Two new reports say T-Mobile is the fastest carrier in the U.S.

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Ookla and OpenSignal both released reports today on the state of U.S. mobile networks, and T-Mobile did pretty well for itself in both.

T-Mobile was the fastest carrier in the U.S. in the first and second quarters of 2018, says Ookla. T-Mobile finished with a Speed Score of 27.86, with Verizon coming in second at 26.02, AT&T in third with 22.17, and Sprint in fourth with 20.38. The Speed Score is a metric that incorporates download and upload speeds, with 90 percent of the Speed Score attributed to download speed and 10 percent to upload speed.

ooklaspeedscore

T-Mo also came out in first in Ookla’s measurement of National HD Speed Ratio, which measures what percent of a carrier’s download data samples are capable of delivering an HD experience (equal to or above 5Mbps). T-Mobile posted an HD Speed Ratio fo 86.6 percent, Verizon’s was 85.8 percent, AT&T’s was 77.4 percent, and Sprint’s was 75.2 percent.

ooklaurbanrural

Two areas where T-Mo finished in second rather than first were in scores focused on the top 100 metropolitan areas. Verizon barely edged out T-Mobile in Speed Score and HD Speed Ratio in both areas, though T-Mo did beat out Verizon in both area when Ookla focused on rural areas.

Finally, Ookla revealed the fastest carrier in many major cities across the country. T-Mobile came out on top in several of them, including Boise, ID; Columbus, OH; Portland, OR; and Philadelphia, PA.

Ookla got its results from 2,841,471 unique mobile devices that completed 12,475,733 tests during the first half of 2018.

opensignalawards

Meanwhile, OpenSignal put out its own report today on the state of U.S. mobile networks between March and July 2018. T-Mobile won out in this report, too, coming in first in 3G and 4G download speeds and overall download speed, 4G upload speed, and 3G latency. T-Mo also tied for first with Verizon in the 4G availability category.

T-Mobile posted an average 4G LTE download speed of 21.57Mbps in OpenSignal’s report, besting Verizon and its 20.56Mbps speed. T-Mo’s upload speed finished at 7.45Mbps, while Verizon’s was 6.94Mbps.

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T-Mobile and Verizon have been going back and forth when it comes to the crown of fastest U.S. carrier depending on which test you look at. Today T-Mo was named the fastest in the U.S., which is exciting news. Of course, not every carrier is perfect in every part of the U.S., but T-Mo has been working to improve its network by rolling out 600MHz coverage, adding mid-band LTE capacity, and expanding low-band LTE coverage.

To read the full Ookla and OpenSignal reports, hit the links below.

Sources: Ookla, OpenSignal

Tags: , , ,

  • Sharti24

    No doubt tmobile is the fastest. With 1/2 the customer base of Att and Verizon they should be faster.

    I would like to see a recent report of who has the best coverage over the entire country. That’s more important than speed

    • donnybee

      How is entire national coverage more important to any one individual over speed? Do you travel more than you download?

      To add to that, 4G availability is tied with Verizon here. Meaning Verizon doesn’t offer more 4G than T-Mobile anymore, and if it does, it’s negligible. Also, T-Mobile beats Verizon’s score in rural areas this year according to the tests.

      • Sharti24

        You must live in a major city. You wouldnt know what its like seeing cell towers out your window but having “no service” on your phone

        • donnybee

          So then it wouldn’t be a case of

          the best coverage over the entire country

          but rather a case of individual coverage. Everyone on any carrier should do what’s best for their own use-case. This report doesn’t mean any of these carriers will work best for an individual scenario, it just means T-Mobile is on-par with Verizon in national 4G coverage and beating in terms of speeds.

        • Hurlamania

          I live in a major area with great coverage and get 5 bars but in my area i Mainly get less than 1 mb or sometimes 2 or 3 sometime at odd hours I can get 20 but if I go about 2 Miles away I can get 30 50 70 Even over 100… the further I go the better it gets

        • Sharti24

          But I bet you can still call/text. Having slow/no data is better than having no service at all

      • Jaramie Black

        T-Mobile is not even close to offering LTE in the places that Verizon does. Nebraska, Wyoming, North Carolina, and Texas are just a few states. Verizon is still coverage king and its not even close.

