T-Mobile and Ericsson record speeds of 1.1Gbps in LAA lab demo

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Following an announcement earlier this year that T-Mobile had started testing LTE Licensed Assisted Access (LAA) on its network, T-Mo has now come out with some details on its latest LAA lab demo.

T-Mobile recently teamed up with Ericsson to perform LAA tests in T-Mo’s lab in Bellevue, Wash. Using 12-layer LAA technology, T-Mobile and Ericsson recorded speeds of 1.1Gbps, making them the first to achieve speeds above 1Gbps on unlicensed spectrum.

In addition to the LAA technology, this demo utilized 4×4 MIMO and 256 QAM by aggregating two licensed carriers and three unlicensed carriers.

Previous testing that took place using 10-layer LAA tech reached download speeds of 1Gbps. Moving up to 12-layer LAA allowed T-Mobile and Ericsson to surpass that 1Gbps threshold.

Here’s what T-Mobile CTO Neville Ray had to say about this LAA demo:

“T-Mobile has built the nation’s fastest LTE network by innovating and bringing new technologies to market for our customers. This LAA technology builds upon our deployments of 4×4 MIMO and 256 QAM and will give customers even greater access to near gigabit speeds in 2018.”

T-Mobile also notes that Ericsson’s Radio 2205 lets carriers deploy LTE on the 5GHz unlicensed band in outdoor micro cells and that using LAA, the unlicensed carriers on these radios can be aggregated with licensed carriers on the micro cells or nearby macro cells.

T-Mo said last month that it plans to begin deploying LAA on small cells this year. There’s still no word on when or where that’ll happen, but T-Mobile’s continued testing of LAA is encouraging, especially when Neville Ray talks about using LAA, 4×4 MIMO, and 256 QAM to spread near gigabit speeds to more customers.

Source: T-Mobile

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  • John Doe

    They should be getting these results in real world by now…its almost 2018. 5G should be ready by 2019-2020. T-Mobile is behind especially when Verizon is going to use millimeter wavelength spectrum for 5G.

    • Carlos Sanchez

      isn’t millimeter band more line-of-sight?

      • Jonathan D.

        You are completely right in your understanding of the millimeter wave spectrum. My proof: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/12/802-11ad-wifi-guide-review/ and https://www.rcrwireless.com/20160815/fundamentals/mmwave-5g-tag31-tag99. Basicly the signal is terrible at penetrating walls and is similar in use to the recently developed 802.11ad standard. However I will concede it produces some of the faster data transfers over a wireless network.

        • wicketr

          It’ll be great for stadiums/arenas/concerts/festivals and maybe the top 100 streets that have immense foot traffic. But otherwise, i don’t see much use.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’ll be great for stadiums/arenas/concerts/festivals and maybe the top 100 streets that have immense foot traffic. But otherwise, i don’t see much use.

          5G home internet access comes to mind as well. There’s a lot of use in that.

    • David Guzman

      But no one has 5G gigabit yet, today in the real world.

      • John Doe

        What T-Mobile is testing is not 5G that is just Gigabit LTE. 5G is not Gigabit…we don’t know what is 5G yet.

    • Jonathan D.

      In terms of t-mobile’s developing and implementing wireless technologies. They are by far leading the pack this is due to where their investments in infrastructure lay. This specifically refers to them implementing lte-A, wideband lte, extended range lte, 4×4 MIMO, 256 QAM, and other technologies similar to them. Their recent acquisition of 600 mhz band across the continental united states will put them on the path to be near or on par with At&t and Verizon once they put all the spectrum into use. This is not only due to the large coverage of the spectrum they acquired but due to 600 mhz being low band, which has great building penetrating. As well they, plan on using these network upgrades as compliments to their developing 5G network. Which they believe will consist of “all spectrum” acting together as the 5G spectrum. As for an official launch year of 2019 for beginning their 5g rollout : https://newsroom.t-mobile.com/news-and-blogs/nationwide-5g-blog.htm.

