SoftBank CEO confirms interest in buying T-Mobile, recognizes challenges

Masayoshi-Son

In a television interview yesterday evening, Sprint Chairman, and SoftBank CEO, Masayoshi Son confirmed that he was interested in a deal to buy T-Mobile. The deal would combine Sprint and T-Mobile in some form of merger and help bring them in to a “real fight” with AT&T and Verizon. He believes a deal would create a “massive price war” between the nation’s four biggest carriers.

Of course, he knows that a merger isn’t going to be plain-sailing. And the company’s interest hasn’t materialized in to an official bid of any kind. But the interest is real. Seemingly, the only element hindering a potential buyout is what the regulators make of it. In early “testing the water” talks with the FCC and Department of Justice, the feeling has been that neither would be entirely supportive of a buyout. SoftBank has to be able to prove that this is in the best interests of the American consumer.

We’ve been hearing for months about a supposed bid for T-Mobile by SoftBank CEO, Masayoshi Son, but haven’t heard anything officially confirming the interest. That is, until now. Both companies have – in fact – been making moves towards this deal for at least 2-3 months now. We heard that Son had approached several major banks to finance the deal, which won’t be cheap. T-Mobile is now worth just under $50 billion  after a very successful 2013. Deutsche Telekom – oddly – moved its T-Mobile stake to an account in the Netherlands to help with interest/value/and currency conversion, making it a more favorable deal. A similar move was made by Vodafone, shortly after the announcement was made that it would sell its 45% share in Verizon back to the American wireless carrier.

They say there’s no smoke without fire. We’ve been seeing the smoke for months, and now we’re seeing the tips of the flame. SoftBank is interested in buying T-Mobile. That may come as bad news to Team Magenta, but I think it’s worse news for Sprint. Tmo is the “cool” brand of the two. It’s the network that’s causing the biggest disturbance, both in terms of value, and what its upcoming 20+20 LTE network is capable of. It’s adding as many new customers each month as Verizon, the #1 carrier. If a merger goes through, let’s hope that Son decides Legere should stay on as CEO, and T-Mobile swallows up Sprint. Not the other way around.

Via: WSJ

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  • Bobby

    Well if sprint buys t-mobile which is unlikely to happen but you never know. If it does happen goodbye t-mobile, hello AT&T.F**k you sprint!.

    • Eric Hare

      Yep, i’m gone if this happens. Wouldn’t touch sprint with a ten foot pole.

      • Wire

        Bad credit?

        • Eye2I

          On the Rag Wire?

        • Frank in Beverly

          Sprint is the home of bad credit/ no credit fools. They’ll underwrite anything with a pulse. And so with their MVNO’s.
          l had the pricks years ago for landline service. I paid my final bill twice, and ended up having to put a note in my credit report when they tried to collect a third time. Regardless of any technical problems or incompatibilities, Sprint is just a dipshite company no thinking person would want to have anything to do with.

      • Trevnerdio

        39 1/2 ft* pole

    • Whiskers

      Same here , i will jump my phones to the cheapest flip phone and head out the door for good . Sprint and Dish both suck and will no support them.

      • Wire

        Please. You’re not going anywhere.

        • Whiskers

          Your right , i won’t be going anywhere with THOSE two loser companies. And i won’t let the door hit me in the ass when i exit so fast through it .

    • Wire

      Bye

    • Trevnerdio

      Lol we were saying hello Sprint 2 years ago because AT&T wanted to buy us…oh, the lesser of two evils.

  • themask128

    If they merger goes through they should dump the sprint network and say goodbye to sparky – I saw a report recently that T-mobile and Verizon were following similar plans that they were doing their LTE in continuous spectrum swaths and not trying to piece multiple segmented bands together to create a LTE network. It says something when the network infrastructure T-mobile is implementing is very similar in many ways to that of the current Market leader verizon – coverage and speed based on proven methods not some science lab stuff that you pray to god works in real scenarios.

    • Zacamandapio

      I’ve thinking about that. Just about when At&t’s and T-mobiles roaming agreement ends we Tmo could end up agreeing to Verizon’s 700Mhz LTE band (And Tmo now owns some of that as well). Then everyone wins 700Mhz and 1700Mhz I believe everyone would end up doing a cross-licensing thing.

  • wezra

    I have a feeling this is a ways off. With a slew of major mergers and buy-outs lately I’m sure the DOJ and FTC are war weary. For right now I believe they are content with having 4 major US cell carriers. These are not new waters for T-Mobile. Back in 2003 – 2004 when Cingular was going to acquire a far smaller T-Mobile that deal fell through at the last minute… then the recent AT&T story that we all know about. And now SoftBank. The story never ends!

  • francob911 .

    I have a feeling if this shit happens Sprint is going to convert all Tmobile GSM towers into CDMA that way they can make sure all their phones stay in their network just like Verizon and Sprint .. At&t will benefit if this happens because they would be the only carrier that would truly be GSM … The Reason I switch from Sprint to T-Mobile is because I could use it in Brazil and Colombia when unlocked by just popping in a Sim card and also I can give it away to a family member over there when I get a new one

    • Willie D

      That is exactly what they will do, or do worse, like they did with Nextel, stop investing into the network, claim they are still supporting it and let piece by piece fall into disrepair and collapse. Move customers over to the saturated CDMA side

      • francob911 .

        BS!!!!! Bs!!! bS!!!!!!!! bs!!!!!!!!!!!

  • nd5

    Sprint has a boatload of spectrum but they have no clue how to use that to their advantage in building out a network. T-Mobile has shown a particular knack for moving it’s network expansion aggressively.

    Any merger that removes any of T-Mobiles leadership and/or business strategy in favor of anything that’s currently being done by Sprint is just foolish.

    I think this is still a huge longshot that a merger would actually get approved, but if it does, and Hesse is a major player in what’s left then it’s going to be a bloodbath for T-Mobile. Sorry, that’s a fact. I am waiting on upgrading a phone or two until later this year until the proverbial poop hits the proverbial fan.

    • Paul

      Our fearless CEO has alluded to remaining at his post if Sprint and Magenta were to merge. Anything otherwise will have me reconsider my devotion to T-Mobile.

      I agree that removing any of the leadership from Magenta would be a poor move. If Hesse can’t turn Sprint around then he doesn’t need to be considered post-merger.

      • fsured

        I agree on reconsidering my service with the company if the deal gets approved after the details are released. At&t would then be smart to court the loads of customers who want nothing to do with Sprint. That could be a good yet small chunk to get them closer to Verizon’s numbers. Many of our phones now would work on their network and if they find away to make it fully work, I’d consider them.

        Does their LTE network frquencies work with T-Mobile handsets? I know they have 800 mhz (that is the right number right?) and our phones don’t have that ablility natively since the company doesn’t have any spectrum in that range. But is their LTE only using that frequency or is it spread among all their signals and bands? It would be interesting if the big phones like the Xperiz Z’s, SG4, HTC One, LG2 etc can actually fully function on At&t with just new base-bands and software approved by the FCC to reclassify abilities.

  • Paul

    “…but haven’t heard anything officially confirming the interest.”
    ??? Going from bank to bank, his meeting with the DOJ and FCC, as well as his other public quotes about T-Mobile showed his interest. Yes, this shows he’s STILL interested.

    I am still of the school of thought that this is an attempt to save a sinking ship. T-Mobile should buy Sprint for what the worth is after the debt is paid off-I’ll take it for $100 and that’s being generous. As I’ve said before, aside from the towers and spectrum, Sprint doesn’t really have anything to offer T-Mobile. The company’s debt drives its value down. It’s losing customers and can barely afford to expand or upgrade its equipment. Let alone its inability to keep up with T-Mobile’s “Uncarrier Moves.”

    We may be in 4th but we are pissing off the 2 biggest carriers. Sprint isn’t even in their radar.

