T-Mobile to acquire Layer3 TV, aiming to launch TV service in 2018

tmobiletvservicedemo2

The announcement that T-Mobile teased yesterday has now been made, and it’s a big one.

T-Mobile has announced that it’s acquiring Layer3 TV as part of an effort to distrupt the cable and satellite TV industry. The deal is expected to close in the coming weeks, and T-Mo says that it aims to launch its new pay TV service in 2018.

Layer3 TV was founded in 2013 with the goal of being a better cable TV provider. The service offers a combination of traditional cable TV channels alongside online video all in a single interface, making it easy to find what you want to watch.

Details on T-Mobile’s upcoming TV offering are still light, but T-Mo does have a brief demo of what a T-Mobile TV service might look like. The video shows T-Mo’s TV service running on televisions, tablets, and smartphones. T-Mobile does say that its TV offering will utilize its nationwide retail stores as well as its sales and customer care organizations.

Here’s what T-Mobile CEO John Legere had to say about today’s announcement:

“People love their TV, but they hate their TV providers. And worse, they have no real choice but to simply take it – the crappy customer service, clunky technology and outrageous bills loaded with fees! That’s where we come in. We’re gonna fix the pain points and bring real choice to consumers across the country. It only makes sense for the Un-carrier to do to TV what we’re doing to wireless: change it for good! Personally, I can’t wait to start fighting for consumers here!”

And here’s Layer3 TV CEO Jeff Binder:

“No market needs Un-carrier-ing more than pay TV, so we’re completely stoked to join T-Mobile in disrupting the status quo. Together with T-Mobile, we’re going to ditch everything you hate about cable and make everything you love about TV better.”

Right now we know very little about T-Mobile’s upcoming TV service, so it’s tough to have much of an opinion about the service itself. T-Mobile has had a major impact on the wireless industry in recent years, though, making its own Un-carrier moves and getting the competition to change, too. It’ll be interesting to see if T-Mobile can replicate that success in the TV business.

What would T-Mobile’s TV service need to offer to get you interested?

Source: T-Mobile

Tags: , ,

  • Dave A.

    Not what I was expecting, but happy nonetheless! Currently using DirecTVNow, hoping this will bring some competition to this emerging, booming market.

  • bkat11

    Good! DirectTV Now SUCKS!

  • Luis Hotdaddy Vasquez

    *YAAAAAWWWWNNNNNN!!!

  • jonzey231

    This has potential to be super awesome. Sounds like they’re trying to combine all the services into one without charging out the ass.

    Plus, Layer 3 is a fiber provided too. So that could lead to benefits in terms of cell service and/or maybe T-Mo will try to becoming an actual ISP as well.

    • Balthazar_B

      Layer3 TV leases Verizon’s fiber network currently. Unless Lowell McAdam is now John Legere’s BFF, something is likely to change, and soon.

  • Larry Griffin

    Finally something that gives DirectvNow a legit run for their money!!

    If I’m not mistaken wasn’t there a T-Mobile Tv way back in the day ??

    • Hilton GoWahoos Redskins

      T-mobile TV still exists. I have it on my Galaxy S8. Piss poor collection of foreign live streams. Good selection of on demand shows. Not worth paying extra for since I already have slingtv

  • Anthony Cardell

    Is Layer 3 streaming based service like direct tv now, sling, etc?

    • slybacon

      Currently it is. We don’t know exactly what T-Mobile will do with it.

  • mikeZo6

    Look at reviews at LAYER3TV no good at all Tmo wasting more money !

    • Deadeye37

      Hopefully they will turn that around like they did to T-mobile After that AT&T Takeover bid.

    • (J²)

      Well, by acquiring a small start up, T-Mobile is spending less upfront AND they will have much more influence over how the TV arm of their business is run.

      Plus, they have to start somewhere. There’s not exactly any successful services that take aim at LIVE TV. The few that do have a very poor channel lineup and very pricey packages. The big players are focused on archived shows (that can usually be found online) and movies.

  • Alex Pilaia

    Hey TmoNews. Love the announcement and the possibility of cutting my FIOS cord. Does anyone know, or is there any way to find out, if this new TmoTV will be compatible with the TIVO Bolt Boxes that have been extremely popular?? Reason i ask is I just took advantage of the Black Friday $349 All in Service Plan from Tivo (Instead of paying $32/mo for FIOS DVR Service.)

    • GreenMonkeyPants

      just chatted with Layer3, their service is 150 channels, with HD, DVR for $75 /month, which rides on top of your own internet service. So you’ll still be paying your local cable or phone company. Not really cutting the cord now is it?