      • John Doe

        Let’s not kid ourselves T-Mobile is catching up with the 600MHz spectrum that has very little to do with 5G…Verizon and AT&T are already ahead of T-Mobile using millimeter wavelength spectrum. They are thinking about 5G while T-Mobile is bolstering its 4G LTE…the same thing happened with HSPA+, T-Mobile was busy amping their 3G HSPA+ up while Verizon was rolling out LTE.

        • Acdc1a

          Exactly how well did that LTE roll-out go for Verizon? Nationwide outages ring a bell?

        • John Doe

          That does not matter they were first and everyone wanted it.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Let’s not kid ourselves T-Mobile is catching up with the 600MHz spectrum that has very little to do with 5G…

          It has everything to do with 5G.

          Have you seen their 600 MHz holdings in areas that aren’t very populated? 40-50 MHz in areas that only need 5-10 MHz of spectrum.

        • John Doe

          That 600MHz will mostly cover areas that DO NOT have any or very little T-Mobile coverage and that is not going to reach gigabit speeds with very low latency for 5G even if you add T-Mobile’s other spectrum it still won’t add up.

          The ONLY places where the 600MHz can be used with T-Mobile’s other spectrum is in areas where they overlap which is not in a lot of places and still won’t be enough for gigabit speeds with very low latency.

        • Jason

          Wrong on all of those points. 600 will be deployed nationwide, co exists with 700, and they are also deploying other spectrum of theirs in new 600 areas like ND. Youre a bucket of fake news LOL

        • John Doe

          Where did I say it will not be available nationwide?

          Dish bought a big chunk of the 600MHz spectrum is big urban cities…is ND a big urban city?

          Also, T-Mobile has very little 700MHz spectrum.

          Tell me exactly how T-Mobile will reach gigabit speeds and low latency with 600MHz and 700MHz spectrum? I would love to hear it even Neville Ray would laugh in your face if you tell him that is possible in real world use.

        • Jason

          Heh we already discussed your laughable notions of 5Gs capabilities at a given spectrum base. You are flat out wrong and you can repeat the same bullsh-t 10 more times and youll still be wrong. Let me put it simply again for the mentally light. A total spectrum base of 100 mhz will easily be able to achieve gbps throughputs with the 5g air interface.

        • John Doe

          Okay I am a very stupid person and unintelligent so please enlighten me how T-Mobile will cover a city like NYC with millions of customers with GIGABIT SPEED with very low latency?

        • Jason

          Easily. 5G air interace, spectrum aggregation, unlicensed spectrum, and small cells. Next CNN? Heh PS everyone knows CNN is fake news so thats not a compliment :-P

        • John Doe

          Oh so they are going to be using high frequency bands? because this is what you said earlier…

          I laughed at the millimeter wave. Millimeter wave is just spectrum. 5G isnt magically limited to super high frequency spectrum heh Idiots

          I though 5G isn’t limited to high frequencies but now you need it huh? LMFAOO

        • Jason

          Did I say millimeter wave anywhere in that reply? LOL Read it again

        • John Doe

          Ok so explain to me what is the unlicensed spectrum? is that low band? Oh no that’s right that is high frequency spectrum and 5G?

          So tell me how would you classify this 5g air interface and unlicensed spectrum? Low band? mid band?

        • Jason

          You dont know? LOL If you have to ask me, then thats pretty sad. About an hour ago you liked to make definitive (and totally bullsh-t) statements. Ill answer your question with a question for you. Is 5Ghz higher or lower than 30 Ghz?

        • John Doe

          No we agreed earlier that I was the stupid unintelligent one here so answer my questions because I am too stupid to answer yours so here again is my question…

          Ok so explain to me what is the unlicensed spectrum? is that low band? Oh no that’s right that is high frequency spectrum and 5G?

          So tell me how would you classify this 5g air interface and unlicensed spectrum? Low band? mid band?

        • Jason

          Thats why I put that 5Ghz in there hint hint.

        • John Doe

          You didn’t answer my question?

