T-Mobile talks up 5G in-home broadband plans with the FCC

tmobilemikesievert

Earlier this month, we saw T-Mobile talking up its home internet plans, with the company saying that it plans to offer a wireless-only TV and home internet bundle if its merger with Sprint is approved. Now T-Mobile COO Mike Sievert has talked a bit more about T-Mo’s plans.

In a recent filing with the FCC, Sievert said that the New T-Mobile would have “a large market” for its in-home broadband service. The company is planning to offer in-home broadband to 52 percent of zip codes in the U.S. by 2024, using caching and network optimization techniques to increase the number of households that it can serve.

New T-Mobile feels that it could get 1.9 million customers on its in-home broadband service by 2021 and that it could grow that number to 9.5 million by 2024.

As for the service itself, Sievert said that New T-Mobile’s in-home broadband would offer average download speeds of 100Mbps. The companyu could cover more than 250 million people with data speeds greater than 300Mbps by 2024, Sievert claimed, and more than 200 million people at speeds greater than 500Mbps. Sievert also said that customers could install their own equipment in order to “[avoid] installation appointments and related charges”.

Speaking of charges, New T-Mobile believes that when it enters the in-home broadband market, its presence will help to drive down prices for all consumers. “New T-Mobile’s entry into the in-home broadband marketplace will cause incumbent providers to lower their prices and invest in their networks — benefitting all in-home broadband customers,” Sievert told the FCC.

If you don’t want to sign up for New T-Mobile’s in-home broadband, Sievert said that customers will be able to use their mobile service as a substitute for in-home internet. “T-Mobile has estimated that 5.8 million households will use their New T-Mobile 5G mobile services for all their broadband needs (whether in-home or mobile) by 2021 and a total of 6.3 million households by 2024,” Sievert explained.

We’ve known that T-Mobile has big ambitions for 5G if its merger with Sprint is allowed to go through, but Sievert’s statements shed more light on how much T-Mo plans to focus on in-home broadband service if its merger with Sprint happens. With these statements on in-home internet service, T-Mobile’s purchase of Layer3 TV, and T-Mo’s current wireless service, it looks like T-Mobile really wants to become your one provider for television and internet service, both in-home and mobile.

You can read Mike Sievert’s full filing at the FCC link below.

Via: FierceWireless
Source: FCC

Tags: , , ,

  • Ben

    I will surely be among the first to sign up for home broadband and TV as soon as the service is available in my area. Anxiously looking forward to it.

  • Philip

    Do I get at least 1TB of download a month just like those land braodband? Can be connected to my own router?

    • SirStephenH

      Routers don’t care about where you get your internet from.

      • marque2

        It would depend on how the 5g pick up box is designed. If it picks up 5g and rebroadcasts as WiFI, and doesn’t have ethernet ports you would need a WIFI range extender. If it has an ethernet port you can of course attach your router – and the 5g box would act like your modem.

  • Brandon

    I’m definitely down for this.

  • Phil7474

    The future looks bright. I can’t wait.

    • Sean sorlie

      agreed!

    • riverhorse

      Follow the Yellow Brick Road!
      The sun will come out tomorrow, bet your….

  • riverhorse

    This will be very hard to pull off without further acquisitions(or sharing at least) of(with) present cable & satellite providers.
    My present TV provider, Spectrum, by itself is having lots of signal issues(just lost its state charter for mainly other reasons–unfulfilled territory reach & coverage)… it could really use some wireless backup to its overloaded hardware. Ditto for the only remaining alternatives– Fios–in similar hot water, Satellite–mediocre at best. And wired backhaul can really help a cellular provider…present cellular service is so inherently unreliable at times.

    • Sean sorlie

      You forget this is all going to run on 5g. Totally different animal.

      • riverhorse

        You are correct– in theory. In practice everyone will still overload 5G– and remember that everyone will want XHD+ + + @ simultaneous: camera angles & PnP, over multiple tvs/tablets/streams on together…UNCAPPED & irregardless of weather.
        All new tech gets overloaded with unforeseen use, unlimited wasteage, and excessively high-band adware…Just like with no matter how fast and large the ssd, ram, dsl, etc.

        I mean, it’ll only work if everything is perfect– no stuttering / delay / cap.