      • nate_CO

        nope :( I’m hoping for skinnier bundles. PS Vue (cheapest plan) is pretty much perfect for me right now… for channels, features, and price.

      • Balthazar_B

        According to Layer3’s online info, they apparently have 275+ channels:

        “NO COMMITMENTS • NO FEES • CANCEL ANYTIME. $. 75. MO. +. Taxes. 12 MONTH PRICE GUARANTEE. 275+ allHD™ Channels Available Whole Home DVR 4K Wireless Boxes Available. “

    • Jason in Chicago

      No, Tivo doesn’t work with Layer3…they have their own proprietary IPTV boxes that you must use.

  • GreenMonkeyPants

    Will this be provided on the T-Mobile network, or will we need to still pay the cable/dsl folks for internet access?

    • Alex Pilaia

      They said it will work with any “Internet connection”. So you would be able to cut the cord on the “TV” portion of your bundle. Your choice to stick with the “Internet Portion” of your bundle, or to you Tmobile WIFI.

      • GreenMonkeyPants

        Now if T-Mobile would offer truly unlimited wireless internet, then I would l have some options besides the only TWO choices I have right now in Spectrum and Windstream.
        Bring on the competition !

  • emcdonald75

    Wouldn’t T-Mobile need a nationwide fiber network like Zayo or does T-Mobile plan to stream video from their cellular network? Would that not put an extreme amount of pressure on the cellular network? T-Mobile would need a lot of spectrum and/or fiber routed to 1000s of small cells in every market they plan to offer this service to reduce the burden on the cellular network. I guess LAA unlicensed spectrum and small cells are going to be big in next year’s deployment plans.

    • Deadeye37

      Or they might have content on some central servers that we access via whatever Internet connection is requesting a stream. I’m hoping that it will be open and allow us to use Chromecast, Roku, AppleTV, etc. I’m not a fan of watching TV on my phone/tablet.

    • Balthazar_B

      This could be interesting and complicated as Layer3TV now leases Verizon’s fiber network. Wonder how long that continues, or if there’s another shoe to drop around T-Mo’s backhaul network. Maybe another partnership with a company that has plenty of backhaul network and streaming server capacity, and already has a business arrangement with T-Mo (e.g., Google)?

      • emcdonald75

        I think T-Mobile would have been better off buying Zayo. Having a fiber network would reduce costs in deploying small cells. Verizon bought XO, AT&T has its own fiber network and I think Sprint has one as well. The future is fiber, especially for wireless networks.

      • Mike Thaler

        Google already has its own live streaming service – YouTubeLiveTV. YTTV charges $35/mo. Main problem iis they miss lots of channels – like CNN.

        • Balthazar_B

          Google has its own mobile service too (with T-Mo’s help), but that doesn’t prevent them from doing business together.

  • Matt

    It would be nice if MetroPCS customers could take advantage of this somehow. I am a long time Metro customer.

  • Rob H.

    I figure this will be their own OTT live service like DirecTV Now, Sling, Fubo, YoutubeTV, Philo, PS-Vue, etc. They need to launch on all or as many platforms as possible. Maybe it will stream in HD on phones on Tmo service too.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    If this runs on the T Mobile network and not have to sign up for home internet I would definitely drop Directv/ATT home Internet and AT&T wireless all together.

    • slybacon

      I think you’ll still need home internet. They didn’t mention the service running on wireless.

      • Sean Sorlie

        In fact, one of the highlights is TV access everywhere on anything so that means mobile connect

        • slybacon

          Layer3 currently runs through fixed internet for their set top box. It doesn’t connect to cellular. T-Mobile may change that, but right now it’s only fixed internet. On mobile devices, it’ll surely be wireless internet.

      • Balthazar_B

        Legere mentioned the mobile angle so often that it leads one to think he intends this service not only to be mobile-friendly, but probably mobile-delivered as well.

        • slybacon

          With 5G tech, I think that would be easy to be mobile only. It would also be cheaper than fixed internet. Legere keeps mocking fixed internet as well.

  • Hilton GoWahoos Redskins

    Sign me up. I have Sling, which is the T-mobile of cord cutting TV services but they are nickel and diming me like cable used to.

  • Tmo_User

    What will this merger be called?

    • Balthazar_B

      T-Three?

    • Alex Pilaia

      TmoTV

    • (J²)

      Probably T-Mobile TV – which already exists but there’s nothing special about it. This acquisition should bring in TV/technical expertise and content provider contracts.

  • (J²)

    This is probably going to be similar to Sling and PlayStation View where customers can watch content on their devices or on their TV’s.

    Hopefully, T-Mobile is able to fix the problems that other services have faced. CONTENT.