          Well I will quote Neville Ray…

          In addition to the 600 MHz band, we have 200 MHz of spectrum in the 28/39 GHz bands covering nearly 100 million people in major metropolitan areas and an impressive volume of mid-band spectrum to deploy 5G in as well.

          What does that say there? 28/29 GHz? Omg it does, Isn’t that what do the kids call it these days? millimeter wavelength spectrum LMFAO

        • slybacon

          Key words from Neville: “…as well.” So, he says he has low band, mid band, and high band spectrum to use for 5G. You can use whatever radio waves you want with 2G, 3G, 4G, or 5G. Radio waves are radio waves.

        • John Doe

          Each have different capacity you can’t use whatever you want. I can’t have 100 people connected to my home dual band wifi and expect everyone to get the 75Mbps that I am paying for…that is not how spectrum works.

        • slybacon

          That is based on current technology.

        • Tom@L

          5ghz wifi barely covers a big house. Good luck getting 5g speeds with 28Ghz spectrum. It will need massive capital expenditure with super dense deployment. Even in a city like NYC, it will take years to get full 5g deployment with milimeter spectrum. They wont even bother deploying it in suburbs like long island. They will still rely on traditional low and mid bands for that.

        • slybacon

          Unlicensed spectrum is what wifi runs on. It is mid-band. Hence why you don’t need a license to use wireless internet at home. Wifi broadcasts at 2.4 ghz and 5ghz. The unlicensed spectrum they want to use is at the 5ghz frequency.

        • John Doe

          That is not a good idea, actually that is a terrible idea. A lot organizations are against it from Google to the wifi alliance, even the mayor of NYC.

          This is not a reliable way to roll out 5G especially when some company can make a router that sabotages T-Mobile’s 5GHz band and they can’t do anything about it, they can’t run to the FCC.

        • Fabian Cortez

          That 600MHz will mostly cover areas that DO NOT have any or very little T-Mobile coverage and that is not going to reach gigabit speeds with very low latency for 5G even if you add T-Mobile’s other spectrum it still won’t add up.

          The ONLY places where the 600MHz can be used with T-Mobile’s other spectrum is in areas where they overlap which is not in a lot of places and still won’t be enough for gigabit speeds with very low latency.

          Have you not heard of 5G home internet access?

        • John Doe

          Yes, but I don’t see T-Mobile doing that and that is my point Verizon said they will do it next year and T-Mobile isn’t even talking about how or what will be there 5G. I get it that they are waiting for the standards to be defined but carriers define those standards that is why Verizon doesn’t care what the 5G will be.

        • Jason

          Ok there is so much BS here I had to chime in. All of these technologies ARE the precursors to 5G. 5G will use all of these. And I laughed at the millimeter wave. Millimeter wave is just spectrum. 5G isnt magically limited to super high frequency spectrum heh Idiots

        • John Doe

          How about you not call people idiots and define the standards of 5G…of wait they are not defined yet so stfu

          Also, 5G is supposed to have very low latency and very high speed and bandwidth…the only way you get that especially in very dense areas is with high frequency spectrum YOU ARE NOT going to reach 1-10 Gbit speeds with low latency on T-Mobile’s current spectrum holding.

          T-Mobile here is using all of their spectrum plus unlicensed spectrum IN A LAB to reach 1.2 Gbit…how do you think that will translate in real world tests?

          I can certainly tell you it will not reach gigabit speeds with <10ms latency with only those spectrum holding, hence why I said T-Mobile is playing catch up with the 600 MHz purchase (which the majority of it in in rural and suburban areas). Dish bought the majority of the Urban 600MHz spectrum in Urban areas (big cities).

        • Jason

          Of course it will. Youve got so many things mixed up, its fairly humorous. First of all your notion of gb speed and spectrum holdings is flat out wrong. 5G will easily be able to achieve gigabit speeds with 100 mhz. They are achieving 1Gbps easily now and thats without the new 5G air interface. Secondly, the 600 pot was so huge that even in the urban areas we picked up 10×10 minimum and in most urban areas 15×15.

        • John Doe

          5G will easily be able to achieve gigabit speeds with 100 mhz.

