T-Mobile achieves world’s farthest 5G connection

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After achieving a few notable 5G firsts with OnePlus and Ericsson back in May, T-Mobile this week revealed that they’ve performed another successful 5G feat.

Neville Ray, T-Mobile’s president of technology, revealed this week that a T-Mo test achieved the world’s farthest 5G connection. T-Mobile, Ericsson, and OnePlus teamed up to complete a 5G connection that stretched 60 miles from the base station.

No other details about the test were given, so it’s not known what kind of speeds T-Mobile got at this 60-mile distance or anything like that.

T-Mobile has placed a focus on having a 5G network that covers long distances, utilizing low-band 600MHz spectrum for its nationwide 5G coverage that isn’t super fast but can reach longer distances and penetrate buildings better than higher-band airwaves. Because of this, it’s no surprise to hear that T-Mo set a record for the longest 5G connection.

This week’s news doesn’t necessarily mean that every 5G signal that T-Mobile rolls out from this point forward will reach 60 miles, but it is an impressive feat that shows that T-Mo continues to work on ways to push its 5G signal over long distances to keep people connected.

Source: Neville Ray (Twitter)

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  • Sharti24

    What ever happened to a single 5G 600 MHz cell tower will be able to cover hundreds of miles?

    • Shaun Michalak

      hundreds of miles does not mean 200 miles from the station.. It means hundreds or “square” miles.. Meaning if you have 60 miles of coverage in every direction, 4 directions, times 60 miles is 240 miles of coverage.. Not exactly like that, but I think you get the point.

      • Mike

        That holds true if it’s an omni antenna. Now if the test was running a directional antenna then the mileage would be different.

        • marque2

          You can put multiple directional antennas roughly in a circle around the tower. But say you are right and you only get a 45 degree beam. It is still roughly 1500 square miles vs 11310 for 360 degrees

        • Mike

          There needed to be more information on the test they did. They make the test sound like some awesome thing, when the actual case these bands have been tested before. 600 mhz used to have tv channels that would carry signal even further than 60 miles, but of course the transmitters produced more power out.

      • marque2

        60 miles is the radius, use pi r^2 = 11310 square miles

        • Shaun Michalak

          I was not getting exact.. my point as not the exact number, but the fact that they were saying hundreds of square miles per tower, not hundreds of miles of a radius.. and to be fair, I am sure most cell towers do not get anywhere near a 60 mile distance.. I would guess that you would be lucky if you got 15 miles most of the time..

          PS.. Your comment implies a full circle, and lets be honest.. A lot of times there are gaps between that north and east antenna in coverage.. SO that takes away from your 11k square mile comment..

        • marque2

          You missed my other post. If you assume a 45 degree beam it would be still 1500 square miles. No sane person would assume there is a way to beam 1000 miles from a tower in the USA.

          Also typical towers can range 20 miles which gives about 1300 square miles per tower.

        • Shaun Michalak

          Yea, but those towers are mainly in rural areas.. and areas that are not in mountainous terrain too.. In cities, I would say around 2 to 3 miles per tower max.

        • marque2

          We are talking about putting antennas in rural areas.

    • marque2

      Dude that experiment show’s over ten thousand square mile coverage

  • Shaun Michalak

    I bet it was in an area with no obstructions, good weather, and straight point to point contact with nothing in the middle.. I also bet at that 60 mile range, they were saying, ” We see the tower.. We can not connect to that tower, but we see that it is there”.. lol

    • Mike

      Maybe the test was 59.51 miles and they rounded up to 60.That’s how vague the story is.

      • Shaun Michalak

        Not only that, but it was also vague as to if it as a “usable” connection, or just a “I see the tower” connection.. Two completely different things..

  • Mike

    Not sure why the hype on this, they must of been using a high gain antenna mounted high in the air to get that 60 mile range, or possibly they had a good day for propagation. 600 mhz can reach that far easily, so not sure what the hype is really all about. Tv channels used the same band and there signals could reach 60 miles or more. Of course the article don’t mention what band they were using. I don’t think 2.5gig band can reach 60 miles running average cell tower power out puts.

    • bobododo

      Hey bud, you’re forgetting that for a 5G signal to be useful it’s not just about receiving the signal from the tower, it’s also about broadcasting back to it… and a tiny handheld device doesn’t quite have the same amount of power as a TV station.

      • Mike

        Hey Bobodobo, the signal from a cell phone don’t need to have high power, that’s why a cell tower is high in the air, to allow it to pick up signals. So again there is nothing magical about what they accomplished, especially if outside, it’s just normal band characteristics and conditions. Propagation could have been part of it as well, especially for the 600 mhz band.

  • Glenn Gore

    T-Mobile just lit up aBands 2/71 site with 5G near here and it has a reach of about 24 miles easily, with good quality signal at the fringes as well. Quite impressive. The only thing stopping it from reaching another 4-5 miles to here is a range of hills that blocks the signal, but at the top of the hills I can receive a great 5G signal with the McLaren. Hopefully the site that does serve here and is 6 miles away will be upgraded soon.

    These distance benefits will be good because of T-Mobile’s penchant for placing sites halfway between towns, serving multiple towns with one tower rather than building a site in each town. Of course this means that no one in any of the towns benefits from the best signal, but at least they can consider every town as “served”, and maybe this new distancing thing will mean that those people will get better service..

    • Mike

      Yes, served with half half signal. Eventually with some of the old Sprint towers, I hope that changes from what you mentioned.

  • mikeZo6

    Stop all BS ! just give us what Tmo said 5G with 1G of speed Not 4G LTE speeds we already have.

    • bobododo

      At the low bands and bandwidths TMO is deploying 5G, the increased throughput of 5G is only about 20% more than 4G.

  • Mike Smith

    Neville is killing it. Poor Verizon still with no 5G plan.