    In order to succeed, T-Mobile is going to have to get content providers on board… BIG ones… The channel line up can make or break a service.

    Most of the services out there have failed to get providers like Viacom on board which has 23+ channels, all of which perform well and are aimed at younger demographics. Unfortunately, if T-Mobile is unable to swindle Viacom and a few other networks that prefer the revenue afforded by traditional TV providers, this will turn out to be no better.

    Hopefully, with T-Mobile’s success and size, it can pull all the right strings.

    • Aaron Tillery

      I Found Hulu Plus to be the best overall alternative to cable and satellite decent price decent add-ons if you choose them good cable line up live channels obviously DVR local stations basic network stations as well as past seasons for their actual Hulu subscription service on top of it so we’ll see

      • (J²)

        True but we need a replacement not just an alternative and some of these “alternatives” are pricey for what they actually are.

  • MadMartigan

    Well, it’s not like they could really make it any worse other than adding yet another streaming subscription to add to the list.

  • Andrea Cristiano Maietta

    A subscription service that actually allows choice not some bundled bs. YouTube tv is ok but the channels are limited. Direct TV now is good but too expensive. Sling is ok but it’s missing channels. We need to be able to get all local channels and then select what we want after.

    • Aaron Tillery

      I Found Hulu Plus to be the best overall alternative to cable and satellite decent price decent add-ons if you choose them good cable line up live channels obviously DVR local stations basic network stations as well as past seasons for their actual Hulu subscription service on top of it

  • James Smith

    That money could have been better spent fixing their horrible coverage.

    • Balthazar_B

      You don’t think they spent enough on all the 600MHz bandwidth they acquired, or that their deployment schedule is in any way not aggressive?

      • James Smith

        Their schedule is aggressive but reality is another thing.

        700 was extremely disappointing. Why should I expect anything better?

        • Balthazar_B

          The amount of 700MHz spectrum they were able to pick up via auction and acquisition a few years ago was comparatively sparse. It would have been too much to expect dramatic improvements from it, unless someone was in an area well-covered by T-Mo’s smallish piece of that pie.
          OTOH, the 600MHz spectrum they picked up is wide AND deep (in most areas in the US).

        • James Smith

          Nonetheless T-Mobile has 700a licenses across the entire state of Florida and yet their coverage still sucks.

          I’m done hearing excuses for them, hence why I switched carriers.

          They can take their 600 and dupe the next round of customers into false coverage promises.

        • Brandon

          Which carrier did u move to?

        • James Smith

          Verizon

        • Mike Thaler

          Mr. Smith –
          Why do you bother being a member of another forum, when you use Vz? We are in Florida several times a year. Only problem we had was the area around Disneyland a few years ago. (Never went inside the park.) Solid from Palm Beach and south.

        • James Smith

          Try venturing to SouthWest Florida or to the center of the state. There is more to Florida than the tourist areas which I will agree T-Mobile covers well.

        • Mike Thaler

          We commute to/from Miami (Aventura)/Oakland 5 or 6 timed/year. Perfect TM service. Travel to Naples, Everglades seems fine. Did hit a few dead spots on I-95 in center of state!!!

        • James Smith

          Lol, no deadspots on i95 on Verizon.

        • Jay Holm

          Way, way overrated!

        • James Smith

          Way overrated when I get “No Service” with T-Mobile but 3 bars of LTE on Verizon?

          How about T-Mobile’s coverage maps are overrated.

        • Brandon

          How much do u pay with Verizon vs Tmobile?

        • riverhorse

          I bet Boost or Cricket, since there’s still a lot of obvious resentment left over.

    • christian

      Ummmm, buying this is actually going to help them out in coverage since they are aquiring spectrum from this company….

      • James Smith

        Spectrum != Coverage

    • blokeinusa

      sounds like you need to move to another provider

      • James Smith

        After 3 years of lies from T-Mobile about upgrades in my area I have.

        • riverhorse

          3 years!?!? Tmo doesn’t do contracts. What happened, Mommy wouldn’t give you extra money for Verizon?

        • James Smith

          When you have an account with 7 people on it located all over the country the logistics of switching are complex.

          Now of course I could have been a jerk and cancelled everybody’s lines with zero notice and no chance of porting out.