          With what spectrum is that and where? You do realize that more than one person uses T-Mobile’s Network?

          They are achieving 1Gbps easily now and thats without the new 5G air interface.

          IN A LAB.

          Secondly, the 600 pot was so huge that even in the urban areas we picked up 10×10 minimum and in most urban areas 15×15.

          You think that is enough in a big city like NYC?

          600MHz does not have the capacity for gigabit speeds and low latency…you should take a class in physics.

          What is laughable here is your arrogant stupidity…I hope you are not working in T-Mobile’s Networking department because they are too smart to hire someone like you.

        • Jason

          Heh I know it because its in the minimum reqs for the 5G air interface little man. I know a lot more about this than you (hint… career) lets leave it at that. Did I say 600 mhz alone btw? Somehow I recall saying a 100 mhz spectrum base. Do you know what that means? Why dont you make an attempt at a guess. Ill sit here and chuckle and then further expound on the point after

        • John Doe

          You said 600MHz and 700MHz in your pervious comment so yes you did not mention any other and there are a lot of places that will only have 600MHz.

          You didn’t explain anything Mr career person. Where does T-Mobile have 100MHz spectrum and of what and how many people will be using it?

        • Jason

          Have you heard of spectrum aggregation little man? :-P You know Im just toying with you because I know to give you just enough rope to hang yourself. What is Tmos average total spectrum per market? I actually know but I figure itll be fun to play with you

        • John Doe

          T-Mobile is already using carrier aggregation, MIMO, and 256 QAM .

          T-Mobile has a total of 51 MHz downlink in NYC. That is where I live I just did a speedtest on my phone I got 25/25 Mbps and 21ms ping (Sometimes I get 60-70Mbps but during the night). 600MHz isn’t live yet but they have very little of it in NYC it will not make that much of a difference.

        • Jason

          15×15 new wont make a differerence? I think its readily apparent you have no idea what youre talking about. I dont even think you know what 5G is. Lets simplify it for the simpletons. 5G is not a specific frequency. Think of it as a new air interface which merges many different sources of IP data. And added to that is densification and small cells.

        • John Doe

          5G has not been defined yet even John has said so himself but it is supposed to reach gigabit speeds and have very low latency you don’t get that with just 10Mhz of 600 in NYC

        • Jason

          Its not defined yet, but since I look at the preliminary specs on a daily basis for occupational reasons I know the expected range at a given spectrum load. Its kinda in the requirements heh

        • John Doe

          So T-Mobile will reach gigabit speeds with low latency in NYC with the current spectrum holding (AWS, PCS, 700, 600)?

        • Jason

          With 5G air interface? Easily. Because it merges everything

        • John Doe

          5G air interface? what spectrum is that?

        • slybacon

          T-Mobile tested 5G with Samsung, Ericsson, and Nokia in the last year and they hit over 12 gbps with latency under 2ms using the 28ghz (mmWave) spectrum that they own boatloads of.

        • John Doe

          They don’t own a lot of 28GHz but anyways that is my point Verizon is already testing and will deploying millimeter wavelength in 2018 but T-Mobile said they will have 5G before them? I feel like this will be like with 4G when T-Mobile came out and said HSPA+ is 4G and Verizon had LTE…yes T-Mobile’s HSPA+ was faster but Verizon had LTE first.

        • slybacon

          So it is about speed, or the letters displayed on your screen? Millimeter wave lengths can be blocked by a tree leaf. They have so little strength to penetrate anything. Good luck having internet when the wind blows. Also, T-mo has 200 mhz of 26/28 ghz spectrum. That is a crazy amount.

        • John Doe

          Yes but they only have that in a few markets not everywhere.

        • Tom@L

          they will do it on carrier aggregation. No single license has enough bandwidth on its own.

        • marque2

          Well one channel of 600 kHz – no. But they use MIMO to combine the data across several channels.