        • Lyn Thompson

          It’s pretty good in Western NC and SC. I’ve had no coverage issues

        • Jaramie Black

          Boone, Asheville, Brevard, and the Blue Ridge Parkway are not good for T-Mobile. Maybe in the city limits but once you get a few miles out, you got nothing.

        • Magenta Man

          Take a look at Wyoming lately? T-Mobile has been very busy…

        • Jaramie Black

          I know they have been busy but still have nowhere near the coverage that Verizon or AT&T does in Wyoming. Oh, and its mostly B71 and I’d bet 70% of T-Mobiles customer base doesnt have a phone that uses B71.

        • Sharti24

          Make that 98% who doesn’t have a B71 phone

        • James Smith

          Yeah, and the majority of those new Wyoming sites use satellite backhaul. What a joke.

      • Sharti24

        Even after a full deployment of 600mhz, tmobile won’t even be on par with Att. People think of 600mhz as some magic wand that will give them amazing coverage. News flash, 700mhz does about the same job coverage wise as 600mhz. Its just that tmobile has a nationwide license to deploy it everywhere thats why they’re deploying it in rural areas where there is currently no 700mhz. Tmobile needs to build more towers not just deploy 600mhz on current towers if they want to match Att/Verizon on coverage.

        Plus do you expect verizon and att to stand pat over the next few years while tmobile is deploying 600mhz? Best believe they’re beefing up their network too. Guess we will just have to watch and see!

        • riverhorse

          So now you are speculating about the future as well.

        • slybacon

          T-Mobile doesn’t build towers, they don’t even own any. 600 Mhz travels farther than 700Mhz, according to physics. And T-Mobile has a deep portfolio of 600Mhz (more 600Mhz than Verizon has 700Mhz). Some will be used for LTE and some for 5G, which 5G phones will be able to connect to LTE and 5G simultaneously to send and receive data.

          What spectrum will AT&T and Verizon use to beef up their networks? Aren’t they using everything except super high frequencies that only travel a few hundred feet? This why why the high frequency stuff (e.g., 28 Ghz) has been advertised as 5G spectrum cause that’s all AT&T and Verizon got to work with. Any spectrum can be used on any network tech once specs approved.

        • Sharti24

          Tmobile does operate their own towers, About 2,000 nationwide

          http://www.t-mobiletowers.com

          600mhz vs 700mhz doesnt make that big of a difference coverage wise. Yes, tmobile only owns 5×5 of 700mhz and they’re deploying 600mhz at 10×10 But coverage will not drastically improve is what im trying to say.

          Also Att has their 2.3mhz spectrum that they’re deploying, Along with Verizon they both are reframing their band 5 850mhz for LTE. Like i said they’re not just going to sit around and let tmobile catch up with them

        • SirStephenH

          T-Mobile actually does build and own its own towers. It currently owns over 2000 towers nationwide. The rest of the sites it uses it leases just like every other carrier.

        • slybacon

          Whoa! No way! They’ve been selling them off over the last few years. Combined, the new T-Mobile will initially have equipment on about 110,000 towers. So, what they still may own is less than 2% of what they will initially operate on.

        • Sharti24

          Tmobile does operate their own towers, About 2,000 nationwide (t-mobiletowers website)

          600mhz vs 700mhz doesnt make that big of a difference coverage wise. Yes, tmobile only owns 5×5 of 700mhz and they’re deploying 600mhz at 10×10 But coverage will not drastically improve is what im trying to say.

          Also Att has their 2.3mhz spectrum that they’re deploying, Along with Verizon they both are refarming their band 5 850mhz for LTE. Like i said they’re not just going to sit around and let tmobile catch up with them

        • SirStephenH

          There are many areas where T-Mobile doesn’t own band 12 and band 71 actually does travel further and penitrates deeper than band 12 (though not by much) so it WILL increase coverage, although not by as much as many people think.

          Also, T-Mobile’s band 12 is only 5+5Mhz while band 71 is 15+15Mhz or more depending on the area. Congestion often makes weaker connections unusable, increased capacity will relieve this issue and essentially extend coverage.

    • riverhorse

      No one does. In some parts I’ve been to only Sprint works… the last place carrier.

      • Sharti24

        Zip code please

    • SirStephenH

      Half the customer base AND half the spectrum….