    • fsured

      There are articles that put T-Mobile as the 3rd. Might not have the customer counts as Sprint but that is changing quick. The authors may be bundling other factors to make that statement. Perhaps network quality, technology, market performances, and subscribers. Myself, I wouldn’t consider Sprint number 3 right now when looking at the bigger picture and not just total subscribers.

  • vrm

    I think that both companies need to survive on their own. Build out slowly and surely and that is the only way they can compete. Throwing together disconnected networks and disenchanted subscribers with devices that barely work on one network let alone both and hoping that it all magically makes them more “competitive” is stupid.

    DT needs to rethink its strategy; perhaps they are right in getting rid of tmobile; if so, they should come out and say it. It is not clear what they want because their actions do not indicate anything for certain.

    Sprint will not be able to handle tmobile. It is for good reason that verizon never made a play for tmobile even when at&t did- it just won’t work.

  • S. Ali

    Nothing is stopping Masa from a pricing war right NOW. What he really wants to do is eliminate TMO as a competitor. Markets don’t become more competitive with less competitors, it makes no sense. Having just 3 carriers means more chances of collusion. Build your damn network, get rid of contracts, eliminate overages, offer international roaming. TMO is competing, Sprint is just complaining they can’t compete.

  • TechHog

    RIP Uncarrier :(

  • Adrayven

    Ok.. so question.. why doesn’t he compete on price now with Sprint? Reason.. he has no intention of doing that. He could bring it with Sprint.. he’s not.. This is a smoke’n set of mirrors here folks..

    • Willie D

      Same reason AT&T claimed they couldn’t deploy LTE anywhere even in major markets for $9 Billion, yet somehow could if they spent $38Billion gobbling up TMobile…a company that had no rural licenses. Yeah like that made sense. It didn’t. Just like Sprint bidding for another incompatible network and competitor.

  • David Tyler

    I’ve been to all the carriers such as Verizon, tmobile and att multiple times but Sprint never appeal to me. I can’t understand for such a scrappy network, their prices are outrageous. Son need to shut his mouth and start a price war like T-Mobile but yet again that is not his attention. He just want to be like the big boys plundering more money from consumers.

  • John

    At&t is #1 with 110.4 million subscribers and Verizon is #2 with 102.8 million subscribers

    • philyew

      The count for Verizon includes only retail connections, thus excluding maybe 18 million wholesale connections from MVNOs.

      • John

        I doubt that is the case check the links on the wiki page. If that is the case then we could say the AT&T number is off because it excludes Mvnos. Neither do that at all, both numbers include everything that they should. Btw I am a T-Mobile subscriber and have been since January 2005.

        • philyew

          “102.8 million total RETAIL connections” (my emphasis)

          http://bgr{dot}com/2014/01/21/verizon-earnings-q4-2013/

          That’s the article that’s linked from the footnote in the Verizon wiki.

          The AT&T number doesn’t specify retail. The source link simply says “110.4 million AT&T wireless customers”

          TM’s 46 million certainly is an aggregation of branded postpaid (25M), prepaid and wholesale subscribers.

          Here’s a source which supports the old figure of 119 million total subscribers for Verizon, and maps it to 109.46 million subscribers for AT&T.

          http://www.fiercewireless{dot}com/special-reports/grading-top-us-carriers-third-quarter-2013

        • John

          Atat recently bought cricket so you have to add 4.6 million to AT&t’s subscriber count.

        • philyew

          Has the deal closed yet? I can’t see any news items stating that it has passed through all regulatory steps. They only count for AT&T after the deal is official.

        • John

          They got stockholders approval

        • philyew

          But as far as I can see, it is still going through the regulatory processes with the FCC and DoJ. The FCC were certainly still taking representations from third parties on the deal last month.

        • Stone Cold

          Closes within the next month

        • philyew

          You would expect so, given that they expected it during Q1 2014 and the only missing check boxes are FCC and DoJ approval. That will get AT&T subscriber base up to around 114M, I believe.

  • Aaron H

    @ John, I see that information on the wiki but how is that possible if verizon and Tmobile were the top 2 carriers in customer gains over the last quarter. Verizon has always had more customers than Att. I just wonder if that information is true.

    • John

      On the wiki page there’s a number with a square for example it says verizon (102.8 million) [3] if you go to that wiki page and click on the [3] it will tell you to the source. All that info for the top wireless carriers on that page have a source if a number has been given. Also AT&T bought out cricket a 7 months ago so that 4.6 million subscribers from cricked has been added to at&t’s customer count.

  • Danny Lewis

    It’s a shame you cannot compete RIGHT NOW… Make Sprint an “Uncarrier.” Do away with contracts, offer good prices, have manufacturers make more Nexus 5 like devices that can work on all 3 networks (I say 3 because I don’t think Verizon would be onboard), improve mobile speeds and reliability, enable VoLTE. What’s holding you back, Son? You can make Sprint be the most desirable carrier if you just get your s**t together.

  • Aurizen

    I would really hate to see the word T-Mobile turn to sprint… Magenta beats Yellow!

  • jeff grace

    John Legere “CEO of T-Mobile” stated that ,just so some don’t say ,who is that. He is not against the merger and has a wide open mind to possibilities, but Sprint is a snail with alot of spectrum ,who does not know how to use it all . Ledger is fine with it as long as he is the CEO still after it is all done,they will either keep the name of Tmobile or rename it. Keep in mind John Legere used to work for Mr.Son and he is friends with him,this comes as a benefit.Also my Hesse is old 60years old and is at the point of getting ready to step down from the CEO position of Sprint. So either way I think Legere/Son and the FCC & DOJ will agree to a merger if Tmobile stays the name or changes and John Ledger takes over fully in charge as CEO.

  • jeff grace

    Keep in mind that Tmobile owns Metro pcs they could take over sprint ,John Legere as CEO of it all and spin off metro as thr 4th carrier that.way tmobile could chew up sprint

  • Masa-Son-Sux

    Load of crap from a corporate emperor. T-Mobile is already taking a real fight to the big two, while Sprint flaps in the wind. Level the playing field for the upcoming 600 auction, and then we’ll ses the fight really explode. Look to Canada for the results of a tri-opoly. No better than the current duopoly here in the US. JUST SAY NO MERGER!!!

  • jeff grace

    Sirauron14 tmo would own sprint ,sprint name would go away

    • KingCobra

      DT owns the T-Mobile name and brand. Using it would require Softbank to purchase or license it.

      • Aurizen

        so T-mobile would become sprint?

    • jeremyvbk

      No Soft bank would own the Spectrum, tower leases, and equipment that DT has in the US. So Softbank would just add that spectrum/equipment/leases to its own arsenal. No need for purchasing of Tmobile Name. Tmobile name would vanish from the US market, and such.

  • Ae Tee

    I’d actually like to see this deal go through, even as a current T-Mo customer. Sprint spectrum + John Legere = win.

    • philyew

      What your forgetting is that once the new company grows to over 100 million subscribers and more closely matches AT&T and Verizon in size and revenue, there won’t be any need for the company – with or without John Legere at the helm – to continue all the Uncarrier policies that make them so attractive right now.

      John Legere without Uncarrier is just another suit running another corporation intent on making as much money as possible out of its customers.

      • vrm

        A huge % of their subscribers (both cos) are prepaid who are more likely to switch- a merger guarantees that they will.

        • philyew

          I don’t want the takeover to happen, but it makes little sense to defect to another company purely because of the merger. I’ve never understood that kind of knee-jerk threat being considered.

          Clearly, if the merged company were to go the direction that I expect it to go, then there would be good reason to consider moving on, but until there are changes that are materially disadvantageous to me, I’d stay with TM and enjoy the benefits that I am currently enjoying for as long as possible. It would take another 12-24 months for that to happen, even if the deal was announced today. Why rush to pay someone more money than necessary?

