Sprint tries to counter Mobile Without Borders with its Open World offer

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Following Verizon’s decision to borrow some Un-carrier ideas for its new rate plans, it looks like Sprint may have done the same.

Sprint has announced Open World, it’s new international add-on that’s a bit reminiscent of Mobile Without Borders. Open World gives you free unlimited talk and text when you’re in Canada and Mexico as well as Mexico, Canada, Dominican Republic, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Paraguay. You’ll also get 1GB of 3G data for free, but after that you’ll be billed $30 per GB in KB increments.

If you’re in the US, Open World offers free calling to Canada and Mexico and free texting. If you want to make a call to someone outside of Canada and Mexico, rates start at $0.05 per minute to Latin America, the Dominican Republic, and more than 180 other countries.

Finally, Sprint Open World offers free texting, $0.20 per minute calls, and $30 per GB data in Australia, Canary Islands (Spain), Denmark, England, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Palestinian Territories, Russia, San Marino (Italy), Scotland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, Vatican City, and Wales.

To compare, Mobile Without Borders lets you use your regular minutes, messages, and 4G LTE data while in Canada and Mexico. That last part is important, because Sprint offers a single gig of 3G data for free. I don’t know about you, but I’d rather have LTE data over 3G speeds. And in other countries, T-Mobile’s got the same $0.20 per minute rate as well as free unlimited 2G data. In all I’d say that while Open World might be nice for folks tied to Sprint, it’s mostly a validation of T-Mobile’s Un-carrier moves.

Source: Sprint

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  • JP

    The pay needs correcting, Scotland and Wales are both in the United Kingdom.

    • JP

      It also states “in KB increments”, not MB increments.

      • MyFiOS 80 line

        Because the rates are metered in KBs not MBs dumbass…

  • Anthony V Cannata

    LOL

    • Paul

      And that’s being nice.

  • randypower

    Nice. I hate Sprint but free voice calls in far more countries than tmo would be very valuable to me. I travel to Nicaragua and Costa Rica where I’d certainly take advantage of that.

    • Drewski

      lol Well then leave. Tmobile has Unlimited voice calls to the USA while in other countries(that T-Mobile has listed down to make Unlimited Voice calls from). So its whatever.

      • eanfoso

        Chill dude he’s just Making a comment, if I were in his shoes I’d want someone to tell me pros and cons not to just straight up leave.

    • Paul

      Make sure you read the fine print. I don’t think it’s free to call Costa Rica or Nicaragua from the US. Probably a discounted rate.
      “If you’re in the US, Open World offers free calling to Canada and Mexico and free texting. If you want to make a call to someone outside of Canada and Mexico, rates start at $0.05 per minute to Latin America, the Dominican Republic, and more than 180 other countries.”

  • Johnnola504

    I’m a little confused as some of the countries, like France are only GSM, no CDMA carriers.

    • Most countries are GSM, so a traveling Sprint customer better have a multi mode phone, which most mid to high end smart phones are.

      • Ascertion

        They do. Nearly every Sprint phone has GSM support (at least in the 850/1900 frequencies). There’s minor exceptions, but in general Sprint phones should handle international networks fairly well. Now even better considering they contain a lot more LTE bands, including the ones T-Mobile has.

        • eanfoso

          They even have the 2600 band only found in China

        • Except that most countries have GSM on 900 and 1800MHz. The same goes for LTE, the most used bands are 1800 and 2600MHz, neither of which is used in the US. As a matter of fact, when abroad with TMUS, the phone connects using UMTS, since most smart phones support 4 or 5 of such bands, which is enough to be nearly universal.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Truth.

  • Hopefully, the whole industry will move on this direction. And not only abroad, but domestically too. It’s ironic that it’s easier to roam abroad than stateside.

    • SirStephenH

      It’s also ironic that despite the ease and low cost of foreign roaming Sprint’s charging a ludicrous $30/GB for foreign data overages.

  • maanshu

    That’s another way of charging fee after the first gb of data used. No thanks !!

  • NorCalOffspring

    Sprint is suffering from “we’re still number 3” syndrome.

    • tony

      $30 per gig overages fees from sprint hahahha o man.

  • Saige CB

    1gb of 3g data? Is it me or i thought on T-Mobiles without borders, you get to use your same plan (since i have unlimited data, i would have unlimited 4G LTE in Mexico and Canada)… Ill skip on that LARGE 1GB on 3G! Plus for those complaining about the extra countries sprint has for calling, i travel a lot and if i need to make a call (usually i text which is also unlimited on T-Mobile in just about every country) i connect to wifi, use T-Mobiles wifi calling to dial out..

