T-Mobile beats out other major US carriers in Consumer Reports nationwide survey

03/26/2014 T-Mobile Un-Leash Announcement

After winning a J.D. Power customer care award and an Ookla award for “Fastest Mobile Network,” T-Mobile today beat out its competitors again.

T-Mobile has been named the best US wireless carrier by a Consumer Reports nationwide survey. The survey asked customers about the carriers’ value, voice quality, texting, data speeds, web issues, and customer support. T-Mo beat out the other three major carriers with a score of 73 out of 100, beating out Verizon’s score of 70, AT&T’s score of 68, and Sprint’s score of 67. T-Mobile’s customer support and value were ranked highly by those that participated in the survey, but its call and data quality were ranked below Verizon and AT&T.

While T-Mobile did best its national carrier competition in this survey, all four major US operators were beaten by regional carriers and MVNOs. Operators like Consumer Cellular, Ting, Virgin Mobile, and US Cellular were ranked higher by survey respondents.

Verizon spokesman Chuck Hamby responded to the Consumer Reports survey about how you’d expect, saying that VZW believes that scientific testing provides a more accurate reflection of a carrier than survey data:

“We’ve always said that the most accurate performance measurement comes from scientific-based testing, not from crowd-sourced or survey data. Verizon will remain focused on providing the best wireless network and experience possible for our customers, not on accolades.”

While there’s certainly merit in scientific-based testing, the public’s perception of a carrier is also an important metric. When considering changing carriers, a lot of people will ask friends and family about their experiences with the various operators, and a good review from those folks can really sway a person’s decision. Because of that, the results of this Consumer Reports survey are good news for T-Mo, even if they’re not based on scientific tests.

Source: CNN Money

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  • Sushimane

    That’s what’s up tmobile keep it up!

  • alex

    i would be nervous if i be verizon or AT&T. i am surprised not to see any major moves from both companies yet.

    • maximus1901

      do you have any idea how much PROFITS they make per quarter? wth would they be scared?
      TMO swings between profit and loss of a few hundred million every quarter meanwhile att/vzw make billions in quarterly profits.
      scared? lol.

      • steven berson

        Kinda makes you wonder why they dropped prices and got rid of contracts. Not to mention allow users upgrade more frequently, roll over data, cheaper international calling. Maybe they are scared.

        • Acdc1a

          They have to protect those billions. Some folks just are not business savvy.

        • Atom

          Prices went up when they decided the whole no contract thing. If you take ANY plan prior to their no contract initiative from T-Mobile, you’ll notice a nice trend.

      • yankeesusa

        Who cares what the companies are doing with their money. In the end what matters to the customer is good pricing and good coverage. Even if tmobile failed in the next 5 to 10 years currently if you have their coverage then they are one of the best. Are their areas where they don’t have coverage…. of course. If you choose to use a service that sucks in your area then that is a dumb choice. I don’t understand all this complaining and trying to talk down a company like if they paid you or something. It’s hilarious.

  • Chris

    “We’ve always said that the most accurate performance measurement comes from scientific-based testing…” that we pay for and skewed to our liking.

  • Verizonthunder

    Congratulations T-Mobile and John Legere for improving the carrier brand.

    • millenialkid

      What are the brand values that he improved?

      • yankeesusa

        If you feel he hasn’t done anything and that’s your reason for not trying out tmobile for yourself then that’s your loss. I tried tmobile 4 years ago and they sucked, so i chose verizon. Then i chose sprint because in my specific area where i live they were good. Then 2 years ago i took a chance on tmobile and that paid off. In my area they are the top dog when it comes to data speed and coverage. If they sucked i would have gone back to verizon. It’s up to the user to decide what service works for them. Common sense people, common sense :)

  • Ascertion

    Verizon’s still the best network, hands down. But with everything considered, T-Mobile offers more value, with unlimited data, cheaper family plans, and other useful perks (global roaming, carrier freedom, music freedom, and BingeOn.) People are starting to see they don’t actually need the Verizon-level coverage if they can’t use the service (data limits, or excessive pricing.)