        • PersianHobo

          or you could of just did a change of responsibility, put someone else in charge of the account and remove yourself to go elsewhere, sounds like laziness

        • riverhorse

          Wow. I think I have a fix for you.
          B&H Photo hosting a Republic Wireless(Project HiFi Jr. – combines Tmo & Sprint) $100 Giveaway:
          Moto G4 Plus World Unlocked version + 6mo Unlimited@ 2gb + free sim + free shipping.
          (64gb version phone $149 / 16gb $109 / 32gb $104)
          You MUST clip $25 website coupon, n have until January 31 to turn on service.
          (Yes, 2gb not a lot: Fios & Spectrum/Charter/TW have internet addon specials $19-29 that can maybe complement.)
          This gives you lots of options:
          Immediately after activation swap out sim to old phone and sell fairly valuable phone unlocked with all bands.
          If in your area both Tmo n Sprint have unsatisfactory coverage, sell the sims w/ their 6mo service and port present #’s to AT&T mvno Cricket 5/6 lines for $100
          Or Verizon mvno Red Pocket.

          But u gotta try something, especially @ so many..

  • Balthazar_B

    What’s in it for T-Mo? A way to counter/blunt their competitors’ TV offerings (e.g., DirectTV Now) and/or business combinations with TV/content entities (e.g., Altice). And it diversifies T-Mo’s business model.
    What’s in it for Level3 TV? Currently, Level3 TV is offered in only a few metro areas. This provides a means to expand their footprint dramatically. And if Legere gets the secret sauce right and give customers what they want at the price they want it, it could turn into a very compelling offering.

    • Mdhen

      I think that it’s to stay relevant and provide growth to their shareholders. I mean if you look at the big two that T-Mobile wants to beat, they both offer additional services and a chance to bundle that with your phone. They need more subscribers and a more compelling reason to have people switch in order to compete long-term against the big two. It’s all about that bundling of service. This also entangles customers a bit more as it is far more of a hassle to switch. If they were smart they would consider life-time or 5 year price locks on the products.

      I imagine as they push for small box cable in more areas, they will also offer a streaming service for those areas that don’t yet have access to the actual cable option. I am excited to see what they have to offer although I am not going to fully hold my breath because on cord cutting there has to be an actual financial incentive to do so with compelling options. Slings of the world once you get the channels you want isn’t all that much different that traditional cable.

  • dcmanryan

    Great idea but to watch in ones home we will need to be using our own internet more than likely. They need to address that because most providers now have a data cap. I watch Xfinity on my Roku where it does not count towards my 1tb cap and watching it nightly for a few hours I use 600-700gb. Imagine if that counted towards my data cap? That’s one TV. T-Mobile needs to somehow let us use their Network in home, on TVs to succeed. If not isp providers will hurt the service with data
    caps.

    • blokeinusa

      You have too much time on your hands if that’s just you personally. thats roughly 12hrs per day assuming a data stream is 2Gb/h. Are you sure thats not including other activities like gaming and downloading

      • dcmanryan

        Nope. And it sure as hell is not 12 hours a day. It streams at 1080p and I’ll turn it on and fall asleep so that will obviously add a bunch, but no where near 12 hours.

        You’re missing my point though. That is ONE TV streaming. I don’t know about your house but I have 5 TVs. Data caps will kill this before it starts but im assuming T-Mobile has considered that and will combat it with something.

        • NR552

          I’ve got 2 TVs, 1080p watching for approx. 3-4 hours each in the evening, plus some gaming on my PC, plus a teenager that has seen every video on youtube, and my monthly usage is only 450 GB tops. Falling asleep while streaming is like leaving the sprinklers on 24/7 and complaining to the water company that they charge too much for water. LOL

        • dcmanryan

          There’s no option to turn it off. If you fall asleep it just keeps streaming. No big deal as I’m not charged for that usage.

  • James B

    That’s it!?! That’s the announcement!?! Smh…?

  • blokeinusa

    Just in time…I cancelled Comcast TV yesterday. Unfortunately the broadband providers will throttle the sh@t out of streaming services now that net neutrality will be repealed.

    • marque2

      Why would they? They didn’t for the first 20 years of widespread Internet.

      • steveb944

        We didn’t have 4K and HDR back then.

  • I don’t have high expectatives about this announcement actually Layer3 is expensive, $75 monthly and $10 plus each tv additional box. For use you need internet and maybe Tmobile will charge for use it since they cannot offer cable internet. If they make an offer similar to Sling or Directv with better programing maybe can compete.

    • Sean Sorlie

      I dont think you understand how T-Mobile does business. You cant expect the offering to look anything like it does now.

      • Well I don’t think that Tmobile could do it better than AT&T with Directv or Verizon with FIOS??? I bet an adquisition of Dish and Sling will make more sense to get more business for Tmobile. So you want Layer3 to watch TV on your small screen phone or to cut the wire?
        You need speed and good programing to people cut the wire if not stay with your cable provider at the same price.

