got 20 down and 12 up while watching a movie.

        • John Doe

          You can’t use speedtest to measure speeds on T-Mobile because it will not show if T-Mobile is throttling. Even if you reach your data cap speed test will not show you the reduced speeds, it will show your normal speeds you get from T-Mobile in normal conditions even while they are throttling or slowing down speed after finishing your data bucket.

          What that means is that those who have hit their cap, and are being throttled, they’ll be able to use the Speedtest app and still see the true network speeds in their location. Not the slower, throttled speeds.

          This is from an article here on Tmonews titled: OOKLA Speedtest App being removed from throttling?

        • Acdc1a

          But for the fact that they stopped doing that. Go ahead, get a throttled line and run it.

        • John Doe

          What? They have been doing this for a long time way before Binge On. I am just letting you know that you can’t use regular speed test app to measure your speed. In fact T-Mobile does this to many speed test apps so you have to make sure you are using one that is not influenced by T-Mobile to get accurate results.

        • Acdc1a

          No, they stopped in November of 2014.

        • John Doe

          where did you get this information from?

        • Acdc1a

          The FCC and CNET

        • John Doe

          Well here is it from T-Mobile’s website LoL

          How can I measure my data speeds on the network?

          For Simple Choice customers, if your data plan features a designated allotment of high-speed data, data used by certain speed measurement applications will not count against that high-speed data allotment. See the full list here. If your data plan includes data use at reduced speed after you have used your plan’s monthly allotment of high-speed data, your data speed will be limited to 64 kbps or 128 kbps for the remainder of your billing cycle once you have used your allotted high-speed data. The results from some speed measuring applications may show current network speeds, rather than the reduced speed that is currently available to you. Speed measurement applications other than the ones listed here will show your reduced speed. A link to a speed test that will show your reduced speed will be sent to you via text message once you have reached your monthly high-speed data allotment. In addition, a link to a speed test that will show your reduced speed will become available on your handset once you have reached your monthly high-speed data allotment. If you use speed tests other than the ones listed here prior to reaching your monthly high-speed data allotment, use of those applications may count against your data allotment.

        • rtechie

          Even without “removing Ookla from the caps” speed test apps are giving you FAKE results because they use idealized paths and various ISPs (not just T-Mobile) prioritize and optimize those sites. You’re getting the MAXIMUM possible speed, not the average speeds you will generally get.

          The only meaningful speed tests you can do are for a specific web site, i.e. “What is the speed between my house and YouTube’s closest CDN server?” not “the whole internet”. Uplink speeds on the internet are too variable for that.

          EFF and presumably posters measured the bandwidth consumed WITHIN THEIR OWN NETWORK, their numbers are accurate and other people who have done testing have reached the same results. .

        • frankinnoho

          That’s one of the reason I use testmy.net. You know what? Not as much divergence as you might think. In fact, it’s about as much divergence as you would typically get from consecutive speed test on the same platform. Regarding the OP, last night while watching slingtv tethered on my PC, testmy.net gave me almost 9gbs of download. Sprint customers never see 9gbs, let alone 9gbs tethered while watching a video!!!! (Does Sprint even allow tethering?)

        • frankinnoho

          That’s one of the reason I use testmy(dot)net. You know what? Not as much divergence as you might think. In fact, it’s about as much divergence as you would typically get from consecutive speed test on the same platform. Regarding the OP, last night while watching slingtv tethered on my PC, testmy(dot)net gave me almost 9mbs of download. Sprint customers never see 9mbs, let alone 9mbs tethered while watching a video!!!! (Does Sprint even allow tethering?)

        • Ordeith

          that’s not necessarily true.

        • Acdc1a

          Well if you’d like to explain the speeds to me that are common that I got on the speed test, I’m all ears.

      • calvin35

        This is a good point and makes sense when you thing about it.