    • Joe

      Tmobile is catching up. Slowly but surely. My father in law travels all over the country so he has to have Verizon because they have towers along most highways. His bill is almost $100 for one phone where as I have three phones on Tmobile and pay right around $100 (not including the ETF’s).

    • Drew

      I despise Verizon Wireless now. They can all go die somewhere else for all I care. Yes Verizon is still top dog, but to me T-Mobile stands to be in the top dogs position right deep down inside my booklet now. Nice, Right? Yays.

  • TechnoRealz

    Congrats to TMO & all their customers.
    There’s a better mouse trap than the VZW/ATT duopoly.

  • Adam

    Over the long term, crowd-sourced decision making will beat scientific-based testing. This is why China is feeling an economic slowdown.

  • NoVerizon

    “We’ve always said that the most accurate performance measurement comes from scientific-based testing…” Thats what I would say if I didn’t like the crowd-sourced data. Good answer but not factual.

  • dinopdx

    I rated T-Mobile’s customer service highly too until the security breach incident. I wrote to them saying how credit monitoring service alone will not protect its affected customers and asked them to pay for those who wanted to do a “credit/security freeze,” and they sent me back a boilerplate letter stating they’re offering credit monitoring service. The letter showed that they didn’t even read my letter and it was almost more infuriating than the security breach. Maybe T-Mobile just didn’t want to say anything while so many class action lawsuits are pending.

    • Leo Mahecha

      That breach wasn’t on T-mobile’s servers, it was actually an attack done to Experian and it was aimed at T-Mobile. T-Mobile had nothing to do with that breach. The letter that you must have gotten was most likely one from Experian saying that they will monitor your credit for 2 years free of charge since it was their fault.

      • dinopdx

        No, the letter was on T-Mobile’s letterhead and it started with: “T-Mobile USA Inc. (“T-Mobile”) is in receipt of your correspondence regarding Experian’s data breach.” The letter then pretty much repeated what it said on its website (and what you asserted about how it’s not T-Mobile’s fault), which I already knew because I can read.

        My frustration is that I took the time to explain to T-Mobile why credit monitoring service is not adequate to protect its customers, and the response I got was pretty much a non-response. I saw T-Mobile giving its customers $200 credit simply because their new iPhones arriving a few days late. And now it refuses to give a $30 credit to customers who want to protect themselves from having their identify stolen and credit history ruined. This is not my definition of customer service.

        • guest

          Wrong tree. T-Mobile was not at fault on the data breach. It was Experian.

          If they give you the $30, they would have to give all the 15 million affected $30 too, $450,000,000 for something they are not responsible.

        • dinopdx

          LOL! I didn’t know there are so many die-hard T-Mobile fanbois here. Here is an example of what I consider excellent customer service: I ordered something from Amazon.com. It was shipped via USPS. Even though the tracking info said it was delivered, I didn’t get it. I contacted Amazon.com, and it immediately sent out another one without charge, even though the tracking info said I should have gotten it. (A few days later a neighbor took the originally delivered item over saying the post office must have delivered it to the wrong address. I contacted amazon.com and it emailed a free shipping label to ship it back.)

          The point is, it’s not amazon.com’s fault that the item was not delivered to the right address, but it “maned up” and helped its customer. They didn’t play this “this is not my fault” b.s. game with me and asked me to contact the post office. I didn’t pick the shipping company (just like I didn’t pick Experian when I gave T-Mobile’s my personal info and I certainly didn’t ask it to keep my information for 1.5+ years), so if anything went wrong it’s between amazon.com and the shipping company to figure out whose fault it was. If T-Mobile really prided itself with good customer service, it should have just helped me with credit freeze and then figure out how to get the money back from Experian or its insurance company.

        • yankeesusa

          Ok, let’s compare a phone service provider to amazon… lol
          It was experian that suffered the breach and tmobile also provided their own service to the customer to help keep tabs on the credit on top of the one that experian offered, even though they didn’t need to. At this point it’s a moot point. Companies are getting hacked left and right and this hack was directly at experian which happened to affect some tmobile customers.
          My question is, even if it was tmobile’s fault, would you leave them? Because att got hacked several years ago and that didn’t make them any worse. That stuff just happens.

