AT&T Posts Statement Regarding T-Mobile Buyout

Today’s AT&T/T-Mobile merger news comes via AT&T herself with a post on their Public Policy Blog titled “It is Much Easier to be Critical than to be Correct.” The blog post starts right off with a one two punch from AT&T promising this deal is necessary in order to give AT&T the necessary network capacity to work within the “broadband revolution.” AT&T of course claims that the capacity of the combined company will exceed that of the two companies working separately. AT&T promises that the winners will be the American consumer with extra capacity allowing for faster data speeds and fewer blocked/dropped calls.

AT&T continues to emphasize their efforts to let everyone know this deal will allow them to bring their LTE network to 97% of Americans. That’s over 55 million more people than they would be able to do on their own. AT&T continues to push the rural coverage message which remains a big part of their lobbying effort to gain government approval.

As we move further into AT&T’s lengthy blog post they work in some digs at Sprint all but calling their claims ridiculous. AT&T believes that while Sprint claims their opposition is due to a concern over a cut in output, raising prices and stopping innovation it’s actually for much different reasons. AT&T believes Sprint’s real motive in opposing the merger is to continue to compete against a “capacity-strained AT&T and a standalone T-Mobile USA that lacks financial backing from its parent and has no clear path to LTE.”

Furthermore AT&T plans to lay out in a Joint Opposition filing with the FCC tomorrow the details of each major complaint lobbied against them:

1) Network Capacity Crunch — AT&T says that contrary to the idea that their capacity issues can be solved without this transaction, they claim that they couldn’t make any kind of moves that would give them the same kind of capacity additions without this deal.

2) Duopoly Myth — It is here that AT&T continues to claim the “duopoly” myth is exaggerated with at least 3/4 of Americans living in an area with a choice of at least 5 wireless providers.

3) Contriving Conditions and Concessions — AT&T says that the proposals for possible concessions AT&T has to make in order to achieve regulatory approval such as concessions related to pricing, 700MHz handset interoperability, bill shock and early termination fees should not just be addressed in relation to their merger approval but as an industry.

The entire post is an interesting read and a good look at the continued arguments AT&T will continue to provide while lobbying for government approval.

AT&T

 

Full Blog Post:

There is one overarching imperative that drives this merger:  giving AT&T and T-Mobile USA customers the network capacity they need to enjoy the full promise of the mobile broadband revolution.  The combination of these two companies, and their uniquely complementary networks and spectrum holdings, will create new capacity – the functional equivalent of new spectrum – to handle rapidly escalating mobile data traffic.  Indeed, the capacity of the combined company will exceed that of AT&T and T-Mobile operating separately.

The winners will be America’s consumers because the extra capacity will enable us to offer them better service — faster data speeds and fewer dropped and blocked calls.

And with the scale, spectrum, and other resources generated by this transaction, the combined company will be able to offer Long Term Evolution, or LTE — the premier next-generation wireless broadband technology — to an extra 55 million people and more than 97 percent of the U.S. population, all without reliance on government funds.  And that is a big win for rural America because it gives those communities the same high quality broadband service that consumers in urban areas will receive.  It also means more jobs and more investment.

That investment will also be a win for the innovators in the high-tech industry, who need the bulked up infrastructure to support their next generation of bandwidth intensive applications and other innovative products and services.

For these reasons, the transaction has drawn tremendous support from across the political and industrial landscape.  Among the many supporters are labor unions, including the CWA, the AFL-CIO, the Teamsters and others representing nearly 17 million workers.  No transaction before the FCC in recent memory has ever garnered such broad support from organized labor.

This transaction has also received tremendous support from a broad cross-section of the high-tech community.  These are the innovators whose very businesses depend on the availability of robust wireless platforms – and their support is a direct repudiation of claims that the transaction will harm competition, innovation and consumers.  Indeed, the members of the high tech community are among the most sophisticated and informed users of wireless platforms; and they have a unique ability to speak to the merits of this transaction.  They are the ones in the trenches every day investing, inventing and innovating.  That so many of them voiced such strong support is compelling evidence of the transaction’s enormous economic and consumer benefits.

Opposing this transaction are Sprint and a few other wireless competitors, along with the same inside-the-beltway special interest groups that reflexively oppose all mergers.  They tried gamely last Tuesday to spin the transaction’s enormous benefits as anti-consumer, anti-innovation and anti-competition.  But the fallacy of their opposition is easily unmasked.  Why do Sprint and other wireless competitors oppose this transaction?  Because they are worried, as they claim, that the combined company will cut output, raise prices and stop innovating?   I don’t think so.  Those consequences could only benefit these carriers as well as their shareholders.

The reason they oppose the merger is because they would prefer to compete against a capacity-constrained AT&T and a standalone T-Mobile USA that lacks financial backing from its parent and has no clear path to LTE.

But it’s not just that their arguments are transparently inconsistent with their motives.  Motives aside, their arguments don’t stand up to scrutiny.  In the Joint Opposition we will file tomorrow at the FCC, we dissect in detail each of the straw men they advanced.

1)      Network Capacity Crunch – Contrary to claims that our network capacity issues can be solved without this transaction, we detail the engineering principles that make the extraordinary capacity gains that the combination will yield possible – and nothing close to those gains would be possible without this transaction.   In fact, AT&T is not only already doing the very things they claim we should be doing, but we are the industry leader in them.  We have more Wi-Fi hotspots, for example, than any other carrier.  And we are the only carrier that has created Wi-Fi hot zones in heavy use urban areas, like Times Square, to off-load traffic from our network.  And when merger opponents say in one breath that we are not migrating our customers fast enough to LTE and in the next that we should repurpose the spectrum we are using for LTE to relieve congestion on our legacy networks, they lose all credibility.

The bottom line is that the combined company will be able to offer more output and higher quality service – and that’s a good thing for consumers even if our competitors don’t like it. We also demonstrate that, by relieving AT&T and T-Mobile from capacity constraints, the merger will expand output, which economists recognize means lower, not higher, prices.

2)      The Duopoly Myth – From the beginning, merger opponents have ramped up the rhetoric, claiming, for example, that if this merger is approved, the wireless market will become a “duopoly.”  The truth is that a “duopoly” signifies a market with only two sellers, and that is a flatly inapt description of the post-transaction U.S. wireless marketplace.  Commission data shows that today ¾ of Americans have a choice of five or more wireless providers, so, at worst, after this merger they will have a choice of four.  That is not a duopoly.  And it is particularly ironic that Sprint is the leading proponent of the duopoly theory given that Sprint is boasting to Wall Street of its marketplace resurgence, including its recent largest number of net ads (over 1 million) in five years.

The duopoly myth can be exploded with a single fact:  MetroPCS and Leap together added a remarkable 1.057 million net retail subscribers in the first quarter of 2011 for cell phones, smartphones, laptop USB adaptors, and other personal computing devices.  That figure is greater than the combined net retail additions (postpaid and prepaid) by both AT&T and Verizon for these same types of subscribers (1.026 million) – all in the same quarter that Verizon debuted its version of the iPhone.

3)      Contriving Conditions and Concessions – Of course there is the expected wish-list of non-merger-related “conditions” designed to extract regulatory concessions that the opponents have not been able to otherwise achieve.  These include proposals to condition merger approval on concessions relating to pricing, mandatory resale, 700 MHz handset interoperability, special access, privacy, receipt of universal service funding, early termination fees, bill shock, and other broad policy issues.  As the Commission has consistently found, such issues should be addressed, if at all, in industry-wide proceedings – not a company-specific merger proceeding.

In the end, opponents’ submissions are long on rhetoric and short on substance.  As Benjamin Disraeli wisely said, “It is much easier to be critical than to be correct.”  After a close review of the facts and evidence presented in this proceeding, we are confident that the Commission will agree that this merger will generate enormous benefits for consumers, workers and the economy, with no significant harm to competition.

