Judge approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger

tmobile-sprint-logos

It’s official: T-Mobile and Sprint’s merger has been approved by the judge presiding over a trial involving 14 state attorneys general.

In his decision, Judge Victor Marrero said that the merger is not likely to substantially lessen competition like the suing state AGs had claimed it would. The judge also rejected the argument that Sprint would continue to be competitive if the merger were blocked, saying that it “does not have a sustainable long-term competitive strategy”.

Additionally, the judge rejected the argument that Dish Network “would not enter the wireless services market as a viable competitor nor live up to its commitments to build a national wireless network.”

T-Mobile and Sprint struck a deal with Dish that’ll see Dish buy Sprint’s prepaid brands and 800MHz of nationwide spectrum to build out a 5G network. Dish will also get access to T-Mobile and Sprint cell sites and retail stores as well as “robust access” to T-Mobile’s network for seven years while it builds its own network.

“Today was a huge victory for this merger … and now we are FINALLY able to focus on the last steps to get this merger done!” said T-Mobile CEO John Legere. “We want to thank the Court for its thorough review of the facts we presented in our case.”

Meanwhile, Sprint Execute Chairman Marcelo Claure said that “Judge Marrero’s decision validates our view that this merger is in the best interests of the U.S. economy and American consumers.”

“Today brings us a big step closer to creating a combined company that will provide nationwide 5G, lower costs, and a high-performing network that will invigorate competition to the benefit of all mobile wireless and in-home broadband consumers,” Claure added.

New York Attorney General Letitia James, one of the state AGs that led the lawsuit against the T-Mobile-Sprint merger, said that the ruling “marks a loss for every American who relies on their cell phone for work, to care for a family member, and to communicate with friends,” adding that “the deal will endanger wireless subscribers where it hurts most: their wallets.”

James also suggested that the state attorneys general could appeal today’s ruling.

“There is no doubt that reducing the mobile market from four to three will be bad for consumers, bad for workers, and bad for innovation, which is why the states stepped up and led this lawsuit,” James said. “We disagree with this decision wholeheartedly, and will continue to fight the kind of consumer-harming megamergers our antitrust laws were designed to prevent. As we review our options, including a possible appeal, Americans should continue to hold the companies to account for their promises.”

Getting approval from Judge Marrero is one of the final hurdles that the T-Mobile-Sprint merger had to clear, but T-Mo and Sprint do still need to get their deal approved by the California Public Utilities Commission. The merger has already been approved by 18 other PUCs.

T-Mobile and Sprint say that they expect the merger to close as early as April 1, 2020.

Sources: WSJ, CNBC, T-Mobile, NY AG Letitia James

Tags: , , ,

  • John Doe

    I predict price increases and limits on service in about 2-3 years. Comeback to this comment in a few years :)

    • The Borg

      That’s going to happen one way or another, with at&t and Verizon around

      • John Doe

        But then T-Mobile will cost as much as the other two so we all lost

        • SparklingCyanide

          nawwww, still a win Johnny boy. don’t be so frugal, i will gladly pay for better coverage.

        • John Doe

          Then go to Verizon or AT&T right now, you are not making any sense.

        • SparklingCyanide

          well now i don’t have to. i have been with T-Mobile since Voicestream days, 20 years in the making babyyyy

        • John Doe

          Same here but if the prices between T-Mobile and Verizon and AT&T becomes the same then I am leaving in a heartbeat.

          My loyalty is to my wallet not a company ;)

        • SparklingCyanide

          don’t let the door hit you, where the good lord Split you. ;D you’ve voiced your opinion, now you can act upon it

        • John Doe

          Of course once prices are increased, I will. No doubt about it.

          EVEN JOHN LEGERE IS LEAVING :)

        • Francisco Peña

          If TMobile costs as much as the other 2, then there is no incentive to ever come to TMo.. you think they would let that happen? Will prices go up eventually? sure, even the other 2 will. Its how much will Tmo go. They will still slide a bit under because their business model is one of better value. Can we put up with some coverage issues? sure. If they get up to the B2, then there is no value and people would leave. So your fears of all of a sudden prices will be on par with the other 2, are pretty out there. Especially if there is no coverage enhancements. Free tacos can only pull in so many people.

        • John Doe

          They will already have as much customers as the other two, they will no longer be competing for customers just like Verizon and AT&T aren’t right now. They will start creating other BS to still you, creating internet TV bundles and home internet, etc.

        • Francisco Peña

          They don’t have as many subscribers as the big two. Remember, TMo and Sprint aren’t merged yet. You can’t lump them in and use their totals yet. They are still separate, and should be counted as such.

        • John Doe

          I am saying down the road they will.

        • Francisco Peña

          down the road anyone can raise rates. That is a cop out. ATT and VZW can too.

          You can be pessimistic about it all, but I’ll take it as a good. Hopefully better coverage. I seriously doubt all three are going to shaft everyone from behind just because there are 3 rather than 3 and a lonely stepkid in the garage.

        • John Doe

          The cost of cell service has been going down in the last two decades at an average 3.5%. I guarantee you that it will go up in a few years as a result of this. You can go and Google it since I can’t post links here but look up cell service costs over time.

        • marque2

          It will probably go up anyway, because the industry has matured to the point where they can’t get cheaper equipment / backbone at the same rate they would like to increase services.

          Also government is charging more and more for bandwidth in these auctions. Increased prices for spectrum add to the costs.

        • John Doe

          No it won’t and the FCC has been opening up spectrum for free especially for 5G like the 3.5GHz spectrum they just opened up. As long as there is competition prices would stay low but now there is less competition.

        • marque2

          The free spectrum is mostly for home use if I remember right. They have been talking about spread spectrum on home user bands for years (and kind of implement it with voice over WiFi). But heaven forbid they actually do that. None of us would be able to watch Hulu.

        • John Doe

          No it is for cell service. You have no idea what you are talking about.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Also government is charging more and more for bandwidth in these auctions. Increased prices for spectrum add to the costs.

          The governement is charging more?? Uh, you do know what an auction is, right?? It is where prices go up when other people bid to get the same thing.. It seems to me that if the prices are going up higher, that it is because others want it and are bidding it up.. Agreed, they do have a price that they want for it.. But the it has been stated that at those last few auctions, they raised much more money then what they expected to.. It was because of what they call “bidding” that raised the prices.. Not the government.. It is like was said.. Spectrum/frequencies on the airwaves is limited, and valuable because it is needed to keep a good network, so everyone wants it.. Supply and demand..

    • SparklingCyanide

      oh well mr.Pessimistic, i’m very glad T-Mobile FINALLY is capable of truly competing on equal ground. i’m very happy about this, i don’t mind it one bit.

      • John Doe

        Good because you are going to be paying the same for T-Mobile, Verizon, and AT&T in a few years so if you like spending more money then you got it.

        • SparklingCyanide

          yussssss, i will gladly pay for better more capable service/coverage. <3

        • John Doe

          Then go to verizon or AT&T. The whole point of sticking with T-Mobile is the cheaper prices.

        • SparklingCyanide

          well now i don’t have to. i have been with T-Mobile since VoiceStream days, 20 years in the making

        • John Doe

          And why have you had them for that long? Because they are cheaper than Verizon and AT&T.

        • Francisco Peña

          And will still be cheaper for some time. And if they raised prices on par to the B2, he could leave. You don’t think TMo knows that balance and will make sure they don’t cross a point where its no longer worth it to stay?

        • John Doe

          Just like people are leaving Verizon right now and Verizon does not care because they will still make money, that is what is called a monopoly but instead of two it will be three just like it is in canada.

        • Francisco Peña

          Verizon doesn’t care because they know TMo can’t compete. If Tmo gets bigger, gets better coverage that rivals ATT/VZW, do you think they will all stand pat and say “Ok, I have my X million subscribers, you have Y subscribers, and you have Z subscribers. Let’s not try to poach each other’s” Of course not. If Tmo raises prices on par, without coverage, people will leave. If their coverage is on par, and they offer lower prices, people will come. Again, VZW and ATT are ahead because of the coverage. TMo doesn’t have it yet, so the people going to TMo can live with that and live with lower prices. Better coverage and lower prices? others will notice and come.

