T-Mobile Home Internet pilot test begins, no data caps and $50 per month price

tmobile-home-internet

After teasing two weeks ago that it’d be running a pilot test of its home broadband service, T-Mobile today kicked the program off.

The T-Mobile Home Internet pilot offers fixed unlimited wireless service over T-Mo’s 4G LTE network. There are no data caps, no contracts, and no equipment costs. T-Mobile says it expects its Home Internet service to offer speeds of around 50Mbps, and pricing will be set at $50 per month with autopay.

With its Home Internet service, T-Mobile notes that your speeds may be lower than other customers during times of congestion due to data prioritization. The resolution of streaming video will depend on the available speeds.

So how do you get in? Unfortunately, it’s not quite as simple as just signing up on T-Mobile’s website. T-Mo is sending invitations to a “limited group” of customers that it says are in “rural and underserved markets”. The company plans to extend the pilot test to 50,000 households by the end of 2019. If you’re eligible to participate, you’ll receive an invitation via email or U.S. mail with info on how to sign up.

tmobile-4g-lte-home-internet-router

T-Mobile says it’ll be able to greatly expand its Home Internet service if its merger with Sprint is approved. With the 5G network that it says it’d be able to build after combining with Sprint, T-Mo expects that it’ll offer 5G broadband service with speeds of more than 100Mbps to more than half of U.S. households by 2024.

T-Mobile has been pushing its Home Internet service as a major benefit to its proposed merger with Sprint. T-Mobile CEO John Legere previously claimed that the New T-Mobile will “aggressively price” its in-home broadband service to help save its subscribers money, while customers on other in-home broadband providers will benefit because those other companies will be forced to lower their prices and improve services to compete.

Legere and T-Mo are also placing a heavy focus on rural consumers with its Sprint merger and 5G in-home broadband. “A core promise of New T-Mobile is our commitment to bring real competition and real choice for in-home broadband to rural America,” Legere said earlier this month. Rural consumers are a focus of the T-Mobile Home Internet pilot that’s launching this week, too, as T-Mo pushes to show that it wants to help those in rural areas get connected.

Source: T-Mobile

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  • Sharti24

    No thanks. Spectrum internet costs $45 a month for 100 mbps.

    • DILAW IDDAHLA

      WOW Cable where I live (MI) is $29/month for 100mbps for the first year and $39.99/month for the second year. 2 year contract is required which is great since the deal is a great deal.

      • Nate

        That is awesome.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          Yeah, I have 1.3 years left and after that it will jump to $79.99/month. But by then I am sure I will find another internet provider with a better promotion ;)

      • Sharti24

        Yeah spectrum’s $45 a month price is for the first year then goes up to $65 a month after the year is up. All you have to do is call in and request to be put back on the one year promo and they will do it for you. Location: NE Ohio

        • T Redd

          Is it unlimited ?

        • Sharti24

          Yes. Spectrum is unlimited GB

    • Nate

      Better than the $60+ taxes and fees that I have to pay comcast each month. Comcast is pretty much the only provider that can offer high speed in my area.

      • mikeZo6

        Yea Comcast I pay $71 400 Mbps works Awesome over 10 devices connect No Lang at all.

        • Nate

          My current best is 130 Mbps with my comcast connection. Seems to be plenty enough for our needs right now. I would be much happier with a $30 or $40 bill though.

        • riverhorse

          Are there data caps?

        • steveb944

          Everyone has caps nowadays.

        • Sharti24

          Not spectrum

        • steveb944

          The only one for now apparently.

        • JJ

          Yes, att and cox have 1000gb as their cap unless you pay extra. Att supposedly is lowering that to 700 but i think it’s dependent on the area.

        • Trevnerdio

          AT&T Fiber has no data limits.

        • JJ

          Att fiber is not available to many people yet and although the limit is higher it does have a limit. The $50 plan has a 1tb limit.

        • riverhorse

          Thanks for that. Sounds reasonable.

        • GeoGuy17

          I am happy with my 50 mbps from ATT Uverse for $30/month. Not a promo price that is what it is as long as I am a customer with ATT. For now that is fast enough and I don’t have to haggle yearly for a better price. It was 10 mbps up but I noticed yesterday that this jumped to 20 mbps up.

    • riverhorse

      plus taxes, fees, box rental…and price raises year to year……

      • Sharti24

        No taxes. No modem costs. I use my own wifi router

        • riverhorse

          Oh, you bought your own modem.
          I just got like 3 raises in a row from Spectrum. First the regulatory fees / taxes, then the programming. Gave up their internet years ago.

