T-Mobile and Sprint once again rumored to be in merger talks

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Rumors of a merger involving T-Mobile and Sprint are back again.

T-Mobile and Sprint are in “active talks” regarding a merger, say sources speaking to CNBC. The parent companies of both carriers, Deutsche Telekom and SoftBank, have allegedly been in “frequent conversations” about a deal. The talks involve a stock-for-stock deal that result in DT being the majority owner while SoftBank would be a large minority holder.

If a merger were to be completed, it’s expected that T-Mobile CEO John Legere would be the leader of the newly-formed Sprint-Mobile. However, SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son has reportedly stressed that he would want a say in how the merged company would be run.

The companies involved are still weeks away from finalizing a deal, today’s report cautions, and there’s no guarantee that an agreement ever gets reached. There are also concerns about whether a merger would be approved by the U.S. Department of Justice.

We’ve seen countless rumors of a T-Mobile-Sprint merger in the past, and this latest report doesn’t sound like negotiations are any further along than they have been in the past. So for now, we’ll just have to wait and see if anything actually comes of this latest round of merger talks.

Source: CNBC

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  • Francisco Peña

    “Masayoshi Son has reportedly stressed that he would want a say in how the merged company would be run”

    You’ve had a say in sprint. Look how that has worked out for you in the past.

    • SurvivingSunnyvale

      Exactly.

      No merger should take place.

      No Sprint execs/managers should ever work at T-Mobile.

      Just buy the frequencies and useful assets from the Sprint corpse.

      • F4LL0U7

        Yeah I’d love to see T-Mobile pick up all of Sprint’s assets, but none of the dead weight. Our coverage would get way better, and I’d assume that those of us on current plans would be grandfathered in when prices eventually increase to the same level as VZW & ATT.

        • John Diaz

          See thats a problem i would prefer shitty coverage but a good plan i dont want to go back to 15 data overage paying expensive international roaming rates a 60 plan that only has 5gb of data and etc yall know what im talking about i had sprint ditched them and AT&T

        • John Diaz

          See that’s a problem id rather have shitty coverage than no free international lte roaming $15 data overage no roaming on telcel in mexico a 60$ 6gb plan data plan and etc also i dont like masayoshi running it with his fucking monopoly techniques

        • John Diaz

          We should not try to follow canadas path in this we should be different not be a monopolistic economy like mexico and Canada.

    • MattPortland

      He ran Sprint just fine. Ran it into the ground.

  • jarjar2007

    This website is getting worse and worse I miss David.

    • Trevnerdio

      Care to elaborate?

      • jarjar2007

        He always seemed to have internal information before any other source. This story is coming from CNBC. He kinda had the leaks way before anyone.

        • John Doe

          Yup, he had internal memos and products shipments and leaked all the Uncarrier events beforehand.

    • SurvivingSunnyvale

      David didn’t run the website.

      • jarjar2007

        His content that he posted seem to have.

      • MattPortland

        Who did before Phone dog?

    • riverhorse

      Can we leave sex out of this please?
      Just kidding!

      • jarjar2007

        HAHAHA

  • riverhorse

    I doubt this would get by the Feds. They would need to offer or expand things like free public WiFi in rural areas, free calling and internet to disadvantaged students…

    • Francisco Peña

      It would pass quicker than 1 yr ago.
      ps.. free wifi and internet isn’t a right.

    • John Doe

      It can. T-Mobile and Sprint can sell the 800MHz spectrum (T-Mobile does not need it but Verizon does) and some of the high band spectrum to appease the FCC and keep all employees and stores and negotiate with other (small) carriers to roam on T-Mobile’s network for free to appease the DOJ

      T-Mobile can then buy more 700MHz spectrum and be in a better position to negotiate with Dish on the rest of the 600MHz spectrum (Which they are not using). They can then use Sprint’s 2.5GHz spectrum (which they have a lot of) for 5G with 600 MHz, high band spectrum (28-71 GHz) and unlicensed spectrum.

      • Clifton K. Morris

        In Canada, their telecommunications body has approved 802.11ad WiFi technology in higher frequency bands.

        Problem is, in commercial deployment. Higher band spectrum, is useful for line-of-sight, and point-to-point. In the demo I saw, of 802.11ad, the signals are absorbed. In fact, can’t turn your back to the router and still have connectivity. I’m leery of any technology above 4Ghz being very useful in many commercial applications.

        Dish launched a satellite last December with as much capacity as half of all the combined satellites in the sky and in service today. It’s called “EchoStar-19”, and a second one if I’m not mistaken.