        • Jay Holm

          Your not the CEO of T-Mobile, your just a random Joe Schmo. People like you try to insert themselves into the mind of a CEO. It’s like criticizing George Lucas, Star Wars was his creation, he can do anything he wants with it. We’re just going to have to wait for some time into 2018 to see what T-Mobile ends up offering.

        • Oh Jesus!, that John Legere is the new Steve Jobs that nobody can critizes or said nothing about his business strategy. I think that fanboys only were in Apple or Star Wars world but not in the mobile carriers, please mature your comments.

        • Mdhen

          Well you are crapping on a product you have yet to see. I think a wait and see approach should be made. It genius move for T-Mobile and probably has AT&T and Version nervous on how they might rock the boat again. T-Mobile could not get anywhere near those two companies in size and scope without creating a suite of products so that they can offer bundling and higher revenues for further investment and shareholder value.

          Quite frankly DirecTV Now isn’t that compelling of a product, nor is their internet options, which many times is only broadband. Verizon prices are just as crazy as the next. If T-Mobile can win on price with decent programming, which Layer3 has already, then I think they have a chance to further grow and create additional shareholder value which is John’s job. He’s been a maverick for T-Mobile so give him a chance before you start poo pooing what is going to be since you have no insider information on the ultimate product.

        • Sean Sorlie

          excellent call out. This guy must work for ATT or something.

        • Sean Sorlie

          Hell yes they will run it better than AT&T and Verizon. That is the whole point. Tmobile is about changing the way things are done not acquiring companies to charge people for crazy bundles like blue and red. The idea is to change TV delivery like they changed wireless.

    • Chilehead

      It’s way to early to assume pricing will be $75. I’m willing to bet it will be cheaper for T-Mo customers. We all bundle! ;)

      • This is the actual price, so if we take the NETFLIX example that is free for the new customers that got the T-One plan and left out the granfathered customers. So yes maybe they bundle but you will need get upgrade or get an expensive data plan. New adquisitions need ROI (return over the investment) so free dinner won’t be.

        • Chilehead

          Who said “free”? If it’s cheaper than my Spectrum Cable bill then it’s a win. I already have broadband internet.

    • marque2

      Why can’t Tmo offer wireless internet?

  • William Monroe

    T Mobile 5G wireless for the home will have this merger make sense someday.

  • SlopeTangentAnswer

    Im in.

  • riverhorse

    Wow, I posted a similar suggestion months ago. Legere is brilliant.
    Cable company wiring is a big complement. Now what remains is further acquisition of regional / smaller other cable entities, telcos, satellite owners / providers.
    Following that, acquisition of a phone and tablet manufacturer.
    And IF needed, a partnership with Google or Amazon or Facebook.
    Tmobile has the potential to become a colossus.

  • Mike Thaler

    Is it technically feasible to have the upcoming 5G service help w. this?

  • Eric Blackman

    Yeah, I think the current company business model disappears entirely and turns into something closer to Sling. I can absolutely see that being a great alternative.

  • moonoverparma

    We’re not cutting any cables if I still have to use my provider for internet service

    • Chilehead

      We separate the two.

  • Eric A

    Knowing T-Mobile you’ll have to add a line before you can get this service.

    • Chilehead

      Knowing T-Mobile….I disagree.

    • SirStephenH

      Or switch to T-Mobile One.

      • Eric A

        I should have though of that. Switch to T-Mobile One AND add a line.

  • Zach B.

    Sooo, will they only put out good TV package deals to new customers and screw loyal customers over like they do with mobile phone deals?

    • Chilehead

      This isn’t Verizon. Breathe.

      • Zach B.

        Funny you mentioned Verizon. They had some amazing deals for all their customers the last few weeks on flagship phones. Meanwhile, T-Mobile had good deals available to only new “add a line” customers. Sure, those deals were “technically” available to us loyal customers…. if we paid even more money with additional lines we don’t need. Not a very good marketing strategy to hold onto customers though, even worse of a strategy when they’re about to launch a new service they want current customers to sign up for.

        • Chilehead

          T-Mobile is still a budget provider but I’ll reserve my feedback on the new TV service until we get some concrete facts about what they will offer. I will never be a Verizon customer though.

        • marque2

          Mobile doesn’t prevent you from cancelling the extra line.

        • Janice and Rusty WIlliams

          If you have Comcast, you may want to check into XFinity Mobile.

    • Andrew Singleton

      can you mention 1 single promotion that is new customers only?

      • Zach B.

        iPhone BOGO, Galaxy BOGO, LG BOGO, all required activation of new lines to qualify for the deal. For those that don’t have anyone else to add to their plan (new customers), this leaves them with no deals to take advantage of when upgrading.

        • SirStephenH

          Most of the deals also require existing customers to give up their better, cheaper plans for more limited and costly T-Mobile One plans.