    • SirStephenH

      You forgot to mention that it’s $30/GB after that “generous” 1GB of 3G data…

  • eanfoso

    I came across a huge conclusion as to why the big two will never be surpassed by the likes of t mobile and that is by the following: I asked a doctor, a chemical engineer, lawyer and government officials as to why do they not drop at&t if t mobile is cheaper? The reason they all gave me, “after my discount we end up paying the same ” I hate to give it to the other guys, but they offer a much more generous corporate discount for people than t mobile and yes this is even in unsubsidized plans and I believe sprint is on that wagon.

    • Rdaex

      Most of the time, the customer THINKS theyre getting more discount than they actually are. Most carriers discount just the “data” portion of the plan, effectively making the discount meaningless.

      • eanfoso

        Lol I wish you were right, but it was tempting to see my friend that works for ExxonMobil pay about 250$ for 4 lines and 60 gigs all with phones in installment, insurance etc with at&t, after taxes and such, I just hope t mobile can match corporate discounts someday.

    • Nick

      Unfortunately this is right and is something I never even thought of. My dad gets 5gb of data and unl talk + text for $35 a month as well as a free upgrade every 2 years through Verizon on his company’s business plan.

      • eanfoso

        That’s a sweet ass deal! Haha I hope whomever I work for in the future also has these sweet deals lol

        • Nick

          Lol me too

    • Spanky

      I couldn’t agree more. I am on an unsubsidized plan with AT&T and receive a 25% discount through my employer.

      • eanfoso

        Exactly, even through my school t mobile offers us 10% off, while at&t gives us 15%, not bad at all, unless you’re a data hog

  • Paul

    Hey, 3G data is basically what they have now. HAHA!

    I am enjoying the imitation game that the other 3 are doing. Sadly, they are producing terrible imitations. Good job, Sprint. Let everyone know how your “lesser version of what T-Mobile offers” works out for ya.

    AND VERIZON! As Clark Howard said about the new Verizon plans, “But the bad news is that Verizon is now clearly going to be phenomenally expensive. It used to be just fuzzy before, but now there’s no question about it. A family of four will pay triple with Verizon what they will with T-Mobile.”

  • Kaliman

    Wow this is very interesting.. I know for a fact all the networks in Mexico use GSM/WCDMA and some LTE …But no one use the IS -95 System down there . So the question here is. Are the Sprint phones WCDMA capable??? Other wise yup, will be great using LTE where available :(:(…And voice calls hmmm … Since I never used a Sprint handset don’t know if the handset are GSM capable…and since there is no VoLTE in Mexico ..then good look with that..

  • Mr Picky

    Just a FYI, England, Scotland and Wales are parts of the United Kingdom. Mentioning both is redundant.

  • Chris

    Also might want to mention Mexico and Canada just once :)

    Open World gives you free unlimited talk and text when you’re in Canada and Mexico as well as Mexico, Canada, Dominican Republic, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Paraguay.

  • Sprint is just a bag of hurt, have they ever had a an original idea?

    • Paul

      WiMax!
      Aahahahahaa

      • SirStephenH

        To be fair the FCC had a large role in that decision…

        • Paul

          No, it was Sprint’s decision to go to WiMax and not LTE. I know what you’re saying, but ultimately it wad Sprint.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Correct!

          UMTS (W-CDMA) was an option.

        • Fraydog

          Yes, but a lot of their spectrum would have been lost had they waited for LTE. Maybe they could have been the first globally to TD-LTE. That’s the best they could have done. UMTS wasn’t an option on 2.6 GHz spectrum due to the unpaired (TDD) nature of that spectrum.

        • Fabian Cortez

          UMTS wasn’t an option on 2.6 GHz spectrum due to the unpaired (TDD) nature of that spectrum.

          Nonsense.

          Ever hear of Band 7 (2.6 GHZ paired)?

          Sprint could have easily petitioned the FCC, just like other companies do. Just look at Dish and the way they’re able to use their uplink spectrum for downlink spectrum, etc.

          Anymore excuses?

          But I like how you conveniently ignore Sprint’s PCS holdings…

  • gmo8492

    Sprint has a major identity crisis, on one hand they are offering all these uncarrier inspired moves, but they still charge “carrier” data overages. Choose one or the other, but stop trying to be both. Smh.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Sprint really thinks it’s part of the duopoly.

