T-Mobile executive says they are working on VoNR

t-mobile-office

Update (11/01): Corrected a typo.

 

It looks like T-Mobile is working on Voice over New Radio (VoNR). This was earlier reported by Fierce Wireless after T-Mo’s President of Technology, Neville Ray, spoke to the publication. According to the executive, VoNR will allow the Un-carrier’s 5G network to handle voice calls and data. 

Right now, T-Mobile customers with a 5G smartphone still use the carrier’s LTE network whenever they place a voice call. This is because T-Mobile first prioritized data delivery before voice calls. The executive shares that this is what they also did with LTE. “With LTE, we rolled out data first, then later VoLTE.”

Compared to VoLTE, Ray believes that the transition to VoNR won’t be as difficult. 

“To have a good, strong reliable voice service on 5G you need a big, strong 5G footprint.”

Ray shares that they are “getting close, but we’re not ready.” The company is currently doing a lot of VoNR testing. This is expected to fully launch in 2022. 

 

Source: Fierce Wireless

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  • Sharti24

    So can/will the iphone 12 with the X55 modem be able to do VoNR? The X55 is able to do SA 5G, it should be able to do VoNR

    • Shaun Michalak

      If I remember right, the X55 processor does support VoNR.. But there was some problems with compatibility with the modems that went with them, and the modems compatibility.. It is all a guess on if they find a way to work that out or not..

      One thing I do know is to get the full capabilities of 5G, you really do need the x60 setup.. The x55 does not support carrier aggregation below 6ghz (basically, only works on mmWave).. and the x60 is fully compatible with the VoNR technology too.

  • Shaun Michalak

    I do not understand what is taking to so long with VoNR.. They made a comment that in May 2020 that they made their first VoNR call with commercial cell phones on their test network.. He even talked about how you could possibly be seeing it rolled out in 2021 when he talked about it at the end of 2020.. So what happened?? Now it is some time in 2022??

    • Dummy Up Meathead

      Pandemic?

      • Shaun Michalak

        I would say pandemic, except the fact that it is all in house testing being done.. They are still installing cell towers, and upgrading those towers.. The upgrade schedule to have all the Sprint towers is still on schedule (from what they said), and if they are going through the hassle of upgrading the towers and replacing all the hardware, I find it hard to believe that they are installing hardware that is not compatible.. It makes me wonder if they ran into much bigger problems than they anticipated, and found problems that they did not expect, which is pushing it back.. Or maybe, they are wanting to do that joined shared spectrum thing, where you can download off of band 41, but upload on band 71, to get the faster speeds.. Could it be in conjunction with that, that might be the problem??

    • Mike

      Do u live under a rock ? You do know there was a lockdown/pandemic and that were still not back to our normal lives.

      • Shaun Michalak

        Nope.. I do not live under a rock.. But the fact is, I could say pandemic, except the fact that it is all in house testing being done.. They are still installing cell towers, and upgrading those towers.. The upgrade schedule to have all the Sprint towers is still on schedule (from what they said), and if they are going through the hassle of upgrading the towers and replacing all the hardware, I find it hard to believe that they are installing hardware that is not compatible.. It makes me wonder if they ran into much bigger problems than they anticipated, and found problems that they did not expect, which is
        pushing it back.. Or maybe, they are wanting to do that joined shared spectrum thing, where you can download off of band 41, but upload on band 71, to get the faster speeds.. Could it be in conjunction with that, that might be the problem??

  • JG

    It looks like T-Mobile is working on Voice over New Radio (VoNA)

    Compared to VoLTE, Ray believes that the transition to VoNR won’t be as difficult.

    You started calling it VoNA, then half way through the article you switched to VoNR. I’m assuming Voice over New Radio should be NR…

    • MissedCall

      Well, there’s no proofreader on this set of sites.

      • Shaun Michalak

        More like no quality control of the writer is more like it.. With a lot of the mistakes I have seen, if they just reread the article they wrote just once, they should easily be able to see a lot of the mistakes.. But instead, it is more like.. write it, throw it out there, and who cares about any mistakes that I make, type of attitude.

  • JG

    Could someone please explain what I’m missing here…

    I can see Voice over WiFi having some unique issues, given the data would travel over network(s) not directly controlled by mobile carrier so they’d need some servers accessible to the public cloud…

    But why is there a difference between Voice over LTE and Voice over NR? In both cases, my phone is turning my voice into a digital data stream, pushing it from the phone directly to the nearest cell tower, all totally internal on the carrier’s own private network.

    Why isn’t it just Voice over Cellular Data, that way it would work regardless if I’m on 3G, 4G, 5G, 6G … So long as the phone can talk directly to a cell tower…

    I can have multiple data streams active on 5G, I can be listening to YouTube Music while I’m downloading app updates and scrolling through Reddit… Why should I be forced to downgrade to an LTE connection should one of those data streams happen to be a voice call? Why would its stream be any different?

    • GeoGuy17

      I would guess it is getting the fallback from 5G to 4G to work along with the different quality parameters. Working at the edge of a cell is much more difficult that where the service is strong. Since there are a lot of cell edges right now with the wideband network, they are probably stalling a bit to further build that out. Unfortunately, the voice part doesn’t seem to be agnostic to the hardware generation being used. Bet there is a newer codec that is going to be used on 5G also.

    • Janice and Rusty WIlliams

      5G NR allows carriers like T-Mobile to use public bands usually reserved for Unlicensed bands (WiFi) to deliver paid cellular service.

      Concevably, T-Mobile could prefer to overload unlicensed networks before T-Mobile uses any of its licensed spectrum, which it has exclusive access to. In turn and over time, WiFi users may see WiFi unreliable.

      And yes, NR has a technology called “Listen Before Broadcast” which is supposed to prioritize “free” WiFi and other use, however, FCC has no way to enforce this. It should be considered “optional”, and T-Mobile can easily turn “Listen Before Broadcast” off.

      Because FCC and DoJ don’t have teeth to enforce the mandated divestitures related to business, I expect everyone’s WiFi will suffer. You may remember T-Mobile also pledged it wouldn’t introduce 36-month contracts, but they also exist. This is what happens when there’s lack of consumer choice, competition and enforcement of consent decrees.

      T-Mobile is able to get away with things AT&T never dreamed of! I’ve heard Deutsche Telekom is so impressed, they are currently in talks to add a statue of Neville Ray at “Mansu Hill Grand Monument” next to the statue of his birth father.