    • Ordeith

      If the tower / phone / relay can’t support the split tunnel, then everything is throttled.
      I’ll repost my test here:

      Binge On enabled, Non-Video File download, no video streaming: 9mbps
      Binge On enabled, Non-Video File download, with video streaming: 1.23mbps
      Binge on disabled, Non-Video File download, no video streaming: 12.4mbps
      Binge on disabled, Non-Video File download, with video streaming: 11.2mbps

  • Guest

    I dont think this will save them much bandwidth. For like
    every one you tether, there is like 10 other who jump on because of BO. At
    best, it gives more existing user a better experience. I think it is fair to
    say we have 45% for and 45% against and 10% no comment or don’t know about BO. As we see in blog and that is very
    conservative because some complainers are non-tmobile customer and some even
    admits it. But, I think for the people who are for is all Tmobile customer or
    they wouldn’t even know much or care for. The complainers are being selfish and
    trying to speak for everyone because of they have a problem and think everyone
    else does. They could just opt out. If
    you think other carrier can do you better move on.

  • Thorhand

    I’d like to add one more thing to the T-Mobile customers still whining and moping over BingeOn. Let’s say you get your wish, and you moan and groan till the FCC fines T-Mobile (in which case I would be protesting outside the FCC’s headquarters). Who do you think is going to up end paying that fine? You think John Legere will cancel his vacation next summer and shell this one out of pocket? You idiots will end up paying for it out of your own money and the rest of us will too through increased prices, reduced services, and less money for T-Mobile to invest in its network.
    I’m sick of all this opt-in / opt-out garbage. T-Mobile does not owe you anything except giving you the choice whether you want a free degraded service or not. Beyond that, you are entitled for nothing. Sorry but this is how the world works. I wish John Legere would stop tweeting and periscoping with you all because it’s giving you a false sense that you’re in a position to tell him how to run a business.
    Don’t like it, just switch to another carrier or go build your own cellular network.

    • Better Yet…

      Yes, T-mobile owes us decent and above all, great customer service. However, as stated, at any point we are not please with the service…Just switch carriers or companies. But by experience, I strongly feel T-mobile cares about their bottom line (revenue stream) and better yet, their Customers!

    • rtechie

      Nobody’s asking for fines. People are saying that the FCC should disallow the service, and they should. “Binge On” is straight throttling, “Music Freedom” is caching. “Binge On” clearly violates the FCC rules, “Music Freedom” does not.

      • Thorhand

        Well what if the majority of customers want the option of having “Binge On”? What if the majority of customers place a higher premium on customer choice and saving money rather than a net neutrality debate that’s secondary to most of them? The FCC should not be interfering with my choice as customer whether I want free throttled/paid throttled video or not.

        • rtechie

          T-Mobile is required to comply with the law, it doesn’t matter what their customers want. If they want the laws changed, that has to go though the legislative process.

          T-Mobile is trying to skirt the law here. They knew that the FCC would not approve of this throttling scheme and so were deliberately obtuse about it.

          And I think very few T-Mobile customers actually want their video throttled. Everyone talking about the “benefits” is talking about being on a “unlimited/23GB cap” plan and using that with tethering to replace a cable modem for their home internet connection. I think VERY few people are doing that/will do that.

        • frankinnoho

          It doesn’t matter what the customers want, because you’re not a customer!

        • Thorhand

          You make one very good point… That not that many people will replace their home Internet connection with T-Mobile. But that’s where reason stops with your argument. There is nothing illegal about giving me the option to get free streaming in exchange for throttled speeds resulting in lower resolution for my videos. Why is that hard to understand? There is no law that prevents T-Mobile from giving me an option as a customer. This would only be illegal if all T-Mobile plans have Binge On and no one can turn it off. I think this is only your interpretation of the law. And I have always advocated for net neutrality, however, this whole debacle is making me change my mind. What was it 4 million Americans that petitioned the FFC to adopt the net neutrality law??? I bet you I can find at least five times that number of T-Mobile customers who want Binge On as an option, even if those 4 million Americans think it’s against net neutrality.