        • dinopdx

          Hmm..don’t know why my previous reply needed review, maybe because it contained a link? Anyway, I was providing an example of good customer service. I ordered something online from amazon(dotcom). Tracking info showed it was delivered by the postal service, but I didn’t get it. I contacted amazon, and it immediately shipped another one to me free of charge. It didn’t play any “it’s not my fault” game with me nor did it ask me to contact the post office. I didn’t pick the shipping company, so amazon took care of its customer and figure out how resolve this with post office and/or its insurance carrier. I didn’t pick Experian to check my credit, nor did I ask it to keep my sensitive information for over 1.5 years, so T-Mobile should “man up” and take care of its customers.

        • Mirad77

          You bought the item from Amazon and contacted them hen the item didn’t get to you, OK. Now contact Experian about the hack would be a better route. When you buy stuff from Amazon and add protection from Square trade, do you call Amazon when your item is damaged or Square Trade?

        • dinopdx

          That’s a ridiculous example. When I purchased phone and service from T-Mobile, I didn’t ask to add or purchase anything from Experian.

        • millenialkid

          Damned straight!

        • Mirad77

          Really? This hack doesn’t affect all TMUS customers but only those with EIP. TMUS have to protect their investment some how, if you don’t like it then pay full price for your phone.

        • guest

          What do you want exactly?
          If you want to freeze your credit you can get a police report so you can do it for free. Some people have done that.
          You can also join the class action lawsuits against Experian and become an activist or something.

        • dinopdx

          I want T-Mobile to take care of its customers so that they won’t leave. I found it funny that anyone would think $30 is too much for T-Mobile to spend on retaining a customer. It routinely spends hundred and hundred of dollars just to attract one new customer (up to $650 to pay off their ETF & old phone, and $200 off a new iPhone, just to name a few).

        • guest

          If you go high up the costumer service chain you may get the $30 or something equivalent, but how much is your time worth?

          T-Mobile is not one single evil entity, it is an corporation made up of many individuals.

        • VernonDozier

          T-Mobile is not one single evil entity, it is an corporation made up of many individuals.

          I’d like to add “designed to increase returns for their greatest shareholder– The German Government”

        • guest

          I don’t think that’s going to stick in anyone’s head.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This conspiracy needs to end.

        • dinopdx

          I didn’t say that T-Mobile is evil. You’re right that $30 isn’t worth my effort to go up the customer service chain. However, I was not interested in other cell phone companies before, but now I am definitely looking.

        • guest

          If you really think your personal information is at risk with T-Mobile then it would be wise for you to switch to another provider.
          If they run your credit, ask them for what creditor they are using, then ask the creditor how they are handling you personal information…

        • Acdc1a

          So your information can be with yet another entity? That seems sane and logical.

        • millenialkid

          What’s wrong with holding companies accountable..?

          I mean, sure, everyone thinks that attorneys shouldn’t be paid. But for every one successful class-action lawsuit, there are 30 that fail.

          I’d join into a class action lawsuit. If you steal $1.00 from me, I’m going to come and charge you reasonable interest in addition to the $1.00 That’s how you stop a bully, and how a Judge would rule in small-claims court.

          We don’t have enough of these class action lawsuits anymore… Companies get away with screwing 1,000,000 customers out of $1.00 per month ($12M) and the court says only $2M needs to be returned..? Come on.

          Again, that’s how you stop a bully.

        • guest

          If you have a legal case against T-Mobile, go for it.

        • millenialkid

          Remember, this *is* T-Mobile.

          Experian was likely the lowest bidder for the services provided. T-Mobile selected them.

          In the bid request, the price was likely lower because Experian’s systems weren’t designed to the rigerous 99.999% rate that a telecom operator (carrier) would require.

        • guest

          Here is where you provide proof and links.

        • millenialkid

          I’m a freaking Customer. My job isn’t in managing T-Mobile’s business. I *pay* a company for services; included in those services are *people* provide services; and included in those services is adherence of local US law.

          How about this–

          Why don’t you go to Central Park for all us. I’ll pay for airfare.