      • Sharti24

        Tmobile currently has the Same amount of spectrum as verizon and they have less spectrum than Att. Look it up :D

  • Jason Caprio

    Speed means nothing if coverage is inconsistent. Just last weekend me and my fiancee were in the Pocono region in PA. Half the time her T-Mobile was roaming on AT&T HSPA which is throttled to a useless speed, and I had LTE the entire time with my work provided Verizon service. Her phone is a Google Pixel XL, mine is a Pixel 2 XL.

    Coverage > Speed. I’m curious how things will be once T-Mobile fully rolls out their 600MHz within a few years, as well as when Verizon refarms all of its 850MHz to Band 5 LTE after 2019 and they’ll be 100% LTE.

    • riverhorse

      I would hope the rollout done by this time next year, not in a few years.

      • Sharti24

        A Complete rollout would be at the End of 2020 at the earliest

        • SirStephenH

          They may not have the band 71 rollout completed by then but they should have lowband (bands 12 and 71) rolled out nationwide before then. T-Mobile is focusing on areas without band 12 first in the band 71 rollout to complete a nationwide lowband network as soon as possible.

    • slybacon

      Coverage means nothing if your data allotment is out!

      • James Smith

        All carriers have unlimited plans now. No need to put up with T-Mobile’s inferior coverage and reliability for unlimited data.

        • slybacon

          Your first statement is completely true. But most Verizon sheep don’t know about it or can’t afford it. I’ve met so many people not on Unlimited plans and I’m so confused why they aren’t.

        • Jason Caprio

          My work provides me with Verizon business 10GB per month, however, my boss says they don’t care if I go over. I rarely stream video on my phone so my average monthly usage is 8 – 13GB.

        • slybacon

          Thanks for sharing how much data you use. I really wanted to know that! Would you like to know how much I use??

        • Jason Caprio

          I couldn’t care less how much data you use. All carriers offer “Unlimited” Data anyway so your data cap argument is invalid.

        • slybacon

          Then why the hell would I want to know how much you use?!? Think about it.
          No one is saying carriers don’t OFFER unlimited plans. But some Verizon customers and businesses are too dumb to switch to those unlimited plans and instead would rather pay the overage charges going over say 10GB of data, or stop using data before the 10GB. What good is coverage if you don’t want to pay for more than 10GB of data? So dumb.

        • Jason Caprio

          I’m talking about Coverage vs Speed and you brought up data caps. That’s apples and oranges. They have nothing to do with each other.

        • slybacon

          Coverage and speed are great. But if you are out of your data allotment or your data has been capped, then speed and coverage mean nothing.

        • Sharti24

          If you are out of data at least you can use your phone for calling and texting. Try doing that with tmobile when you get “no service”. I think thats the point jason is trying to make. Coverage is the most important

        • slybacon

          I don’t remember the last time I had “no service”, maybe through a canyon or over a mountain pass. I guess that’s my point is I don’t struggle with “no service.”
          I can’t wait for a Band 71 iPhone to further coverage more, though. Hopefully it’s this year.

        • Sharti24

          What area/zip code are you in? Jw

        • slybacon

          Mostly Utah and southern Idaho. I travel to the west coast a lot for work. I have “no service” at 35,000 feet. Haha. But I’m also a student pilot in salt lake and have service at 7,500 while piloting

        • Sharti24

          Wow you’re in more of a rural area than i am (ne ohio). Im suprised you even have tmobile with all the traveling you do through the mountains

        • Jason Caprio

          I guess I’ll have to respond using your logic. Unlimited and the best speeds are great, but when you are roaming on AT&T heavily throttled or in an area with no signal, Unlimited data and fast speed means nothing.

        • slybacon

          I haven’t roamed on AT&T for a long time, since last year sometime. We’ve had different experiences on T-Mobile, apparently!

        • Sharti24

          Drive through WV on 77 and tell me how the no service and 128kbps Att roaming is.

        • slybacon

          Again, different experiences. And I’ll never go to WV in my life.

        • Sharti24

          Most people dont “go there” they travel through there on their way to Vacation. Sprint and Att covered 77 great. Tmobile sucked

  • Iphart

    T-Mobile for most people is (mostly) an outdoors service.
    I have T-Mobile.

    • slybacon

      Please explain.

  • James Smith

    *When you can get coverage, which is never when you really need your service to work.

  • PC_Tool

    Gotta love the folks chiming in with “But coverage!”

    Thanks so very much for pointing out to everyone that if you aren’t getting a signal, speeds don’t matter.