        • Sean sorlie

          You might be right, but i do not believe so. The carriers are already starting to deploy small cell tech which is going to change things considerably. A mini tower on every street corner, in every light pole… So on. Congestion SHOULD cease to be a problem as long as the land lines are able to handle the load.

        • riverhorse

          That would be fantabulous.

      • marque2

        I move around a lot. Some of my apartments the Tmo signal is almost dead, like my current one, and I have to buy cable. However there are several places I have lived where I have been able to just hotspot my phone for internet, using the current 4g network. I have been able to get up to 20Mbits per second which is more than I need. Note, I got my Tmo one plan when they offered upgraded 4g hotspot speeds. I understand you might have to pay a bit extra now for this.

    • Jay Holm

      I don’t have any problems at all with cellular service, I live in BautBay just east of Houston, and travel anywhere from 15-50 miles a day for my job….nice strong signal and data speeds.

      • riverhorse

        Neither do I when in San Antonio, and driving west all the way to California and east to Florida.

        But, when taking Amtrak all the way down south from NY, even roaming, there is zero signal in between large cities. Resort areas- data slows to a crawl during peak times, and disappears inside the door of most dwellings(which are small/light small town type).

        Also, @ NYC & major NJ cities, signal deep inside skyscrapers and basements disappears.

  • riverhorse

    Just to reiterate– excessive ad junk is trashing this site. It’s becoming totally unnavigable on anything but the latest Android flagship or top of the line Windows gaming rig.

    • Jason Caprio

      I don’t deal with ads. On Windows I use Google Chrome with Nano Adblock + Nano Defender. On my Pixel 2 XL, I use Blokada.

      • riverhorse

        Thanks, will try switching to your recommends. Windows Edge with nothing added, works ok– although it has slowed down a tad lately–but it’s useless vis a vis Chrome for other things I do(certain types of html pages will not save correctly no matter which addon used).

        It’s sad that ad blockers are needed, some of my best niche software + best product bonuses I woulda never known about, have come thru random ads.

    • g2a5b0e

      “It’s becoming totally unnavigable on anything but the latest Android flagship or top of the line Windows gaming rig.”

      Exaggerate much? My desktop is from a few years ago & it was far from a “top of the line Windows gaming rig” when I bought it. It seems to do just fine.

      • Jason Caprio

        I think his point is, the ads are extremely annoying and intrusive. I just loaded this site up again on my phone with my ad blocker disabled and, wow, I never knew it got this bad! Videos popping up, huge banner ads. Hell no lol

        • marque2

          I don’t see many ads. download AdwCleaner a free tool from Malwarebytes to remove adware trojans that are probably on your computer.

        • riverhorse

          You can also use HijackThis to double check(kinda like medical second opinion) and easily remove anything with a click.
          Some niche good software tends to get false-positively flagged by a lot of cleaner software.
          But a lot of the issues are not necessarily installed malware– they are the fault of individual websites, out of control commercial providers, AND Windows / Android blocking more and more system access from programs(both at OS and hardware driver levels) for security reasons. This is compounded by the recent exploit “patches” issued by chipmakers(they don’t have a real effective solution and use more of shoot fish in the barrel approach, neutralizing chip/ram/io performance).

          Those who browse one tab at a time may not notice much difference, those who open a kazillion tabs will really suffer.

      • riverhorse

        ¡¿What’s a desktop?! ¡¿Why still?!
        This issue is especially tough WITH TOUCH SCROLLING ON TOUCHSCREENS, when one needs to use Chrome + have many simultaneous tabs open… otherwise IE works ok. Older computers also work ok because the OS wasn’t as bloated; and as well, for security reasons newer Windows no longer grants as much system & hardware access to independent apps,.. it’s why Windows Edge has such advantage over most other browsers.
        Traditional Desktops can also fare much better than today’s tech. All in ones, laptops, tablets–they run hot from almost continuous charging / don’t have the same space or fans to dissipate heat…they auto-slow down to compensate.

        13 years ago I built the very last desktop, only portables since then….I haven’t touched a mouse in over a decade. And re portables, 5 years ago I purchased the last classic laptop, only hybrids & tablets(touchscreen– even if with physical keyboard).