          When you’ve tracked him down and he’s finished with his jog, and between tweets, managing his fake doll’s twitter account, JUST ask Legere who is managing the business….

        • guest

          I’m sorry. I thought you had something. I take back what i said.
          Words, follow me.

    • DontGetYourBritchesInAWad

      That is the way all these companies are handling the breaches.

      • dinopdx

        And that makes it right because?

    • Andrew Singleton

      Experian was the party that was hacked. T-Mobile is a victim and is providing credit monitoring as a pure bonus. If you are “infuriated” you should take it up with Experian, the people who got hacked.

      • dinopdx

        “T-Mobile is a victim.” LOL! Next thing you know, someone will use T-Mobile’s social security number to open fraudulent credit cards.

        • gmo8492

          No matter how you slice it, T-Mobile was not the offending party and did what was necessary to protect their customers from future fraud. It doesn’t even matter anyway since every major bank, government, and any other corporate entity that deals with personal data has been hacked.

        • dinopdx

          “did what was necessary to protect their customers from future fraud” Credit monitoring alone will do nothing to prevent future fraud. Anyway, I am not talking about who is at fault here. I am talking about customer service.

        • Andrew Singleton

          ok.

    • Acdc1a

      Are you going to ask the IRS to pay to freeze your credit? Yes…they were hacked too.

      • dinopdx

        I may, if my data there were hacked. There are class action lawsuits against the IRS too.

        • Acdc1a

          IRS won’t disclose…unless someone already filed a return in your name.

        • yankeesusa

          Have fun with that and while your’e at it you should go after home depot,target,michaels,kohls,several hotel chains and the list goes on…..

    • yankeesusa

      It wasn’t tmobile who got hacked, it was experian. google it.

    • dinopdx

      The few T-Mobile defenders below cracked me up. I am talking about customer service 101 here: acknowledging a customer’s concern and trying its best to address the concern. In this case, my concern was that credit monitoring service alone is not adequate to prevent fraud. T-Mobile has completely failed by not even acknowledging my concern. I thought it’s strange that T-Mobile paid me over $900 to switch to them, and yet it’s resisted paying $30 to keep me happy so that I wouldn’t switch again.

      And, yes, I did know the breach was on Experian’s server, but so what? I purchased my phone and service from T-Mobile and I am T-Mobile’s customer. Why should I care who T-Mobile’s subcontractors are? I didn’t pick the subcontractors nor did I purchase anything from them. If your Honda’s airbag failed, would you go to Honda or the airbag subcontractor Tanaka? If your iPhone’s LTE chip failed, would you go to Apple or the chip subcontractor Qualcomm? If you got sick from eating at Chipotle, would you go to Chipotle or its subcontractor(s) who supplied the tainted raw ingredient(s)? Well, based on their comments about their expectation of customer service, they would probably be fine with a $1 off coupon from Chipotle.

  • Rob H.

    Congrats T-Mobile on another great year! Here’s to a equally successful 2016

    • millenialkid

      If it gets any more successful, it’s probably best that some of us take our business elsewhere.

      I already have trouble keeping a connection longer than 10 to 15 minutes.. Even on WiFi… So I know it’s not my portion of the call that’s dropping.

      T-Mobile has become the nation’s most admired teenybopper network for those that need constant entertainment and a cheap phone.

      • Washout

        What are you talking about? Either you have horrible service in which I suggest getting a different carrier, or are having serious tech problems. In fact, dropping a connection on both their network and on wifi suggest that it is your phone that is the problem. Just saying…

        • millenialkid

          No, my part of the country has a terrible engineering “challenges”. Ledger won’t add budget until Q2 next year, (at the earliest).

        • guest

          Awww

        • millenialkid

          I know its so sad. Come over, and sign my gag order. Make me feel happy again. Hold me until Un-Carrier 11.

        • guest

          No boyfriend or girlfriend?
          Is that T-Mobile’s fault?

        • millenialkid

          Nice post.

          Actually, Married here. 8 years and counting. With the wife at Nordy’s tonight, (family discount night) I was thinking of taking the T-Mobile 14 day “cheat-drive”, but instead called Jake at StateFarm instead and got a great insurance quote. Jake is still wearing khaki pants.