    I’m pretty sure there are at least 7 people in the world who didn’t already know that.

    • Frank Goodman

      Ookla and OpenSignal results can be skewed. For example, devices that don’t Support band 12 can Be completely removed from the results. Also, any competed (or failed) tests where signal strength or RSSI is below a threshold an also be thrown out.

      Added to this, paying Ookla for licenses to host servers on-network can also skew results if people think they represent off-network speeds.

      Also, you’ll notice you can never hit T-Mobile’s ookla servers on DSL or cable. That’s because they are optimized to only provide tests to T-Mobile wireless devices. Perhaps they use the data cache patents T-Mobile filed and has to store data physically at cell sites.

      To compare, Sprint does not host Ookla Servers in their switch or datacenters. That requires more hops, added latency too.

      Also, T-Mobile brings internet to the cell site instead of connectivity to the switch.

      • PC_Tool

        Huh. Neat-o.

        Not at all sure what any of that has to do with my post, but hey; you do you.

        • Frank Goodman

          You indicated that’s signal strength is the only factor.

          However, Signal strength (or number of bars) is definitely NOT the only factor that plays into what kind of speed a customer uses.

          Other factors include channel saturation, RSSI values and also more importantly how the test is engineered from the switch in the cell site itself.

          Having a fiber optic able from a cell tower to an ookla server can skew results especially when competition places servers off their network to give a more real-world test results.

          That is where RootMetrics excels. But also, and with t-mobile publicly bashing RootMetrics, as an “inaccurate methodology” T-Mobile can suggest to Opensignal and Ookla how it wants results tabulated/computed and results weighed.

        • PC_Tool

          “You indicated that’s signal strength is the only factor.”

          I really think you need to reread my comment as I in no way did such a thing.

          …but thanks, anyway.

      • SirStephenH

        Devices that don’t support band 12 SHOULD be removed because they skew the results. They’ll show poor/no and slow service where it’s excellent because they can’t access a major part of the network which everyone else and their mother can.

    • slybacon

      My friend on Verizon sometimes says that. Except now, when we going mountain biking in the rural areas of southern Utah and camp out, T-Mobile has been popping up more and more. And while us T-Mobile friends are surfing and streaming online Trivia games and such, my Verizon friend sat there by himself because his Verizon bucket was empty and he was out of data. “But Coverage!!!’ I love it.

      • PC_Tool

        You could have at least made a hotspot for him. ;-)

        • slybacon

          Haha! We actually offered to hotspot, but he was way too prideful and didn’t accept.

        • Romdude

          Can I ask the kind of phones you were all using?

        • slybacon

          Two of us on T-mo were using an iPhone 6s and iPhone X, and the Verizon friend was on an S9 or Note 8, can’t remember. It seemed big. Probably the Note.

      • thepanttherlady

        I had to get a Verizon phone when I moved to the mountains here in SoCal. The corner I live on is an absolute dead zone for T-Mobile. Every time someone new moves up the mountain they start a facebook post on one of the pages asking what service works best. The answer is overwhelmingly Verizon.

        Moving to South Dakota next month. Seems AT&T is #1 with Verizon 2nd. Will have to see who works best when I get there.

        • slybacon

          I was in Arco, Idaho for the eclipse last year and my sister’s Verizon iPhone dropped to 1X when my T-Mobile iPhone was on LTE. There are exceptions everywhere.

        • Jason Caprio

          I was near you that day! Me and my fiancee were parked on the road leading to the Borah Peak Trailhead in Idaho. We were there hours before the eclipse so we had to entertain ourselves on our phones. I had to run an LTE Hotspot because her T-Mobile had zero signal there. Can’t say I was surprised.

          After the eclipse, however, I believe there was a surge in “communications” because Verizon’s network collapsed and I ended up 1X roaming on what my phone was calling “Cellular One”. For about an hour I couldn’t get a phone call through. I believe this happened because I would expect in those rural areas, 90% of customers are on Verizon/AT&T and the few towers they have out in the middle of nowhere because overloaded. T-Mobile was spared the overloading. Once we reached Idaho Falls it was back online.

        • Sharti24

          Weird. Tmobile shows great coverage there. Maybe they added a new tower recently.