Tags: , , , , , ,

  • Heymynameis

    I hate you AT&T!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=12601280 Devon Bain

    This fantasy land AT&T lives in, are there properties for sale? Because I’d like to live in it.

    AT&T would have us believe that a duopoly of an incredibly high barrier to entry market is both fictitious and, in cases where it is not, is a net gain for the little guy on the hook for the bill. I wonder if gas prices are plummeting toward $1 in this world, as well, because surely a tightly-controlled market such as oil surely has the best interests of the consumer at heart, too.

    Please. This is a grab for the top spot and to throttle anyone else in the business. Next on the block is Sprint, and when they finally go we’re all screwed, because the last great choice in value was between them and T-Mobile.

  • SemiSpook

    Sad part is, there are a lot of people correct on the counter-claims AT&T is making. How is it when I’m in rural PA on my T-Mobile phone, I get BETTER coverage than I ever did when I was with AT&T/Cingular?

    A lot of people are going to be losing their jobs, more on the T-Mobile side. That’s why a lot of current subscribers are leaving in droves: they don’t want the crappy coverage and customer service that people have come to expect from AT&T.

    • http://www.phasedma.com Anthony

      All I keep seeing is AT&T saying (once you remove the fluff) that they have lacked responsibility, and shot themselves in the foot in regards to their network build out.

      And then they go on about how most cities have “5 carriers”.  Well I live in Rochester, and it’s a fairly large city (if not a very average city), and we may have 4 choices, but that doesn’t translate to 4 carriers with great coverage.  Rather it translates to AT&T and Verizon with great coverage.  So yes AT&T – You already are a duopoly – How you expect anyone not to think you would be in with T-Mobile merged with you is beyond me.

  • Ckochinsky0125

    Why is it they are expanding to lte now when they said they couldn’t. How about expand your network like verizon rather then buying another company out because you are to lazy.

  • Anonymous

    I can’t wait for the merger!  AT&T kicks T-Mo’s ass!

    • Respawn

      Hey watch out! They be throwin’ manure in here! Ballistic B.S. coming though.

    • http://twitter.com/starsgalore Stars.Galore

      how about you hold your breath until this happens. no really hold it.

    • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

      And you need to get out of ATT’s ass!
      Go troll ATT blog or something.
       

  • http://twitter.com/msjazz79 Jasmine w

    Can someone answer me this, if this merger should go through, and personally I hope it does not….even though AT&T states that “Commission data shows that today ¾ of Americans have a choice of five or more wireless providers” let me ask this are any of those other competitors GSM providers?

    • Anonymous

      The whole gsm monopoly argument is kinda weak in my opinion.  Your average user doesn’t even know what GSM and CDMA means.  Besides, it’s not AT&T’s fault Verizon and Sprint use CDMA.  Sure it’s nice to be able to travel the world using your phone with a foreign SIM card or use your phone on another US GSM carrier, but in the grand scheme of things, a very small percentage of ppl actually need/want their phones unlocked.

      • perfectblue

        Very true.

      • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

        Let’s see, how many people travel outside the USA, and how many people visit the USA…..hmmmm.

      • http://twitter.com/PaulHarrisonPro Paul Harrison

        Moreover, it’s not really true, unless you’re limiting discussion to “2G and 3G” GSM, in which case the argument isn’t going to be that relevant except until shortly after the merger goes through.

        The 4G version of GSM, complete with SIM cards and everything else we love about it, is called LTE. Everyone except Sprint is rolling it out (and Sprint have indicated in the past they’d consider replacing WiMAX with LTE if the latter shows significant strength. Mind you, with everything they’ve invested in WiMAX, it’s getting harder for them to switch.)

        AT&T is rolling out LTE.
        Verizon is rolling out LTE, and thus switching to 4G GSM.
        MetroPCS (ha!) is rolling out LTE, and thus switching to 4G GSM.
        Cricket is… I believe they’re taking part in some other operator’s rollout of LTE – in any case, they’re well and truly on the bandwagon.
        Cellular South (who they?) is rolling out LTE
        US Cellular has announced plans to switch to LTE.

        That’s an awfully large number of operators, and with LTE likely to be an option for all operators in Europe (3G required separate licenses and frequencies), I don’t think a GSM “monopoly” will matter much.

        The reason why we should oppose the AT&T buying-and-sacking of T-Mobile is because it removes the one decent national operator in the country, the only one that has a consistent record of promoting innovation and openness. The GSM argument might have been relevant two years ago, but it really isn’t today.

        • Anonymous

          I agree with you about TMO innovating and promoting openness, but DT (the parent company of TMO USA) is a willing participant in this transaction.  They want to remove TMO USA from the US Market themselves.  No one is forcing DT to sell TMO USA….Back to the point of TMO innovating and being open….That “good guy” mentality hasn’t yielded success.  TMO is by far the most customer friendly carrier in the US, but that doesn’t really matter now. 

        • Anonymous

          I agree with you about TMO innovating and promoting openness, but DT (the parent company of TMO USA) is a willing participant in this transaction.  They want to remove TMO USA from the US Market themselves.  No one is forcing DT to sell TMO USA….Back to the point of TMO innovating and being open….That “good guy” mentality hasn’t yielded success.  TMO is by far the most customer friendly carrier in the US, but that doesn’t really matter now. 

  • Jwhit

    Lies,lies and more (you guessed it) lies

  • TweetMo

    I’m torn. I support small government that stays out of our business, and yes, the word “our” includes businesses.
    However, I do feel that this will cause a duopoly, over time.

    • Tortionist

      You have a point. It could very  well cause a duopoly over time, but I sincerely doubt it will. To be a true duopoly/monopoly, several things would have to happen. First there’d have to be a barrier to entrance of the wireless market for new entrants, there’s not (yet). Second you’d have only 1 or 2 businesses in that market/industry. There’s not. There’s at least a half a dozen other wireless companies. Third and lastly, in a monopolistic/duopolistic market the 1 or 2 companies could basically charge whatever prices they wanted and still keep their customers. That’s not the case either. AT&T and Verizon, can only charge so much before customers start leaving in droves. A duopoloy on a national level? Sure it’s possible, but not if Sprint plays it smart. Cricket has a chance to become a big player on the national level, if they do things well and continue to improve. I am against this buyout, seeing as how it will get rid of a great wireless company that has the best prices and customer service, as well as the most Android phones. Anyone that thinks T Mobile doesn’t have the best plans and customer service needs to understand there’s a reason they are constantly winning the JD Power and Associates award. Long live G Mobile…er T Mobile!

      • Zifnab2k

        Problem with 5+ carriers is that other than sprint, att, verizon, and T-Mobile, the rest are not national. Worst most of them actually lease their services from other companie, like metro pcs and boost mobile.

        • Tortionist

          I understand that. I’m just letting him know what actually constitutes a monopoly or duopoly. in this case it doesn’t. I actually do not want this buyout to happen. It will help to slow down innovation and lower the competition as well as drive prices up. It will be much like our healthcare and medical industry here in the U.S. that truly sucks, due to the lack of competition, which helps to cause high prices, and lack of  innovation. Not to mention the American Medical Association, is a large monopolistic union that seriously helps to keep healthcare prices and health insurance prices high. 

  • Jarvis Billena

    If this merger goes through for at&t i hope you lose all your customers and employees!! In fact i hope they run now..:)>

  • tmo employee

    AT&T, You killed t-mobile! You bastards!

    • Anonymous

      No…T-Mobile killed themselves by thinking small over the past decade

      • http://twitter.com/starsgalore Stars.Galore

        im guessing you don’t watch SouthPark???

  • Respawn

    Right, and I’m Mr. T, pitying the collective fool that is AT&T.

    Still their ballistic B.S. makes me laugh. If Mr. Stephenson wasn’t the AT&T CEO, he’d be one hell of a standup comedian.