        • Nick Gonzalez

          Well in response to your first paragraph, back when AT&T (Death Star) was attempting to gobble up T-Mobile, I had all the intention of switching to Sprint as soon as the deal went through. It’s funny looking back now.
          I guess I felt kinda betrayed by T-Mo. I know a lot of people that were AT&T customers, mainly for the iPhone, that absolutely hated their service with AT&T and I was always proud of my great service with T-Mo. That’s my take on the “knee-jerk” response I think you are referring to. Loyalty man. That’s all we’re looking for.

        • philyew

          You want loyalty and Deutsche Telekom still wants to get an acceptable return on the $55 billion it sank into Voicestream and PowerTel twelve years ago. I’m guessing the billions are going to win…eventually.

        • vrm

          So people should stick around because DT wants compensation for bad investment decisions of the past ? How do you know that keeping tmobile and building it will not be better investment in the long run ? They keep vacillating on that issue.

          No, the billions will NOT win, if people leave. And no, its not a knee-jerk reaction. I am with tmobile ONLY because I want them to stay in business.

          Why is not joining aio wireless not a good decision for a tmo customer ? Cheaper prices and at&t network. What happened to the US cellular customers that sprint bought ? And the nextel customers ?

          I just hate that son- he is a douchebag afflicted with megalomania. And that is putting it mildly.

        • philyew

          You’re responding to arguments I’m not proposing. I’m not saying anyone should stay around for any reason at all. If you want to go, go.

          I’m simply saying that unless there is a better deal elsewhere that makes sense to take up, it really is self-harming to leave for an inferior deal purely because the takeover goes through.

          As long as DT pick up the amount of money they consider acceptable for their stock, they really don’t have any ongoing interest in whether people stay or go. My point is that the concept of loyalty is meaningless to them, or any other corporation, when it comes down to hard cash.

          Appealing to their “better instincts” or expecting them to overlook their fiduciary responsibilities to their shareholders in favor of loyalty to their customers simply isn’t going to get anywhere.

    • vrm

      doesn’t matter who is ceo- the problems facing a joint co. – disparate networks, different technologies and sprint’s spectrum issues are all gonna stay. tmobile is far more likely to succeed on their own due to contiguous PCS and AWS spectrum. All they need is a bit more low band spectrum.

      sprint’s problems are many fold- merging with tmo will make it both their problem. You aren’t just buying spectrum. Even the spectrum itself is of little use to tmobile- they already have AWS and PCS.

      this merger is a match made in hell. It will make nextel look like a spring break mistake.

    • KingCobra

      Sprint’s mostly high frequency spectrum is of little use to T-Mobile. Especially the nearly junk 2500mhz Clearwire spectrum. T-Mobile has plenty of high frequency spectrum, they need more 700mhz or other low band spectrum. Something that Sprint doesn’t have very much of either.

      • Jay Holm

        Sprint has a lot of 800mhz spectrum from Nextel.

        • Kidney_Thief

          They really don’t. 6 + 6 MHz is all. Plus, nobody else uses SMR, making it difficult to integrate.

        • S. Ali

          800mhz that is nationwide. Compared to 5+5 of 700mhz that TMO has in a handful of markets and isn’t deploying until 2015 (or later). Unless they win adjacent spectrum in the 600mhz auction or partner with regional carriers, it isn’t much better. The AWS-3 auction provides spectrum adjacent to Sprints H-Block. Sprint is in a very good spectrum position, its a matter of how quickly they deploy.

        • Kidney_Thief

          I wasn’t in favor of buying the 700 MHz spectrum, either. Whether it’s from the A block or from Sprint, neither of them really help T-Mobile in the long run. I wish they had just sat on the cash and waited for either the 600 MHz or AWS-3 auctions to make their next big play.

          If Softbank gobbles up T-Mobile, one of my concerns, besides the logistical nightmare, will be that Softbank will be so cash-starved that they won’t be able to have a strong showing at either of those auctions.

          As far as spectrum position, do you know what kind of tower density they would need to deploy on the 2.5 GHz bands? Either they’ll need to deploy tons of small cells or start building a lot more towers. Either way, things are definitely not going to get better for anybody outside the city. So, with the combined company, if 2.5 GHz doesn’t even really provide a value add over current deployments of AWS or PCS, then what’s the advantage over buying up more AWS or PCS and having a network that’s compatible with everybody else? It would sure make roaming agreements a lot easier.

          So, I guess what I’m trying to say is this: what does Sprint actually provide T-Mobile besides a whole lot of heartache and a little bit of PCS spectrum?

        • vrm

          exactly ! Why doesn’t everyone call him on that ?

        • KingCobra

          Son just wants the customers and to eliminate the competitor that is eating Sprint’s lunch right now.

        • Rod

          That would be enough if they built it out as an overlay network. A combined Tmo/Sprint would have plenty of above 1ghz spectrum to build out a high density LTE network in the cities and suburbs and using the SMR as a backup network for indoors and rural areas. Kinda like Verizon’s AWS network, but in reverse.

        • Jay Holm

          What does SMR stand for again?

        • Kidney_Thief

          Specialized Mobile Radio. It’s mostly used for public safety, but was also used for fleet dispatch, etc. Nextel was originally a fleet dispatch company, but repurposed the spectrum for cellular, which is why nobody else uses it.

        • Jay Holm

          Regardless of what it was originally used for, it can still be used for LTE-A Carrier Aggregation, right?

        • Kidney_Thief

          Yes, but my point is that it’s so specialized that no other carriers support it. If you want to maintain roaming agreements with, say, AT&T, then using handsets that only support SMR, PCS, and 2.5 GHz spectrum is not the way to do it. At least T-Mobile’s network is compatible with AT&T, and even Verizon. Sprint, not so much.

        • jeremyvbk

          And again it is not that hard to support b26/bc10 As b26 is a super-set of band 5. The nexus 5 support future 850cellular LTE as well as 800SMR LTE because b26 includes smr and cellular 800

        • Kidney_Thief

          Well-played.

        • jeremyvbk

          False they do own 8x8Mhz in some areas. Please give accurate information.

        • Kidney_Thief

          Well, if we’re going to get into semantics, they actually own 6.625 MHz in some areas, primarily Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida. There are some other pockets here and there, but the licenses are so vague that they don’t even include a frequency range.

          My point was that they have 6 + 6 MHz mostly nation wide.

  • tomarone

    The executives make LOTS of money with these deals, and that’s the ONLY reason they do it. He saying there would be a ‘massive price war’ is smoke and mirrors to try to get the approval. It’s total hokum. (hooey).

  • tomarone

    When is Facebook, Google, or Microsoft (or Apple?) going to bid for TMO?

    • Rod

      None of them have anything to gain from buying tmobile. It would be a conflict of interest for Apple, Google and Microsoft. Facebook doesn’t have the capital or valuation to buy a major wireless carrier.

      • tomarone

        They could use debt for acquisition if it was a logical ‘synergy’.

  • ccnet005

    Tmo was bought and sold the day legere stepped in.
    It was just a question of to whom and how much.
    Hopefully the FCC will step in and not let this happen.
    One more merger and all rates will go up.

  • vinnyjr

    I would seriously hate to loose a gsm Network to Sprints bastard child network.Their 3g network will always be patheticaly slow and unreliable no matter how much $$ they throw at it. It’s always been very cool to be able to swap out sim cards in gsm phones and be able to use T-Mobile phones on AT&T’s Network and AT&T on T-Mobile’s Network. It just always works especially now with the refarmed 1900 Network. What would be really great is if T-Mobile took some interest in their US brand and pumped some $$ into it and made a go of it. T-Mobile has proved with some $$ behind it and with the right people in the drivers seat, (John Legere & co) T-Mobile can make it. T-Mobile will always be my Carrier of choice.

    • Stone Cold

      This is the exact reason I see this as failing that would leave one GSM major provider in America.

      • Rod

        Not really. CDMA is dead in the water. Since its a proprietary standard owned by Qualcomm most CDMA carriers are abandoning it. Once Verizon gets VoLTE, their CDMA network is toast and they’ll be 100% GSM. It’ll take longer for sprint to do it, but they’ll fall in line… eventually.