        So, Dish has a plan, it’s just taking time to deploy their network when it has a requisite requirement of launching satellites into the sky. By eliminating the need for a telecom connection, Dish only needs a lease near electrical power. That SUBSTANTIALLY makes it easier to deploy.

        • John Doe

          T-Mobile can use 2.5GHz trust me…Sprint is using it now and it’s fine. 5GHz wifi works great so I don’t know what you are talking about (One router covers my entire house).

          Satellite is not reliable…meanwhile carriers are digging and laying fiber so Dish is behind and will be behind for the foreseeable future. They will even lose their spectrum if they don’t use it soon, they have so buildout 70% of their 700MHz spectrum by 2020 or they lose it.

        • Clifton K. Morris

          No, that’s not really happening with Fiber installations. When was the last time a company came to dig a trench?

          The truth is that T-Mobile has been cozying up to Cable Companies. Cable is already in the ground, and can deliver (at least in my area) up-to 2GB on-demand.

          The propagation of 2.5Ghz isn’t feasible. I had ClearWire and if the receiver was on the wrong side of the room, ClearWire didn’t work.

          To rollout 2.5Ghz rollout of former ClearWire/Sprint’s spectrum (while incredibly fast) would require 6 separate towers meaning 6 leases, 6 fibers trenched, 6 power lines to provide service in the same space a single 700Mhz antenna would. That would also mean that 6x more people would have to be hired to manage all the processes and approvals.

          The new 5G Satellite actually increases reliability too. But, it’s pricey because it has to be installed by a technician with additional FCC certification; its broadcasting a signal 50,000 miles into space. It’s not something that a homeowner can install.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The propagation of 2.5Ghz isn’t feasible. I had ClearWire and if the receiver was on the wrong side of the room, ClearWire didn’t work.

          That’s because ClearWire was ~50% Sprint. 50% of terrible is still terrible.

          To rollout 2.5Ghz rollout of former ClearWire/Sprint’s spectrum (while incredibly fast) would require 6 separate towers meaning 6 leases, 6 fibers trenched, 6 power lines to provide service in the same space a single 700Mhz antenna would. That would also mean that 6x more people would have to be hired to manage all the processes and approvals.

          Do you have any evidence to support this notion that everything must be multiplied by six (6)?

          Do you care to post anything that is actually true and factual?

        • Sean Sorlie

          No he doesn’t. This is my first time seeing this guy and every post is full of nonsense.

  • William C Bonner

    I was pretty happy when T-Mobile didn’t merge with AT&T and I really don’t want it to merge with Sprint.

    • John Doe

      T-Mobile needs Sprint’s spectrum and they don’t have the cash to buy it. T-Mobile while it is the fastest carrier it is still playing catch up with AT&T and Verizon (They will be able to roll-out 5G on a much bigger scale than T-Mobile especially AT&T)

      • dtam

        why does tmobile need sprints spectrum? tmo currently has lots of spectrum and needs lots of money to build out a network on that spectrum. why take on sprint’s debt?

        • John Doe

          T-Mobile needs way more spectrum than that for 5G they are lagging behind AT&T in terms of high band spectrum (T-Mobile has none). AT&T and Verizon are sitting on a lot of spectrum waiting to use it for 5G. T-Mobile is using all of their spectrum (they are currently even using the 600MHz in a few markets and rolling it out quickly) so I don’t know what spectrum T-Mobile isn’t using.

        • gmo8492

          T-Mobile had mentioned they have the spectrum for 5G, they got a good chunk of 3GHz when they merged with metro pcs.

      • Nearmsp

        AT&T too said the same thing, but T-mobile kept eating their customers. This argument is not going to fly. Try something else.

        • John Doe

          Only a fool that doesn’t know what 5G is would say something like that. Verizon and AT&T are not sitting on their hands with their 300 million+ customers.

          This is why you are not the CEO of T-Mobile. T-Mobile needs more spectrum and John knows this that is why he is pursuing mergers with companies with spectrum like Dish and Sprint…if they didn’t need spectrum they would have merged with a cable company or let Apple or Google buy them.

        • Nearmsp

          This defense of this merger is a lame excuse. If your logic is used every company that runs freight would need to own the railway tracks. One can negotiate and share spectrum by paying the fee. That is how many countries in the world operate.

  • They_Call_Me_Bruce

    Sprint Mobile? Who came up with that name? Why would you put Sprint anywhere in the name, let alone first? If you want to get off on the right foot with the merger it would be best to scrub Sprint from the public’s memory.

    • Derek

      Let’s try it again with the correct lettering.
      SprinT-Mobile
      See it now?

      • They_Call_Me_Bruce

        Oh I got it the first time, and it’s still stupid. Kind of like Bennifer. Can you combine the two names, yes, should you, no.