          . And its not a monopoly, as there are 2 biggies.

          People whine all the time about cable companies having a monopoly in their area. Luckily, in our town, we have two, Spectrum and Frontier (formerly VZ Fios). Those two companies are always trying to offer deals to get folks, and some bundles can be had for under $100 (tv/internet/phone).

          You may think this merger stinks, but not everyone does.

        • SparklingCyanide

          nope, it’s because i liked the Magenta color :3

        • John Doe

          Clearly, you deserve to be duped then :)

        • SparklingCyanide

          yusssss <3 <3 <3

        • Martyy

          Why is John so mad thooo???

        • riverhorse

          He’s a troll, continually upping the ante until you snap. He then reports you and gets your answer deleted.

        • Shaun Michalak

          nope, it’s because i liked the Magenta color :3

          Me, I would have just said that Verizon is untrustworthy.. I had them and they lied about the plan that I got, they charged me long distance and roaming fees, for using a phone on the Verizon tower in my own area, for a call that never went through.. and then refused to shut my service off after I had it shut off (and had it in writing), and expected me to continue paying my bill after service was shut off.. Definitely untrustworthy..

        • Martyy

          The whole point of TMO is TMO Tuesdays! DUH

    • KMB877

      I’m not convinced. Looking over the similar cell services into the Europe, prices dropped dramatically over the last 20 years.

      • John Doe

        Um, how about you look at north of the border lol

        • Francisco Peña

          That’s Canada… they are a bit backwards up there.

        • John Doe

          They have three big carriers just like what will happen here.

        • Acdc1a

          Well that of course assumes that Dish was just dropping BILLIONS of dollars for no good reason to be the 4th national carrier.

        • John Doe

          They will sell their spectrum for profit down the line, Verizon and AT&T will be looking to buy spectrum. Dish has been sitting on spectrum for years and they didn’t do anything even John Legere himself said that Dish is hoarding spectrum to sell itself off.

        • Francisco Peña

          Rogers: 11M-ish subscribers
          Telus: 9M
          Bell: 11M.

          Big three for Canada.
          But Canada isn’t the same as Europe, nor is Canada the same as the US.

          Japan has 3 biggies too.
          Docomo’s 30GB plan (Gigaho) is about $65ish
          au’s Flat Plan (20GB) with Unlimited calling is about $55
          Softbank’s Giga Monster Plus (50GB+) is about $60.
          All those have 1,000 yen discounts on top of those prices for new subscribers for the first year.

          Those are all pretty competitive between themselves. even having just 3 big carriers

        • John Doe

          Japan has very strict regulatory market…it is not the same as the west at all.

        • Francisco Peña

          and Canada isn’t the same as the US. thanks for pointing that out.

        • John Doe

          Canada’s market is similar to the US and the carrier landscape will be the same.

        • KMB877

          Major difference!
          Canada: population 37.6 million and 3.9 million sq milles
          USA : population 328 million and 3.8 million sq miles
          Europe: population 741 million and 3.9 million sq miles.
          So, to cover well the canadian territory with cell service for only 37.6 million citizens will have a gigantic cost.

        • Joshua David

          Australia covers a large land area with a population smaller than Texas, yet their prices are far lower than in Canada. The CRTC is letting Bell, Telus, and Rogers get away with murder.

    • Red

      Um, yes, prices of things tend to increase over time. Kinda works that way.

      • John Doe

        Wrong, cell service pricing has been going down in the US. It is 54% lower today than it was in 1997 and it has been going down by 3.5% every year. Now I predict it will go up though.

        • Acdc1a

          Funny because in 2001 I was paying $39.99 for a single line with 3,000 minutes (virtually unlimited) and unlimited texts with the $2 internet add-on thrown in for free. Today that plan is $60 on “essentials.” So tell me how much less I’m paying please…

        • John Doe

          It is called inflation, and you said it yourself…you getting more cell service for that $60 today then you would have gotten in 2001.

          Take economics, I know it is hard to understand. I am sorry they don’t look at you specific price plan lmao

        • Acdc1a

          You’re the one who said service is cheaper, not me.

        • John Doe

          Yes and if you used more than one brain cell to make sense of it or googled it you would know what that means.

        • Mike

          In 2001 your phone couldn’t stream Netflix, Spotify, YouTube , and etc. their was also no 4G LTE or 5G. Plus in 2001 Tmobile coverage sucked badly.

        • Jay Holm

          Exactly! People aren’t taking into account that we have a far, far more advanced wireless network than we did in 2001.

        • Acdc1a

          In 2001 a 50″ TV weighed about 400 pounds and cost north of $2,000. It also didn’t have smart functions. That same TV is $350 and weighs about 20 pounds. See how that works?

        • marque2

          I have seen 65″ TVs in the $250 range. It is incredible how much they have gone down in cost.

        • Mike

          TVs used recycle parts and it doesn’t have a powerful CPU, huge memory , large storage, cameras , and etc. comparing a tv to a cell phone is ridiculous. Also most of tvs are entry level TVs go price a top of the line Samsung and LG tv.

        • Shaun Michalak

          I think a lot of it depends on your use, and your needs, as to if it is cheaper, or more expensive.. I remember years ago, I used the cell phone very little, so I got their “by the minute” plan, where I paid $100, and I got 1000 minutes, and it was good for the year.. if you only use about 1 hour a month, then that means it cost you about $8 a month to have a cell phone.. No plan today can compete with that.. But as for unlimited plans, it all depends on if you want data or not, do you want unilimited talk or not.. and do you insist on being with a main carrier, or will a MVNO do?? Do not care about data, then their Metro end gives you 2gb of data, and unlimited talk and text, for $30 a month.. Much cheaper then the “essentials” plan from T-Mobile..

          Or, if you want to go even cheaper, AT&T had a prepaid plan that if you paid for it by the year, you could get the same thing, but with 8gb of data, for $25.. Basically, it all depends on how you use it, as to if prices have gone up or down though..

      • Deibid

        Nope. Prices decrease in cell service. When I worked for T-mobile circa 2009, unlimited service for one line was around $80-$100 for one line. It’s gotten cheaper since then!

    • Ja D

      Price will increase. TM will just add more features /increase the price and make you give up your old plans.

      • marque2

        That is how Tmobile got me to upgrade. They offered more features and speed which my family could use. so we upgraded from $30 to $50 a month average. If Tmobile offers me more features that I can use for a few more bucks a month again – I will once again upgrade with Tmobile.

        People think charging more for more service is bad. That is a really odd concept.

      • John Doe

        That is not called competition then.

      • marque2

        They never force giving up old plans. They get you to move on by making the newer plans so much more compelling.

    • Shaun Michalak

      Hmm.. Remember this comment “The judge will rule against this, enjoy your day :”.. Yup.. You were soo right there too.. HAHAHA.. 0/100 so far with your predictions.. Don’t blame me if I do not hold my breath.. lol

      • John Doe

        That was not a prediction, more like a hope and you will being a dense so it was tongue in cheek. This though is a prediction and you can count on it. It does not matter if you hold your breath or not…it will happen.

    • marque2

      You probably also predicted we would all die once net neutrality ended.

      • John Doe

        States are passing their own laws like California which is keeping companies from changing how they control the internet, the FCC is still fighting states over that so it is not over yet.

        • marque2

          FCC should fight the states. Net neutrality grossly reduces infrastructure investment. Since eliminating it we have gone back on track and internet speeds are increasing once again at rates similar to pre nn.

        • John Doe

          No they lost in court, thank god and republicans will most likely lose in the next election too :)

  • Sharti24

    Ok cool, Now let us roam onto Sprint towers.

    19852 OH-664, Logan, OH 43138

    • warpwiz

      It will be a while, since Sprint is CDMA.

      • KMB877

        2G and 3G are not compatible. LTE and 5G are compatible instead.