        • frankinnoho

          Actually, I think the whole point is the fear that people WILL give up wired internet service. In point of fact, many of the same arguments for wired internet were the same arguments for wired phones.
          I can remember people back in 1999 when I dropped my land line phone, many people were literally shocked and aghast that I had “turned off my phone”, that cell phones were neat but weren’t ‘real’ phones! That was inspite of the fact that most people never new my phone was off until I told them because way before I had dropped it everyone had stop calling land lines and were exclusively calling cell phones.
          I’d be wiilling to bet the cable companies greatest fear is that of becoming the next MCI or old Ma Bell. One of the most repeated talking points is that free video has to stop. Why? Net neutrality, or competition?
          Regardless of binge on, net neutrality, bla bla bla, wired internet has about as much future as wired phones.

        • rtechie

          > There is nothing illegal about giving me the option to get free streaming in exchange for throttled speeds resulting in lower resolution for my videos. Why is that hard to understand?

          Because you are wrong. The FCC regulations say that ISPs like T-Mobile are not allowed to throttle connections to websites. Period. End of story. It doesn’t matter if the customers explicitly want that or not, at least not the way the rule is written.

          Let me give you another example: The FCC regulations also say that ISPs can’t block websites. Period. End of story.

          Now there are some ISPs that implement porn filters ON THE ISP LEVEL so that there is no way to go to porn sites using that internet connection. Parents use these ISPs to prevent thier children from seeing porn.i.e. the customers explicitly WANT this blocking. According to the way the rules are written, these ISPs are violating the rules.

          I completely agree that ISPs should be able to offer these restrictions optionally. My only objection to Binge On is that it’s opt-out instead of opt-in.

          I’ve also said that Music Freedom is fine (even if it’s not optional) because it’s not blocking or throttling and doesn’t disadvantage the customer in any way.

          > And I have always advocated for net neutrality, however, this whole debacle is making me change my mind.

          I have always advocated against it, because I knew it would lead to situations like this.

        • TechnoRealz

          I’m on unlimited & if I was using 1080P & all the other unlimited people were using using same rate @ same time & my performance improves by scaling down to 480, why wouldn’t I do it voluntarily?

          But unfortunately, you want to distract & blame it on TMO when my fellow unlimited users can’t control themselves & thus ruin it for everyone else performance quality wise.

        • rtechie

          TechoRealz, I am not convinced that Binge On will meaningfully reduce node congestion. It’s clearly designed to reduce transit costs to other ISPs. If you don’t know what those terms mean (node congestion, transit) you really aren’t qualified to comment.

        • John

          This has always been the biggest threat to net neutrality – its when carriers like tmob dangle freebies in from of the masses, convincing them that they *really* want something but – uh oh, big bad FCC and those *horrible* volunteers af the EFF just won’t let them do it!!

          Then the masses start to hate net neutrality, without even understanding the bigger issues.

        • Interesting perspective. In that case, the rules just need to be clarified that throttling is OK if it’s in the context of consumer choice and not anti-competitive.

        • John

          You could ask tmobile to build something that uses an open strandard, rather than making them the gatekeeper between you and the websites.

    • frankinnoho

      I really don’t think many of the whiners are Tmo customers. This comment section has always had a problem with shills from other carriers, mostly sprint, coming over and crying to the moon about every uncarrier initiative. The difference this time is the blogosphere has been harping on a faux net neutrality and faux customer choice angle and it has them all spun up.
      I am an actual customer, Unlimited, 2 lines, one with a QHD screen. But only a 5.5in QHD screen, not a huge 5.7in screen on the gsn 5 one of the whiners has. I don’t really notice a drop in screen resolution that these shills keep harping about, but I definitely notice a lack of buffering, smooter play back, and the fact that I haven’t experienced congestion throttling. Oh, and lots of iPad tethering with no worries.
      Long story short, real customer here, and if Binge On hadn’t been turned on by default, I would have hunted down the setting and turned it on.

      • Thorhand

        Yeah same here. Unlimited customer and I turned Binge On to ON before T-Mobile turned it on for me and did not notice a drop in quality on my iPhone 6 and even less buffering. Ads are ruining YouTube not Binge On. Sprint customer and the Blogosphere harping about this could take a hike as far as I’m concerned.