      • gmo8492

        John Legere already came up with a slogan, Sprint like hell.

    • Francisco Peña

      Only on this site did they call it once “Sprint-Mobile”
      The original source doesn’t mention that, and considering the negative stigma of “Sprint,” that name should be off the table. Probably TMo-Sprint with Sprint going away after 1 yr.

  • Mike

    The only way this gets approved is if Sprint can prove the company is bleeding money , losing customers, and network improvement cost would be to expensive. So instead of bankrupting Sprint a merger would be more appealing.

    • Nearmsp

      Well AT&T tried to use that reasoning saying T-mobile would bankrupt unless they bought it. Sprint can’t sell that horse. If it bankrupts, new shareholders will buy the company on the cheap or a foreign telecommunication company will buy Sprint. A failed business is no reason to kill competition or reduce choice for Americans. This is a bizarre reasoning.

  • Andrew Addison

    This merger is not going to happen. I doubt that this will work out for both Sprint/T-Mobile. They are fine just the way they are. Sprint might end up partnering up with someone else instead, while keeping its name still present. So yes, this merger will fail.

    • Tony Chen

      they should just rename sprint into slow thats how slow their network is :p

  • Clifton K. Morris

    A combined Sprint/T-Mobile would have nearly double the spectrum rights of Verizon and AT&T put together.

    I imagine as part of the DoJ review and competitive market analysis from the DoJ, FCC, and other players such as AT&T, Verizon, UsCellular, and even non-traditional organizations such as the NAB, companies in cable and media distribution would also file ex-parte requests for divestitures of spectrum, customers. So look at it this way- media distribution is a huge business, and is the US’s second largest export. T-Mobile’s selection and bundling agreement with Netflix could be seen as anti-trust issue alone and by itself.

    Furthermore, and where things get hairy is in the last T-Mobile merger, historically speaking. Originally, John Stanton had to lobby members of congress to allow a foreign government-owned telecommunications provider in the US as a challenger/incumbent provider. I’m not sure what divestitures or new restrictions would be placed on T-Mobile if they are no longer an incumbent. If Sprint has any government contracts, those may also be up for auction.

    • Clifton K. Morris

      One additional item– The Trump Administration has been very interested in creating net gains in the labor force; that is very clear.

      It’s difficult to quantify how a net creation of labor and jobs would occur; however, it remains quite probable that the US Dept. Of Labor would also be tasked to review this merger as well. When Trump asked for better coverage in his hotels, Legere checked out of the Trump Hotel early.

      Overall, it’s an interesting scenario to think about, with many challenges to consider and overcome.

      • John Doe

        Masayoshi son is Trumps best friend…haven’t you heard? He already promised to Trump to invest $50 bil in the USA and create something like 50,000 new jobs.

        • Clifton K. Morris

          Yes, I read that news article also. However, there’s a difference in job creation and also that of job “creation” (I use the term loosely) by acquiring a company of 50,000 employees then laying people off through employee attrition and the resulting acquisition process.

          I haven’t seen any news from Masayoshi that indicates a net increase of 50,000 NEW FTE positions created.

      • Sean Sorlie

        You should just stop talking.

    • Andrew Addison

      I do not want this merger to happen at all. I would love for T-Mobile/Sprint to remain as is. Just saying.

      • John Doe

        LMFAOOOOO

      • Clifton K. Morris

        T-Mobile is in an odd situation where it’s marketing is stronger than its network and nearly at capacity. This is likely why Sprint’s signal is better than T-Mobile in certain areas. Adding millions of new customers every quarter is great if the company can afford to support them.

        People I know on TMobile are dropping calls more and more frequently; and I receive more T-Mobile switch error messages when I call. A recent news article in my city reported that T-Mobile is dropping calls at a rate nearly double than a two years ago. That’s substantial.

        It’s best to think of T-Mobile as an airliner who “won’t stop” overbooking its flights by a factor of 200 or 300% more people than the airplane originally designed to carry.

        • Sean Sorlie

          HAHA, wow… I cant believe how uninformed you are. Do you work for Verizon or something?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Do you work for Verizon or something?

          No he doesn’t.

          Fun fact: He was fired from T-Mobile. Ergo he’s a disgruntled employee spreading disinformation.

        • Sean Sorlie

          AHH it all makes sense now…

      • Tony Chen

        t mobile doesnt need sprint we have 600 mhz spectrum that covers entire usa.