      • readdanielquinn

        Not their LTE

      • CarlKL

        geez… you are living in the 90’s. CDMA is 3G, which nobody cares about.

      • Jay Holm

        Umm, it will be a while? MetroPCS was CDMA also T-Mobile did an amazing job at integrating that network.

        • John Doe

          Yeah it took T-Mobile 4 years with MetroPCS which was a small regional carrier unlike a huge national carrier like Sprint.

        • Mike

          Tmobile was also not what they are today. Their bigger and have SoftBank backing them now. They can get it done within 2 years.

        • John Doe

          What are you talking about? DT is the major stakeholder. And it has very little to do with money, they have to take time to transition Sprint customers over and refarming Sprint’s spectrum to 5G…it will never happen in 2 years.

        • marque2

          It should be much easier, because MetroPCS had a largely incompatible CDMA network. Sprint is mostly 4G. It should be a snap to put new phones in place at Tmobile stores that work on both Sprint and Tmobile 4G spectrum. Done.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Not to mention, they have been planning this for over a year now, so my guess is they probably have been editing their towers to be able to be changed over with a simple flip of the switch.. Especially since 4G LTE uses the same technology, so there is no compatibility problems like there was when it was CDMA and GSM..

          I use a program call cellmapper to check coverage and stuff, and they let you check coverage based on the carrier settings.. Recently, I have seen towers coming up that were Sprints, on T-Mobiles page of coverage.. You do not get any coverage yet, but if it is seeing, and reading as a T-Mobile tower, then that tells me they already have stuff in place to make them accessible to T-Mobile as soon as the merger goes though.. Like I said, flip a switch.

        • John Doe

          The problem is getting people to upgrade to those phone and upgrading cell towers. Phones are already available.

        • marque2

          People keep phones about 2.5 years. They will upgrade on their own. Meanwhile TMobile will off Sprint customers more and more incentive to switch until TMobile gives up and just sends out a $200 phone. That is what happened with metro.

        • John Doe

          Yeah that takes time it will never happen in less than a year or even two years.

        • Mike

          Sprint phones made in the last few years are capable of running GSM fool. I seen plenty of ppl with unlocked Sprint phones go to AT&T, Tmobile, and other GSM carriers.

        • John Doe

          Where did I talk about phones…learn how to read. They can’t just turn it on for all customers they have to take time to transition them over and increase capacity. Also 5G. Sprint’s 5G is not the same as T-Mobile’s

        • Mike

          Moron they can turn the radios on the current Sprint customer phones to accept Tmobile service while they convert Sprint towers.

        • John Doe

          No they can’t and they won’t. Instead of insulting you should go and read T-Mobile’s own plan which does not say anything of you are saying. Dumb idiot.

        • Mike

          Read closely . Majority of Sprint phones can use GSM service . All Sprint has to do is unlock the phones and Sprint customers can pop in a Tmobile SIM card and get service. I’ve personally switched a Samsung Note 9 and IPhone XS Max from Sprint to T-MOBILE. Tmobile can handle the capacity while they’re transition Sprints network. sprint customer base isn’t crazy large.

        • John Doe

          You clearly don’t understand what capacity means. Yes T-Mobile can do that but it would degrade T-Mobile’s service. They would have to expand it slowly overtime.

      • JStatt

        They will wait a year or two and then shutdown the CDMA 2G/3G network. All it takes is a software update for most phones. There aren’t very many phones that are CDMA only. Once the software is updated they will naturally switch over to GSM, until T-Mobile kills the legacy 2G/3G entirely.

        • Shaun Michalak

          You need to get off this CDMA/GSM thing.. Those are 3G technologies, and They all use LTE technology since they went to 4G.. All the 3G networks are going to be shut down either this year, or next.. So they mean nothing anymore..

        • marque2

          I think Verizon already dropped all the CDMA, and you are right Sprint is in the process of the final death nell for CDMA. I don’t understand these folks going off about it. It is like 10 year old news.
          Next – we will hear what will Tmobile do with all those Sprint “4G” WiMax towers.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Nope.. Verizon did not drop it yet.. They originally had plans on dropping it last December, but they put it off for 1 more year, so they will drop it at the end of 2020 instead of 2019.. But that was the original plans..

    • JStatt

      Actually they had to sell vast majority of Sprints towers to Dish in order to get approval (along with their 800mhz spectrum). But other spectrum will allow for better coverage.

      • Sharti24

        Correct. They’re giving dish the sprint towers that overlap with tmobile coverage. Tmobile will retain 11k current sprint towers

        • Jay Holm

          Other than nationwide Band 41 2.5ghz, what other spectrum is T-Mobile gaining? That’s nationwide? I understand Sprint has a ton of spectrum, they just never invested the money to build it out. . .

        • Sharti24

          Pcs 1900 band 2/25 is nationwide

        • Jay Holm

          So 1900mhz is Band 2, Band 25? And it is nationwide! Can it be coupled/combined with any existing T-Mobile spectrum?

          I currently have the LG G7, I am happy with my smartphone, I will probably wait until there are smartphones with integrated modems that support ALL LTE and 5G bands from both T-Mobile and Sprint to upgrade…

          Do you work for T-Mobile?

        • Shaun Michalak

          Yes, both band 2 and 25 are both 1900mhz.. Think of it like that.. T-Mobile uses band 12, AT&T uses band 17.. Both are 700mhz.. The difference is, band 12 uses blocks A, B, and C, where band 17 does not use block A.. It is the same with band 4 and 66.. The only difference between the 2 is that band 4 uses blocks A – F, and 66 uses blocks A – J.. It is still the same frequency though.

          The problem is not much can it be coupled with it, but more along the lines of does your phone support it.. For example, since band 2 and 25 both are 1900 mhz, a phone can support both of them.. But, if the manufacturer restricted that phone to only use band 2, then you still will not be able to use band 25 even though it supports it.

        • Jay Holm

          Regarding my statement about Sprint owning 200mhz of nationwide Band 41, 2.5ghz, is that true? And that only a small amount of that ever got deployed because Sprint never invested the money. Will T-Mobile FULLY deploy all of the 2.5ghz spectrum, to it’s full potential, all of the spectrum holdings? That has got to be capable of a whole lot of bandwidth, and data throughput!!!

        • Shaun Michalak

          Like I said, as far as I am aware, they only have about 150mhz of it.. But, I do believe that T-Mobile plans to utilize most, if not all of it.. But the thing is, even if they do, they will probably be installing it on 5G only, so if you do not have a 5G phone, then you may not be able to use any of it..

        • Jay Holm

          I am sure 150mhz or so of 2.5ghz will be able to put out quite a few gbps!!! The future is indeed very exciting!!! It will be interesting to see how ATT & Vzn respond to the New T-Mobile in the coming years. . .

        • Shaun Michalak

          Well, it is not just the 150mhz.. They will also get about 30mhz of 1900 mhz.. so that will add in more.. Plus, 5G has lower latency times, which gives faster speeds too.. I agree though, it is going to be nice to see what happens all around.. From the faster speeds on T-Mobile, to what Verizon and AT&T does..

          One bad thing about the 2.5ghz frequency though is this.. It is not great at penetrating objects, so you will not get as good of coverage as you would with 600 mhz band 71.. But they will work good together, because people that are closer to the tower can use band 41 for service, which takes the congestion off of band 71, and that allows better speeds for people that are relying on band 71 for coverage..

        • marque2

          One of the problems with 2.5ghz is the FCC provided it for educational use only. No-one could figure out what to do with that so it was worthless to Sprint. FCC recently lifted that restriction.

        • Jay Holm

          Wow, that’s stupid. So what is the true reason for Sprint failing at deploying the 2.5ghz more, the FCC restriction, or not investing more $ into their network? A combination of both reasons?

        • marque2

          I agree with your wait stance on the phone. G8 is a big upgrade over the G7 though. Screen looks incredible in comparison.

        • Sharti24

          No i dont work for tmobile just a fanboy lol.