        • Awoken Announce Table

          I switched to T-Mobile One, it’s about 4 bucks more a month than my grandfathered 4-5 year old contract.

        • marque2

          I got my two last phone on a BOGO. Once I got the rebate I cancelled the extra line. $40 of extra payment, but well worth it.

        • Andrew Singleton

          yea t-mobile doesn’t give out $800 smartphones for fun

    • Mike

      So what every company offers new deals to attract NEW customers. Ever heard of cable tv and internet where you get a special rate for 1 year then the price goes up. Do you complain in 2+ years when you get offers in the mail for cable when it’s for new customers only?

  • Joe2050

    I’m assuming if the FCC repeals net neutrality (no regulation at all) who’s to stop them from providing dedicated speed for their own Layer 3 TV service, and throttling the others (i.e. Hulu, Prime, Vue, etc…)

    • Andrew Singleton

      guess who supports the dismantling of net neutrality

      • Sean Sorlie

        Tmobile doesn’t if that is what you are getting at…

        • Andrew Singleton

          LOL.

      • marque2

        I do. The whole net neutrality was to prevent end providers from charging Google and Netflix among others from paying for high quality service on the local networks and backbone. Now they get premium service for free. And Google and Netflix spent tons of money on lobbying and brainwashing people that we wouldn’t be able to put up a small blog any more. It was total BS to benefit Google and Netflix. Why have a law that specifically benefits and subsidizes these two mega companies? (And Amazon Apple …)

        • (J²)

          Actually, I recall an ISP throttling Netflix a few years ago.

          Video streaming is the future but requires bandwidth, so ISP’s have been introducing soft caps BUT now could also impose throttling.

          Just because you may have your personal opinion on the matter doesn’t mean there aren’t legitimate reports of ISP’s selectively de-prioritizing content and offering to prioritize at a cost.

          Guess what, if all the ISP’s chose to charge more or throttle all video streaming then all the video streaming services will die…

          These services have had a target on their back for some time only recently have these services been seen as a future replacement for cable.

        • marque2

          The problem with your recall is it never happened. Oh you heard Netflix flacks scaring you about that – but that is just what big evil corporations do to try to get you to give up rights to benefit their greedy causes.

          Interestingly after Net neutrality started T-Mobile did start throttling Netflix and I appreciated it when they did because they also gave streaming video away for no bandwidth cost. I was actually quite upset with all the Net neutrality groups and Google who all threatened to take this service away with lawsuits. Not sure how Tmo eventually resolved it.

          The funny thing about you millenials is for some reason big evil corporations like Apple, Google, Amazon, and Netflix are given the benefit of the doubt but you would never do the same for Exxon.

        • UniBroW

          Um, providers such as Comcast and or Verizon did throttle Netflix. Net Neutrality is a good thing. Stop being a ninny and following your party line. They should make it, at the very least, law in congress before repealing it

        • marque2

          The whole point was to get Google and Netflix to not have to pay their fare share and because they don’t our internet providers charge us much more.

          Sorry it is not party line. A bunch of millenials got duped by Google.Internet was doing great for 20+ years without problems and then Google decides it doesnt want to pay and all of a sudden without net neutrality it will collapse. Silly.

          Plus having non neutrality has benefited me. Tmo offered Netflix streaming with no data charges a few years ago – but it had it had to be throttled. I was estactic getting such a deal – but the net bunnies were all crying how this great deal violated net neutrality. ATT is doing something similar with the Direct TV app – offering DTV for no data charges to ATT customers. Until two days ago they were being harassed as well.

          Anyway the gist of it is this. If you are a big company you should pay to use the internet and you shouldn’t force the charges on everyone else while lying to gullible young people that their home web pages will disappear.

        • marque2

          Also if your local provider does try to throttle Netflix, because Netflix refuses to pay their fair share- they will probably offer you a deal to do so – much like Tmo did.

          And if you dont like it there are now many internet choices that will soon be available.

          And please note how government meddling caused the endpoint problem with limited cable and phone company choices in the first place. They messed that up and you expect them to monitor a “fair” internet?

        • CJNewYork

          You don’t think you were “duped” by ISPs and their rhetoric? They spent 100 million lobbying or government too. Throwing stones from a glass house, I see.

          Both sides have a point, but getting rid of NN changes the very nature of the internet, since it is ‘net neutral’. The regulation isn’t meant to add or take away anything, rather, keep the net the same as it always been. But on look what you’re bragging about. ISPs can now turn the internet into cable. Is that the “innovation” they keep saying would happen without NN? Seems like it.