        • Sharti24

          I bought my own wifi ROUTER not modem. They issue you a modem for free and They charge $5 month for a router if you use theirs.

          There are no taxes. I pay $44.95 per month out the door for 100mbps. Maybe ohio is different but spectrum doesnt tax internet or landline phones, Only cable tv

        • riverhorse

          All that makes for a very good deal!

        • Sharti24

          Att just installed fiber on my street two months ago. 100mbps is $40. $90 for 1gbps. Prices go up $10 after a year

        • riverhorse

          “Why that sounds like a very respectable neighborhood!” (Midnight Run-1989)

        • JJ

          That is great, but not everyone lives where you live. Laws and regulations change based on where you live and pricing also changes. I pay $53.99 with no tax for 100mb also. I have my own modem and router too. But my friend couple hours from me pays the same for 200mbps. Everyone has different needs or situations.

    • JJ

      And that’s great, this means this service is not meant for you…

  • Chris

    I’d love to try it. I currently use an ATT hotspot for my home internet. LTE works great..

    • Sharti24

      Are there no landline internet providers where you live?

      • Chris

        Nope

        • Sharti24

          Shoulda got on the Tmobile unlimited phone hotspot deal for $25 extra before they canceled the add on

        • Chris

          I don’t have t-mobile phone service, I use ATT. Unfortunately I think T-Mobile’s speed is too slow at my house

      • JJ

        My brother in law uses verizon hotspot because no land lines where he lives.

      • ugp5

        no wires here that work

    • ugp5

      ATT hotspot is what I use for my ISP as well.

  • MisterListerSir

    Hopefully they’ll be able to bring the speeds up or the price down when they begin expanding this. Right now, it really only makes sense if you have no other options or your only options are robbing you blind.

    • Red

      See my comment above.

      • MisterListerSir

        …or your only options are robbing you blind.

    • riverhorse

      It’s assumed that 5G will follow, when available.

      • MisterListerSir

        That’s the plan. This is basically their beta-test of it – just using current tech.

    • GeoGuy17

      My parents pay $60/month for 1mbps. They receive less than 100 kbps. During peak times the internet is inaccessible. Frontier robs many of its customers blind.

      • MisterListerSir

        I’m really hoping this Pilot will expand to get most of the folks in that situation. Well before expanding into cities and trying to compete with Comcast and their ilk – the rural areas have been underserved for way too long.

  • blindexecutioner

    And there it is. The data being throttled kills any enthusiasm I have for this even though I live outside the city and this would be like 10 times faster than my internet. The throttling would happen at prime times which is when most rural people who sign up for this would want to use it. LTE just isn’t a good home internet alternative. Until they can offer unlimited, unthrottled data (supposedly 5G can do this but I am very skeptical of the prices and conditions 5G will bring) it won’t be a good option for home internet.

    • Red

      Remains to be seen. Let’s say that they can provide the 50mbps, and that during peak times it gets throttled to 25mbps. Considering that right now I’m paying around $70 for 10mbps, T-mo gets the Big Win!

      • GeoGuy17

        Even if the service was throttled to 10 mbps, it is still better than what is available in most rural areas.

        • Red

          I know. Trust me, I know!

    • riverhorse

      The terms say zero limits/caps. Are you referring to normal peak usage slowdowns?

      • SirStephenH

        He’s referring to “deprioritization” which isn’t “throttling”.

    • MisterListerSir

      Why would you have to worry about deprioritization in rural areas? Towers in LA get congested. Towers in Chicago get congested. Towers in B.F.E.? Not even remotely likely.

    • blokeinusa

      Maybe you should try living in a rural area and see how it’s like not to be able to get basic service’s. Something like this is a better solution than what’s currently out there

    • JJ

      Well, my brother in law lives in a rural area and att dsl doesn’t throttle but speeds in the evening go down to about 1.2 from around 13mbps. And the throttling on this only happens when you hit their threshold. And in rural areas congestion is usually not a problem. From having verizon,sprint and att, tmobile has been the best at handling congestion in my situation. The thing is to try it for yourself. No sens in sitting here and saying it’s not going to work for someone because it doesn’t work for you…

    • SirStephenH

      Deprioritization ≠ Throttling

  • Iphart

    It is 50 MB up to your front door and as soon as you get inside your house the speed goes down to 3 to 5 MB.

    • Pook

      [citation required]

    • riverhorse

      That’s what isp hardware is for- strengthen antenna, amplify signal, etc.

    • GeoGuy17

      mbps not MB

    • JJ

      Oh, so you’ve been using it and testing? How do you like it so far?