          Sprints Band 2/25 is like tmobiles band 4/66. Just falls in different blocks

        • Jay Holm

          So are bands 4/66 & 2/25 easy to integrate into T-Mobile’s LTE network? Also, 2/25 are nationwide, right?

        • Sharti24

          Yes both questions

        • Jay Holm

          Do you know if my current LG G7 will be able to take advantage of the extra 2/25 when it is added to the 4/66? If I don’t upgrade?

        • Shaun Michalak

          “Do you know if my current LG G7 will be able to take advantage of the
          extra 2/25 when it is added to the 4/66? If I don’t upgrade?”

          I think you got something slightly off here.. Band 2 and 25 are both 1900mhz frequencies, but they do not double up at all.. They can be used in conjunction with each other, but they are meant to be deployed separately, as their own thing.. Meaning that band 2 can be deployed as just band 2, and the same for 25, where you do not have to have the other one to use it..

          Bands 4 and 66 on the other hand do need to work in conjunction. Band 4 can be deployed by itself, and work fine.. But, band 66 is a combination of band 4, with a little more frequency on top of it.. So say band 4 goes from 2000 to 2100 mhz.. Band 66 may go from 2000 to 2200 mhz.. These are not the actual frequencies, but just an example to make it simple.. But as you can see, band 66 needs band 4 there, and then expands on it.. Where band 2 and 25 do not expand on each other, but they are just in the same frequency range.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Sprint has 3 main bands.. Band 26, 800mhz, band 25, 1900mhz, and band 41, 2500mhz..

          Sprint has a tiny bit of band 41 in use, they use pretty much all of their band 25, and their band 26 is going to be sold to Dish.. T-Mobile gets the rest.

        • Jay Holm

          Question regarding the part where you said Sprint has a tiny part of their B41 deployed. The 5G from B41 is putting out 300-600mbps, I don’t know how much spectrum that is, but I heard Sprint owns a huge amount, as in 200mhz nationwide of 2.5ghz Band 41, but never fully deployed it due to not investing enough $ in the network, is that true? 200mhz of nationwide Band 41? If so, this is going to be an amazing, amazing 5G network!!!!!! We’re talking 3-5gbps in the not too distant future. . .

        • Shaun Michalak

          From what i have read, Sprint has about 200mhz total of frequency.. About 150mhz of band 41, about 30mhz of band 25, and about 14mhz of band 26.. The band 26 is going to be sold to dish.. Sprint right now has just about all of their customers running off of band 25, and they only have band 41 installed in a few areas.. Upon checking, I would guess that on average, about half of all Sprint towers have band 41 installed on them.. . But when I looked at first seen dates, it seems most of them have been within the last year that they were seen.

          Last I read, of the 150mhz, I think they said that they were only using about 30mhz of it at most.. I am not sure about their 5G use though because that was before 5G was a thing.. What I can tell you is that the higher the frequency, the faster the download speeds that you can get.. So with band 41 being at 2500mhz, it will be decently high.. Also, to give comparison as to how much that 150mhz worth is.. T-Mobile only has a total of 110mhz of all frequency, low and mid band.. So just installing all of Sprints band 41 would potentially triple their download ability and speeds.. and that is if it was all on 4G specifications.. 5G will be even faster..

        • Jay Holm

          Assuming T-Mobile does indeed fully deploy Band 41 nationwide, this will be very, very exciting!!! I live in Houston, so I will be paying attention to any announcements regarding the Gulf region of Texas. . .

        • vrm

          Dish has the option to buy band 26 and they may choose not to. In any case, initially it will be deployed on t-mobile network and Dish will roam on it.
          It would be great if they keep band 26 and deploy edge on it. 5×5 will be great for Edge and you could easily get 512 kbps guaranteeing great coverage (GSM goes much farther at lower power). All bands have GSM support for band 26 (850 mhz). Would also be perfect for IoT.

        • none

          Or, keep band 26 and deploy LTE on it. 5x5MHz gets you 12Mbps even on a crappy low-end phone, 5×5 gets you 24-30Mbps on a high-end phone.

          Deploy band 41 LTE and 5G across the entire US, give Metro customers unlimited hotspot and replace broadband…

        • Shaun Michalak

          It would be great if they keep band 26 and deploy edge on it.

          The only problem with that is.. First, they are taking down all tech that is older then 4G.. and to keep up the extra equipment would cost money that I doubt that they will want to needlessly spend.. From what I read, Sprint uses multiple vendors for their equipment, and T-Mobile is going to standardize everything to one manufacturer.. This would meant that they would have to take the equipment out, and then put new equipment in just to keep supporting it.

  • Linx

    Thanks to this judge for making the right decision! For those worried about price increases, your plans should be “grandfathered” so no major fears should be realized.

    • pablostation

      Key word(s) here are “should be”. They don’t have to do anything, because there is no contract they have to honor.

      • JStatt

        That’s not true. Condition of merger is a three year lock.

        • Kurt Olsen

          However, when has the FCC held ANY carrier to merger conditions?

        • Ummon

          Need receipts…

        • JStatt

          It’s been a long time since a major carrier merger such as this. But in other mergers they were indeed held to the deal. Comcast has been restrained to net neutrality for a decade when they purchased NBC/Universal. Also Verizon and ATT have both been forced to wholesale spectrum due to various FCC rules. I agree the FCC can sometimes slack up. But I think T-Mobile is smart enough to A.) Not run afoul of the FCC after spending billions getting this approved and B.) Not run afoul of a very public promise to keep rates the same or lower for 3 years.

        • marque2

          When has Tmobile forced people out of grandfathered plans in the past? From what I hear, they actually bumped some of the grandfathered plans and kept the price the same, because the data rates were so outdated. never heard of another carrier doing that.

  • JStatt

    This merger is not what I fear about T-Mobile. The loss of John Legere is a far bigger warning. Who is going to be there to stick up for “uncarrier” principles? That being said, I think it will be fine.

    • John Doe

      He is leaving for a reason lol

    • Steve

      Mike Sievert will be the CEO and according to reports, “As T-Mobile’s Chief Marketing Officer and then COO, Sievert led the
      design and execution of the 16 Un-carrier “moves” that have defined the
      company and established T-Mobile as the customer satisfaction leader and
      most-loved brand in the industry”, which is a quote from the Business Wire on 11/18/19

    • Timbo1

      As far as I understand her will still be on the board at TMobile.

      • Shaun Michalak

        “her will still be on the board” lol

        Man, I didn’t know he was that feminine.. lol

        • marque2

          Don’t assume gender.

        • Shaun Michalak

          I think John identifies as a guy.. By the way, it was a pun.. I think he hit the “r” by mistake and put down “her” instead of “he”.. Either way, you need to lighten up a little..

  • DannyMac

    Getting approval from Judge Marrero is one of the final hurdles that the
    T-Mobile-Sprint merger had to clear, but T-Mo and Sprint do still need
    to get their deal approved by the California Public Utilities
    Commission.

    Ahh, so there’s still more go to :

    • m35g35

      There is that final step. Also, the states are likely to appeal. Probably won’t go far, however, they will try.

    • riverhorse

      If they don’t approve they open themselves up to unfair restraint of interstate commerce, plus- they know they would lose a lot of fees because many Ca residents would sign up with out of state addresses.

  • Shakenbake

    I’m all for the merger.
    Question, Im on a promo 2phones/$100 unlimited plan that Tmo ran years ago. I’m grandfathered in and CS told me I can stay on that forever if I choose to.
    My question is, when I get a 5g phone, will my data plan cover 5g, or do I need to get a 5g plan?

    Edit: John Doe (below) is a miserable SOB huh

    • Sean Sorlie

      You will have 5g access. T-Mobile is not charging extra for it like everyone else.

      • JG

        True. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re going to enable access to 5G on their old One and Simple Choice plans.

        I don’t think they will, but they could require us to upgrade to a new Magenta plan (that gets free 5G access). When they started Netflix on Us they restricted it to certain plans. I wasn’t able to claim it myself for my plan since like @shakenbake I’m on the special 2 lines for $100 deal.