        • guest

          Okay.

        • Phone Guy

          Switch out, and switch back when its improved. Easy.

        • yankeesusa

          That would be the smart thing to do but it’s not smart when you complain about service and do not make the changes yourself to get a service that works for “you”.

      • yankeesusa

        It sucks that service in your area isn’t good. I’m glad my service is top tier. Hopefully you are smart enough to change to a service that actually works for you.

      • Phone Guy

        Funny. I can talk hours and hours without a drop, even while driving through LA. Must be your phone or the network in your neighborhood. WiFi I don’t use as WiFi is so flakey. And T-Mobie has the same lineup of expensive phones.

        • i think anyone with a cell phone know the spots where their coverage is weak; it’ll be interesting to see if this new app allows those to be reported… and even more interesting to see if they’ll be resolved.

      • AJ2

        That’s why I never understand people here constantly wanting Tmobile to get more customers. Not only will the network get more congested, but they’ll be less incentive to provide deals & lower prices. They’ve already increased prices several times since launching Uncarrier

      • SirStephenH

        If both your cellular and Wi-Fi connections are dropping out then it’s more likely a problem with your phone, not the network.

  • DILAW IDDAHLA

    I have a personal T-Mobile phone and a work Verizon phone. As far as service, Verizon is very consistent and connection is always great. However, I would rate T-Mobile better based on VALUE. As far as customer service, Verizon is very strict and tend to not do their customers any “favors” or give loyalty discounts. T-Mobile on the other hand has a different customer service experience. They make you feel good but because they lie to you to get you off the phone. It has been almost 4 months of me trying to get my trade in credit for my old Iphone 5S. T-Mobile has the phone, but every time I call I get excuses and promises for the following week or 2 and hear nothing from them. I honestly think these surveys are not trustworthy.

    • Phone Guy

      Email John Legere. His email is posted. He will solve it quickly.

      • DILAW IDDAHLA

        I have spoken to over 7 different agents and 3 out of the 7 are from the retention department (loyalty department). The conversations are recorded since my phone does it automatically. The 3 retention department agents all promised me a call back and all didn’t call. One told me “I will follow up with you in 2 days and will get it resolved. Either get you the $115 trade in credit or I will give you a credit of $115.” This was almost 9 days ago. A bunch of liars and I wish it was only 1, but the second retention agent told me he will give me a call by Wednesday, today is Friday and still no call back. T-Mobile asked me to send my iPhone 5S and I did, I have agents documenting that the phone was received and the IMEI # matched…it’s documented, but now they are telling me they don’t know where the phone is and have to look for it. It has been almost 4 months. I have no faith in any of their agents and I doubt J.Legere would get involved in a claim over $115 trade in. He has more important things to do like renting a jet to fly over the ATT HQ

        • Adam

          You are much more patient than I would be. There are instructions on how to demand binding arbitration on T-Mobile’s web site. You basically send them a certified letter and wait 60 days. Although on average, small claims is cheaper and more consumer friendly, it sounds like your case is a slam dunk and binding arbitration will be less work on your part. The mostly likely outcome will be your demand letter will be read by someone who knows what they are doing and immediately give you the credit.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          This is what I will do next. Thank you :)

        • AJ2

          Tmobile has value but customer service reps leave a lot to be desired. I left Tmobile years ago because of them. I’ve had several instances since then dealing with customer service trying to get info via live chat & social media where all their comments are in writing. The majority have been clueless about their own company’s policies. They constantly provide incorrect information. I can ask the same question to 3 reps & get 3 different answers & yet none of them is true. I don’t see an improvement in customer service. I was going to try the Test Drive but they cancelled that (even tho the Twitter rep didn’t know that +somehow thought I’d have to pay a $15 activation fee)… Yes I know they have their Jump guarantee but I’m not going through the hassle of porting a number or spending $upfront when my current MVNO still provides me with more than double the data for less than Tmobile cheapest). The value is high for family plans but not as much for individuals ;its time they get a holiday promotion. I still haven’t met a single person in my major city that has Tmobile as a work or personal phone. Ironically, Ive anecdotally seen a lot of people recently switch to Verizon

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          Their customer service gotten worse trust me. Eventually T-Mobile will start increasing their fees trust me. Every company wants to make more money and I truly think that’s when T-Mobile will see their customers leave them once their value is not the best. I know I would leave in a heartbeat if Verizon is $30 more expensive a month for my family plan (8 lines), but unfortunately Verizon is almost $130 more than T-Mobile.