  • Cartman01

    I <3 u at&t. Go at&t get rid of crappy T-Mobile.

    • Rey Martinez

      a troll that just cant troll.
      what a shameee..

    • AdrianMT4G

      K.

    • Tortionist

      AT&T sucks, I was with them for a little over a year. Their customer service sucked and they couldn’t get my billing straight for that whole time. In addition I had a lot more dropped calls than with T mobile, in the which i’ve literally had less than four dropped calls in 4 years. With AT&T I had well over a dozen in little over a year. I will not go back to crappy AT&T. I’ll go to Verizon before I go back to AT&T. 

      • Rey Martinez

        lol my friend i was on the phone with just last night had the iphone 3gs for atnt.
        holyfuck. she had more dropped calls within those 2hours, than ive ever experience in my life XD
        itwas at least more than 5 times.
        she was all, ah im sorry dropped call
        ah im sorry, again 
        imsorry
        imsorry
        sorry. again.

        • Alkboy3

          People keep saying tbat tmob should have gone with the iphone… It is lame, I had thr 3gs, dropped call, fdopped call, shitty battery. Please. If ATT customers enjoy paying out the ass, then they can bend over ready for the hands.. F+ck ATT, F+ck the merge, I pay 53 for what 3 of my coworkers pay 115 for EACH, and I have no dropped calls, and the vibrant. What up!

  • Fray Contreras

    You know its funny how the people on this site is crying about this merger and some people actually support it. I dont know how people say that ATT customer service is bad cuz they really aren’t bad at all. I really never had a problem with their customer service. Besides T-Mobile’s network is complete garbage. Like seriously. Its really horrible. Compare to att, t-mobile is bad. People is complaining about high rates. Hello everything is gonna go up. Dont expect them to be cheap for the rest of your dam life. I bet you if T-Mobile was doing good their plans wont be how they are right now. BRING ON THE MERGER!!! 

    • Perfectblue

      You got balls to be saying this on a T-Mobile supported website! If T-Mobile’s network is so garbage, then why is AT&T the one trying to acquire it from them?? And as far as AT&T providing customers with good customer service, that means you probably work for them & gotta talk like that for your job’s sake if that’s the case, I don’t know. And furthermore, T-Mo’s customer service is available until late @ 1AM daily versus AT&T which ends their customer service @ 9PM. So what are you saying???

      • Fray Contreras

        The reason they trying to get with T-Mobile because they both uses the same compatible network. They want spectrum so it can be less traffic flowing on their network. Right now its crowded. Its the fastest way to get spectrum. So merging with another company which has the same network makes alot of sense. Cuz getting a spectrum alone takes a very long time. The only thing I dont like about ATT is that their customer service is closed on weekends. That really sucks. But other than that I dont have a problem. And no I dont work for them u ass.

    • Tortionist

      Actually T mobile would still have the same plans or better. You don’t know much about economics do you? AT&T customer service is bad, they suck. I was with them for a little over a year. Only a selfish fool would support this buyout. It lowers the amount of competition, thereby helping to destroy innovation and raise prices. T Mobile has a great network, less dropped calls, etc. You should learn about economics before you go spouting this crap. You obviously don’t understand innovation, taxes, and inflation. There’s two main ways for a company to succeed. The same two ways that a country grows and prospers economically. That’s through technology/innovation and better management practices. Through the improvement of better practices and technological innovation, prices go down and not up. Companies have to continually improve in both of these areas or it seriously affects their bottom line and they eventually go under. Companies can’t raise prices whenever they wish, unless they are a monopoly, otherwise people will shop elsewhere. For taxes, if a company wants to make more money or hurt competitors, they lobby the government to get laws passed that benefit them and hurt their competitors. Basically, they get competitors to pay much higher taxes due to their lobbying and getting the government involved. This happens a lot nowadays. There is a natural 3% to 5% annual inflation rate. Many people think this causes prices to rise. It doesn’t, it just causes the dollar to buy less, which has the same effect as prices rising, but it’s not the same. Also just because some prices go, doesn’t mean that inflation is causing it. I had to correct my wife on that one. She’s the PR (public relations) major, already graduated, and i’m the economics finance major, haven’t graduated yet. The better way to look at inflation and put it into perspective is not by what something costs now versus what it cost in the past, but rather by how many work hours it takes to pay for something. An example would be the T.V. In the 1960′s it took about 500 work hours to pay for a T.V. Nowadays it takes about 100 work hours to pay for a decent T.V. Even though the prices are higher nowadays, due to innovation best practices, our money spends better, if you will. I think you get the idea. Prices will go up, but our money will buy more and more efficiently. This makes your argument invalid, especially when you look at it in the right way.

      • Fray Contreras

        Yes.. Your right on certain things.

      • Tortionist

        Actually, i’m right on all accounts. I know economics and how it works, you’d be surprised at how little people know about economics these days. It’s really kind of sad.

    • Zifnab2k

      Its funny for you to say globules network is worst than att. Here in la I’ve seen as high as 6 mbps on my 3g (not 4g) phone. Meanwhile I’ve seen consistent speeds of 1mbps on atts “4g” phones. I don’t know where you live, but in Los Angeles att is trash. And that doesn’t even touch on their voice issues. I’ve never been able to have a full conversation with an att customer here. Half the time my call never reaches their phone. Every one of my friends that had an att iphone4 shelled out the cancellation fee and bought the same phone on verizon just so they could make phone falls and get data speeds that exceed 400 kbps(that’s what att 3g gets in LA)

      I love people that get good reception in their city and think its indicative of good service country wide. They suck bro, quit suckling at their test.

      • Fray Contreras

        I live in NYC one of the most congested city. My brother owns the iPhone 4 and I own the Samsung Focus. With the iPhone he gets nearly  6 Mbps and with the Focus 5 and some change. Now their 4G phone is actually capped and we all pretty much know why is this. I never had any dropped calls or anything. So I guess its pretty bad over there. Plus the reason its like this cuz of the stupid iPhone. Verizon recently started having the iPhone. So their network is not congested like att.

  • Johnny Boyd

    They sound just like Washington Politicos…..they know whats best for us, It doesn’t matter if WE know whats bes for ourselves.

  • Tmax

    AT&T can say whatever it wants, but I remember when they were a monopoly. They couldn’t have cared less about their customers and I don’t expect that will change. The moment it’s official, I am dumping my T-Mobile service. I’ll be damned if I will ever support AT&T again. I don’t care if I have to use a string attached to a tin can.

    • http://twitter.com/starsgalore Stars.Galore

      don’t forget it wasn’t at&t, it was southwestern bell… it was more like momma bell bought at&t and because at&t was a more popular name they kept it

    • AdrianMT4G

      Lmao!

  • oaussieo

    I am a T-Mobile customer and I can say if this goes through (witch I don’t think it will, but if it does) I will be transferring my service to one of there competition (Sprint, Verizon)

    • J. Williams

      I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EVZR6774PL27ROXUJQSQQEP4X4 Mauni M

    Att can suck my left nut. 

    • http://twitter.com/starsgalore Stars.Galore

      what about your right one? ;)

      • J. Williams

        LOL

      • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

        That is saved for Verizon.

  • Akjsdfha

    funny how At&t peeps keep saying TMO sucks when AT&T openly omits saying that they suck and need TMO’s network

    • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

      Trolls will be trolls.

  • Anonymous

    I’ve come to realize that T-Mobile USA is like a National/Regional Hybrid.  They bridge the gap between a MetroPCS & a AT&T/Verizon.  Their coverage and plans are indicative of this.  The handset lineup is definitely on par with National carriers though.  T-Mobile’s position in the US market has alot to do with why they’re on the auction block.  Up until recently, they haven’t been able to compete in terms of price with regionals, so they get beat there. And they lack the exposure/investment to run with AT&T and Verizon.  So T-Mobile sits in the middle, getting beat on both sides.