        • slybacon

          Your mind is limited to 4G tech. Next generation technology can use the same amount of spectrum, but achieve lower latency and faster speeds. 4G and 5G are not speed categories like Mach 1 and Mach 2. They are technology categories with ways to transmit more data on an existing radio wave (efficiency).

        • John Doe

          You cannot reach gigabit speeds with low latency using the same amount of spectrum with the same amount of congestion…spectrum does not work like that, it does not matter what you call it (4G, 5G, etc.) you will have to add more spectrum to increase the capacity for more bandwidth.

          That is like saying I can double the amount of cars this highway can take without expanding it…you ain’t going to shrink the cars LoL

        • slybacon

          That’s a great example. Going from 4G to 5G will be like adding smaller cars (more compressed data packets) with self driving technology that allows them to drive closer to each other. Great example of next Generation.

        • John Doe

          No they are not going to compress data for 5G they will use high frequency spectrum to add more capacity.

        • slybacon

          But why don’t they just use high frequency spectrum with 4G? Won’t it achieve the same speeds? Or is there something different about 4G tech and 5G tech???

        • John Doe

          Because they haven’t fully tested it yet and it would take years to deploy antennas on almost every city block. 4G did not require gigabit speeds or low latency.

        • slybacon

          So, is 5G with millimeter wave only going to exist on a few blocks? Ouch. 5G is years away anyway. They should just deploy millimeter with 4G tech now, if it’s the same thing like you’re saying.
          5th Generation technology will also not require 1,000 mbps speeds or any certain latency. It will be capable of it, though.

        • John Doe

          How will they charge people more money if they call it 4G? Also phones have to be capable of using that spectrum LoL

        • slybacon

          Did your bill increase when your service went from 3G to 4G? Mine didn’t.
          Anyway, 5G is different than 4G, no matter what radio wave frequency is used.

        • John Doe

          yes it did, they increased it from $20 to $30 in 2014 then to $45 in 2015 then John legere said they wouldn’t increase cost for 2 year…guess what? 2018 in next month LoL

        • RealShit

          Price changes will happen in ANY industry. And your entire point is wrong because there is something called “grandfathered in.” Which means you keep whatever rate plan you have no matter if we have 3G, 4G, 5G speeds.

        • John Doe

          They literally said when they announced the price increase in 2014 was to make up the cost they spent on network improvements and that was imposed on everyone… it wasn’t a new plan I wasn’t grandfathered. T-Mobile can increase prices on current plans when they want but they can’t make you switch plans that is how you are grandfathered in which is not the same as not having a price increase.

        • kim li

          Umm…first you said they increase because they improved the network, now you said they can do it anytime. While both is true, you bet they won’t be the only one going to do that, if they are they just plain stupid and asking for trouble. Honestly, I didn’t get any increase over $5 since 2009 or even farther back with my grandfather unlimited. Increase are due to tax n fee increases. I mean while you may get some points but you seem to over exaggerate and only bias on T-Mobile. No one knows who really going to be on top of the game with 5g or whatever the future lies. I do see tmobile doing a lot of real improve all around and much more customer oriented. T-Mobile or any carriers doesn’t have to discolose everything they are doing. I’m sure they all are well aware of one another action. Pretty sure they have some plans to counter or compete one another moves or else they will fall fast (eg sprint).

        • John Doe

          You can go look up the press release if you don’t believe me about the price increase (I can’t link here) but they definitely increased prices several times…I have been with T-Mobile for almost 20 years so I should know.

          When it comes to 5G T-Mobile said the something that they will be first to market with 4G and they ended up using HSPA+ and Verizon had LTE rolling out already.

          History speaks volume.

        • marque2

          You can’t shrink cars (and even if you did it wouldn’t make much difference because most of the space is due to the two secomds of distance between the cars – not the cars themselves) but we can shrink the amount of time (the number of waves) required to send an amount of data. There is a theoretical maximum for each wavelength but those haven’t been reached by a longshot.

        • Tom@L

          nobody is going to get those high density 5g speeds unless you are in a big city downtown like NYC or SF. At suburbs, your millimeter spectrum will be missing.