        • tpeazy

          Let’s get a little bit of clarification here folks. Its not a CDMA vs GSM thing. Unless you live in the boonies your T-Mobile phone operates on a WCDMA network. GSM was the past. As far as vinnyjr complaining about Sprints network…well, the truth is that CDMA was MUCH better then GSM. That is one of the reasons Verizon became number one. CDMA was so superior the GSMA decided to go that route with their new standards. So for all intents and purposes…GSM is dead. WCDMA (a variant for which Qualcomm still gets royalty payments) is the new standard. There are even WCDMA patents tied into LTE. So Qualcomm is getting money for LTE also. Just wanted to set the record straight.

        • fentonr

          WCDMA is a gsm based technology, not a CDMA one despite it’s name.

        • tpeazy

          Ahh…no. Not true. W-CDMA was developed by NTT-Docomo as a 3G technology that was later adopted by the GSMA so as to not have to pay Qualcomm royalties. Because NTT used Qualcomm technology in developing W-CDMA, QComm gets paid anyway.

        • fentonr

          Who gets paid has nothing to do with WCDMA being a UMTS technology which is also a GSM based technology.

  • Volker

    I have no problem with this merger going through… As long as the new network is GSM/HSPA based replacing the CDMA. And it would make sense to do this too, as I believe SoftBank is GSM and If I understand network vision correctly, sprints signals are software based and wouldn’t require new equipment on the tower side. Couldn’t they also send an update to their dual-mode customers phones that would turn off the CDMA function and use the GSM to lock on to the “new”/current TMO network?

    • Kidney_Thief

      And what of their obvious spectrum incompatibilities? Sprint’s spectrum holdings are a mess.

    • KingCobra

      Nope. The only frequency that Sprint and T-Mobile both use is 1900mhz PCS. A merger is going to require that one of the networks be shut down and integrated into the other.

    • Hogpistol

      Sprint has a bunch of spectrum tied up in crappy networks. Anyone remember iDEN? Ugh. Every thing Sprint does is a disorganized mess. I’d hate to see their management running T-Mo.

      • Rod

        iDen no longer exist. They turned it off last year in June or july. They’re supposed to re purposing the 800 SMR band for LTE as part of Sprint Spark

        • fentonr

          I think hogpistol was saying remember how bad the whole iDen thing went.

        • jeremyvbk

          No he said “sprint has a bunch of spectrum tied up” As in being used currently in “crappy networks” Which is false, they have 800smr in LTE and 1X. Which both are not “crappy networks”. Sprint 1X beats out an edge network on Tmobile any day. Especially on 800Smr

        • fentonr

          You’re miss quoting. He said sprint has a bunch of spectrum tied up in crappy network. Then, as a new sentence “anyone remember iDEN”. That could mean the assumption that iDen is still running or it could mean that is a good example of the kind of crappy networks Sprint has felt with in the recent past. I may be wrong, but his post makes more sense using iDen as an example of the kinds of networks Sprint has had. It doesn’t really matter one way or another, I read it one way, you another, we’ll not know what was really being said without clarification.

        • Hogpistol

          Clarification arrives – I was tying Everything Sprint does being a disorganized mess with iDEN which anyone that remembers the Nextel acquisition knows that was a complete clusterf…uh…family site so nevermind.

          I know iDEN no longer exists and has been redeployed into other uses. I do see where you could have got the wrong idea where I said they’re tied up in crappy networks. When I typed that I was mostly thinking about the ridiculous idea of going Wi-Max when everyone else and their mothers were going LTE. (Among other bone headed decisions)

          It’s like Sprint’s leadership would be the type of people to invest in Betamax or HD-DVD. I don’t want those people running Magenta.

    • Rod

      Turning Sprint dual mode phones into GSM only vía software could work, but they would all be stuck on Tmobile edge, except the few phones that have AWS and 1900mhz, which limits the selection down pretty much to the iPhone 5s/5c. Doing that would be way to “uncarrier” for them. It makes more economic/ easier to just make you buy a new phone.

    • Mike N

      I’m sorry, but NO. Sprint is nothing more than a dying corpse. The ONLY way forward with a merged company is for TMo to simply convert all Sprint customers to our current service and FIRE EVERYONE who has been touched by Sprint.

      Everything Sprint is POISON. Keep it OUT of magenta!

      • jeremyvbk

        Sprint is not a dying corpse. There is nothing there to support that. The 4 aThe FCC would rather see 3 companies because of a buyout, than 3 because of a “dying” company. Sprint is in a much better position for future growth than T-mobile.

    • jeremyvbk

      They would not use a GSM/HSPA network. They would most likely keep CDMA and turn HSPA into LTE, as it is most efficient. Especially since NV 1.0 is complete and they have low frequency voice coverage.

  • Terry

    4 family members all have sprint but me only tmobile for double digit years so I kno sprint service sucks so If sprint buys tmobile ima just buy a pager n find pay phones to use

  • Cluewire

    Sprint is not buying Tmobile the buyer is Softbank. We are going into the land of the unknown.

  • KingCobra

    It won’t happen. His claim that acquiring T-Mobile will create a price war in the market sounds similar to AT&T’s claim that they couldn’t rollout LTE unless they acquired T-Mobile. The public nor the DOJ/FCC are that stupid.

    He already has Sprint, 50+ million customers. Improve your network, create some aggressive rate plans, advertise more and create a price war right now.

    • S. Ali

      > He already has Sprint, 50+ million customers. Improve your network, create some aggressive rate plans, advertise more and create a price war right now.

      This. Price wars have already started, Sprint is the only one being left behind.

      • Verizonthunder

        I agree with you S. Ali the fact they have the most spectrum should be no reason to absorb other carrier’s… well there is Bad Management, Poor execution for deployment of LTE upgrade’s with no time frame’s. If the focused on one area at a time and expanded one state at a time they could have major LTE coverage in major cities and suburbs uhhhggg anyone on here could give them tips on how to keep a business running and does not require a piece of paper that claim’s I went to dot dot dot what good does that do you if you fail to implement those skills from school into your business or work place in general.

    • Chardog

      A price war among the top 4 carriers after a merger… He has his math wrong. Post-merger there would only be 3..

      • Chardog

        And didn’t DT just say they weren’t looking to exit the market in the short-term…?

        • Hogpistol

          I wouldn’t take that statement as being worth anything.

        • Verizonthunder

          Hogpistol is correct about Dutch Telecom. They have desire’s to leave to US market sense At&t tried to absorb them. Sadly I feel bad for people on T-Mobile who know their owner’s want to kick the curb on the business that had consumer’s flocking.

  • sushimane

    That’s not a good of a reason for a merger in my opinion T-Mobile is gain momentum so the doj and the FCC should see that minus the metropcs merger they see tmoble becoming a force to be recognize even if the 4th largest carrier their gaining customers from the big three so the deal should be out of the window and Softbank would be paying that break up fee. FCC and the doj should have the power to question sprint motives because they hold a lot of spectrum that their not using and now they wanna take down the 4th largest carrier to gain customers and have a betting war against the big two? That’s kinda a hit on the govern concerns of having three big carriers. The company can price the plan how much they want. Softbank CEO is crazy.

  • This son of a gun needs to keep his money in the bank, and return to his country. I am sick of this guy taking over a company that’s feeding the poor people needs. Please start a petition to have this guy out of this.

    • Luke

      You are a pathetic fool

  • Stone Cold

    It is Softbank the Owners of Sprint trying to make this deal appealing. Not Sprint trying to buy T-Mobile. Son is saying and doing all the right things to gain favor. But I am still not onboard with Softbank attempting to merge Sprint and T-Mobile.

  • notyourbusiness

    He’s just a greedy bastard who wants to get his hands on a company that’s doing a lot better than his. Sprint just needs to keep its grubby paws off of T-Mobile and concentrate on improving its own network.

    • James

      T-Mobile execs even the CEO want the merger to happen. Now you were saying?