    • Nearmsp

      This merger will not happen. T-mobile is the reason there is a massive competitive forces in play. Soft Bank bought a lemon in the form of Sprint and Mr. Son has failed to make Sprint profitable. The only way he can make his investment full is by killing competition. FTC and FCC have to certify the merger does not reduce competition and is not bad for consumers. Even FCC Chairman, a political hack will have problems being so blatant as to rubber stamp this deal. No amount of divestiture can satisfy this massive reduction in competition. Cellular phones are like a utility and lowering of competition will affect all Americans. This is a bridge too far. Mr. Son can praise President Trump all he wants, but this will not fly. I am going to be doing my best to shame Mr. Pai and other political hacks who try to do the bidding of their political masters.

  • Aurizen

    I would prefer Amazon to buy them. Or a Cable company. That would be good.

  • rizzior

    This so called Merger should not be allowed. [Sirius/XM Anybody] Remember ?
    we are being rewarded with great deals and very generous plans the World is envy of us for because of T-Mobile’s creative CEO [John Legere’s Foresight].
    Great Competition always wins. the more, the better.
    If the FCC had allowed the AT&T/T-Mobile Merger, do anyone really believe that the Carriers would be so Liberal with their Services, [I don’t think so]. we cannot have three Major networks in this Country again. That will be too much Monopoly and not enough Competition.

    • Clifton K. Morris

      I haven’t seen anything marketably new from T-Mobile since Cole Broadman was running the company. In one form or another, Cole’s team did the same things.

      However, it does seem they re-allocated a healthy portion of the budget originally allocated to “Goodwill Credit” to features that with more-or-less guaranteed features that attempt to solve specific pain point problems- Jump insurance as an example.

      Also, the pressures from Wall Street pushed Verizon and AT&T to divest of their real estate and tower portfolio after T-Mobile *had* to. Those transactions created a strategic wedge which allowed T-Mobile to advertise coverage similar to Verizon’s outdoor macro network. Verizon will remain a market leader with better coverage; especially in-building, and 3-sector sites for capacity. Verizon’s Microcell, picocell, neutral host, and DAS (smaller antenna systems) were not explicitly stated to be a part of those agreements. It’s also investing in a huge swath of fiber needed to keep pace.

      That stated however, the upgrades coming to cable networks are mind boggling; almost insane. A recent technology demo showed coax cable’s capability to support 16,000 symbols (16K QAM) on a channel. There was a silence in the room when that demo occurred, and the Cisco executive at the demo had to pick his jaw up from the floor. It’s several years away from making it out of the lab, but it’s technology someone like Legere would understand (he came from Global Crossing.)

      However, such a substantial leap allows Cable to adequately compete with 100G GPON. To compare, the new LTE release 13 is at only 256 symbols (256 QAM).

      There’s only so much a that can be done to manage and mitigate interference with an over-the-air interface. However, shielded coax can contain signals better. And with cable technology like this, its no wonder why Cable companies one-after-the-other turned down buying TMobile and Sprint. In a few years time, they’ll be looking to sell more bandwidth to them!

      • Sean Sorlie

        Are you kidding? “I haven’t seen anything marketably new from T-Mobile since Cole Broadman”… Have you been living in a cave? T-Mobile has completely changed itself and the industry is pricing, technology, and customer service. Are you a Broadman fanboy or something? I cant fathom anyone actually believing this…

        • Fabian Cortez

          I cant fathom anyone actually believing this…

          I’m glad I haven’t been the only one over the years calling him out on his lies.

  • pda96

    The end of the Un-Carrier.

  • Sean Sorlie

    Hey i totally agree. I would LOVE to see Dish and T-Mobile though. That way T-Mobile could drive down the ridiculous TV prices as well.

  • pug_ster

    Sprint is too debt heavy at this point so Tmo buying them off means that they will have no money to upgrade it’s network and converting existing customers from cdma to gsm. Better off that sprint have some other company to bankroll this and improve it’s network and convert to gsm instead of everybody beating each other on price.

  • Sharti24

    Jokes on you

    • marvin bolden

      No the jokes on you CDMA holds calls way more better than gsm i know i travel everyday

      • Tony Chen

        CDMA IS OLD TECh thats why verizon is getting rid of cdma by 2019.

        • marvin bolden

          It might be old but it oit performs gsm all day everyday

        • Sharti24

          So whens sprint going to Volte?

  • Sharti24

    Boost sucks man. Have fun not having signal

  • Nobody Special

    I have Sprint and T-Mobile….

    T-Mobile 4G/2G does not work in my house unless i put my phone on the 2nd level of my house in the window. I can use wifi calling but why should I. And I have removed my Home Internet and now I use my T-Mobile Phone as my home internet :)

    Sprint works wherever i am in my house 3G connection :)

    T-Mobile may be better than Sprint, but Sprint’s Network works better in my house (my 2 cents).

    • Sharti24

      Get the tmobile range extender boxes that dont require wifi