        • Pak T

          5G is already available to everybody, post paid and prepaid, plan type does not matter.

      • Alex Pilaia

        You are just going to need a 5G capable phone… Plans wont change, and 5G is included for Free as per Mr. Legere… If you have a phone made prior to Q2 of 2019, you will need a new phone.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Wrong.. Q2 2019 would be for phones that support band 71, not 5G.. They never came out with any 5G phones that work off of the towers until Dec, and at that time, there was only 2..

        • marque2

          You are both half right. First Tmobile Band 71 phone came out at the end of 2017 (LG V30). For 5G I think Samsung had one Q2 of last year. But Tmobile doesn’t have many yet, and the Samsung only works with the higher frequencies (I believe – it won’t do all of Tmobiles 5g spectrum and can’t combine the 5G frequencies)

          I would wait until the middle of this year for a new 5g phone.

        • Shaun Michalak

          That 5G phone you are talking about was for mmWave, not tower 5G.. Yes, they have had mmWave 5G out for about a year now, but the problem is, it is not compatible with 600Mhz 5G, and unless you live in an area that has that mmWave, then it does you no good.. That is where people seem to get confused.. They do not realize that mmWave and band 71 5G are not compatible, unless the phone supports them both.. They said that they do not expect any phone compatible with both until 1st quarter this year.

        • marque2

          I have not said anything wrong. And you are wrong about frequencies being “incompatible” The compatibility wasn’t built in the chipset yet at the time of the Samsung release. Next round of Qualcomm release and all will be well.

        • Shaun Michalak

          So you are saying John Legere and T-Mobile is wrong then, because that info came straight from them.. Fact is, if it does not work, then it is not compatible..But I will let you read the quotes yourself, and then you can tell me again how me, and the people at T-Mobile are both wrong.. lol

          “In order to access this 5G coverage, you’ll need either a OnePlus 7T Pro 5G McLaren Edition or Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ 5G.”

          “One thing to be aware of is that the 5G that’s launching today is different than the 5G that T-Mobile deployed in six cities earlier this year. That coverage is based on millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum and is only compatible with the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G, which doesn’t support the 600MHz-based 5G that T-Mo is launching today. The OnePlus 7T Pro 5G and Note 10+ 5G do not support T-Mobile’s mmWave-based 5G. T-Mobile has told PCMag that the first devices that support all three “layers” of 5G — low-band, mid-band, and mmWave — are expected to arrive “in the Q1 timeframe”.”

          So please explain to me after reading those quotes, how you are right, and I am wrong??

        • marque2

          You are just mouthing off now. We know this – but it isn’t a problem forever, just the first phones. That is all I said. The frequencies don’t have an incompatibility. That is a ridiculous statement. The chipsets that can use mmWave, midband and lowband just aren’t available yet. They will be this year.

        • Shaun Michalak

          So basically, you just argued to agree with what I said.. If you read my comment, it stated “unless the phone supports it”.. So if the phone does not support it, it is incompatible.. and now you just stated the same thing, after stating that I was wrong.. WOW..

        • Natural skeptic

          Band 71 was 4G before it was refarmed to become 5G if I remember correctly.

        • Shaun Michalak

          You are thinking band 12.. T-Mobile just got band 71, aka 600mhz, about 2 years ago. Then they had to wait a year or so after that to wait for the TV stations to stop using the frequency before they could do anything with it.. Band 12, aka 700Mhz has been around for close to 10 years now, and that has been used for 4G only up until now.. It was not until last year that T-Mobile started installing the band 71 on their towers, at which time, they usually installed a small part of it to be used for 4G, and the rest was set for 5G.. T-Mobile has about 31mhz of band 71.. They would install 10mhz of it as 4G, and the remaining as 5G as they installed it.. There is probably places where they installed all of it as 5G too, but I am not positive about that part.

        • Natural skeptic

          Actually they did use band 71 for 4G LTE, https://www.t-mobile.com/news/600-mhz-update-puerto-rico.

        • Shaun Michalak

          That is what I said.. They are installing “some” of their 600mhz on 4G, but most of it is reserved for 5G.. Your article even agrees with that.. “and lays the foundation for nationwide 5G in 2020 with 5G-ready equipment”.. Band 71 was never deployed, as only 4G for the whole thing.. Only part of it was to improve service and coverage, due to the fact that there are a lot of places that have little or no 700mhz there for coverage.. Only mid band.. That is why they lit a small part of it up for 4G use.

    • riverhorse

      (His mother must be a real miserable &$#+* too.)
      I side with Sean, since as part of the merger approval Legere promised 5G access with no raises.
      I have real doubts about 5G, let alone viable in the near future. I think we get near satellite internet first. Although for us customers that would be the same (I’m guessing Sat would also partner with Cell providers).

      • Shaun Michalak

        The thing is, 5G just means that it is capable of faster speeds and guarantees nothing beyond that.. If you are in dense areas, where there is a lot of trees, buildings, etc.. I would not expect too much past the low/mid band (1900mhz and under) for faster speeds.. Sprints 2.5Ghz frequency just is not going to penetrate buildings and walls good enough to have a good complete coverage.. But, for the people that can get it, it will dramatically boost speeds.. Also, if you can, then if you are fully on the 2.5 spectrum, then that will free up the 600mhz for them to get faster speeds.. I think it is all just going to come down to how much of the frequency / spectrum that is there, as to how good your speeds will be.. Close to towers, probably great.. Miles down the road, I would not expect too much improvement..

        • riverhorse

          I’m more worried of just rounding the corner and boom- no more 5G.
          With all the present 4G holes and bad building penetration, I’m extremely skeptical of 5G.
          Unless… Deals are made with the upcoming Leo satellite internet providers- that tech i have a lot more faith in.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Personally, I am not worried about rounding a corner and no more 5G.. I am more worried about rounding a corner and no cell service.. I know with the 2.5ghz, it is going to be hit and miss because of penetration values and stuff.. I have one of Sprints hotspot’s that only works on band 25, and I know using it, I am outside, I get 2 to 3 bars.. Go inside the house, and I am lucky to get 2 bars.. Go halfway through the house, and no service.. I can see the same thing happening with their band 41, aka 2.5ghz frequency.. But even if you still only have 4G, as people jump off of 5G, then it will take the strain off of 4G for better service..

          But then again, from what I have read, T-Mobile is keeping about 35% of all the Sprint towers to install service on.. Knowing that, I think that they will be fixing a lot of those “holes” or gaps in service.. and maybe even a lot of those poor service gaps too.. In the end, I would say that only time will tell as to how good it is..

        • riverhorse

          Almost got a Sprint hotspot for one of the kids. They are the provider of Free Hotspot for schoolkids program. Seems not much missed (inside big building).

          AT&T reopened to new signups Connected Car, popular with RVers, for like $20+t&f. Unofficially, the Sim can get popped into portable home hotspots wo issues. Totally unlimited everything.

          On a Metro phone (wo band 71) i couldn’t get service inside office buildings in a handful Eastern States… And nothing between cities in VA.
          I have to retry again with both an all bands phone & one from Verizon. I keep forgetting to take andor check all, initially Verizon seems good ( @ 1,2 bars)-even for fast data inside big buildings.

        • Shaun Michalak

          You have to watch those hotspot devices through Sprint.. I got one from them, and it only supports band 25.. This means, if you go over to T-Mobile, it will not support much of anything that T-Mobile uses.. I am taking the merger into account when I say that..

          As for coverage.. It depends on if you are talking Virginia, or West Virginia.. West Virginia coverage is really lacking.. Much worse then Virginia.. From my experience, band 71 in some places makes little to no difference.. In other places, it makes a huge difference.. So it is hard to judge if missing band 71 accounts for anything with where you are at.

          I know that T-Mobile said something about free hotspot for qualified kids, where you can get 10 gigs of data to use for the year to do school work on. That is supposed to be free if the merger goes through..