  • GinaDee

    Sprint fans always talk about how much money Son has yet in reality Softbank is riddled in debt up the yin yang.

    Japanese investors are already nervous because Sprint continues to suck even after all the money they’ve already put into its shares.

    Sprint already has more spectrum than any other US carrier. There is nothing stopping them from building the network of their dreams and marketing it out to the masses. Oh wait yeah there is: themselves.

    Sprint has a poor history of execution starting with Forsee’s botched network purchase of Nextel and down the ranks till today. No more excuses Sprint. Put up or shut up.

    I rather see another large US investor buy into TMUS. Sprint needs to stay out.

    • jeremyvbk

      You forget most of their spectrum is 2500/2600 spectrum, which is more expensive to deploy. My question is what is keeping Tmobile from expanding into Their excess Edge only areas? But Tmobile is also in a ton of debt, and Even just had to raise Prices on unlimited data. Why because they can not afford this “price war” they tried to start. They do not have as much of an upper hand as you many think. At least sprint is turning a corner. And this will make a much better network experience than Many think.

      • Paul

        Not sure you understand the economics of the price war and the cost of build out.

        • jeremyvbk

          Yes I do. You cannot expect to build out a great network and keep dropping prices. Just can work out.

        • Paul

          Right, they can’t continue to drop prices and afford to expand. They can have a lower price to start, drive the others down by pulling their customers; new customers = more profits.

          The others are matching your price? Then you add extras; international data and texting, etc. They are active, not reactive, and this helps them control movement in the market.

          They were straight forwards and explained why they are raising prices, as well as raising the data limits. They are also respecting their current customers by grandfathering them in.

          To expand they need more spectrum and equipment. No matter haw far they expand people are gonna moan and groan that they aren’t covered enough.

          While I think they should have addressed this a long time ago, I am glad that they are aware and are taking steps to go forward. It’s easier for them to upgrade towers, it’s not patch work. They are working to get cellular connections working on the 4G/LTE lines; currently on 2G/3G. Honestly, once they can move cities to strictly 4G/LTE cellular usage they can move the other equipment out for expansion.

          Then again, I’m not a rocket scientist.

        • jeremyvbk

          To get the coverage of all current edge areas to W-Cdma and LTE they will need backhaul. And that as shown in why sprint has been having issues with , it will take years upon years to provide back haul that they need. And then they would need to fight with permits and such.

      • Justin747

        Sprint has been turning that same corner for the last 3 years.

        • jeremyvbk

          Better than T-Mobile who all they do is patch work. They have very little expansion plan, and are years out from providing low band LTE.

        • Justin747

          Location, location, location….

          I’ve used Sprint and T-Mobile in many major cities from Chicago to the Pacific Ocean. In my experiences Sprint lags behind T-Mobile in almost major every city. You may be in a strong Sprint area, but these complaints about Sprint service aren’t just coming from nowhere. If you don’t have any issues with Sprint service, enjoy it and understand that you are the exception and not the rule.

          Average Joe customer doesn’t care AT ALL about spectrum and bands, they just want their phone to work. HOW T-mobile did it doesn’t matter. T-Mobile had no LTE and passed Sprint up in POPs easily

          However T-Mobile did it, Sprint DESPERATELY needs to steal all the ideas from them.

        • jeremyvbk

          But they should care. People will find out about the large areas of Edge which is very terrible for most smartphone users. Sprint has no need to steal ideas as NV is working in a lot of places. And think these people leaving are going to just bog down the next network leaving sprint with all of the bandwidth to claim for advertising. And they have the best plan for increasing bandwidth, tons of 2500/2600 spectrum. Ask well as 2 5×5 bands for LTE. Plus sprint will be #4 and will get probably get in better position for 600mhz meaning for bands, and a better experience for users. What people don’t understand does hurt them.

        • Justin747

          People throw out that Edge argument way too much.

          I live in LA. If I go to the mountains I fall back on Edge. I don’t go to the mountains much so this doesn’t concern me. As long as I’m in populated areas of LA, I’m on LTE and occasionally H+.

          Here is the problem: Sprint service is spotty EVERYWHERE in LA. Sprint considers LA a “spark” the city also.

          I’m OK with Edge in the boondocks as long as it works in the places I go primarily. Sprint can’t get either part right. It’s just generally spotty and inconsistent.

          I get spectrum. I really do. But the average person doesn’t. I almost don’t even mention it anymore in discussions because it’s just worthless until it’s used. I care about present, and presently Sprint has too many issues to address before they can cannabilize another carrier.

        • jeremyvbk

          Have you had sprint recently? And LA may have issues but everywhere I’ve gone I’ve had a much smoother experience with sprint. And the major difference is sprint is deploying 2 layers of LTE to every site except mexico and Canada border areas. And adding a 3rd even higher capacity LTE to the sites. T-Mobile is missing LTE on a much higher percentage of sites. And my city of 100k+ 200k+ area has a mostly edge coverage even when displayed as LTE. With speeds and reliability of way less than sprint 3g. Mileage varries

        • Justin747

          I’ve used Sprint recently, I have friends who still use Sprint and who work for Sprint, and I also worked there.

          I get it. I get the network build out. I understand the 3 LTE capacities.

          The problem is NOW Sprint’s network has issues in MANY places. Customers don’t care about how great it will be in the “near” future when they are paying a full bill every month. They don’t care about spectrum and frequency talk. They just wast a phone that works. The build out was poorly planned and it is now showing. I would also expect poor battery life with Spark when it’s completed, but who knows when that will be.

          I understand T-Mobile is technically missing LTE in more sites. But in places T-Mobile does have LTE, it works amazingly. Quality > Quantity if I absolutely had to choose.

          100k – 200k isn’t a large city. It doesn’t surprise me at all that a city of that size has Edge. T-Mobile admits that these cities aren’t their target market.

        • jeremyvbk

          It is plenty large enough for the other 2 carriers as well as previos Metropcs to have Better coverage. 100-200 thousand is pretty decent size for cities. I am sorry but that is the worst excuse for having edge here. The build out was not poorly planned, most of the issues were actually on the side of backhaul vendors not supplying backhaul in a quicker manner. And yet again quality does need quantity to make it have a better guality, What good is “amazing” LTE if it confined to the huge Cities, since obviously they are not worried about 100-200k cities. Tmobile will never be able to be anywhere near ATT or Verizon if they stick to their major cities. SImple fact, that people do travel, and need coverage where they travel. And Sprint does have a plan for that. Sprint will be the major winner in that category and once people realize their city of 100k isnt covered worth crap. And they are on “no contract” so they can switch even quicker.

        • Justin747

          I don’t care if T-Mobile will ever reach AT&T or Verizon. This is not some Sport where if a carrier gets to 1st place they get a trophy like the Super Bowl. Why are you people so fascinated with your carriers getting more subs than the next? I dont want this merger because T-Mobile works for me and Sprint has an AWFUL AWFUL AWFUL track record with almost everything they have done in the past 8 – 10 years.

          Not having LTE in a city with 100k – 200k is poor. That’s fine, but that’s also how business works. You must understand how small of a city that is when major cities have MILLIONS of potential customers. Would you rather get $100 a month from 40k people in a city of 200k, or would you rather get $100 a month from 1 million – 2 million people in a city of 5 million people? If T-Mobile doesn’t work for you in your area, simply don’t use it. This isn’t rocket science.

          Backhaul, vendor mistakes, blah, blah, blah….

          I keep trying to explain to you Sprint apologist that this is NO excuse for sub-par service for such a long time while NONE of the other carriers have these issues. Explain something like this to a customer who takes care of a sick child or parent. Tell a paying customer face-to-face that Sprint made some bad plans and their service will get better at some undetermined date in the future. Then proceed to tell them that they need to full pay their bill every month while receiving not full service until Sprint figures out their network issues.