      All of those overages and activation fees yet they’re still losing subs. and money.

      Somebody’s doing it wrong.

  • BadBatz

    Considering that the coverage in Central America for roaming T-Mobile customers is often better than in the US, hopefully T-Mob will include more countries in the “no borders” plan. How about “use it from Darien Gap to the northern reaches of Canada”, eh?

  • Melissa Cardenas

    first of all i already tried tmobiles new plan in mexico on my Galaxy s6 edge , great but still no lte , Was in San isidro US side phone had already switched to Movistar and a 3G icon came on. once i crossed into Tj was movistar 3G . I even have screen shotz to prove it from my tmobile phone and moms att lg g3 roaming .Only difference now is speed greatly improved over 3G was getting up to 5 mbps ,were as before the mobile without borders plan i would get kbps speed .They need to get an agreement with TELCEL in mexico ,Att does and gets LTE when roaming on TELCEL ,so far with tmobile i havent been able to roam on telcel its always movistar and 3G only ,which its not bad but coverage aint that great ,in places movistar has no coverage n telcel does i cant connect to telcel at all. I can usually only connect to iusacell which also aint that great and its also 3G no lte .

    • That’s curious, because in Mexico LTE is deployed on bands 2 (Movistar) and 4 (Telcel, Nextel), the same ones used by TMUS. Iusacell seems to operate only 3G UMTS, but I’m not positive.

      • Melissa Cardenas

        well im pretty sure my tmobile galaxy s6 suports those bands but nop nada and i know movistar has LTE in hermosillo sonora cuz i also went there to visit an aunt ,she has a mexican movistar phone and had LTE while i only had 3G Roaming on movistar with tmobile like i said have screen shots from all phones to prove it ,how i post on here? and my mom had LTE roaming with her At&t lg g3 on TELCEL . Like i said only thing that changed is speed even tho its 3G its fast up to 10 mbps if u in a good movistar area ,good enough for fb n twitter for me .

        • SirStephenH

          It does support bands 2 and 4. Have you tried forcing LTE? Some phones and networks have different ways of determining signal quality and not all phones can pick up signals as easily as others so one may bump you down to 3G while the other stays on LTE. This doesn’t always mean that LTE is not available, it may simply mean that LTE isn’t believed to give you the best experience at that place and time.

        • Melissa Cardenas

          yes but no luck and besides my S6 switches automatically between 2G edge,3G ,lte when its available so dnt know why in mexico it doesnt connect to lte ?,even when lte is available in mexico its only 3G or 2G edge i seen 2G edge sometimes when traveling on the road in mexico and again it does it automatically switches back n forth between 3G n 2G . And i know my phone does that automatically because here at home In los angeles i also dont have to go to network settings everytime , when lte is avalable i have lte if i go out of the lte area it drops down to hspa or edge automatically i dnt have to do anything ,problem is only in mexico it wont connect to Lte even when its available ,but like i said its all good since they now allow faster 3G so its all good just dnt kno why they advertise lte if it dont work in mexico maybe in canada it does but nada in mexico.

        • I believe you, alright. Perhaps it takes sometime for the carriers to let TMUS customers to roam in the LTE network. It would be interesting if you’d slap your SIM card in your mom’s LG phone and her SIM card in your Samsung phone to see what happens.

  • SirStephenH

    “Open World gives you free unlimited talk and text when you’re in Canada and Mexico as well as Mexico, Canada, Dominican Republic, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Paraguay.”

    You listed Canada and Mexico twice.

    • Dan

      So is Northern Ireland

  • tony

    sprint charges $30 per gig? HOLY SHIT lol hahahahha what a joke

  • Matt

    With T-Mobile improving almost weekly, there may be little or no reason to consider Verizon anyway. I’m a MetroPCS member of the T-Mo family and by and large, I’m a happy camper. Love my unlimited data!

    • Walt

      Is it truly unlimted high speed data or are you throttled at all? Whats the most data you’ve used in a month? Im thinking of switching to this plan from my 5gb cricket plan. Thanks

      • Sean

        It’s still truly unlimited, but you have lower priority on T-Mobile’s network. Any place that’s congested means that your speeds may be slower than any T-Mobile prepaid or postpaid customer. Also, the coverage itself should be identical.

        • SirStephenH

          “It’s still truly unlimited, but you have lower priority on T-Mobile’s network.”

          “Truly unlimited” means NO slowdowns…

        • VernonDozier

          You mean slow downs due to capacity issues related to customers signing up due to advertising campaigns?