  • Anonymous

    AT&T is without a doubt the worst carrier in this country. They have the slowest data speeds along with the worst plans. Listening to AT&T talk about this proposed buyout they are doing it all for the sake of the buying public, aren’t they nice. I have T-Mobile in the Boston area with fabulous data speeds and zero dropped calls. AT&T in my area (Boston suburb, Rt. 128 belt) have the worst data speeds and you can not stay on a call if you tried, honestly, it is just awful. This is a huge market for any network, AT&T has not improved this area for years.  I will not hold my breath for them to improve. If this buyout goes thru, everyone in this area will go to either Verizon or Sprint. This is all common knowledge in our area. The funny thing is when you call AT&T they tell you they have fabulous speeds in our area and swear to it. I dislike liars, no I hate liars. My dad use to tell me this all the time, There are two kinds of people in this world he didn’t like, they were thieves and liars. AT&T is both. I am hoping this buyout doesn’t go thru and T-Mobile finds a better answer for their business solution, I hope that is staying in the USA with their great service. T-Mobile’s HSPA+ is a damn good network and will probably be better and faster then anything that AT&T will every put out. Just My Opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Saying a thing is so does not make it so.
    It’s easy to pitch an argument for your case on a blog post where you can’t be challenged and called to support your claims.  It’s another thing to do so during a hearing.

  • BrianC

    I don’t care if the deal goes through.  What I care about is that AT&T can offer unlimited 4g with tethering for once device.  That is the one concession they need to make.  

  • Foofighter28

    it’s true about the financial ability for TMO to finance an LTE build, you dont know how difficult it is to wait every year for your build budget to get approved and a leader that had his head in the clouds thinking we dont need data bla bla bla stuff that outsiders wouldnt know about.  

    So in a way this really is a welcome thing, they’ve always let it be known that they were shopping to a partner or outright buyer…Sprint’s just a bitter pill becuase they didnt get to dance w/ the girl at the dance

  • now_onTMO

    How about we all tmo customers transfer to sprint just to piss attits.. Attits will probably try to buy sprint too.. Lol lol lol..

    Im not hating on att at all, but if I’d blame anyone for this stupid merger, it’s DT..

    Ughh whatever..

  • SPrince88

    Let me sum it all up…as a current T-Mobile employee…T-Mobile has no one to blame for this but themselves for their absolute lack of marketing. The commercials suckkkk in comparison to the “Droid” ones. People really come into my store asking for a “Droid” phone. Reason #2..Not getting the iphone…I have people that just come to America for the first time, come into the store and ask for an Iphone 4..sorry we dont have it….Reason #3..Why the hell do you give Walmart first dibs on the HTC Sensation 4G…we have the phones in stock at my store and cant even sell them..but Walmart can…T-Mobile gives a lot to their retail partners (Radioshack, Walmart)…Reason #4..How come corporate stores get the worst shipment…Since the G2x and the Sidekick 4G came out…we have had about 20 phones (out of both brands) combined..we have been sold out for weeks…with no sign of shipment..and this goes for every store in the area..and im located in New York City btw..not some hicksville town….Bottom line T-Mobile does not know how to be competitive. They should be 3rd over Sprint right now..But hey guess thats the way the cookie crumbles….

    • Foofighter28

      have you looked around and found the company’s business plan?  you’ll be looking a long time because TMO US Never had one.  How does a company that employees 40k+ people not have a business plan?  And yes marketing sucks and so do the company’s sales objective.  First you want to target the vzw/att customer then you want to focus on value and then next month it’s something else…then Humm  takes over and wait we need to capture everyone AND CHURN.  Something the last CEO didnt care to deal with since back in the hayday they were signing  up more than they lost but now that it’s flattened out…guess what you lose more than you sign up.

      Oh and what we said about using our 3G network for just voice capacity nevermind sorry bout that we need to focus on data arpu because that’s where the money is…really??  Did you have your brain trust figure that one out too?  Ugh i can still see the smug cockey arrogance when he said to all the middle mgrs how he turned down Steve Jobs and the iPhone…how’s that shoe taste?  Probably pretty good with your golden parachute

      I’m not bitter…i just really like this company and pissed that they ran it into the ground

      • InvisibleHand

        I still remember hearing “we’re not an internet company, voice is where the money is”. Now hit 60% smart-mix and keep acquisition ARPU up. Thanks Bobby D.

  • Anti-AT&T

    I am really hoping this merger does not go through. Having dealt with both carriers I would take T-Mobile hands down. Everything about them surpasses AT&T. Their customer service and support is outstanding. Good equipment and plans at excellent prices. AT&T can claim what they want but they will buy T-mobile and ruin it for all of us.

  • http://www.electric4less.biz KeepTMoAlive

    I found the original blog site and I noticed that they are not allowing any comments to show up.  Just another example that gutless AT&T can’t compete so they have to buy out the competition.  I left AT&T for TMo in December because I was fed up with their dropped calls and expensive plans and when they added the capped data plans I was so glad I switched.  Now with the merger they’re dragging me back.  They are going to reuse the TMo’s 4G band for LTE so my 4G phone will be practically useless.  I find the blog post to be disingenuous whiny and self-serving.  The merger will leave us with 3 national carriers and eliminating the national carrier that currently has the cheapest rate plans.  That is not a good deal for the consumer.  I will be switching to Sprint.

    • Joe_ek84

      they wont turn of the 4g band till prob around 1 year to 1 year and a half after deal closes

      • Joe_ek84

        by then youd prob want an upgrade anyway

        • http://www.electric4less.biz KeepTMoAlive

          You’re right, I will be switching to Sprint by then.  I just don’t like that they are taking away one of my choices.  Good old American “Free” Market.  If you can’t beat your competition, buy them.

        • InvisibleHand

          If you have enough money to buy your competition, I’d say you beat them pretty damn well.

        • http://www.electric4less.biz KeepTMoAlive

          That assumes that you are getting your money from revenue as opposed to venture capital or some inflated stock issue.  Just because a company has money doesn’t mean it is winning.

  • Houstone

    Att= arthritis

  • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

    Hey ATT,

    I bet you can cover 100% of USA with that 30 something billion to build more towers/improve network instead of using it to buy T-mo.
    And you will be hate less for doing so.

  • Anonymous

    Let’s see, of the 4 “major” carriers which ones has overage charges on the top “unlimited” plans? Sprint? Unlimited. Verizon? Unlimited. T-Mobile? Unlimited with throttling but no overage charge (and the top data plan is 10GB). AT&T? 4GB plan with 1GB automatically added at a cost of $10 with additional 1GB being added at the same cost up to whatever amount you consume. So 10GB on AT&T would cost you $45.00 for the datapro 4GB plan plus $60.00 for the additional 6GB so $105.00 in addition to your $69.99 unlimited calling package for $174.99 on an individual plan.

    10GB on the other carriers:

    Sprint- $99.99 for unlimited plan plus the $10 premium data add on fee- $109.99.
    Verizon- $89.99 for unlimited plan plus $29.99 data- $119.98.
    T-Mobile- $119.99 for unlimited 10GB plan- $119.99

    Yeah, it’s an industry-wide price thing. What a bunch of BS. I’m only being correct, not critical AT&T.

    As for “duopoly” think about the total subscribers.

    Note: These totals are from end of 2010.

    ATT- 95.5 million including prepaid

    Verizon- 94.1 million including prepaid

    Sprint-  46 million
    including prepaid

    T-Mobile- 33.7 million including prepaid

    Total of 269.3 Million out of 302.9 Million total (as stated
    by CTIA). If the merger happens AT&T would end up with at least (not
    including subscriber adds before the merger is approved) 129.2 million customers.
    That means Verizon and AT&T would have 223.3 million customers total out of
    302.9 million for a total of 73.72% of all subscribers in the US. That is a
    staggering amount of customers for only two carriers. Metro PCS, Cricket, Virgin,
    etc account for only a small percentage of overall subscribers so their
    argument doesn’t hold up as far as competition goes. Also the amount of phones
    offered will go down considerably without competition and they are not even
    addressing that issue at all.