        • jeremyvbk

          Sprint has “AWFUL” track record? I bet you don’t remember Tmobile’s Terrible track record. ATT ahs a bad Track record, as does verizon. Every carrier has a “bad record”. But you think In a city of 5 Million, Tmobiel will get 1-2 million? Between 4 carrier, with ATT and Verizon having majority share between the two, Tmobile Wont have that 2million. If I were a company and could get $100 from even 10k people I would have a reliable network there. SImple it adds more revenue. Your excuse as to why tmobile has very poor coverage here is pretty bad. IF they are going to have the equipment up, it only makes sense to at least provide decent coverage. Yes it is. How about Tmobile tries Expanding Its LTE footprint to any of its edge network and then see how it performs on A t1 line. ANd vendors do have a a huge part, guess you dont see that. They are what maintain the equipment, install it, and set it up. And not serving a 100k city is not an excuse in this day and age. I keep trying to tell you that, there is nothing but Tmobile Wants to do about it because they are too busy trying to start not a price war, but by trying to “claim the fastest speed ” in a 1 block radius, but forgets about huge swaths of Land, and tons of 100k cities. And sprint offers bill credits while there is Network enhancements being done. And sprint apologist? That must make you a Magenta Apologist. Maybe once T-mobile can explain why it will not expand beyond major metropolitan cities with usable service , then it would shut people up. But I can at least say I have seen much better performance on sprint, from others, and myself, all across the country. So one area you live at is not a good way of telling people sprint sucks. Every carrier has bad areas. but Tmobile is mostly bad areas, except the few square miles covered in metropolitan areas. Poor excuse on Tmobile

        • Justin747

          I remember all the other carriers flaws and hiccups.

          You wanna know the difference?

          Sprint is the only one still having these issues.

          Again I must repeat, I DO NOT CARE about all this whole race to #1. All I care about is Sprint not buying T-Mobile because of how poorly they have built out NV and their inconsistencies with plans and services

          All of those numbers I mentioned were guestimates. Please don’t take those numbers as accurate. You COMPLETELY missed the point on that comparison. 20% of 5 million will always be more than 20% of 200,000.

          This isn’t like a game of Monopoly or SimCity. This is real life. T-Mobile currently doesn’t have the luxury of this magical LTE blanket that can cover the entire US like you people seem to think exists. They have the resources to cover major metropolitan areas so that’s what they are doing and are doing fairly well. How is this even foreign to you? Smaller cities simply have less choices in everything, not just cellular carriers.

          If the vendors Sprint used have them in this mess, then they should have hired better vendors and found new vendors. Whatever needs to be done. Again, there is NO excuse. Stop damage control.

          You are basically making generalizations with no facts. You are saying T-Mobile is bad in areas with absolutely no proof. My very 1st comment said I have used Sprint in many major metro areas. Denver, Chicago, St, Louis, Dallas, Phoenix, Albuquerque, OKC, San Fran, LA, San Diego, Nashville, Vegas and a few others. I had much better service with T-Mobile than I did with Sprint in all these areas. Sprint was basically unusable in the entire state of Arizona

          Please visit Root Metrics or ANY other carrier comparison and tell me what you find.

        • jeremyvbk

          20% is still 20%. They deployed LTE here, just half assed deployment, Coverage on LTE is less than a mile direct line of site from towers. And Maybe it was unusable because of Network upgrades which take more than just overnight to appear. Guess you didnt know they have done damage control, NSN is taking over for most of Ericsson Markets which is a sign. My city does not have less choice in anything but Tmobile. Considering we are a pretty big hub for major companies and such. And one of the fastest growing cities. And I do have facts. Facts based upon many more users than just yourself. Hundreds of peoples actual testimonies. Better than any skewed Root metric data. And root metrics have not taken into consideration of Bad data caused by Recent Triband devices, and bad data sent by phones. And also based on Root metrics Tmobile is behind of Sprint. Just checked it by the way. And what gets me is Data performace is still ahead of Tmobile. Says something about sprint compared to Tmobile that you praise so Highly of. I at least have “proof” you asked for

        • Justin747

          Here is the thing you are missing….

          T-Mobile doesn’t work for you. Cool. You are doing the proper thing by not giving them any of your hard earned money. If you don’t like the service T-Mobile has in your area, either move or continue to NOT use them. You have no issue here. You are creating a problem for yourself that doesn’t exist

          So why exactly are you on a T-Mobile site complaining about a carrier you don’t even use? S4GRU —–> is this way

          Again…

          You are COMPLETELY missing the point. You have somehow turned this whole debate into carrier vs carrier instead of the potential merger we have here.

          T-Mobile isn’t behind Sprint on Root Metrics. You have to go to the actual cities on the map. Check coverage in Los Angeles. I can’t post a link but I’m sure you can find it

        • jeremyvbk

          Why do I need to go to a city, when overall they perform better? You seem to only look on the small scale, not the big picture, And yes it is relevent as to you started the bashing of how sprint needs to “steal ideas” Because they desperately need its? I provided you with how that is not true based on reports you use for “proof” . And a merger would be on a national scale, not a city scale as what you go by. Which is what I am saying, by Sprint is more reliable, and better than what magenta fan boys make it out to be. Sorry for the painful truth, but Why don’t you go check out Root metrics, and see for yourself on how “crappy” sprint is. Not as bad as you and others make it out to be. Someone has to at least point that out.

        • Justin747

          I said IF YOU DON’LIKE THE SERVICE T-MOBILE HAS IN YOUR AREA THEN MOVE OR CONTINUE TO NOT USE THEM

          Read the comment before you reply.

          Now…

          Sprint has performed poorly in my tests. I don’t want my Sprint experiences to merge with my pleasant T-Mobile experiences. Why exactly do you feel some type of duty to defend Sprint non-stop like you are some kind of mascot?

          And you didn’t answer my question. If you don’t like T-Mobile and their services, WHY ARE YOU HERE!?!?!?! Do you not realize this is a T-Mobile news site? Just go to S4GRU and discuss Sprint with like minded people. Your presence here is pointless

        • jeremyvbk

          And I stated my reason of why in my experience they are better and how it wouldn’t be such a bad thing to combine. And what if I like to read more than just one article about something. Maybe your point here is pointless? You are not one to judge who’s presence here is pointless. Sounds like an angry magenta follower. Still haven’t responded to my comments about root metrics. You told me to go there and report what I saw. I diddid and you didn’t like the truth you thought was different. Sorry to disappoint the magenta fanboys like yourself. Well now that I’ve had my fun tonight I have projects I’m working on ;) Had fun talking to a brick wall

        • Justin747

          I give.

          You win.

        • tpeazy

          Thanks Justin. I appreciate you giving in. Peoples perception is their reality. If it isn’t, they will make it so. I being both a Sprint and T-Mobile customer and having a trucking company with trucks going across the country weekly will say this: Sprints voice network works (in my opinion) better then T-Mobiles across the country. Likely because CDMA is more efficient then GSM (Please no WCDMA HSPA comments, because that is not GSM). This used to be a big issue as outside of big cities, T-Moble didn’t work at all. Now they at least have edge coverage. From an overall perspective, T-Mobile is better. First, T-Mobiles Edge is comparable to the speeds (data) I am getting from Sprint’s 3G. Second, T-Mobile has outpaced and outclassed Sprint on its network upgrades. I consistently have more LTE in more places. Even on HSPA and HSPA+ I am getting faster speeds then Sprint’s LTE. Thats real world across 45 states or so. Sorry Jeremy..but just keep believing and maybe one day it will be real. lol

        • tpeazy

          Justin, most of the Cities I am in, in Riverside County are ,100K and they have T-Mobile LTE. Not Sprint. T-Mobile is really killing Sprint in Southern Cal. Sorry Sprint fans..it is.

