T-Mobile will soon add all customers to new policy that shares information with advertisers

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Recently, there are reports that T-Mobile will be implementing a new privacy policy that will allow them to share certain customer information with third-party advertisers. And according to the reports, T-Mobile’s new policy is somewhat similar to AT&T and Verizon. 

Beginning April 26, T-Mobile will automatically enroll all customers to the new program. But there is an option to manually opt out from participating in the program by using your account’s privacy tools. Back when T-Mobile and Sprint were still two separate companies, Sprint offered an opt-in service instead of an opt-out one.

The report shares that the new policy will allow the carriers to share user data with third-party marketers so they could provide more relevant ads. The carriers, however, say that the information they will be sharing will not reveal the individual identities of customers. They also say that information from a child’s device or service will not be shared. 

Unfortunately, this is something that many are adamant about. This is why companies are doing their best to make this practice less intrusive. 

But if you are really against this, you can head over to your account privacy tools to opt out of the program. You can click here to learn how you can be in control of your account privacy.

 

Source: 1

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  • steveb944

    Manual opt out is not very Uncarrier. Guess that’s over.

    • dcmanryan

      I agree. They have it backwards and it should be a manual opt in. Of course they wouldn’t make much money then so…

      • gg55592

        Yeah, no one would opt-in, so in that case they may as well not do it. What we really need are laws saying your ISP can’t track you. That’s the only real solution.

        After all, you’re paying money to them for a service. They shouldn’t then also be monetizing your personal online behavior. At least Facebook, et al, have an excuse because they are providing a free service, so they have to make money somehow. But for an ISP to do this is inexcusable and totally unethical. They should just be a dumb pipe and compete purely on how well they provide that service.

        • dcmanryan

          I agree. It’s scary how many companies know our exact position without our consent. If you pack a phone someone know where you are and that’s just the start.

  • UniBroW

    Opted out when I got the email about this last week

  • gg55592

    Yeah, uncarrier is over. T-Mobile is now just a giant company like Verizon and AT&T and adopting all the evil practices that go along with that. This is why competition matters. The Sprint merger never should have been allowed.

    That aside, I’m pretty sure opting out just means they won’t target ads to you based on your surfing habits. It doesn’t mean they aren’t collecting the data. So if you really don’t want T-Mobile creating a file on everything you do online, you need to use a VPN service. And you need to block any T-Mobile apps and underlying system services with a firewall.

    • UniBroW

      I recently started using Proton VPN, seems pretty good so far. I wish it was better at deciding when a VPN connection was slow and automatically reconnected to a faster server ¯_(ツ)_/¯

  • Omegajb

    The way the article is written it sounds like even if you opt out now if on April 26th you’ll be re-enrolled. Hopefully not.

  • CarlKL

    Anyway, it is very easy to opt-out but you have to do it for each line.

    • KlausWillSeeYouNow

      If you do set your preference for “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” on the master line, you don’t need to go line by line.

      If you’re referring to the three (or so) privacy setting toggles that exist for each line, yes, that needs to be done line-by-line.

  • Mike

    Opt-out! It was easy to do.

  • JStatt

    It’s more than having to opt out, but also that they make it painful by burying it in the settings and then forcing you to do it per line instead of across the whole account. My expectation is eventually they will tie this into bill discounts like they do with AutoPay.

  • monkeysoup

    You must opt out for each phone line you have… one at a time, at 2 privacy settings per line. However, it was very easy to do and took a less than a minute for my 5 lines after logging into my account. No big deal, really.

    • KlausWillSeeYouNow

      If you do set your preference for “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” on the master line, you don’t need to go line by line.

      If you’re referring to the three (or so) privacy setting toggles that exist for each line, yes, that needs to be done line-by-line. I agree that it wasn’t that hard to do.

  • marque2

    Tmobile is sending out text messages about this change. I just got mine at 14:30 PST

  • No longer Uncarrier. They also charge $30 activation per line. Turning into the carriers they said they weren’t. Miss John L.

  • Eddie Vazquez

    Sharing is equal to selling the information. More income to the Uncarrier.