          What I am waiting to see is if they keep the low income plans available.. There are companies like PCsforpeople that allow low income people to get internet service off of cell towers for people that have no internet service. I know someone that uses that service.. Basically what it is, is a service that allows you unlimited use on the Sprint network for $15 or so a month, but you have to buy the hotspot to use it.. Since this is a “Sprint” thing, are they going to continue with this service, or are they going to shut it down?

          Also, I am waiting to see what happens with their network.. Since they are keeping something like 35% of all the Sprint towers and use them for their service, I can not wait to see how much better their service gets from it.

        • riverhorse

          Thanks for the info. I’m up and down the Amtrak seaboard Maine-Virginia.
          I’m thinking of getting a place within spitting distance of handful Midlantic State borders, for sports betting purposes.

        • Shaun Michalak

          I live in Pennsylvania myself, but I have traveled a lot over the years.. I have gone from here, over to Michigan, down to Alabama and Georgia, up into New York, and down the coast.. So I have seen over the years, how their service has changed.. Yes, they still have a lot of dead spots in their service.. and truthfully, there are some places that I have no idea why they never put a tower up.. Then I see other places that have little traffic, and is a completely rural area, and they do put one up there..

          Personally, I would think that they would put up towers in more congested area first.. But hey, the way I look at it.. at least they are doing something to improve coverage, and on that note, I am not going to complain. It all takes time.. At least they do not have that 15% coverage that they used to have any more..

          Looking on their Metro end, I think the one thing that annoys me is the pricing of their phones.. To get a lower end smart phone that they sell, with discounts, it is going to cost me almost $80 out the door.. yet I go up to walmart and see AT&T prepaid phones for 34.88 and 39.88, plus tax, out the door.. This is talking android version 9 too, so it is not like it is a 3 year old model either.. I am not saying that they should sell basic smart phones for nothing.. But at the same time, I do not understand why their cheapest phones, through metro, and with a discount, are double what a basic phone is through AT&T at Walmart..

        • riverhorse

          Even though cheaper than at TMO, I’ve griped that Metro phone selection is bad and overpriced the last few years.
          I switched to Visible for the trifecta of better phone @ lesser price & lower monthly unlimited $.
          To be fair, they do have a nice unlimited tablet plan for $10, and even less than that with $5 family plan deduction for all lines.

          Metro will give the phone for free when porting in number – but it’s still quite a bit of money out the door(esp. for a substandard model): tax on the full suggested price + $15 Sim activation. They sell the phone case for $30, can ask for $15 off it to make up for the activation.

        • Shaun Michalak

          I completely agree.. When I first started with Metro, their basic smart phones started at $30.. It was a 8gb ROM, 1gb RAM phone.. But that was the total price, plus tax, with no discounts or anything.. Now, their cheapest is closer to $80, but has double the RAM and ROM, and that is after discounts.. The sad part is that the price of memory has come down since then, and their competitors, like AT&T prepaid, Cricket, etc all have retained lower prices on phones.. Metro is really the ones ones that have cranked them up for a basic phone.. People think I am crazy for complaining, but at the same time, no one can give me a good reason why they can not just sell a comparable phone at a comparable price to their competitors.. They also raised the price of activation too.

          As for the so called free phone.. That is what gets me on that one.. You have to pay tax on the MSRP.. I never could understand that.. If the MSRP is $200, they sell the phone for $150 with no discounts, $100 with discounts, but you still have to pay tax on $200 even though that is not what it sells for, for you to buy it outright?? All I can think if is for the purposes of tax write offs from the company??

          All I can say is I hope with the merger, that they re-evaluate their pricing..

        • riverhorse

          Yep. And bad product variety. Over a half decade of 5″@ non-HD, 16-321-2 gb models. Any improvement in any of those specs gets deflated by downgrade or removal in another area.
          To this day there isn’t a single non-flagship offered @ over 644gb, HD, 6″, NFC, usbC, faster charging- not even with 3 of those requisites removed. Even one of the flagships doesn’t meet those requisites.
          Flagship bad selection too-, one or two lesser screen sizeramstorage versions… And only eons after release.

        • marque2

          unsuscribe

        • riverhorse

          I did. All the three majors have at least one mvno or prepaid arm offering unlimited all for $25, rendering Metro fairly useless(except for its $10 tablet plan). That + the shortly arriving satellite providers is why i never worried about the price hike hysteria hounding the TMO merger- too much competition continues the historical downward pricing.

        • Shaun Michalak

          If you are talking $25 per line, when you get 4 lines, all 4 have done it.. Cricket, Boost, Metro, and Visible..

          I told you how I have Metro.. Well, I have done a few speed tests lately, and man do I feel my area is neglected.. I live in Erie, PA, and I do a speedtest at my house, and lately I have been averaging about 3mb down.. I went down to where my nephew was going to school in Pittsburgh, PA, and I did some speed tests down there and was averaging about 10mb down.. Then I go down to Kane, PA, and I did a speedtest down there and got about 30mb down.. Then come back to Erie and do another one.. back to 3mb down again..

          This just goes to show how much of a difference there is from one area to the next on how good your speeds are..

        • riverhorse

          I mean $25 for only one line, unlimited everything. Visible (Verizon prepaid but no roaming or 23g fallback). Red Pocket has two divisions that change names at times- one uses AT&T, other uses TMO(after 50gb throttled to 128k). And there are others whose names escape me.

          I hear you on coverage area. When I’m on Amtrak in various states, Metro will have coverage in cities but often zero signal in between (not even for calling). Resort towns signal slows to crawl during peak times. So the cheapest way to cover all for a road warrior could be at&t Connected Car $25+t&f(and stick this Sim in portable jetpack when not in the vehicle) OR a Red Pocket phone(but with the former can do HD & unlimited hotspot to many simultaneous devices), $10 unlimited tablet Metro (& enable phone capability in it) & $25 Visible. All of those are unlimited and cover all the majors.
          Otherwise it’s hilarious to read complaints how xxx carrier is the worst, or requests for a carrier recommend. Only way to know is to test drive.

          I agree flagship not necessary but if using it to work & on the move, then at least a mid-tier 6++” HD+ 64-128gb NFC quick charge & good battery. For all that at Metro you’d be limited to one phone- the flagship…but even then only the least of the flagship line where you go “if I’m gonna splurge I’d want the larger screen and double the GB for just a few $ more.

          Looking at the near future, I think that even if 5g disappoints, cellular carriers will do deals with the soon arriving satellite providers, or the latter will offer standalone satellite phone service. So hopefully in a real short time we will have zero areas without coverage. All areas with bullet trains will boom. Florida a good candidate.

        • Shaun Michalak

          I think asking for 0 areas without coverage is impossible.. Well, not impossible, but it would take so much to do it that it would not be worth the hassle.. All carriers have a problem with signals when it comes to tunnels.. Satellite will be no different.. Satellite will be better for larger unpopulated areas, but then again, won’t satellite phone have the same problems with a loss of signal (weather, trees, etc), just like DirectTV and Dish??

          As for phones.. I personally do not like a large phone.. I have the Aristo 3, and I think that one is about as large as I want.. I have the LG Stylo 4 on one of the lines, and tried that, and felt that one was too big..

          When it comes to single line, unlimited $25 plans.. I not know know of a single carrier that has that.. Metro right now is having a special where you can get it for $40 if you port.. Visible is $40 regular price.. The only way I have seen any of them for $25 is per line when you have multiple lines..

          When it comes to 2G/3G fallback.. I do not think that you have that on any company these days.. The little bit that there is there, is very limited.. Even with Verizon or AT&T.. My friend is a truck driver, and he used to have a 3G phone under AT&T, and when he got it, he had good coverage.. But a few years after 4G came out, they started taking down the 3G to add that spectrum to 4G so supplement it.. He started noticing a lot of dead spots with no 3G coverage.. he had to upgrade to a 4G phone to get coverage back again.