        • tpeazy

          I have had Sprint and do have Sprint. I also moved my primary phone over to T-Mobile. I live in southern cal. I travel between Riverside, San Diego and Orange counties on a daily basis. My experience is this: Sprint sucks…even with this so called NV, the network still sucks in most areas. People complain about edge….please..my experience is that edge works better and faster then Sprints 3G network. Even in these areas that have been updated. I held on for a long time, but I just don’t understand why Sprint’s network is so bad. But it is bad.

        • GinaDee

          Haven’t you heard about T-Mobile’s plans to expand LTE to 270 million POPS? And this is without low band spectrum.

          That’s why they upped the Truly Unlimited Data plan with 5GB’s of tethering included to raise money. They’re serious.

          How much money you want to bet that they’ll hit their goal before Sprint does?

        • jeremyvbk

          Plans mean nothing. I will believe in once I can see Tmobile LTE in my city, more than a mile away from a tower. If they go by what their maps say coverage covers than they will not cover 270 millions as their maps are one of the worst deceptive lies regarding coverage. And to get to 270 Million POPS it will take a huge amount of money and Time, which is against them. Mom and Dad are going to stop giving them money to expand, especially since they are trying to sell.

        • Grace

          I will believe it when I see T-Mobile LTE in my house. Or even in the yard. I am surrounded by LTE, and actually used to have coverage other than the inconsistent EDGE I am left with. It is like they just abandoned my neighbourhood.

        • jeremyvbk

          Not suprised, LTE is more fragile. It actually looks like Tmobile had to refine their coverage maps after so many complaints in my area. Shows a slight better representation of actual coverage. And your situation is the same as mine, coverage got worse after LTE upgrades, but It was pretty bad to begin with anyways

        • Grace

          Unfortunately for me, my coverage really deteriorated after the 1900mhz refarm. I had some 4G before that, but afterwards, even the fall back to edge became unreliable. I was hopeful when the LTE lit up about 9 months ago, but even that does not work well :( I don’t know if I am willing to wait until they get this spectrum up and running or if I will switch and see how it is after it is implemented.

    • Christopher

      Your information is wrong.

      • notyourbusiness

        Quit spamming under multiple names, troll.

  • BigMixxx

    The scary thing about this is that he’s right. He has to stop the competition because it will devalue what he invested in sprint. Best way to do it? Buy them.

    As close as the customer count would be the better it is for us. The sad thing is, the smaller carriers would get creamed. But they are being bought up. Metro is gone, leap is gone, us cellular and cincinatti wireless will soon be devoured. There will only leave 3 carriers.

    The price war will be with data. With more and more “things” being attached (cars, planes. Boats) the invest!entire would be right.

    Idk…I’m just rambling. But they are aggressively going after t mobile. And its not just cash like at. There may be some synergies….

    CDMA is toast. T mobile has a mature network
    LTE is the way to go, there are some good pairings with the band with they both have.
    Allows sprint to stop asking for specialized devices. They could make use of that 800 MHz spectrum.
    The overlap would be massive but there could be ways around that…

    Art would shake in their boots because there is no fight to fight. Verizon would actually lower data costs…

  • Jason Mauai

    “Legere should stay on as CEO, and T-Mobile swallows up Sprint. Not the other way around” – agreed.

  • Bklynman

    Everyone is upset over nothing with this so call buy out/meger. If it does happen,it won’t be
    for at another 16 months to 2yr. By that time TMO should have take over the 3Rd spot from
    Sprint,then would the FCC,and DOJ,appove this buyout? I don’t think so.

    • Jay Holm

      Precisely! If, at all anything were to happen, likely it won’t happen til the 2nd half of next year at the earliest.

      • KB

        Exactly, if things move ahead with a merger, TMo cancels all future development. So 6 months and TMo stops working on their network. Few months later it becomes obvious, and TMo is falling further behind for a year before preparation for merging networks that will take several years to make meaningful progress on.

        • Bklynman

          That will not happen,unlessDT Tell John to stop everything,and do nothing,let everything fall apart,don’t improve the network,let the towers,fall apart,etc. I can’t see that happening. I just read att. had to reduce it prices,because of the new prices TMO,came out with. I don’t think,DT,is going to tell John to stop.

  • superg05

    i think there trying to prevent t-mobile from getting nationwide 600mhz coverage cause they’ll become number 3

    • Jay Holm

      T-Mobile will become #3 before the auction for the 600mhz spectrum takes place. Likely they’ll take the #3 spot from Sprint either Q4 this year or Q1 of next year at the latest.

      • John

        If you believe that you are truly daft.

  • tmobile

    This guy is a goof

  • Ren Sack

    Wait! Canada has 3 main carrier, right? How many times they need to get a second mortgage just to pay their cell phone bill? Yeah go ahead approve that merger. I bet they will jack up those monthly bills in a heart beat.

  • Does anyone remember all the crying Sprint did when ATT tried to buy TMO because it was bad for the consumer? But now it’s magically going to be good for competition?

    • Nick Gonzalez

      Excellent comment. I forgot about that! +1

    • JBLmobileG1

      Probably because in their eyes, Tmobile would eventually, and hopefully, be theirs. I remember even their CEO (Sprints) commenting a while back how Sprint and Tmobile would go good together. I don’t see how when they are like Apples and Oranges when it came to mobile compatibility. If anything, the only thing that they both could relate to is that, They Both Were The carriers at the bottom of the barrel. Things have been changing though, and Tmobile is coming back stronger than ever and now Sprint and their new parent company Soft bank wants a piece of the pie more than ever.

    • Kris

      Different situation. First of all when Sprint wasn’t owned by Softbank then. And it was a different situation. It was a the number 2 carrier buying the number 4 and becoming number 1 and pretty much making it impossible for Sprint to compete. Now a combined Sprint and T-Mobile would be good for competition (T-Mobile even agrees with this. Look it up) Because combing both would make them a stronger 3rd and able to better compete with Verizon and AT&T. And it would give them more leverage in auctions. Try doing some simple research before commenting.

  • Mike N

    F HIM! TMo has just barely managed to make itself competitive with AT&T and Verizon. We do NOT need him screwing up the progress that’s been make so far.

    SCREW SOFTBANK! YOU AREN’T WANTED…..YOU AREN’T NEEDED! GO SIT IN THE CORNER AND PLAY WITH YOUR SPRINT-TOY.

    Look, Son. You bought it, now go run it. The poison that is Sprint need not drag down TMo into the same pit of incompetentcy!

    • Cam

      You are being a twat

  • francob911 .

    You guys don’t get it even if T-Mobile buys buys off Sprint it still wouldn’t benifit us as consumers . They would be only 3 carries and they wouldn’t be good prices like now

    • James

      Yes it would benefit us as consumers. What doesn’t benefit us is having 2 large carriers that the 2 smaller carriers can’t really compete against and can’t really by the spectrum needed for a strong network because the auctions heavily favour the big 2. A combined 3rd and 4th carrier would be able better for competition and for us.

      • David

        Actually James your right and wrong … This is a fact like in Canada they use to have 4 carriers like here now … Put now they have 3 because one joined with another.. I hope this never happens here . What happened over there is actually worse for them because 1 they raised their prices and eliminated unlimited data… Witch I’m sure it will happen here if the merger is a Go. What were having here is actually good for cunsumers if The merger goes thru … Yes SprinTmobile will have more coverage put…. The prices will go up tremendous ly . the people that are with T-Mobile and r sticking with them is because they have good coverage in their area.At the end Coverage is only going to get better not worse … And No a combined 3rd and 4th wouldn’t be better for us as consumers … It would only be better for Sprint CEO and the rest of the top people …

  • mingkee

    Buying T-Mobile WILL NOT save Sprint from destruction!

  • Bull Winkle

    The only one waging a price was is T-Mobile. What’s Sprint waiting for? Puh-leez. He’s in business to make money, not offer more choices. The mobile industry has been colluding all this time. Now he wants to eliminate the one carrier that actually is waging price war. Nice try, buddy, but I like my affordable plans and I love that I can use my phone overseas. BEAT IT!

    • Ianto

      Sprint has better prices than T-Mobile by far. They are by far cheaper.