    • marque2

      Not necessarily. And if you do have issues and get at least some signal to your house Tmobile will give you a signal enhancer which roughly doubles data speed indoors. Ours gives us about 40mbs when we used to get about 15 with some slighy dead zones in the home.

  • RonV42

    My mom is paying $55 for 6mbps from a major carrier. This may be the best deal out there for her.

    • steveb944

      Wow that’s highway robbery. I would have gotten unlimited hotspot for that.

  • Joe P

    I wish they had signal in the part of rural Arkansas where my mother lives. She currently has Hughes satellite internet that is so slow as to be barely usable and charges by the GB.

    • GeoGuy17

      My parents have Frontier DSL which is the same way. Where my parents live in IL they should be able to catch band 71. Band 2/4 is useless at their house.

  • mikeZo6

    Tmo with 5G won’t come even Close to speeds people have in cities with Xfinity and Fios….400 Mbps and 1000Mbps
    Tmo Broadband will Not help most people
    For Rural people sounds great

    • Leoj305

      who really needs 1GBPS connections?

      • mikeZo6

        with that comment WHY have 5G or 4G LTE then

        • Probablynot

          Because the increased bandwidth allows way more people to utilize normal usage (5-50mb/s) without bottlenecks.

        • MisterListerSir

          it’s not just about speeds. 5G has a far greater capacity; allowing far more devices to be connected simultaneously. Pretty much necessary with IoT is growing as fast as it is.

        • marque2

          Lower latency by about 20 fold as well if implemented per standard.

    • Pook

      do people get that for $50 / month? NO

      • mikeZo6

        $71 truely unlimited does NOT slow up at peak use.
        Compared to Tmo $50 can’t use during peak 3Mbs to 5Mbs no thanks

        • SirStephenH

          Actually cable internet does slow down during peak usage hours. With cable, areas share the same connection back to base so when your neighbors use the internet your connection usually suffers.

        • marque2

          All networks slow at peak use. I can even see the slowdown sometimes on my cable service.

      • mikeZo6

        Tmo is entering broadband as a first time, so TV stations are going from HD signal to Ultra 4K signal and CABEL BOX does all that..

    • matt

      You can’t get xfinity or fios in rural areas , genius

      In rural areas your choices are limited to someone’s private long range WiFi network. Cellular or $120 satellite internet a month with a 50 gig limit and a 2 year contract

    • blokeinusa

      If it’s stable enough, I’ll dump Comcrap in a heart beat just to get faster upload speeds

    • Android_God

      For a vast majority of people, 100 mbs is all they need

      • marque2

        For the vast majority of people 20 mbs will support a family. When you start doing 4K TV 50mbs would be warranted for the family. That would support 3 4K video streams plus plenty of extra for general web viewing. Most people can’t see the difference between 1080p and 4K TV though.

      • Pal

        Want. Depending on price I would be satisfied with 6mbps.

      • Chris Collins

        I have tested this on my network. With 2 people watching netflix on Roku and 2-3 tablets and cellphones surfing social etc I seem to only ever need about 20Mbps. Now thats with Hd not 4K which I understand drives up use quite a bit.

  • squiggleslash

    The fact it’s limited release sounds bad but I wonder if this is a way for T-Mobile to make their mostly unused rural cells generate some revenue. Sounds like a win-win if it is as it encourages T-Mobile to keep expanding coverage, and provides underserved communities with reasonable broadband services.

    • mikeZo6

      Tmo is forced to cause with Metro merge they promised rural improvements but did nothing for them.. Now with sprint merge FCC said to Tmo well u promised rural improvements BEFORE and didn’t deliver what makes Tmo promises now with sprints merge any different

      • JJ

        Huh? They haven’t done anything for rural? Here where i live there are several rural towns that now have tmobile with speeds around 40 to 80mbps down. In my town which is considered outskirts i’m getting around 90 and traveling up to several rural mountain towns in ga that never had tmobile, they now have tmobile and it did so well i had to share my hotspot with my verizon family member because his data was only about 1.2mbps

      • Pal

        They did huge improvements over the last ~4 years here. It used to be there was no service by T-Mobile at all, then the next year was 2g, which was garbage, then there was kinda 4g if you went outside and held your phone up high, pointed it in the right direction while standing on a ladder. After that they sent out a free signal booster but it only boosted signal to one room inside the house if you could get the base station in just the right spot to pick up 1 bar of LTE signal. Then 700mhz lit up and it was like Christmas! Netflix, YouTube, steam downloads and no booster! I’m looking forward to the future upgrades.