          I have 0.1MB/second right now in a place I used to have 32MB. You can’t make these numbers up.

          I’ve seen the future, and the future looks like a there’s a 90% chance of shite storms and poor capacity planning.

          It’s a great MBA-level lesson of what happens when the marketing people (who don’t understand engineering) get filled up with red bull and poprocks.

        • Walt

          Pics of your speedtests?

          Trust but verify ;)

        • Fabian Cortez

          He won’t provide you with any.

        • Honestly, I believe that TMUS can in some towers deliver paltry speeds below 1Mbps downlink even with healthy uplink speeds. This is the symptom of a congested network. However, I assume that this a temporary situation to be addressed by the carrier sooner rather than later and wouldn’t ascribe this to the carrier in general, everywhere or all the time.

        • Fabian Cortez

          So can I still have that high-paying job you offered me, Clifton K. Morris/VernonDozier?

        • Honestly, I believe that TMUS can, at some towers, deliver paltry downlink speeds below 1Mbps even with healthy uplink speeds. This is the symptom of a congested network. However, I assume that this a temporary situation to be addressed by the carrier sooner rather than later and wouldn’t ascribe this to the carrier in general, everywhere or all the time.

        • “Truly Unlimited” Sprints tagline they where limiting speed of video on some “Unlimited” plans. Network congestion is a problem with every carrier and T-Mobile has the best policy in place.

        • Its Unlimited DATA not Unlimited Speed. What T-Mobile has in place is fair game. In network congested areas, Unlimited users who use more than 21GB of data will be temporarily slowed down by the network to allow everyone in the congested area fair usage of data in that area. Everyone else who has the 1GB, 3GB, and 5GB plans are already limited to they don’t need to be temporarily slowed down. Once the congestion in the area is reduced, unlimited users will be back at full speed.

        • thepanttherlady

          Just a correction to tour first sentence. Some of us are paying for unlimited high speed data.

        • Ah, yes you are correct. I was trying to word it in a certain way. But after re-reading what I had, it makes sense.

      • SirStephenH

        T-Mobile de-prioritizes unlimited plans after 21GB. This means that your data will be at a lower priority than other users which will result in reduced speeds, especially in congested areas. T-Mobile doesn’t include data used by tethering, music streaming apps included in Music Freedom, the official T-Mobile app, and the Ookla, FCC, and Rootmetrics speed test apps in the 21GB limit though which means that you may be able to use far more than the 21GB overall without being de-prioritized.

        • I don’t have problems with the data de-prioritized and on average I use about 40 – 75 GB a month. The de-prioritized is active in some metro areas that have congestion problems and I hear switch off LTE will help when that happens and with fall back to the HSPA network if avaible.

      • Matt

        One month I used 25GB of data w/o an issue.

  • Matt

    When will T-Mobile begin re-farming the HSPA network to LTE? As soon as they do that, my LTE coverage should be fantastic.

    • SirStephenH

      “When will T-Mobile begin reframing the HSPA network to LTE? As soon as they do that, my LTE coverage should be fantastic.”

      *Refarming* might help more. :-)

      • Matt

        Yeah, I caught that little issue. Stupid autocorrect!

    • There refarming is happening every week. But yes it will get a lot better!

    • Probably when they are able to offer customers who still use only HSPA and Edge capable phones, a free upgrade to an LTE capable one.

  • SirStephenH

    $30/GB! They’re going to make a small fortune through overages.

    • matt

      i think its billed in kb increments, so the 30 is prorated i think

  • Rob H.

    Sprint is almost as bad at lousy uncarrier attempts as VZW.

    • Matt

      Oh no, Sprint is much better trying to emulate T-Mobile. Verizon is just a #epicfail.

  • Fabian Cortez

    “Do or do not. There is no try.”

  • Fabian Cortez

    Something to note, if one adds this to their Sprint account, one is forced to remove Sprint’s previous international value roaming.

    The same “value” roaming that provided unlimited 64 kbps data, unlimited text messages, and 20 cents/min. voice calls to an anemic and embarrassing ~26 random countries.