        New tech creates its own set of problems.

        • marque2

          My scrolling touch screen does slow my computer down in general. Another issue you might have – similar to my computer, is that the motherboard sends an overheating signal to the processor, even when the computer is not overheating. Called BD PROCHOT. If that is the case download Tornado Throttlestop and you can change the settings to override this (I prefer rev 1, 8.50.5 because Rev 2 seems to have DLL issues) Anyway using this I am able to clock my CPU up to 150% the way the CPU was intended to run (I5-4210)

        • riverhorse

          Thank you! Will check it out!

      • marque2

        I believe him – but he probably has adware trojans on his computer. If you suspect adware and get random popups, and weird things like video ads on Wikipedia.org, you want to check out the free AdwCleaner from Malwarebytes. I use it about once a month. Malwarebytes also has a pay version which dynamically scans pages for adware and various bad things dynamically.

    • marque2

      I had problems with trojans apps installing on my browser, and was getting popups and random ads all the time. When I was getting video ads on the Wikipedia, I realized that something was wrong. You might want to download some repair software. This free one from Malwarebytes works fairly well.

      https://www.malwarebytes.com/adwcleaner/

      They also have pay software that will dynamically monitor for junk and adware. adwcleaner once a month seems to work very well for me though.

      • riverhorse

        Thanks very much. It’s this site only that’s the culprit. I think thepantherlady demanded a raise, so they had to find the extra money somehow.

    • marque2

      In case my message with the URL doesn’t get approved

      I had problems with trojans apps installing on my browser, and was getting popups and random ads all the time. When I was getting video ads on the Wikipedia, I realized that something was wrong. You might want to download some repair software. This free one from Malwarebytes works fairly well.

      [url removed]
      duckduckgo (duck it!) for AdwCleaner from malwarebytes

      They also have pay software that will dynamically monitor for junk and adware. The free Adwcleaner once a month seems to work very well for me though.

    • vrm

      Without an ad blocker, you need a supercomputer and a LAN like internet connection to be able to browse most websites today. I use ad guard or ublock and they make tremendous difference.

      • riverhorse

        And headphones plugged in at all times for the blaring ads that still filter through.
        You got that right.
        I lmao at computer reviews like “this system is light and cheap, perfect for just browsing, email, and social networks”.
        I’m gonna check out your two mentions, thanks for that. I do like “some ads”, too bad many are such bad players.

      • Jay Holm

        ImI browsing on my LG G7, ads don’t bother me.

  • Phone Guy

    I don’t understand the pricing models. I pay $39 for my 100MPS internet. (5x faster than I even need- for me-). I saw Verizon is pricing their $70 per month service (if you don’t have a VZ mobile). These services, due to short range and high frequency, will best be suited for big cities where there are already cheap, fast options. What is the reason to go wireless for more if you already have high speed for half the price and its more than you need?

    • Ver

      Who do you have $39 with. I have spectrum and they keep raising the price on me.

      • Joe2050

        They jacked mine up $20 more.

        • Jay Holm

          Hmm, you didn’t take your business elsewhere?

        • Joe2050

          I would like to be there is lack of choices, they are the only provider in my area. I have no choice with these cable providers. I was able to talk with them and get a $10 discount however that is still $10 increase from the original $20 they wanted.

      • marque2

        He must have one of those introductory plans. My 50mb/s internet is $88 a month. However, we were able to pretend to move and get one of those $39 rates occasionally for six months to a year before it goes up again.

        • vrm

          There are also plenty of MVNOs for wired internet who are always cheaper and their price is steady. I have internet thru earthlink (via spectrum) and the price is lower than thru spectrum directly and hasn’t changed in years. Also, no data cap.

          Only caveat is it is “slower” than what spectrum offers but even at this speed, it is more than enough to stream 4K videos- in fact, multiple 4K streams. So I don’t care about the ability to brag about speeds when it gets the job done.

        • marque2

          I agree with you about the speeds. Cable companies tend to oversell it. When I am on my own 10Mbs is good enough for me and is capable of 2 simultaneous 1080p streams. My family doesn’t have 4k so 30Mbs is fine for all of them – no complaints. When I hear people complaining that Tmo will only support 300Mbs and cable will offer 1000 – I roll my eyes. 99% of people need nowhere near those speeds – at least not today. Maybe in 20 years.