    • marque2

      I think you are right, they don’t really want to put up service in urban areas because they are already congested, even though there is little competition in the urban markets now. It does make sense that Tmobile can recoup some costs from supporting low use rural areas as you stated. I didn’t think of that. Agree that it is a win win.

      • SirStephenH

        Urban areas are congested?

        High usage areas don’t automatically equate to high congestion. Cities tend to have great speeds and low congestion because the network is far denser. The rural areas are the ones where congestion is a real problem due to the sparsity of the network and reliance on only 5+5MHz of band 12 for coverage.

  • Sharti24

    Do we have any details on the setup box tmobile will be issuing us? Like is it 4×4 mimo, 256 qam, 600 mhz compatible? How about 5G ready for future upgrades Or even the cost of the box per month/ a one time fee/ access fee

    • dcnatl

      It comes with a free TRS-80

    • SirStephenH

      The above article says that there will be no equipment fees.

  • Sharti24

    I feel that this idea of home wifi internet will get the merger approved. If tmobile is serious enough to “disrupt” the cable industry by becoming another competitor for home internet i cant see why the meger wouldnt go through. Especially since they’re marketing this for rural America first

    • MisterListerSir

      That’s been my defense of the merger all along. While the number of wireless mobile phone carriers drops by one, that’s really not what they are anymore. It boosts the number of internet providers by one, too.

      Comcast used to be just a cable provider. Then they provided internet. Then content. Now they’re even offering mobile service.

      T-Mobile used to be just a cellular provider…that’s not what they are anymore. :)

    • JStatt

      Exactly. You hit the nail on the head. People focusing on the reduction of 4 major MOBILE players to 3 are not understanding what the real potential is. T-Mobile can enter the home internet and other spaces of the industry and add an extremely dynamic competitor in what has been a quasi monopoly. In mobile, whether we have 3 or 4 won’t have a large impact. T-Mobile will survive, and Sprint will survive (though slowly die). Prices won’t be much different. But combined they will not only be a threat to the Big 2 in mobile but also all of the big fixed broadband companies in the country.

  • Christopher Heimann

    What I would need is an external POE antenna which I can run to an internal wireless router/switch.

  • steveb944

    It’s finally happening, next will be TV. I’ve never wanted this merger so much until now.

  • the martian ambassador

    I would prefer to just pay $50/month (fees included) for an unlimited 4G tethering add-on per phone line. Even better, let it be shared by other lines on your account but limited to one session at a time. Mobility is what would make this a more attractive option than land line internet .

    • Sharti24

      They used to offer that for $25 extra per month

      • marque2

        Yes but it was quite restricted. I believe it was only 10 gigs of service a month for $25. $50 for unlimited would be a really good deal if truly unlimited.

        • Prode

          They had a $25 add on awhile ago. They removed it but it did give unlimited just like the phone. I still have it and won’t get rid of it because of what I can do with it.

      • the martian ambassador

        I still have One Plus International on one of my lines, and it’s great. That said, it is not unlimited 4G tethering. T-Mobile One lines with One Plus International are still subject to the 50GB prioritization threshold, and over that limit, primary data usage is supposed to be on the phone itself.

        • Sharti24

          Have you ever been deprioritized after 50gb while tethering from your phone?

        • the martian ambassador

          I haven’t gone over 50GB but theoretically it could be deprioritized.

        • Prode

          I live in MN and have the add on. My home internet went out for a week a few months ago and I used 160gb during that time at home. I was never slowed down at all that month.

    • JJ

      The point of this program is not mobility, it’s accessibility and helping those where att, cox and others refuse to go because of costs. This will never happen on a mobile phone because it will clog the towers if you allow unlimited tethering from your phone which is not what it was intended for.

      • marque2

        It would be just as good in Urban areas where the big cable charges 80 bucks a month for similar service.

      • the martian ambassador

        They are emphasizing rural access in this announcement, but the service is not going to be limited to rural areas.

      • Will

        I understand what martian is saying. I would love to be unlimited on tethering as well for when I need it.
        I would also agree it’s not what your phone was intended to do. With a larger box and better ventilation the modem pictured above would likely hold up better than a smartphone for heavy usage just from a cooling perspective.
        Either way, it’s going to have the same effect on the towers.
        For what home internet is intended for this is a pretty solid option for those in rural areas. Starting with this in rural areas is good. Gives them an opportunity to improve on it while providing a good service to people who have limited to no option right now. When it goes national, I’d have to assume it would be more robust to be competitive with big cable and telcos.