        • frankinnoho

          Oh, I don’t think they are Sprint customers. Sprint customers for most part hate Sprint, perhaps more than anybody. Besides, wait a couple off months and they become Tmo customers.
          No, I think they’re contractors, mechanical turks paid by the post to throw bombs into message boards, chat rooms and comment sections. Their comments are filled with talking points, hypotheticals and what ifs. And they go to increadable lengths to ignore or deny the point that the solution to all of these points is the same… TURN IT OFF!
          If they did that, then they would be at thier supposedly original state of service with Tmo, and all would be as it was, no problems. But that would not be the objective of a contractor, or a blogger for that matter. For them it’s all about stirring the pot.

        • Thorhand

          Yeah I’m starting to think they are some sort of mercanries hired by the Internet guardians to defend the supposed freedoms and ideologies they created. But whatever they are, they are starting to annoy the hell out me! It should have been opt-in wa wa wa wa. Yeah for the love of the universe, turn it off already and move on with life!!! God forbid these guys ever get dumped by a girlfriend/boyfriend, or they don’t get their peanuts on a domestic flight,… The blogosphere would explode.

    • John

      1) My main wish is to send a powerful message to tmobile that lying to their customers will get them in trouble. For me personally, that’s the main issue.

      2) I agree JL should be tweeting and periscoping. He is the one that has crafted the lie that he is transparent and ‘fighting for the customers’, and his company has benefitted from this, tremendously.

      Now he is caught in a series of dishonest, manipulative bullshit, and then there is the massive clusterfuck that arose which never would have happened if he hadn’t cultivated that image.

      3) Regarding paying fines, they’d be a drop in the bucket compared to tmobiles overall revenue, so why are you going on about it?

  • calvin35

    Does anyone know if there is any reason why T-Mobile couldn’t have just made Binge On a new data plan, like Binge On unlimited or something like that? New subscribers could sign up for it if they wanted and existing subscribers could switch to that plan if it was something they wanted. Would that even be possible?

    • frankinnoho

      What a… thank the Gods they didn’t!!!! I get to keep my 2 line $100 a month grandfarthered plan AND get all the video tethering I want free! “Real” customers would have really been up in arms if they had to give up their promised plans to get this feature.
      As a real Tmo customer, I am glad they have done it this way.

  • realuglysteeve

    I am grandfathered on the unlimited $ 60 ( before taxes )plus 7 GB tethering. My problem is that they shoved that Binge On program on all of us automatically. I had to turn off this ish myself. It should have been something that people would voluntarily sign for. That’s where the problem is. Some of us already had unlimited. The way they did it made is look like they were doing this to throttle everyone. They truth is the Binge On does throttle, they can call it whatever they want.

    • Guest 2

      Sorry you had to “hunt down for the switch”… “that is something a traditional carrier would do when they really hope you, the consumer, won’t take any action”.
      (The quotes are from John’s letter)

    • calvin35

      That is why they did it. Binge On is about throttling add many unlimited users as possible and everything else is just a distraction.

  • vinnyjr

    My disabled sister watches several hours of Netflix daily, sometimes more. If Binge On wasn’t automatically turned on my sister’s data allowance would be long gone plus an added overage cost. I like the way it’s set up, if you don’t want it just shut it off. I have unlimited data plan so I checked out of Binge On the very first day it went live. Videos at 480 are a very good quality product. I watched both 480 & 720, the difference is very hard to detect. Netflix keeps my sister happy, Binge On keeps that option available to her all day, every day. Binge On is a great service. Thank You T-Mobile, Thank You John Legere.

    • taxandspend

      I agree. I changed from unlimited but would have kept BingeOn active anyway – I watch Showtime, Netflix, and HBO at the gym depending on the day on my LG V10 (5.7″ quad HD display), and can’t tell the difference when on their wifi (which means no degradation) and when on LTE. So the quality is good enough for me. Why hog resources just for the sake of hogging them. That’s why I’d leave it active.

    • kgraham182

      Everything you said was ok until you said overages. T-Mobile doesn’t charge overages.

    • Peace Love and Death Metal

      Calling bs here. Anyone who has had tmo in the past 3 years knows that they don’t charge overages.