          Salmon Challis National Forest, Birch Springs Rd, Mackay, ID 83251

        • Jason Caprio

          We were directly north of Chilly, ID which shows no coverage for T-Mobile. Verizon worked wonderfully there until after the eclipse lol

        • slybacon

          My sister had 1X on the drive in, 3 days before the eclipse and no traffic yet.

      • Sharti24

        Not difficult or expensive for him to switch to verizons unlimited plan. What is it $75 for 1 line?

        • slybacon

          He’s on a family plan, so it would be expensive to go from $40 per month to $75 per month. This was also suggested. Thanks for the idea.

        • Sharti24

          4 lines of unlimited are $160 with Verizon. Same as tmobile

        • slybacon

          I don’t disagree with you. Even cheaper on T-Mobile, but we won’t go there. Haha! Not all Verizon customers are smart.

        • ChuckB75

          $160 on T-Mo is $160 on Verizon… plus what, $18 per line in additional taxes, fees, etc?

  • Sean sorlie

    Most of the people who complain about T-Mobile coverage had service years ago and have no clue what it is like now.

    • Frank Goodman

      I used to think the same thing with Sprint.

      In my area, T-Mobile doesn’t manage customer acquisition or growth very well. Must be the management.

      T-Mobile is over-loaded, is in last place, in terms of speeds. It turns out that Sprint tests I ran yesterday are all faster than these on-network results of this survey.

      • slybacon

        No one believes your ‘T-Mobile speeds are in last place’ propaganda. They will believe the reports from billions of tests and their own tests over yours. I also got speeds much higher than these (near 95mbps) when I last tested a couple of days ago. These are averages nationwide.

    • James Smith

      No, its still terrible.

      • Wilma Kane

        Agreed…While I loved having T-Mo i went back to ATT because the coverage sucks….I was with them for the past two years. I’m in Connecticut…come on…its a small state and you can’t even cover the whole thing T-Mo??

    • Jason Caprio

      I will agree that T-Mobile is much better than it was a few years ago, however they are still way behind when it comes to coverage in rural areas. Verizon reigns supreme in terms of raw coverage of the entire USA. As somebody who frequently travels, reliable coverage is very important to me.

      • Sean sorlie

        Verizon has a good foothold in most rural markets although even that is changing. In a couple years, there will be no difference at all. Which means people can stop paying Verizon crazy money for service.

        • Jason Caprio

          All I’m hearing is that in a couple years T-Mobile will be equal than or better than Verizon in terms of coverage. I take those statements with a grain of salt. In present day, TODAY, Verizon beats T-Mobile in coverage, not tomorrow, next year, or 3 years from now. TODAY. Until T-Mobile starts winning in Rootmetrics National and State scores, they will always be the underdog.

        • Sharti24

          Preach brother! Im rooting for Tmobile like anyone else but facts are facts. there are too many sheep out there who will argue that tmobile is on par with verizon

        • Jason Caprio

          I agree. I want T-Mobile to succeed to drive competition and innovation. I do not want this merger to happen though, that will have the opposite effect.

          Those who think T-Mobile is on par with Verizon live sedentary lives and never leave the city.

        • Sharti24

          I want sprints towers, spectrum and customers. Their debt scares me but tmobile will probably just raise prices to help pay for it

        • Sharti24

          Verizon costs the same as tmobile for a family of 4. $160

        • James Smith

          So why would anybody choose T-Mobile?

        • Nobody Special

          The T-Mobile One Plan for a family of 4 is $160 dollars with taxes, fees and Netflix included.

          Verizon Plan for a family of 4 is $160 dollars excluding taxes and fees. So actually Verizon total charge may be approximately $180 based on your local taxes and fees.

          $160 isn’t the same as $180

          Verizon’s service is better than T-Mobile’s (of course) so I would recommend getting the Verizon deal for that reason. But if you value substandard service over quality and reliability then I would recommend subscribing to the T-Mobile plan.

          I’m fine with having low standards… So that’s why unfortunately I am a T-Mobile customer with an unlimited grandfathered 4G plan (7GB wifi hotspot) with the Stateside international calling and texting add-on on all of my voice lines with a very low price tag of $110 plus taxes and fees for 5 voice lines…. Verizon nor AT&T can match that price… Whenever they can match that, or come close…. That would be the day I switched carriers.