    Just a few thoughts anyway.  

    • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

      Best 10GB/month on t-mo for me is……(EM+ 500min $29.99 + $10/5GB) x 2 lines = $80 before taxes.

  • Guest1

    AT&T. You just love f****** people up right? I called AT&T because of issues with my billing on my business network. It showed over $400 dollars. THEY CHARGE FOR REPAIRING. That’s just ridiculous & stupid. Their policy is that as long as its their problem(meaning they fix the outside of the building) we don’t have to pay at all… what the hell am I supposed to do when the phone line is inside? I wasn’t even notified at all that they charge for repairing at the time. So I called customer rep and it took 30 minutes of my god damn life just to get to one dumb butt rep. He didn’t understand my dilemma so he transferred me over to repairing…ARE YOU SERIOUS? I hung up and called them again. Another 30 min wait. I explained it to the lady that picked up and she was actually kind enough to listen and file a report to some group where they actually credited the repairing $200. Bottom line AT&T is a piece of s*** and when they do get the merger done I want to see a better god damn customer service  and make the rep someone who can speak English fluently not some Hindi dude that lives halfway across the earth and stutter/talk so fast you can’t understand them. I also want better pricing and non of those hidden bills that fly at you. (which i will never see when it goes through) btw. I’ve been using T-MO’s network for cell phones and been very happy with them. AT&T can just go suck my left nut and make my right one jealous.

    • Guest

      Your english isn’t all that super terrific there pal!
      Asians complain about everything.

      • Anonymous

        Heh?  Asians complaining about everything?  WTF are you on to?

        • Guest

          Ask an asian

        • Anonymous

          I asked myself and myself couldn’t give an answer.

        • Anonymous

          I asked myself and myself couldn’t give an answer.

        • Anonymous

          I asked myself and myself couldn’t give an answer.

      • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

        Way to hide behind guest account, you stereotype bigot. 

    • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

      Wow, many wants ATT to suck the left, don’t worry, Verizon will make the other one happy too.

  • Trashcan

    I dont want ATT service and I DO desire a GSM provider.

    So ATT if you do purchase TMobile you would have a MONOPOLY.

    MONOPOLYs are not good for consumers, not matter what you say.

    ATT sits on spectrum already that it doesnt use.  Why does it want  to hog more, when it cant manage or use what it currently has.

    So based on these facts, all your arguments are useless and your actions clearly prove you will only increase prices for users and competition will suffer as ATT will be the ONLY GSM provider in the US.

    So please listen to clients, WE DONT WANT ATTs sevice in any way.

    • Tortionist

      I agree with you for the most part,except that AT&T wouldn’t be a monopoly or even a duopoly for that fact. Yes they have monopolistic intentions, but that’s different from a true monopoly. All businesses have monopolistic intentions. This buyout is bad for the consumers though. It helps to get rid of competition and innovation and that, I am completely against. That is why our healthcare is so messed up. Little to no competition, and a lack of innovation. It’s pure economics. One fact that few people realize is that there has never been a true monopoly in the U.S. Not once. 

    • InvisibleHand

      Writing MONOPOLY in all caps doesn’t make your weak argument any stronger. How can a company have a monopoly simply because you don’t like you’re alternatives? That’s like saying that comcast is a monopoly simply because I’m not willing to consider satellite T.V. and comcast is the only cable provider in my area.

      • duh

        its not about preference… its necesity. if you travel to different countries, you’ll know that gsm phones are what u need. it is a total monopoly towards travellers and we live in america were jobs are created on different countries

        • Anonymous

          Verizon does offer world phones if your a traveler you would need one of those.

        • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

          Right, Does it work on 3G network worldwide? or 2G only?
          People do need 3G data even when they are in another country….

        • Anonymous

          Don’t know about the 3g on the Verizon world phone, but US T-Mobile 3g only works in the US. AT&T will work on 3g in Europe because they use the same bands. So really your stuck with AT&T or you would have to buy prepaid to use euro 3g.

        • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

          Wrong, please stop giving out misinformations of you don’t know.
          AFAIK, CDMA’s so called world phone can only do 2G network, edge sucks.

          Both unlocked ATT and T-mo’s phones can work with 3G on most carriers around the world.
          Higher end phones on ATT usually have 850,1900, 900, 2100 bands for 3G
          Higher end phones on T-mo usually have 900, 1700, 2100 for 3G

          Most of the world uses 2100, some use 900, few use 850, and few use 1900.
          And both ATT and T-mo have 900 and 2100 for use with most carriers in the rest of the world.

          I travel a lot! I just pop a local sim card in my ATT or T-mo phones and good to go. (yes, I have phones from both carriers.) A matter of fact, I have a Tilt2 from ATT and HD2 from T-mo and they are both at this moment happily using Hong Kong carrier’s 3G network, as I am over seas now.
          And the same goes for people visiting the USA.

          So, No… having unlocked GSM phones, one will not be stuck on any carriers when traveling.
          And if one have a phone with all 5 bands for 3G (Many Nokia high ends like N8), you won’t even be stuck on ATT or T-mo when in USA, you can use either one.

          CDMA sucks for traveler, and it’s only good for people staying in USA most of the time.
          But ATT sucks more, I would goto a CDMA carrier and buy an EXTRA unlocked GSM phone for travel, just to not go back to ATT.

        • Jaiblevins

          If you travel to a foreign country, you’re not using at&t or T-Mobile,anyway. Unless you want to pay outrageous international Roaming charges(not charged by at&t, but by the cell carrier in that country, btw.) And, the only way to use your American GSM phone on another network is to unlock it, or buy an unlocked phone. Either way, the complaint about GSM monopoly, is disingenuous, at best, as both Verizon and Sprint do offer “world phones”.

        • http://ashn.myopenid.com/ Ash

          Read my reply to archie53.

  • F800

    Maybe I know just enough to be dangerous, but AT&T’s claims regarding expanded coverage seem to be a bit disingenuous.  For voice service, seems true that the combined company could offer improved coverage almost immediately in the GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850 MHz band which they both use and which all of their handsets support.  They could look regulators “in-the-eye” and argue that this would benefit consumers immediately, and it could be argued that data service, too, would be improved to all if you consider GPRS/EDGE (technically, AT&T could call this data service but few users would call it acceptable).

    When they include ‘broadband’ in the conversation, however, I believe they begin the deception.  AT&T uses 850 MHz, 1900 MHz and now 700 MHz (LTE) for their high speed data while TMO uses 1700/2100 MHz.  There is NO way this buyout is going to expand boardband coverage until AT&T purchases and deploys new basestations, antenna, etc.  This expense will be same, whether they get TMO or not, and it won’t be a rapid roll out, especially after AT&T writes that $39B check.   Additionally, there are very, very few handsets today which have the abilitly to operate on 1900/1700/2100 (and I don not believe ANY support 700/1700/2100).

    So please correct me if I’ve missed something, but if this is correct, any claims about better service are limited to voice service.  New (expen$ive) infrastructure investment and completely new handsets will be required to make this happen.  Sure, the technology is here today, but the it would take less investment on AT&T’s part to expand their service if they DIDN’T buy TMO.   I think they just want to buy a larger customer base, reduce competition, and manipulate pricing. 

  • Jarvis Billena

    I think its funny how people say they didn’t like the idea of t-mobile trying to have sprint buy them out and now it seems like 75% of us will be switching over to sprint if this crap goes down..I know ill be with sprint!! How about you??

    • Frankvcs

      I agree. I will be jumping ship to Sprint

    • Anonymous

      I think simple mobile will be my new carrier being that they in essence are a cheaper t-mobile. They literally run off of our network and charge a lower price for it. I wonder what happens to them in all of this.  