        • Chris

          Have you tried Sprint? Now that they have converted their network in my area I am getting up to 91mbps on my download speeds. My service is very reliable now and I get better pricing than any other provider. To me their “value” beats any other provider

    • I’m sure it’s not “lies”, employees have no desire to lie to anyone. It’s interesting when people encounter a problem and thy ascribe ill intent when it’s most likely a shipping or system problem. Just ask for a supervisior and be nice and I’m sure they’ll want to resolve it as much as you do. Why WOULDN’T they?

      • DILAW IDDAHLA

        I called again, I asked for a retention department supervisor. I explained to him why I was calling. He said my case looks like a novel when he opened the notes. He said “what if I just give you $115 credit because that’s what we quoted you for the trade in.”. I told him OK, but make sure you put a description that this credit is the value of my trade in, not ” a gift” from T-Mobile. He agreed… Case closed. Wow, took me 4 months and I know he did it because I told him “I have conversations with agents telling me T-Mobile has the phone, the imei # matches and I was given a date to see the trade in credit in my account…. I will file a civil or small lawsuit to get my trade in credit”… To be honest with you, forget this company’s customer service. It’s trash

        • Probably be better for you and for T-Mo if you choose a carrier you like better.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          OK

        • Because it sounds like despite getting what you want you still think their service sucks. So… why stick around? I’m sure they’d be OK with your porting out.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          Ohhhh, I am supposed to praise their customer service for giving me my trade in credit 4 months later after I let the supervisor hear the recorded conversations and showing him the tracking of the shipment. BTW, he asked me to give him a week to look into it lol. I said no and I told him I will take this to court and that’s when he gave me my trade in credit

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          It’s obvious that you are biased and I won’t be surprised if you work for T-Mobile. BTW, they gave me MY MONEY 4 months later

        • Def a fan, I guess that makes me biased. Def not an employee.

          I’m sure you will agree that in any business, some customers are never happy and more trouble than thy are worth. If you’re constantly having issues, and still think they’re crap, then why would you stay? Just to complain?

          Anyway glad you got your rebate resolved. It’s not uncommon for them to take a while.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          Yeah, you said it…. You are a fan and biased.

  • SirStephenH

    So Verizon basically said that they don’t care what customers think. Not surprising at all.

  • I have to say if anyone is thinking about Projeft Fi I didn’t like it. As a long time Tmo user I took my Nexus to places that typically had issues on Tmo and saw no improvement. So either Sprint had issues in the same places, or their technology for switching between the two doesn’t work.

    • Fabian Cortez

      It’s more likely that Sprint had the same issues in the same places considering their network is smaller.

      • Could be. I like data too much for their pricing.

      • I was really counting on them complimenting T-Mo coverage significantly. Disappointing.

  • Dylan Wentworth

    That reminds me. I was supposed to get a call back from customer care about unexplained bill creep and that call never came. When you only have 4 choices, none of them good, a consumer reports survey is like asking someone to choose between vomit, diarreah, constipation and bloody stools. Take your pick.

    • Romdude

      How dramatic.

  • Nestor

    Your last statement is surely convincing, Alex, thanks.

  • itsanewday

    this may be a change of topic, but if there are any employees on this thread that can answer some questions

    why are stores being staffed with 11, 12 or 13 sales associates? upper management wants us to work harder for less pay

    why does this company only hire part time sales associates? funny that upper management wants their sales reps committed 100% of the time and work like a full time associate but only get part time hours. most employees that work only 20-24 hours have another part time job or go to school and most full time employees only get 30 hours max and are looking for another part time position…how is anyone supposed to live on part time hours and part time pay?