        • riverhorse

          I’m using Visible $25. All you do is join Party Pay(all 4 accounts each gets their own bill not responsible for others don’t even see their info). Reddit & other forums have dedicated join threads. In fact, i just had Visible notification re 2 dropouts- Verizon not great in their area, immediately went on Reddit, posted, had a dozen requests in minutes. It doesn’t do 2-3g(so maybe not great for on the road) but Verizon doing away with those this year anyway- possibly making feasible adding 5g use. A cheap backup is $10 unlimited Metro tablet plan that includes all the bands, even 71. I’m trying to enable native calltext (Samsung Tab can do it btw) on it, but the free TextNow works like a charm.
          Then I’m gonna try asking Metro if can switch the tablet Sim to a phone. And even if i can’t enable native calling, I’d port all other paid phone numbers to free VoIP providers, even the Visible line. Going from paying $100+ for multiple unlimited lines to $50 without dropping any of the numbers to why pay $50 vs $25 to why pay $25 vs $10… Except if on trips it becomes obvious both are needed for each other’s coverage area gaps, and further- if both have identical dead areas, maybe $25 AT&T also needed.
          But all that not only won’t break the bank, it makes most non all-unlimited plans absolutely useless-even for light, feature phone users, who will occasionally run into no or buggy WiFi on the road. Someone will pop on here though, claiming they call very little & have no use for smartphones or Internet. ROTFL

          I think AT&T falling by the wayside. BUT they were trying to do the right thing refarming their 23g promptly; OR they were forced to because their 4G was overloaded. Conversely, Verizon has repeatedly delayed that…Dec of this year the new date, otoh this will result in faster servicemore coverage?

          I think that the new satellite won’t be subject to weather, as B2B will be a huge component of it.
          If I’m wrong, it will have backup roaming agreements with cellular.. there’s just too much money riding on its deployment.
          And the merger approval delay really hurt TMO vs this looming competitor threat.

        • Shaun Michalak

          The way i look at it.. If weather can be a factor in service off of a cell phone, just a couple miles away, I find it hard to believe that there will be no factor there for satellite service which is 300 miles away.. Also, I have never heard of a satellite service that was not effected by weather, no matter what it is for.. That is why I find it hard to believe that cell phone service will be any different. Granted, the weather usually has to be pretty bad to completely lose enough signal for it not to work.. But that does not change the fact that there is still an opening there for it to happen.. Same could be said for trees and stuff.

          With your visible account being $25.. You proved my point.. You have to join up with others to get that $25 price.. You did not just go up, on your own, without having any other lines, and get that price. Granted, it is nice that each person is responsible for their own payment, but it still does not change the fact that if 1 or 2 or 3 of those other people dropped service, that your price would go up.. Even if just by a little.

          Unlike AT&T, Verizon has 4G on all of their towers, so not having access to 3G is not a big deal.. AT&T on the other hand, has a lot of towers with only 3G on them, so that would make a bigger difference with coverage..

          I am not sure if you use lot of data, or if you heard about it, but T-Mobile said that if the merger goes through, they are going to offer a 2gb plan, with unlimited talk and text, for just $15 a month.. and you are supposed to get more data every year, from then on, for more data to use.. 2gb year one, 3gb year 2, 4gb year 3, etc. or something like that.. They never really specified if that was including tax or not though..

        • riverhorse

          Never paid more be cause there’s just too many clamoring to join groups.
          If you’re right we see combo hybrid agreements with cellular. But I think they’ve figured it out given the many competitors and vast capital in play. Will run circles around Dish n Direct.

        • Shaun Michalak

          and if you can get them, I say go for it.. Nothing wrong with doing it as long as you do it legally..and from what I have seen, there is no exceptions about who can join in the details.. As to the last part.. Only time will tell.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Me, personally, I do not care about flagship models.. I never really even check into them, because I do not get enough use out of my phone to say that it is worth buying one.. On average, I usually end up with about 2gb of data, on the high end, that I use per month.. So there goes the whole streaming thing.. and as for taking pictures.. I take a few, but not many.. So I just do not get my moneys worth to care about flagship models myself..

          Give me a phone with 2gb RAM, 16gb ROM, and a decent camera for the few pictures I do take, and I am happy.. So for me a flagship phone that costs $800, with 4gb RAM and 64gb ROM and an octacore or better processor, is just a waist.. But to each his own.. You want one, go for it.. But the option should still be there for those that actually want it.

    • Shaun Michalak

      T-mobile does not have any 5G plans.. You pay for their service, and you just get 5G if you have a phone that is compatible for free.. Your 2/100 unlimited plan should stay the same too.. I am not sure what you got on the 2/100 plan, but in essence, it is not much different then the current plans that they have out now in price.. Either way, T-Mobile is good and keeping people on the plans they sign up on until they choose to change plans

      • Shakenbake

        Since you said that, I’m going to look at the current plans.
        My promo plan is 2 phones, unlimited everything, no throttling, no data caps, no resolution restrictions, and 10gigs on each phone for hotspot. For $100 PLUS tax.
        No free Netflix. TMobile Tuesday yes.
        Last time I checked you have to pay more for no resolution restrictions. I believe all plans throttle too, mine doesnt…..
        Thx is for answering my question.
        I wasn’t sure if the plan was just for lte only

        • Shaun Michalak

          The new plans do not throttle, unless you only have a limited amount of 4G speeds on something.. or the speeds are set to 3G only.. What they do is, they give you full access up to a certain amount, which I believe is 50gb right now.. Then, after that 50gb, if you go over that, and there is a lot of congestion, then you will drop in priority on the tower.. If you are not in an area that gets a lot of congestion, then you will probably never notice any difference.. But if you are in the middle of a big town, then you probably will..

          From what I can tell, if you use the hotspot, you would have to go up to the Magenta Plus plan, which has 20gb hotspot, because the Magenta plan only does 3gb of hotspot.. To get 2 lines on that (Magenta Plus) right now, it would run you $140 with taxes and fees. I guess it would all depend on, how much are taxes, does the netflix balance things out, etc.. Netflix two TV’s in HD is $12.99 a month.

          The other option would be to wait, and see if they come out with something better after the merger..

        • Shakenbake

          Thanks for the reply!
          I feel comfortable with my plan then it looks like.
          It would be really sweet if it was 100 even, tax included, but I’m not complaining, I’ve been very happy with my plan and T-Mobiles service .
          I’m really looking forward to the merger.
          I am sad, very sad actually, to see legere go tho. I hope his replacement steers the ship the same way

        • Shaun Michalak

          From what i hear, he is going to.. What I am waiting to see is what the price for plans turn into.. I am going through their Metro line of service, and with them, their plans are $30 for 2gb of data, and unlimited talk and text.. But T-Mobile said, if the merger goes through, they will be implementing plans for $15 with the same thing.. Since Metro undercuts T-Mobile plans due to prioritizing on the towers, this makes me wonder.. Just what are the new pricing schemes going to be like if and when the merger goes though? On both, T-Mobile and Metro’s end.. Not to mention, if they want to stay competitive, Verizon released Visible, which is Verizon’s version of Metro.. But their plans are $40 a month for one line, vs Metro at $60.. They are going to have to take that into consideration too with their new pricing scheme..

        • Shakenbake

          Yeah I looked into visible.
          The downside is deprioritization and no customer service at all. Only chat.
          It is on verizon network.
          It has mixed reviews….
          Metro Idk too much about. Tmo is holding on to it from what you’re saying. I’m the wrong person to talk to about metro

        • Shaun Michalak

          Any company, if you are not with the main name of service, is de-prioritized.. That would include Visible for Verizon, Cricket for AT&T, Boost for Sprint, and Metro for T-Mobile.. It also includes 3rd party sellers like consumer cellular, straight talk, tracfone, mint mobile, etc. I have Metro myself, and I have been with Verizon, and T-Mobile as customers in the past. I never got any service from AT&T though.

          You are correct that there is no number to call.. That is a downside.. But at the same time, if you do not have any problems, then there is no reason to call, so that may not be a big difference.. For the years that I had T-Mobile, there was only one time that I called them up for anything, and in the 5 years that I have been with Metro, I think I have only called them up about 1 time too. and that was to get a phone activated.