          ISPs did a lot more against NN then just Netflix vs Comcast, like when Verizon and ATT didn’t allow Google Talk to work on their phones, for example. Plus, they already said they wanted to prioritize traffic. Does “prioritize” mean slow down or charge a fee? Did you ever find that out from the rhetoric your side told you?

          Should sites like Netflix pay more for service? Yes, and they already have. However, why did ISPs put us in the middle of their fight? And ISPs don’t seem it mind picking us off to get to them either. Why would I want to take a bullet from ISPs?

          The only thing you’re myopicly looking at is what you can salvage out of the wreckage, instead of realizing how NN saves you from the crash in the first place.

        • frankinnoho

          I don’t think he was “duped” by ISP’s… comment boards are full of paid shills these days, hired by ‘Reputation Management” companies to spin stories to their clients liking. Or, he’s just a contrarian a’hole.

        • SirStephenH

          You are not talking about content companies paying their fair share, you’re talking about ISPs double dipping. The way the internet works is that they pay for their access on their end and you pay for yours on your end. If your use of a product involves higher costs then YOUR ISP increases YOUR bill or they change YOUR caps, the same happens on the content supplier’s end. Allowing an ISP to double dip does nothing to lower your bill, your ISP simply pockets the extra profit and your content provider is forced to increase your bill to cover the extra costs imposed by your greedy ISP.

        • marque2

          Tmobile throttles Netflix to this day and I appreciate Tmo offering me extra service in exchange – interestingly that happened after net neutrality was put in place.

        • (J²)

          Another Trump-Republican conspiracy theorist… Who selectively picks and chooses when news reports are valid… With that being said, this will be the very last comment or response you receive because there’s no getting through to people like you.

          It did indeed happen and was reported on the news and made its way to the FCC as a complaint.

          There were several other content providers reporting the same.

          “The funny thing about you millennial is for some reason big evil
          corporations like Apple, Google, Amazon, and Netflix are given the
          benefit of the doubt but you would never do the same for Exxon.”

          How is comparing technology companies with oil/gas/environmental companies even valid? (rhetorical question – please don’t answer that) That’s an Apple’s to Oranges comparison and a totally different topic. (Again this is why I stated the first three sentences).

        • Mike

          So you don’t recall Netflix bandwidth being throttled by Comcast.

        • marque2

          I believe there was a threat and then Netflix payed comcast what they should and the problem went away.

          But you really think comcast could get away with that for very long? You don’t think other providers would come in and offer non throttled Netflix? You think the problem that was caused by government giving monopolies to cable companies would go away with more government solutions.

          In the two years there will be so.much provider competition from cell companies that it won’t be possible any more. The solution is more competition not more government control.

        • Janice and Rusty WIlliams

          Actually, I remember that differently. Comcast was at capacity on networks it owned and managed. It was starting to slow other customers not using Netflix.

          Comcast approached Netflix, and asked them to setup an account and peer with a fiber provider called Level 3 Communications (Now it’s called CenturyLink). So Comcast suggested a wholesaler Comcast was familiar with, but perhaps Netflix never heard of.

          This is something a capacity planner/manager would normally do, but Netflix, being totally oblivious, saw this differently.

          So what started as a suggestion to increase service and quality for customers of both companies was twisted around a bit by Silicon Valley Reporters.

        • Mike

          Its not Netflix or any streaming service fault. Comcast and other providers refuse to upgrade networks which is why America isn’t in the top 25 in fastest internet speeds in the world. For the USA internet to be so slow we pay the more then the #1 country with the fastest internet . So stop trying to take up for the greedy cable companies who still use old outdated equipment and technology.

        • SirStephenH

          The problem with your recall is that it did happen and is well documented and reported.

          As for T-Mobile throttling, it is technically against Net Neutrality but they got away with it because…
          (A) they didn’t charge companies
          (B) they treated all video equally, not preferring one service over another
          (C) it’s voluntary for the consumer, they don’t have to have their video throttled if the don’t want it to be
          (D) they claimed ‘reasonable network management’ which is an exemption in the Net Neutrality rules

        • Janice and Rusty WIlliams

          T-Mobile got away with it because no one filed a legal complaint.

        • Janice and Rusty WIlliams

          Wholesale Internet provider Level 3 Communications did this all the time on the backbone of the network. It’s called “Dropped Packets”.

          So companies whom sell internet to end-customers like AT&T, T-Mobile, and Comcast would often use a company like Level 3 Communications to connect offices in multiple states together.

          But, AT&T might believe 400MB of “dedicated” speed is necessary for a particular area. Generally, a block of bandwidth like this, would require a contract with a multi-year commitment; it isn’t like Level 3 can make a phone call to Level 3 and bump up the speed an extra 20-30 megs because one new customer signed up today.