        • Sharti24

          Like “taxes and fees included” is really going to be a factor between someone deciding between tmobile and Verizon lol

          Plus 5 lines on tmobile one (military) is $110. But your price is good if you’re not military

        • Nobody Special

          I am not in the military. Several years ago i had 2 voice lines (no data) for $50 plus taxes. But when i kept using up data and being charged extra due to me not having a data plan…I decided to get the unlimited plan back then that was being advertised 2 unlimited lines for $100. i took advantage of the free 2 lines….. then later on i opted for another free line…. thats how i ended up with 5 lines for $100 bucks. And i also added the Family Stateside International calling for $10 when that was being advertised.

          FOr me…. spending an extra $20 bucks in taxes and fees can sway my decisions this way or that way. I have many other expenses per month… so paying an extra $20 here means … i will have $20 less to put on another bill. Im not rich, im on a fixed budget…. that extra $20 dollars can be applied toward shoes for my kids or groceries… i would rather use that extra $20 for my family than just giving it to the state in taxes.

        • Nobody Special

          The T-Mobile One Military Plan’s mobile tethering is unlimited at 3G speeds. My Plan has similar cost (with no Netflix).. but my plan has 7GB of high speed tethering for each of my 5 voice lines…

          My advice to everyone is… choose whatever plan works for you. I have now a total of 5 tablet lines on my account (2 lines with 6GB data and 3 lines with 2GB data). Once I use up my data my speed is reduced to 2G speed. That may not be suitable for others… but I have lower standards, so im fine with 2G speeds. 2GB of data may be too little for most people…. but again, my standards are lower than others, so im fine with 2GB of unlimited data. It may not be fast enough for 99% of Tablet Users, but it’s perfect for my needs: email, music, and gps navagation. $10 for a Simple Choice 2GB unlimited data tablet plan that comes included with the regular texting plus Stateside International texting at no extra cost is a no brainer. Grab that plan while you still can !!!!!

        • SirStephenH

          You’re also not paying for the same service between these two carriers.

          For example:

          With the tier 1 Verizon unlimited plan you can be deprioritized at any time (teir 2 = over 22GB, tier 3 = over 75GB) vs only over 50GB and only on congested towers for all T-Mobile plans.

          There’s no option for 1080p video on Verizon (tier 1 = 480p, tiers 2 and 3 = 720p) while T-Mobile offers 1080p on its One Plus plan (480p on its basic One plan).

          Say you were to get T-Mobile’s top plan (T-Mobile One Plus). You’d be paying LESS than Verizon’s 2nd tier plan and be deprioritized after 50GB, but only on congested towers (22GB for Verizon) and you’d be able to watch video in 1080p (720p for Verizon). That’s not even including all the other perks (free Wi-Fi on flights, Simple Global, high speed roaming in Canada and Mexico, taxes and fees included, free Netflix, etc).

        • James Smith

          Yeah but TODAY its not even close. That is what matters to most people. I could care less what T-Mobile’s projected coverage may look like 3 years from now. It makes great marketing material but that’s about it. I want service TODAY.

      • Sharti24

        Dont forget about Att and their superior coverage over tmobile too

        • Jason Caprio

          Ahh that would explain why my fiancee’s T-Mobile is constantly roaming on AT&T when we’re in the hills in PA lol

        • Sharti24

          Why is she on tmobile and not cricket or someother Att mvno

        • Jason Caprio

          She is on a family plan with her parents. I tell her Cricket would be a much better price and coverage lol

        • Brandon

          Where in PA does your fiancée lose service with T-Mobile or any other places?

        • Jason Caprio

          Most rural areas in the Poconos. Bushkill, PA is one. Most recently just east of Gouldsboro, PA.

  • Frank Goodman

    All things considered, I am quite happy with Sprint’s online-only deal (still going on and not advertised) “one year free” rate plan. Plus Sprint roams on verizon.

    30Mb download speed on a tethered connection Is just fine for what ends up costing $3.00/month in taxes.

    • Website Administrator

      How much is Sprint paying you?

      • Frank Goodman

        Nothing. However, I end up with about $67.00 left in my wallet each month versus T-Mobile ONE rates.

        I miss the free oil changes and magazine subscriptions, first-5-minute-free to the psychic hotline; bling that T-Mobile had to give away every Tuesday. My mailbox is empty now. ☹️

  • moonoverparma

    Your sprint service is soon to be T-Mobile service.

  • SirStephenH

    Drugs are bad m’kay.