        • Sharti24

          But when 1000+ people are connected to a tower that puts out only 300mbps max, That 1000mbps sure looks good to help with conjestion

        • riverhorse

          conjestión. FTFY. grin. We need smilies asap.

        • Jay Holm

          Exactly!!!

        • marque2

          That is what the phone companies used to cry about, regarding Cable, since cable is technically shared with folks all along your block, vs the DSL dedicated line. I never really had issues with the cable congestion – though in the old days I did notice in the evening. I suspect it won’t be as bad as people think, and in the end most people require much less speed than they think.

        • Ver

          You must have a grandfathered plan. Earthlink in my area (Los Angeles) is higher than Spectrum. But if anyone knows of anything decent in LA, please sing out.

        • riverhorse

          same here, nyct dot net works for me. In fact, the billing stays the same… through spectrum’s billing– same like one can do for other utilities like electricity(keep paying the behemoth, which passes the payment on to the alternate provider). No fuss, no musss..

        • Jay Holm

          That is sokethiso these comlanico fail to jndunderst, consumers are sick of price increases! They do more to chase customers away, than they do to retain them. Glad you found a provider who offers a STABLE, and consistent price!!!

      • Sharti24

        $65 is spectrums max price for internet of 100 mbps

  • mavricxx

    I’d love to have another internet carrier! The internet is sucks so bad that they take advantage of you. They know you may only only have 1 option so they take advantage of it.

    • Sharti24

      How much do you pay and with whom?

  • riverhorse

    Sorry for the misspelling. I could use a double Midori Margarita right now.

  • Jay Holm

    I noticed the compamc being referred to as “New T-Mobile” a number of tikes…hmm…

  • Dummy Up Meathead

    I already get 200mb down from Spectrum. I would hope for significantly higher speeds with 5G.

    • Tim Hotze

      The speeds will vary based on how far you are from the tower, network congestion, etc.

      I can get gig Internet at my home today, but it’s ridiculously priced, and there’s only one wired broadband provider to my house that offers ANY kind of decent speeds.

      T-Mo is talking this up because they’re trying to show that allowing the merger will INCREASE competition, as cable/DSL operators compete with wireless for home broadband, instead of REDUCING competition by removing a competitive option (Sprint) from the mobile landscape.

      • SirStephenH

        Watch the fine print on gigabit internet, it’s normally a MAX of 1Gb/s and they often cripple upload speeds. Connections are shared by “neighborhoods” so congestion will bring down speeds and therefore they normally don’t guarantee a minimum speed with their highest plans. We’re with Wave and we get 650-850Mb/s down and 11-13Mb/s up depending in the time of day.

  • DannyMac

    I can definitely see a future where all our devices use the cell network. 5G will be the beginning of this movement.

  • wsj

    Have to have a signal booster in my home, and they expect to deliver High Speed wireless internet.

    • riverhorse

      5g should render this moot.

    • SirStephenH

      5g will use a far higher density network so connections should be better overall.

  • Deadeye37

    For me, I don’t see how T-mobile will be able to compete in some urban/suburban markets. The price of cellphone service being $70+ and only having ~50-75 GB of high speed data before you get deprioritized makes me think that their broadband offering would be similar. If we’re lucky, they may increase that deprioritization threshold. My family on average burns through 1-2 TB of data a month with streaming, work, games, etc. The service plan that we use is 200 Mb from Spectrum for less than $70/mo (currently, the 2 biggest Internet providers here are offering 200-300 Mb Internet for ~$50/mo). No way that T-mobile will be able to be competitive with that.

    This would definitely help other areas, though. I know the suburban area where my parents live only offers affordable broadband in the 10-20 Mb range for ~$30-50 with decent broadband (100+ Mb) being offered by cable for ~$80+.

    • riverhorse

      I would expect that with 5g improvements, Layer 3 TV, and vis a vis competition…that the product would be totally unlimited or at least something like 1-2TB limit. Otherwise it wouldn’t be very attractive. I’m not really worried.

      • SirStephenH

        AT&T and Verizon are planning unlimited, I doubt T-Mobile would want to be left out.