      • Jonathond

        they’ll probably get sucked up in the sale and eliminated.

      • http://www.volkswagen.de Michael

        I agree! SimpleMobile is cheaper than T-Mobile and the same exact thing. Various family members of mine have it without any issues.

        Only downside is that once you port a phone number over to SimpleMobile you cant port it over to T-Mobile postpaid (maybe prepaid yes, but not sure) as it is already on T-Mobile. Ironic isn’t it?

      • mrsbelpit

        They also tell you you get unltd data and cut you off at 1 gig.  There’s complaints all ove rthe internet, look into it.

      • Dewey Cox

        “our” network will not be there. If we go down, all smaller companies that use “our” towers will go down too.

    • Mark Terry II

      I think for many people it’s simply a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils. I do not like AT&T (left them for Verizon, then left Verizon for T-Mo). I always had problems with AT&T billing, improper charges, customer support issues, and dropped calls. Sprint, on the surface, seemed good. When I tried Sprint for two weeks I found that I was constantly losing signal due to their extremely patchy network, even in supposedly high coverage areas. Their coverage map is like a Georges Seurat painting. It looks nice until you get real close and see that it’s all patchy little dots that equate to about 1/8th mile of coverage with lots of dead spots in between.

      That being said, if AT&T does merge with T-Mo, I’ll ride out my contract to see how things go. If things don’t look good I’ll dump my Android phone and pick up a feature phone and a pay-as-you-go plan with Metro PCS. I won’t support AT&T, because I think it is a horrible service provider, and Sprint is simply not an option at all. Unfortunately, regardless of the vitriol and grand statements, I think many people will cave in and join AT&T’s death star because they are loathe to give up their smart phones or high speed connectivity.

  • Zifnab2k

    Lower prices? Lmfao. It already costs $980 more per year for a comparable att plan to what I have with T-Mobile. They expect me to believe that they will lower prices? When in atts history habe they ever lowered prices? Answer:never.

    I love that some signatures from some union bosses is being used as an indication of American support. I see it as an indication of brobary personally. As for tech industry support” I’ve been a web designer / developed for 8+ years, and I would never support Att. Its clear att has no clue how to efficiently run a network infrastructure. Why would I believe that now, with their pockets 38 billion dollars lighter, they would suddenly know how, and at no additional cost to the consumer… that’s incredulous at best.

    They wont be providing me with better service, as I will never be a att customer again for any reason short of a full monopoly. Until then, I’d rather put my money in some other crooks pocket.

    • InvisibleHand

      Maybe the reason T-Mobile is financial trouble is because they charge you a cool grand less than the companies who are profitable? Just a thought. Whether or not the merger is approved, prices will go up. T-Mobile cannot sustain its current offerings long term. Whether or not AT&T knows how to efficiently run a network infrastructure is irrelevant considering they know how to efficiently run a business, which is why they had 38 billion to throw at DT. 

      • Anonymous

         T Mobile is and hs always been profitable.. show me quarters where they lost money or didn’t make a profit.

      • Anonymous

        Companies like Cricket charge less than either company but they are growing.  Sprint charges like T-Mobile but they are doing better than they’ve done in 5 years.  

        T-Mobile is not actually in financial trouble yet but they are less profitable this year compared to last year and reason being is because customers are choosing to leave.  Why?  Who knows but I bet its poor advertising and no trend setting handsets.  Droid(s), EVO, iPhone 4… MyTouch 3G???(MT4G was way too late in the year

      • BigMixxx

        Really?  T mobile’s operational margins are the BEST in the industry.  There is no doubt about that.  All this hype about Churn, etc, etc, etc.  T mobile’s yearly Operational costs are about 4 billion, 25% of what the next nearest competitor is.   They have a VERY good baseline of operations. 

        • Dewey Cox

          Churn is a MAJOR factor in their lack of growth. You cannot turn as many customers as they do and continue to grow. If I am correct, they have the highest and VZW ( who everyone seems to hate) has the lowest.

  • Anonymous

    Lots of jobs will be lost at T-mobile. Every one who is a duplicate of some one in ATT gets the boot and WA will lose one of its big employers. I hope the FCC stops this insanity.

  • TMoFan

    Once again at&t is using the small players like Leap to push this takeover, yet at the same time they try to have it both ways by saying they don’t compete with them including T-Mobile. Which is it at&t? They should mention that these same small carriers all have serious concerns about this takeover but that would get in the way of their corporate bs.

    I’d love to see this takeover fall apart.

    • InvisibleHand

      If you ask anyone who works for AT&T or Verizon,you will find that they only believe that they compete with each other and that all the “second tier” companies (including T-Mobile and Sprint) compete with each other. Competition and consumer options are viewed very differently during market segmentation/targeting, which is why the smaller players like Cricket are viewed as options for consumers but not competition for AT&T.

      • Anonymous

        T-mobile is a direct competitor to AT&T anyone and everyone knows that.

        • F800

          I believe InvisibleHand is talking about the internal perceptions and attitude of AT&T.  While it’s not surprising that they have that attitude, it is enlightening to know that that’s their perspective.

  • Mcbride222

    Version:1.0
    StartHTML:0000000167
    EndHTML:0000014801
    StartFragment:0000000544
    EndFragment:0000014785

    Not
    surprising that Microsoft
    (“the cooler”)
    is in favor of the AT&T / T-Mobile merger a near monopoly it’s
    self who has been killing innovations in the PC industry for years.
    Microsoft is like a beach whale waiting to die. No vision,
    creativity or dreams of any kind. Right mobile 7 whippy. Thank God,
    for Steve Jobs and the Apple iPhone.

    The
    Commission has a difficult task in resolving many complex issues and
    balancing the wide interests of many parties but that is not the case
    in this matter. It is very clear that the Commission has no
    choice
    but to deny this
    request
    by AT&T to take over T-Mobile when an overwhelming number of the
    comments that have been submitted to the Commission voice strong
    opposition to the merger between the two. The merger would reduce
    competition in the mobile market and will most likely drive up
    prices. Cemented into the public records are thousands of comments
    that are clearly unfavorable
    to
    an AT&T / T-Mobile merger. The Commission has an obligation to
    ensuring that the public interest is a priority and is met. The
    Commission must deny this request to consolidate the mobile industry
    into a near duopoly that will benefit a few at expense of the many.
    AT&T would control most of the available mobile spectrum and
    in-turn give AT&T an unprecedented amount of control over the
    mobile industry having a very real potential for abuse which must be
    taken into genuine
    consideration
    by the Commission. Verizon will be next in line with a request to
    merge with Sprint for all the same reasons. The bottom line is that
    we are talking about a consolidation of
    electromagnetic
    spectrum a very valuable and limited natural resource that is
    absolutely necessary and is a must have in order to build and a
    wireless network. You have access to usable spectrum or you don’t
    and without it you are locked out of the wireless industry. Allowing
    one company to control most of all the available and usable mobile
    spectrum is unthinkable and very dangerous when you take into
    consideration the we are now living in a mobile world are very
    dependent on our mobile devices like Smart-Phones, iPads, and
    Laptops. The combined AT&T / T- Mobile would be the largest
    mobile provider in the U.S. and would be able to assert total control
    over mobile handsets, applications, equipment, protocol development,
    mobile cloud, music, voice , data, photos, Internet access, gaming,
    digital GPS, digital payments, the mobile OS, auto and home
    applications and a lot more as more and more devices become available
    in the near future. A T&T said in its request that it will be
    facing lots of competition from companies like Leap and Light-Squared
    who controls
    some satellite spectrum. Washington
    D.C. Politics, House
    Armed Services Committee just passed it’s version of the National
    Defense Authorization Act that expresses very deep concerns about
    potential GPS interference. “the FCC should indefinitely postpone
    final decision on whether to authorize LightSquared operations until
    the harmful interference issue has been resolved, with the full
    coordination and approval of the Department of Defense.” Trimble
    Navigation said the tests showed that LightSquared’s network clearly
    cause interference with GPS “There is not a solution here,”
    he said. “In our view, it’s time to stop squandering resources
    on this and look for alternative spectrum. The
    speed of which the Commission can make more spectrum available can
    take many years, the 700MHz. spectrum has taken over 10 years and
    still have a lot of interoperability, roaming, and interference
    concerns. It may take many years before usable mobile spectrum is
    made available. The fact of the matter is that you can not have true
    competition in the wireless industry if you don’t have access to
    spectrum you have to have spectrum to build and run a wireless
    telephone company no matter how much money you have or how fast your
    iPhones is with out having usable spectrum you can not compete. If
    you have no spectrum you have no competitors that is whole idea and
    the underlying grand plan of the AT&T / T-Mobile deal. Just like
    wars are about the oil not about Osama.