          So the problem isn’t actually the last-mile providers, but it’s the fact that wholesale providers like Level 3 have programmed the routers on its network to not accept or transfer more than xxx amount of data at a time, and that contract will be enforced regardless of how successful a marketing promotion is.

        • SirStephenH

          So you support higher costs for goods? Comcast throttled Netflix and lied about doing it the whole time. They did this to force Netflix to pay them money. Netflix was forced to comply and they passed the cost on to the consumer but Comcast didn’t even lower people’s bills, they just pocketed the profit.

          Right now you pay for your access to the internet on your end and Netflix, for example, pays for theirs on their end. What ISPs like Comcast have been trying to do is double dip. You pay for your access on your end and Netflix pays for access on both ends. This means the data gets charged twice on your end for the same amount of data. All this means is that you’ll be paying the same to your ISP even though they’re now make double the money on transporting the same amount of data and your costs for accessing things on the internet will cost you more. This is an anti-competitive practice, and is not how the internet works.

  • Randall Lind

    I don’t think I want to go from a $200 cable bill to $200 mobile bill. T-mobile gets $158 a month from me now. I am buying a Tablet and phone and I got like 6 months left but still. It would only work if they were also my internet provider as well. If you have to pay $200 a month for TV/Phone then turn around and pay $65 to Spectrum for internet. I say no. I pay $43 every 3 months for IPTV and $11.89 a month for Netflix plus $64.99 a month for internet. Before I switch a year ago I was paying $200 for cable. I still have to pay them $64.99.

    • donnybee

      If your T-Mobile bill went up to $200, you’d be spending just as much as you are now. Could be even less if T-Mobile paid your Netflix.

      • SirStephenH

        I assume he has a better grandfathered plan or T-Mobile would be paying for his Netflix.

  • O. L. Jackson

    This is great and somebody need to shake this shit up and all i see is a bunch of crybabies about a package that hasnt seen light yet lol.

  • SirStephenH

    Could’ve gotten into the TV business with a Dish merger. Would’ve come with a great deal of complementary spectrum (unlike with the Sprint deal) and a larger customer base as well.

    • (J²)

      That would be at least a 1 year process of getting approval to merge and another few years integrating.

      It also assumes that Dish Network doesn’t want to assist with running the combined company (like Sprint).

      By buying a service instead, there a slim chance of denial and long delays.

      • SirStephenH

        Approval should take less than 6 months and they should be able to “integrate” in a matter of weeks or months (at least as far as the customer is concerned). The spectrum could be used immediately. Dish only has band 66 and 71 spectrum which T-Mobile uses. Band 66 could be easily added to towers with it already and others with a simple software update, there would be no hardware requirement because it supersedes band 4 so they already have the necessary equipment deployed. Band 71 can be added to towers with it currently and added alongside others as deployment continues.

        • (J²)

          Based on no merger ever… T-Mobile acquired MetroPCS with no opposition in 8 months and took over 2 years to migrate customers then decommission the network.

          And that’s only under ideal circumstances…

    • Mike

      That would of been nice but who’s to say Dish wants to merge with T-Mobile?

      • SirStephenH

        There have been backroom talks in the past and without a legitimate plan for deploying their spectrum, Dish has been looking at all possibilities in order to get it deployed before they lose it, including mergers.

        • Mike

          Dish wants to be majority stake in any merger. Which means DT and John more then likely will be gone

        • Janice and Rusty WIlliams

          Dish is currently talking to Amazon and Jeff Bezos. As for the discussions between Dish and T-Mobile, What I recall, Dish wanted majority ownership; Which makes sense. To compare, T-Mobile doesn’t take a position of owning assets, it even depreciated the value of the office it’s in so it could get a 3-year tax refund. If Dish were to merge with T-Mobile, T-Mobile management would likely try to find assets to sell.

          Ergen is essentially pouring his personal funds and cash into the wireless arena. Even if spectrum is returned, the US Government will issue a refund. Think of it like buying a 2000 automobile, never driving it. Also, spectrum assets don’t wear out, or depreciate with use. It’s a very safe investment.

          Ergen is the richest man in the state where he lives. He’s allowed to be a little eccentric. But now, and today things have changed; Dish re-structured and re-organized. The Wireless assets are now completely separate from the TV business, and Charlie Ergen stepped down as CEO of the video business.

          But overall, you could draw a conclusion that any and all T-Mobile merger discussions are relatively superficial and more-or-less used to gain insight to competitor plans and also align investment into European Telecom and R&D from the German point of view. (Alcatel, Nokia, Ericsson, Siemens and others.)