    #gettingbettereveryday #Tmobilelikehell

  • jj201367

    tmobile is still better

  • T-Mobile is way better Unlimited High-Speed Data, Text, and Calling in U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Unlimited Data and Texting in another 120 countries, and some airplanes plus a discounted calling rate or just turn on Wi-Fi calling ;)

  • john

    now tmobile should stop all the uncarrier rip off nonsense for the next 10 yrs and focus on improving signals & coverages. it should also be 3g to 4g data to all the 120 countries on simple choice plans

    • BadBatz

      I don’t know if you have actually used the T-Mob international roaming abroad but in many places the real speed is 500 K or above so definitely more than the advertised EDGE connectivity. Yes, in many places it is a crap shot not only in terms of speed but availability and quality as well: Uruguay, Suriname, South Africa, Bonaire, Mexico Brazil and Argentina (except some parts of big cities) are good examples of mediocre speeds and lousy signal in general. But pretty much everywhere in the EU, including Eastern Europe; Turkey; Central America (El Salvador, Nicaragua, Panama, etc.) the data speeds are OK, including adequate for Google maps navigation, MMS, etc., and signal availability is great. Ookla speed tests are all over the map while abroad (sometimes vary by 5000% within few minutes) but pings and connections to a stateside VPN server are very telling. All this comes from my and my SO experience over multiple visits to these places.

      • Fabian Cortez

        It’s not advertised as “EDGE connectivity” but as 2G speeds (128 kbps).

        There’s a difference between 128 kbps over EDGE and 128 Kbps over LTE.

        • BadBatz

          Maybe there is, BUT in most places outside of EU I have used roaming THERE IS NO LTE, full stop.
          My phone’s display (HTC One M8, M9, BB Classic) would say 3G (most often) 2G (seldom) EDGE or GPRS (also seldom.) A bare 4G would be displayed sometimes but most of the time it would cycle between 3G and 4G. in most EU countries it would simply either stay on 3G or cycle to 4G every now and then. Except where there was no data connection available at all (even with GSM voice available) the “network generation/type” displayed had seldom, if ever, any relation to the actual speeds of the data connection itself, with the fastest data, faster than 128 kbps advertised, often with “3G.”
          Also, FWIW, the war of acronyms rages on :-)
          GPRS, EDGE, 2G, 2.5G…yeah, bring it on!

    • Phone Guy

      But they are. Have you not been paying attention to all the auctions where they are trying to get low band spectrum. Have you not seen how then went from zero to almost their entire network on LTE in zero flat. This is exactly what they are doing now.

  • chitown

    Wales is still part of the UK.

  • RedGeminiPA

    I considered T-Mobile before going to Sprint. Considering I live in the largest city between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, PA, and T-Mobile is STILL only EDGE with very spotty coverage, I switched to Sprint… the 2nd carrier here to have LTE behind Verizon. Yes, Sprint’s data speeds are nothing great, but they’re still magnitudes better than being stuck on EDGE. On top of that, when roaming through towns with weak or no coverage, Sprint roams on Verizon, which is readily available. T-Mobile now offers LTE in a couple small mountain towns, but STILL nothing better than EDGE where I live (Altoona, PA).

    Friends from out of town who have T-Mobile that come here to visit all say they can barely get a usable signal… so much for roaming on AT&T, who has excellent coverage in my area…

    Maybe I’ll consider T-Mobile after I move to Florida next year. Until then, Sprint works for me.

  • Cam Fas

    Just got a notification from the petition abolish overages that I signed. I think I want to make a petition that says abolish soft data caps under 40gigs since it means you can only watch 20 minutes of Netflix a day on hd that doesn’t really feel like much to be The prioritized on a network that prides itself on being data strong The prioritized on a network that prides itself on being data strong at least make it reasonable and that being said they have made insane coverage games that I am happy about in such a short amount of time but the data Soft camp in this day and age is ridiculous

    • millenialkid

      Problem is that there isnt enough towers for that to even be possible.

      Everyone always thinks companies need more spectrum… but the companies don’t want to build towers close enough to you to provide reliable service.

      I think it’s really amazing that these days, virtually everyone in the US lives 3-5 miles from a central office, which provides home phone service and DSL.

    • Daniel Marcus

      Keep in mind that there are significant differences between prioritization and caps. A data cap is simply a limit that when hit causes certain conditions to go in to effect. Prioritization means that first you have to hit the limit, and then, the network has to be over capacity, after which you are still served to the best of the network’s ability, just after the people who have used less than the limit have been served. In other words, you could watch hours and hours of Netflix HD as long as you’re not in a congested area, and you’ll never notice a difference. Of course, if you do go in to a congested area, I’ll still be able to browse Reddit at full speed while you complain about your movie not playing in full HD, because I don’t generally watch hours of movies on LTE.