    Verizon’s tag line “Rule
    the Air”.
    Can you hear me now?

    TheEmperor
    Has No Clothes
    Let’s take a look at the Facts of the matter for the Los Angels,
    market. AT&T / T-Mobile / Qualcomm
    and
    Verizon will control most of the available usable mobile spectrum in
    the Los Angels market giving two companies unprecedented control.
    First thing you need to understand that spectrum is a finite
    resource, future technology developments will only increase the
    demand for more mobile spectrum. Radio spectrum enables every type of
    wireless service including satellite systems, radar, mobile and fixed
    telecommunications, as well as broadcasting. Today in most markets
    you have only about 330MHz. of usable mobile spectrum that includes
    AWS, 700MHz. PCS and Cellular. It could be many years to get more
    spectrum into the market place.

    Interoperability
    rules
    must be impose in the 700MHz. band as a narrowly tailored and
    specific condition in any AT&T /T- Mobile / Qualcomm
    transactions. The commission must require Interoperability across the
    entire 700 MHz band Any
    mobile wireless device that is manufactured after
    June 2013 and
    operates on paired spectrum in the lower 700 MHz band must operate on
    all paired spectrum in the lower 700 MHz band.

    The
    Commission must do whatever is necessary to remove the unfairness
    that has been permitted by the parties who deliberately and
    consciously have been orphaning
    bands of smaller providers
    and as a result of such
    manipulation the
    lower A Block holders face far higher costs than those associated
    with other spectrum bands a significant
    disadvantaged through the lack of access to new devices and delays in
    the development of standards, chip sets, and equipment.
    The integrity of the agency is at stake and can not be compromised.

    Version:1.0
    StartHTML:0000000167
    EndHTML:0000014801
    StartFragment:0000000544
    EndFragment:0000014785

    Not
    surprising that Microsoft
    (“the cooler”)
    is in favor of the AT&T / T-Mobile merger a near monopoly it’s
    self who has been killing innovations in the PC industry for years.
    Microsoft is like a beach whale waiting to die. No vision,
    creativity or dreams of any kind. Right mobile 7 whippy. Thank God,
    for Steve Jobs and the Apple iPhoneThe
    Commission has a difficult task in resolving many complex issues and
    balancing the wide interests of many parties but that is not the case
    in this matter. It is very clear that the Commission has no
    choice
    but to deny this
    request
    by AT&T to take over T-Mobile when an overwhelming number of the
    comments that have been submitted to the Commission voice strong
    opposition to the merger between the two. The merger would reduce
    competition in the mobile market and will most likely drive up
    prices. Cemented into the public records are thousands of comments
    that are clearly unfavorable
    to
    an AT&T / T-Mobile merger. The Commission has an obligation to
    ensuring that the public interest is a priority and is met. The
    Commission must deny this request to consolidate the mobile industry
    into a near duopoly that will benefit a few at expense of the many.
    AT&T would control most of the available mobile spectrum and
    in-turn give AT&T an unprecedented amount of control over the
    mobile industry having a very real potential for abuse which must be
    taken into genuine
    consideration
    by the Commission. Verizon will be next in line with a request to
    merge with Sprint for all the same reasons. The bottom line is that
    we are talking about a consolidation of
    electromagnetic
    spectrum a very valuable and limited natural resource that is
    absolutely necessary and is a must have in order to build and a
    wireless network. You have access to usable spectrum or you don’t
    and without it you are locked out of the wireless industry. Allowing
    one company to control most of all the available and usable mobile
    spectrum is unthinkable and very dangerous when you take into
    consideration the we are now living in a mobile world are very
    dependent on our mobile devices like Smart-Phones, iPads, and
    Laptops. The combined AT&T / T- Mobile would be the largest
    mobile provider in the U.S. and would be able to assert total control
    over mobile handsets, applications, equipment, protocol development,
    mobile cloud, music, voice , data, photos, Internet access, gaming,
    digital GPS, digital payments, the mobile OS, auto and home
    applications and a lot more as more and more devices become available
    in the near future. A T&T said in its request that it will be
    facing lots of competition from companies like Leap and Light-Squared
    who controls
    some satellite spectrum. Washington
    D.C. Politics, House
    Armed Services Committee just passed it’s version of the National
    Defense Authorization Act that expresses very deep concerns about
    potential GPS interference. “the FCC should indefinitely postpone
    final decision on whether to authorize LightSquared operations until
    the harmful interference issue has been resolved, with the full
    coordination and approval of the Department of Defense.” Trimble
    Navigation said the tests showed that LightSquared’s network clearly
    cause interference with GPS “There is not a solution here,”
    he said. “In our view, it’s time to stop squandering resources
    on this and look for alternative spectrum. The
    speed of which the Commission can make more spectrum available can
    take many years, the 700MHz. spectrum has taken over 10 years and
    still have a lot of interoperability, roaming, and interference
    concerns. It may take many years before usable mobile spectrum is
    made available. The fact of the matter is that you can not have true
    competition in the wireless industry if you don’t have access to
    spectrum you have to have spectrum to build and run a wireless
    telephone company no matter how much money you have or how fast your
    iPhones is with out having usable spectrum you can not compete. If
    you have no spectrum you have no competitors that is whole idea and
    the underlying grand plan of the AT&T / T-Mobile deal. Just like
    wars are about the oil not about Osama.

    Verizon’s tag line “Rule
    the Air”.
    Can you hear me now?
    TheEmperor
    Has No Clothes
    Let’s take a look at the Facts of the matter for the Los Angels,
    market. AT&T / T-Mobile / Qualcomm
    and
    Verizon will control most of the available usable mobile spectrum in
    the Los Angels market giving two companies unprecedented control.
    First thing you need to understand that spectrum is a finite
    resource, future technology developments will only increase the
    demand for more mobile spectrum. Radio spectrum enables every type of
    wireless service including satellite systems, radar, mobile and fixed
    telecommunications, as well as broadcasting. Today in most markets
    you have only about 330MHz. of usable mobile spectrum that includes
    AWS, 700MHz. PCS and Cellular. It could be many years to get more
    spectrum into the market place.

    Interoperability
    rules
    must be impose in the 700MHz. band as a narrowly tailored and
    specific condition in any AT&T /T- Mobile / Qualcomm
    transactions. The commission must require Interoperability across the
    entire 700 MHz band Any
    mobile wireless device that is manufactured after
    June 2013 and
    operates on paired spectrum in the lower 700 MHz band must operate on
    all paired spectrum in the lower 700 MHz band.

    The
    Commission must do whatever is necessary to remove the unfairness
    that has been permitted by the parties who deliberately and
    consciously have been orphaning
    bands of smaller providers
    and as a result of such
    manipulation the
    lower A Block holders face far higher costs than those associated
    with other spectrum bands a significant
    disadvantaged through the lack of access to new devices and delays in
    the development of standards, chip sets, and equipment.
    The integrity of the agency is at stake and can not be compromised.