      • frankinnoho

        Ummm… do you have tmo? Because, if you do and you run through your data alowance, as he describes, you have to purchase a data pass if you want to continue using high speed data. It’s $10 bucks a gigabyte. It’s not an overage, but if want to keep burning high speed data, you pay it. Even on unlimited plans, after you used up your tethering allowance you have the option of buying a data pass to keep going. So you calling BS is just silly. Which “reputation” management company do you work for so I can let your boss know what a friggen idiot you are?

        • Peace Love and Death Metal

          You’re wrong. If you don’t have unlimited it cost $15 to add 4gb extra to the plan if it’s just 1 line. If you have multiple lines that all have the same data then that 15 becomes 10 That is is approx $3.75 per gb or $2.50 per gb .

          {Mod edit’s}

        • Al

          Please be kind, what happened to peace and love?
          Not everyone is as smart as you, so let’s have patience. Talking to him like that is not going to help, or at least not by much, on the contrary we risk causing him emotional trauma.

        • frankinnoho

          You must be his boss.

        • frankinnoho

          Yeah…. It’s called an On Demand Data Pass… PASS as opposed to PLAN, genius! I would have to look up what it cost to change PLANs, but purchasing an On Demand Data PASS – 7 Day 1GB Phone Hotspot Only Pass is $10.
          You need to watch you mouth and get your facts straight.

        • Peace Love and Death Metal

          Okay okay you’re right.

    • John

      Do you work for tmobile? Stockholder? You are a known tmobile apologist, spamming the comment sections with all manner or BS in an effor to paint tmob in a good light.

      Way to play the ‘disabled card’ though! Are we to believe she wouldn’t have been able to turn it on herself? You must be a really crappy sibling if you are unwilling to turn on binge on for your sister. And what of all the disabled people who can’t change the settings and who did NOT want their data throttled!! Now they are stuck with tmobile’s throttling against their will?

    • Anon

      What was your disabled sister doing before BingeOn? This is only 3 months old.

  • Guest 2

    To the defenders of Binge On throttling and T-Mobile: There is/was a lot of bad press these past days out there, from PC Mag and PC World to Yahoo News and the ABCNNBCBS News. You may want to defend there too or you could tell John that things are not looking good.

    • John

      There is so much bad press because John Legere has been so dishonest with us. The critics are not all perfect but they are right and Legere is wrong.

  • Peace Love and Death Metal

    Cool uncle John L should not be doubling down on this. The best path would be for him to apologize for throttling our video without our consent and move on.

    This is so dumb, he is really trying to feed us sh!t and call it caviar, again.

  • Peace Love and Death Metal

    Why did my comments get modified?

  • Brian the populist.

    Its true he throttled the heck out of our speeds i notcie because everything i used to on my mobile took soo long and now that ive turned off bing on my netflix and speed have more than doubled it MIND YOU I DONT NEED A SPEEDTEST TO TELL ME HOW FAST MY INTERNET IS BECAUSE USER EXPERIENCE IS A TELL ALL!

    • Guest 2

      I don’t know if it is Binge On or what but when I put YouTube on my Hotspot connected laptop the video starts playing at 480p for couple of seconds, then it stops and starts buffering, I guess that’s when YouTube adjusts the video to 144p, then it plays mostly fine with some pauses from time to time… at 144p.

      On my phone YouTube videos have been playing fine, but I don’t know at what resolution, could be 144p, 280p, 360p or 480p.

      Maybe the Bingers are not even getting the promised 480p, but something less.

      If this is the case, they should call it Video Throttle To Maximize Data So You Can Binge On But Do Not Ask More Questions.

      • John

        Exactly. Tmobile is doing this to benefit themselves, not us. They are throttling the F out of us and acting like they are doing us a favor, f them.

        • Anon

          Read the original comments from the Alice Cooper CEO, “…it’s what our customers want…”
          Without asking his customers. Uncarrier just became the worst carrier.

        • John

          I had a measure of respect for the man-child two weeks ago. But I’m deeply, deeply offended by his dishonest rhetorical techniques. Including the thing you just mentioned – he knows he has a cult following and that he can *create* the support by telling his sycophants what to believe…. so he keeps *just* *repeating* it.

          This is his solution to criticism and disagreement – just keep repeating and repeating his talking points.

          Most people just start to believe things when they’ve heard it enough.