          Yes, T-Mobile is holding on to Metro.. The only prepaid services that they are not keeping are the ones coming over from Sprint..

  • Michael Postlethwait

    It makes no sense whatsoever for that NY attorney general to be concerned about our wallets. Their taxes are higher than a kite! That idiot is simply playing politics. He has no chance of victory if he decides to appeal. In fact, he’ll be hurting more wallets.

    • riverhorse

      Well, it’s a she- but a Dem- so you have committed no faux pas at all: they have no clue what gender is.

  • Martyy

    Remember when ATT was about to buy out TMO? HAHAHA Well look at TMO now…

  • JG

    I applaud the efforts of these AGs, trying to ensure our mobile landscape remain competitive. I’m curious, though, when they plan to turn their attention to broadband.

    Every American has 4, now 3 mobile carriers they can chose from… But just under 1 in 10 Americans (mostly those in rural areas) have 0 broadband providers they can chose from. The majority of Americans with broadband (some 70% based on the last numbers I saw) have the choice of exactly 1 provider. Where I live now, for example, I have the choice of Spectrum. Where I use to live, I had the choice of Comcast.

    The AGs argued that 4 > 3… If 3 is a horrible number to be at, what does it say when 3 > 1 > 0???

    If the AGs are all gungho about making sure we have competition to ensure prices stay low and innovation stays high…. Why have none bothered to do anything about broadband given it is considerable less competitive than the now 3 party mobile?

    Charter bought Time Warner half a decade ago. In the letter we got, Charter promised we’d be seeing many new amazing features and services from our new overlords… Since then, our bill has gone up several times… And I cannot name a single new feature they’ve added to our account… The only thing they did do was drop support for whole house DVR. So now if I record something on the DVR in the living room, I can’t watch it in the bedroom unless I unplug the living room’s DVR and plug it into the bedroom’s TV…

    • Shaun Michalak

      My whole problem with their lawsuit was the fact that it contradicted itself from day 1.. The thing is, Sprint has no intention of going into rural areas much.. They said that losing sprint will hurt rural customers.. But how does losing something that is not there, hurt them?? That makes no sense.. They claimed that we need more competition and coverage in rural areas.. Sprint has no low band, so there is no way for Sprint to effectively put coverage there.. On the other hand, dish does, and can.. So in a sense, they are saying that giving someone that has the ability to put coverage there, is not worth the chance, but keeping someone that will not is good?? You know how crazy that sounds??

      But the thing is.. IT is as you said with cable providers.. NY has been promising to have complete coverage, across the state, with high speed internet for years now.. Have they followed through?? Nope.. But yet letting T-Mobile take over could give them the bandwidth that they need on the towers to make up for it, and they are against it??

      Here, we only have one too.. Spectrum.. I remember when spectrum first took over.. TWC had $15 plans, $40, $50, and up.. Spectrum took over, and it went to the lowest price plan being $65.. Then they raised that price up to $70.. The AG’s have done nothing about this, and it actually made things worse, because how many people may be able to afford $40 a month, but not double that?? So in essence, Spectrum is the cause of people not having any kind of high speed, and the AG’s do nothing.. yet here comes a company that is trying to fix a lot of the states screw ups, and lack of action, and what do they do.. Sue them to stop them.. It is crazy..

      • marque2

        Actually there are quite a few Sprint cell towers that will be very complimentary to Tmobile and will fill in significant gaps.

        You guys are just making stuff up to troll.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Facts to back up your statement please.. Lets see some facts of what we made up.. Don’t worry, I will not hold my breath waiting mr troll.. lol

        • marque2

          You can look up sprint towers on your own. Many sites to do so. I have looked in various areas I travel like I8 in Arizona and where Tmobile has 2 towers Sprint has 6.

        • Shaun Michalak

          But there you go making stuff up again.. See, we were not talking about “Sprint” service much.. We were talking about “Spectrum” service mostly… The only thing I said about sprint was “Sprint has no intention of going into rural areas much”..So lets look at where they have coverage.. About 95% of the midwest is rural area.. Hmm, guess how much coverage Sprint has in the midwest?? About 5%.. Nope, don’t look like I was making that up.. Lets look at my state of PA.. Hmm.. If they are going into rural areas, and I am wrong, then explain why Sprint only has about about 15% coverage in the top half of my state.. Explain why if I drive 15 miles down the road, into rural areas, that they have no service there?? Since I am the one making stuff up, I am sure that you will have no problem explaining all of this..

    • marque2

      They really blew it with the horse and carriage industry. Let the industry go down to nothing and it became so expensive we all had to buy cars instead. That is why the AG’s were pushing so hard this time.

      Yay for government saving us from things from which we do not need saving.

    • vrm

      It was never about reduced competition; instead it was about INCREASED competition when the 2 cos merge. It will create a powerhouse. Just imagine 5G deployed on a ton of mid band spectrum- this is what at&t and Verizon are afraid of and probably lobbied behind the scenes to scuttle the deal while publicly pretending not to care.

      • Clifton K. Morris

        Well, the good news about this merger is that TMobile created new legal precedent that will enable or allow AT&T and Verizon to merge.

        Verizon and AT&T stand to benefit by divesting of legacy networks, including copper networks, to companies like CenturyLink and Frontier Communications at ballbusting pricing to satisfy DoJ concerns.

        • vrm

          verizon and at&t will never divest internet backbones. They collect a lot of revenue from those networks- ALL data, including wireless flows on them. For this reason, they will not be allowed to merge- monopoly of internet back bone.

          I don’t think they have “copper” networks. Maybe in some cable markets, the last mile but that is being replaced also with fiber.

        • Joshua David

          All the old phone boxes in my part of metro Atlanta have been gutted. AT&T is ripping out copper.

        • Mike Smith

          Last stat I read was that 3% of homes have a land line. That ship has sailed.

      • ugp5

        Right, if I limit my expectations to my imagination I will never be disappointed again!
        When Charter purchased TWC they promised the would service their own territory to get it passed. I imagined it would happen, but it did not.
        I will not make the mistake of thinking my imagination of 5G service will ever become reality.

  • Phil7474

    Great! About damn time

  • Shaun Michalak

    My hope is that they will use all the towers that are not doubling up to improve coverage.. and that they do not keep that same “more coverage with less towers” attitude.. and I hope instead of trying to get as much coverage per tower as possible, they leave the ones up in the middle so that people do not have to deal with 1 bar service in the middle of those 2 towers more then they have to. If they do, they will have one very good network that they can finally be proud of.. Right now, they are not bad, but definitely have a lot of room for improvement, and this may very well be the room for improvement that they needed.. If so, then they can start working on “filling in the gaps”, where neither have coverage in now..

    • Sharti24

      Tmobile is keeping 11k Sprint towers for their own. I believe the overlap towers will be bought out of their lease or given/sold to Dish so they can use them for their own network one day

      • Shaun Michalak

        I know that T-Mobile is keeping a lot of them.. But there is a difference between keeping them in places where they have no service now, and keeping them in places where service is not that good.. For example, take a span of road.. They have 2 towers up, but down the middle you either get 1 bar of service.. While there is technically service there, if Sprint has a tower down the middle which can improve coverage so you keep a decent signal constantly, do they keep towers in areas like that, or do they sell them because technically, they have coverage, even though it is not good in that area??.. Those are the ones that I hope they keep and use. If T-Mobile and Sprint have their towers right next to each other, or on the same tower, obviously those would not be needed.. But I am more wondering about the ones that could improve the signal, where coverage is already there.

      • BobbieDooley

        Well, Today, anything is ok in the neverland of Doug Chartier. I heard he’s committed infidelity 9 times now, (that we know about) and The European Company enables this.

        Considering this track record, Timotheus Höttges is absolutely a man I’d work for and get some golden handcuffs on. Donald Trump’s kids would want to consider working it it too!

  • Mike Smith

    So now Google FI is just a T-Mobile MVNO? I hope they add AT&T or Verizon… or both,. THAT would be something.