  • http://www.volkswagen.de Michael

    bla bla bla

  • Brians Android

    I don’t
    wish to be ugly but at&t you are full of yourself. Any fool can see you for
    what you are! GREADY AND SELFISH! Donta don……

  • Anonymous

    Their champions at Metro PCS are even against the merger . I’ve said it enough but I’ll say it one more time. If you are paying twice what a company is worth , getting a twenty billion dollar loan , and spreading LTE to massive areas where you will lose money , you will have to raise everyones prices counting your current AT&T customers . There is no way around it . Unless you are going to ask the taxpayers subsidize this LTE rural rollout or are indifferent to paying back your loan . At that point the taxpayers would have to back , restructure , or pay for your loan . You would have the largest market share . YOU WOULD BE TO BIG TO FAIL !! Without raising prices on all its customers it won’t be able to finance this massive borrowing .

  • http://buyresearchpaper.org/ research paper

    Thanks for interesting post.

  • Habbit

    When my AT&T contract finally ran out, I transferred my brother’s number and my line over to T-Mobile, and called AT&T and told them to cancel the other two numbers on the plan. I should’ve known there would be later trouble when I had to go over what I wanted to do with the outsourced Indian call representative three or four times before she finally (I thought) understood what I was wanting.

    Three months later I receive an e-mail from AT&T stating that the past three months of payments were overdue, and that they would be filing my debt with a bill collection agency if the entire sum wasn’t payed in thirty days or something like that. What??? Huh??? The hell??? I haven’t said the word AT&T for three months, how in the world could I owe them money? Anyway, I gave their horrible customer service line a call and figured out that in fact, the two numbers that I had canceled were in fact, not canceled and had been accumulating fees for the past three months. And the punch line is that ALL the representatives, the minimum wage an hour ones up to the supervisors, I had spoken to were adamant that I pay the “overdue” fees, something like $600. Even after one of the representatives admitted, “Well, it looks like the lines haven’t been used since June xth, the day the others were transferred.” Of-freaking-course they haven’t, because they were supposed to be canceled, ass.
     
    Regardless, for three weeks of back-and-worth with them, they would not budge on me not paying the fees caused by their mistake, until I told my dad about the situation, and he was so furious he called them using my information and, I don’t know how, but had them fix everything. 

    Not only was the service piss poor for around a $200/month cell phone contract, this icing on the cake sealed my deal of never wanting to deal with AT&T’s wireless service ever again. I get the same or better service with T-Mobile for $70 cheaper, a much better phone selection, much better customer service, and… cute chicks that work in every T-Mobile store I’ve entered. Ma Bell can keep its iPhones and terrible network infrastructure. 

    • Mopar6464

      Your First mistake was not getting the cancellation of the lines in writing from AT&T. It’s Your Fault You did’nt follow up on that matter and trusted a regular employee .

      Your Second mistake is judging everything of AT&T around the Iphone. There are other phones that are just as good if not better that get better reception and call quality.

      Time to man up and take responsibility for not following through withdifferent in the cancellation process.

      As for service quality of AT&T , It’s not all the same in Different Geographical Locations.

      In My area T-Mobile Sucks for 3G service , always getting Edge 75 % of the time just 15 minutes outside a major city. The call quality is fine , but T-Mobile can’t at least provide full 3G coverage while billing you for it while receiving Edge service. That’s one of the reasons that has crushed T-Mobile reputation and why a lot of people leave.

      Half my family is on AT&T and the other half Verizon with four of us left on T-Mobile. And Verizon’s grass is not any greener on the other side either. My brothers 3G speeds are actually faster than Verizon’s 3G speeds with side by side test with the same smartphones.
      T-Mobile has faster data than both , when you can actually get 3G speeds and not Edge. But that’s only good if you stick you tongue right on a T-Mobile tower for direct reception.

      • CharlieSheen

        Love Mopars. 

        But you are wrong on the speeds. Independent research, some of which has been posted here, shows Verizon kicking everyones but on LTE. I dont follow 3g. But TMOs 3M D is the laughing stock of the industry. Thats why I bought a mifi from VZE and dumped LiL Wayne. 12-14 almost everywhere rocks.

        But wait, I am in Orlando and get 42 or 21 on Lil Wayne. Sure, and elephants fly.

        Buy the way, ATT posting has nothing to do with complaints. Comcast did the same. There were over 120,000 complaints lodged against the Comcast merger. 

        Hello?

        Can you hear me now?

        David iphone will love ATT back home where it belongs.

        Homey dont play no new TMO phones that will be a doorstop in a year.

        • Mopar6464

          In My Area in Ohio , AT&T 3G is faster than Verizon 3G service. Im not comparing it to LTE 4G  that Verizon offers in limited areas , that’s like comparing apples to oranges.

        • MNS

          Yeah, such a great LTE network that’s had a few outages since its launch a few months back! But knowing you, a Verizon customer, I’ll bet you’ll say you never had such PROBLEMS!

      • Habbit

        So apparently the reply I sent to you a couple days ago wasn’t approved by the moderators, and since I don’t want to type up a long reply anymore, I’m just going to say your excuses for AT&T’s mistake are laughably stupid. 

  • Auser72

    The fact that ATT felt a need to respond to the criticism over the past couple days means, should serve as a affirmation that the criticism IS WORKING. Those against the merger should feel that more invigorated.Let our voices continued to be heard. We have too, too many examples of the negative effects of lack of competion in any market means for the consumer, to fall for the bullshit line of advantages ATT is trying to give us. If it was all about providing better service, why not spend money on infrastructure improvement vs.merger/acquistion.

    • mrsbelpit

      I was about to post much the same thing.  The last time I looked at the comments on the FCC website, there were upwards of 35,000.  Keep it up, T-Mobilers (and anyone else who hates the idea of this merger)

    • Maschwar77

      I could not have said it better myself.  A response on AT&T’s part is indicative of a thinly veiled concern that the merger will fail costing them at least a billion dollars.  With that kind of cash infusion, T-Mobile would be left in a position to do some major improvements and coverage expansion to its network, potentially launching them way ahead.  Already, T-Mobile is far more customer friendly.

  • Anonymous

    May ATT shut the f’ up and stop using “tiring bomb” because many of us are so tired for such BS and such doing only increase the hate to the explosion!

  • Mo

    It does not matter what the people think! They will just pay off the politicians [bribe or known in America as lobbyists], get them to sign a letter to make the DOJ and FCC, and get it to be approved. Just as it happened with NBC and Comcast.
    Your Representative/Congressmen/Congresswomen who is suppose to represent you are more willing to give up what you want in the name of campaign donation.
    Happy, Happy, Joy, Joy.

  • Meagan

    Did you hear AT&T is installing FREE WiFI in 5+ NYC Parks?  Another way for AT&T to get props from the politicians and city folk.  This allows AT&T to install cell towers in more places without a lot excessive red tape.  The cost of giving FREE slow WiFi with blocked ports and adding a cell tower at the same time.  Very smart business tactic, whether we like AT&T or not…

    • Anonymous

      Its that kind of thinking that can help them compete instead of taking over the competition .

    • Anonymous

      Thats the kind of thinking that can allow AT&T to compete without buying up the competition or making promises they can’t live up to . 

  • Anonymous

    The site allows comments. Make yourself heard.

  • Bill

    If AT&T is serious about this merger than make their towers available NOW for T-Mobile users.  I’m sick of using two services where AT&T does not allow roaming.  AT&T and Verizon Wireless gobbled Alltel and while I have four bars do you think my T-Mobile device works there; nope!

  • Luwisanchez

    at&t sucks I get faster download speeds on my tmobile mytouch 4g than their sorry as wifi.6 to 8 mb down on mt4g.1 to 2.5 down at&t wifi.