      • Bull Winkle

        … And monkeys fly simply because I say so.

  • obeythelaw

    The more I read about Softbank and even Son, I don’t really dislike Softbank or Son. If you read about Vodafone’s failure when they came into Japan, it was Softbank that purchased them and is now number 1 in Japan. I think a Softbank purchase would help with the growing of the spectrum needed to compete with AT&T and Sprint. Sprint has a negative cash flow as does T-Mobile. The real question is not how long can T-Mobile continue to bleed but when with their current pricing structure. Case in point is the recent increase of $10.00 a month for new subscribers for the unlimited data plan. There were some changes in Jump last month. T-Mobile still offers an overall good value but it keeps T-mobile as a regional carrier and not the nationwide company that it looks like it wants to be. Not saying Softbank is the answer. However, what Softbank did with a messed up Vodafone Japan is what can happen in the US. Sprint is sitting on spectrum now. However the capital and operating costs to build it out and maintain it is huge. With a negative cash flow, it just can’t happen. Same for T-Mobile. They picked up 700mhz but that is not in all of the top markets either. Sprint has 2.5 ghz spectrum. It’s a huge pipe but doesn’t travel far. You need more sites and the capital to build it. With T-Mobile’s subscribers and Sprint’s subscribers and the combined spectrum of the two, Sprint could become a good number 3 and potentially a great number 2. Right now, Sprint is crappy 3 and T-Mobile, arguably is tied with Sprint at 3 even though it has less subscribers, T-Mobile’s LTE speeds are faster but the coverage just isn’t there yet.
    For me, I’d like to see how far Softbank goes with this.

  • JG01

    If SoftBank bought TMobile, they would be removing the competition, leaving the big three, who could then get together and control the prices…..have you forgotten about what they did when ATT tried to buy TMO….. If we have TMobile as the fourth company in the race, what is happening now in the industry will continue. The price war has already begun and will continue like this for some time. If Softbank bought them, it would end very quickly. The US is very different from the rest of the world as to how carriers conduct business. In the rest of the world your phone are unlocked, in the US, they are locked….see the difference! TMO needs to keep on doing what they are.. this is best for the consumers in the US, we need to become more like the rest of the world and the carriers to just sell the plans and the customer can buy whatever device they want to use.

    • Max

      No it would make competition. Competition in the US wireless market doesn’t exist.

  • Flyincloud

    He must not be paying attention to the price that is going on right now.

  • Pirka

    Recently This guy said US internet speed sucks. Which is very true because i have been to japan and used softbank phone i got 50mbps to 100mbps and they have their hotspot wifi all over the country. If he wants to combine tmobile and sprint and then lunch it as softbank (i dont care for the name) and make it like softbank in japan with his money and people then im all for this merger but im afraid we might have to pay price like verizon costumer are paying. Then im all against it. This is kind of tricky!

    • pirka

      Also, CAM can you please put the link of presentation of Masayoshi Son from softbank website because i think it is very relatable to this website and all of us right now plus its very interesting on how US is falling behind on mobile internet compared to other first world countries.

      If anyone wants to watch it right now just go to softbank’s english website and its on the top right corner.

    • JG01

      So he something in Japan. This the US, we have the FCC ^ the DoJ to get around , they have both have control over what happening on our air waves. I am for any company that reduces the ownership of a cellphone. But the big question is , how long would it last. AT&T , Verizon can afford to loose a few customers that can go to TMO or Sprint. Right now, the customers are moving to TMO because of what they are doing. Do you really want TMO to merge with Sprint and stop what TMO is doing? If the TMO CEO ends up being in charge(which is probably not whats going to happen), then once they have a market share of about 100Million customers, then what?Target goal would have been accomplished! They should do what other countries do and sell all device unlocked and focus on selling the plans without contract. This will be the only way that the carriers will be held accountable for their service & pricing.

  • kyo251

    I meant 21 yen per 30sec

    • kyo251

      My post didn’t show up. Softbank JP charges for whitelist is 980yen a month, with free calling from 1am to 9 pm and charges from 9pm to 1am forgot how much. Also they charge 21 yen per every 30 sec calling to another carrier. So why would anyone want them to merge with T-Mobile?

      • Pirka

        Do u even know the value of their currency??

        1000yen = about $10

        Now please be quiet!

  • kiiKane

    I think the best way for this to play out is for Sprint to buy Tmo, consolidate any sites at the same locations and keep any extra sites for increased coverage andor density. Sprints new NV sites are perfectly suited for adapting to tmo’s network. The issue is the time taken to integrate the two networks and get people on handsets that support the additional lte bands. At this point Sprintmo would have 700 & 800MHz low band in many markets, a huge swathe of midband (aws pcs etc ~50MHz of it from tmo) and ~200MHz of 25002600 which it could partially divest. It could also pickup 20-30MHz at the 600MHz auction and have the best network out there. There’s also the oppertunity to work with Dish to use its 2500-2600 for home broadband using fixed antenna which would give significantly better service than a phone and again, more money.

    Key to this would be Dish coming in as a 4th player, to facilitate this Sprintmo could seal a network hosting deal with them. Dish has loads of spectrum but basically no physical network. A roaming and network hosting deal with Sprintmo would give them a headstart and give sprint an additional source of income.

    Buying tmo would depend entirely on the price. In areas tmo is over committed and both sprint and tmo lack Verizons coverage. If the price is sane then Sprint could acquire both tmos spectrum AND its customer base and slash the ACPU allowing it to expand. This is all in a perfect world, they could run into a huge cluster**** of legal challenges, spectrum divesting and technological hurdles of getting handsets with support with 7 LTE bands, plus actually changing NV sites to support an additional few LTE bands would require more permits which takes time and money. All possible to deal with but Sprint can improve without buying tmobile, it will just take longer.

    • Daniel

      No. They should not be able to buy T-Mobile. Not with their history of buying carriers. Also T-Mobile is the only carrier doing anything proactively where as sprint, ATT, and VZW are all just playing catch up with T-Mobiles big changes. We need the changes to keep coming that are pro consumer not pro profit

      • Ianto

        It isn’t Sprint buying T-Mobile moron. It is Softbank.

    • millenialkid

      Sprint doesn’t need that.

      T-Mobile leased all their towers to a third party tower management company, Crown Castle. All Sprint needs to do is sign an agreement with Crown Castle.

      AT&T also entered into a similar lease/sale agreement with Crown Castle. So.. To build a network overnight, Dish has to do is sign a similar agreement with Crown Castle to use AT&T towers. Then both companies have all they need.

      Now, as for 2.5GHz. Well, the trials I saw about DishNetwork show Fixed Wireless. If Fixed Wireless is the service, likely, the wattage could be increased. For example, remember Bag Phones? Bag Phones could transmit 3 watts of power, but when handsets came along, next to your head, the wattage was dropped to 1 watt on cellular, and 0.7 watts on PCS frequencies.

      With Fixed wireless, where the antenna is mounted outdoors, I think the FCC may entertain transmission levels up to 5-10 watts; especially if equipment is located outdoors. This additional wattage will greatly expand range at 2.5GHz; perhaps to something on-par of 700MHz.

      With such a swath of 130MHz Clearwire Spectrum, I think Sprint may try to use some of the Clearwire 2.5GHz band for microwave links to connect towers. If they use microwave instead of T-1s or DSL copper interconnections, they wont have to pay the Baby Bell’s T-1 or T-3 line leasing. Also, Sprint won’t have to lease as much fiber optics.

      This would lower Sprint’s overhead, but they would be a pretty bad steward of US airwaves and spectrum rights– using airwaves first to connect phones, and Clearwire Airwaves between towers. What a waste..!

  • Jeff Webb

    Lets hope that any buy out of T-moble won’t wreck my Audi Connect. The Audi Connect 3G is just enough to keep it going but that is what was available on the ancient 2013 models. One would think that LTE would have been standard for that system way, way, way back then.