        • kim li

          Well, they may not mention too much about working on it. But, it doesn’t mean they are not or not aware of it. I’m pretty sure they are pretty on it with all their new shifts and efforts. I can really see their effort and devotion. It would be very sad that they are not aware of it and that commoner like us are. I think they are much smarter now, than just let something obvious slip through. Here is some information on their take on this https://newsroom.t-mobile.com/news-and-blogs/5g-mid-band-spectrum.htm. Instead of some 3rd party reference.

        • Lou

          Verizon and At&t don’t have much life left… Just sit back and watch the blood spill…

        • John Doe

          I hate Verizon and AT&T as much as the next guy but even John Legere won’t not be stupid enough to think that.

          Verizon and AT&T have a combined market cap of around 400 billion dollars and probably 300 million customers across their services.

          It would have been nice if T-Mobile bought Sprint and Dish.

      • Jony Monkeyseed

        LTE-LAA is actually LTE using unlicensed spectrum.

        Why should public spectrum be used for a commercial product..? Secondly, if low-band is so important, and LTE-LAA is such a great technology, why not place T-Mobile service in the FM radio spectrum?

        • Jason

          The FCC approved using unlicensed spectrum in specific frequencies

        • slybacon

          Public spectrum (wifi) takes a frontseat to LAA. You won’t need wifi though if you have a T-Mobile LAA phone in the future. Think of LAA as automatically connecting to wifi without needing the password.

    • Lou

      How much have you contributed to technology

      • John Doe

        What kind of question is that? LoL

    • marque2

      Verizon millimeter wavelength is not going to be used on Verizon phones. Gotta wait about 3 years for that. Verizon is trying to create a home Internet service and will claim they have 5g – but the 5g Internet service will not be compatible with any Verizon phones. You will need to get a special reception box. It might be good internet service – who knows, I am glad someone is trying to compete.with my cable company.

  • Ty Christensen

    Let’s get LTE in more places before going for gigabit fake speeds that’ll never be seen in real world.

    • Jason

      Its not one or the other. And all these new technologies are to build the framework for 5G. All the 600 mhz we bought will be responsible for coverage expansion.

    • Lou

      Of course they won’t work on a flip phone.

  • Lou

    T-Mobile is the first one to Break that G spot :)

  • J.J.

    Again this is great news but….. unfortunately TMobile is working backwards(speed before coverage). At this point being a10yr+ customer i rather them take a break on the speed and finish the coverage issues then use resources to catch up on speed. 120mb down at my house, unusable 4g a short drive away. Many stick with tmobile (including myself) due to the value/cost advantage but over the years of price increases that is going away also. It just seems like they are grasping to the fastest network monicker for marketing when the truth is it does not matter how fast you are if you can’t get signal in many places the competition does. That being said I’m extremely excited to see what this 600mhz has to offer in filling in gasps

    • Acdc1a

      Where exactly are you having trouble? I ask because they’ve filled in gaps and holes over the last 3 years by me to the point that anyone on the other 3 are just insane.

      • J.J.

        Northeast Indiana. Random 4g areas through town ) fort Wayne) that are basically unusable. Building penetration in stores is a issue. Rural Allen county i run into issues. And anything West of fort Wayne rural while enrt to Chicago i run into complete dead zones. No 700mhz in ne Indiana. I saw they got 600 to cover The area so just waiting.

      • J.J.

        I will admit during my travels over the last 3 years there has been phenomenal improvement but man when i hit a lte/4g dead zone when others around me have signal it really “grinds my gears” but I have not left due to the value but I’ve priced it many times in anticipation, but i always stay since it’s great most of the time and only seriously travel twice a year but If i was a trucker or something currently i would be forced on Verizon from my experience….. #Runonsentencegangsta lol

        • marque2

          When they fill the holes they want to fill them with the latest technology – not something backwards. Band 12 helped Tmobile fill a lot of gaps. Did they put 2g “edge” or 3g “HPSA” on it? No they put the latest 4g that they had at the time.

  • riverhorse

    Finnish counterparts have achieved 1.9gbps…