      • Pal

        They could offer an unlimited LTE corded box so you would leave it at home. Would limit mobility of it at least.

  • Adam

    Lots of city folk commenting. They just don’t understand what it is like to have mobile data that is 3x wired speed, because telcos/cable don’t see your neighborhood as profitable.

    • none

      I used to live in a rural neighborhood, and paid $75/month for 100Mbps service from Comcrap. MetroPCS at that house consistently got 130Mbps.
      Of course, Comcrap no longer services that neighborhood(evidently, it was costing them too much money, because I was one of the 4 subscribers in the whole neighborhood, of course, I suspect it was just an excuse to stop offering service. It doesn’t cost them anything to serve the neighborhood, the cable lines were installed by the city.). Everyone else had 10Mbps DSL service from AT&T.
      Other than that, there was expensive HughesNet 25Mbps high-latency satellite, or expensive Viasat 100Mbps high-latency satellite.
      Having T-Mobile home internet would be amazing there. For the last few months I was there(after comcrap stopped serving the area), I decided to put an LTE module in my laptop, and use a hotspot SIM, which gave me far better internet than comcrap or ATT.

    • Joseph Highfill

      I use a Tmo phone as a hotspot in my area there is nothing even that ATT fixed wireless won’t, but I get decent Tmo signal from band 12 and 71 towers and the combo would kick any wired solution in my area.

      • Pal

        Me too

    • Pal

      Yup

    • teaReactor

      I used to use Tmo as my main internet way back when unlmt data pckg was first added. Didn’t have a choice. No DSL, no cable,.. we did eventually get DSL, but took months haggling with ATT and theur executive support team. We had serviceable lines, but wasn’t in the system… my phone (a rooted MyTouch 3G) had to be near a window due to meh building penetration, sometimes with a fan bc it would overheat from the constant tethering… fun…

  • Brian

    Enjoy, those peak hours when you barely get 0.30 kbps of data speed. lol

    • marque2

      That is what the DSL providers use to tell us to scare us from getting cable – since cable is technically on a shared line. Never happened.

      • Brian

        Nope, its facts. My speed tests are done during peak hours.

  • Danny Rodriguez

    50mbps? is that a joke? 5G at 100mbps? Im pretty sure 5G is being touted at GIGABIT speeds. And for 50 bucks? yea thanks but not thanks. Ill stick with FiOS for 100/100 for 45/month

    • JStatt

      It’s not 5G. If you actually read it, they are using 4G LTE to pilot the program. The speeds may improve in the switch to 5G provided the merger is approved. Also, though you didn’t mention, I doubt you live in a rural area because fiOS serves almost nothing in rural areas. So what you have available is not comparable to what underserved communities are really given, which is total junk.

  • none

    This is why (no matter what some may say) the T-Mobile/Sprint merger is a good thing.
    Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon need a strong competitor.
    With the merger, New T-Mobile will have more spectrum available.
    Sprint right now has tons of 3G spectrum, in 850MHz and 1900MHz, that could be refarmed to LTE which would add some coverage where T-Mobile currently doesn’t have any, and boost speeds, reducee congestion in places where T-Mobile already has LTE.
    Sprint’s LTE network could be absorbed by T-Mobile, to offer more low-band bandwidth(which is what they need to handle large amounts of rural customers on their home internet service), and more high-band coverage(which reduces congestion for people in cities and suburbs.)
    Lastly, New T-Mobile would also have more subscribers.

    The only thing to worry about is, what happens to MVNO’s running on Sprints network. They would likely have to keep some CDMA running, to appease users of phones that don’t support both networks.

    The combined network would run on bands 2, 4, 5, 12, 25, 26, 41, 66 and 71, phones would need to support all of those bands in order to have coverage.

    • SirStephenH

      CDMA will be kept around for only 2 to 3 years after the merger is approved while T-Mobile merges the networks. All CDMA users will have to upgrade their phones during this time which is plenty of time considering that most people are on a 2 to 3 year upgrade cycle.

      Band 2 is superseded by band 25, band 4 is superseded by band 66, and band 5 is superseded by band 26. That means that T-Mobile only has to support bands 12, 25, 26, 41, 66, and 71 which most T-Mobile phones already support.

    • Pal

      They’ll kill off sprints network and repurpose the spectrum. Might take awhile but it will happen.

  • Will

    It’s amazing how many people seem to have missed the word “pilot”. This is a test market group to see how it performs and how people react to it. If you’re living in a large town with 20,000 people or more its current state isn’t going to be for you. That’s a given. I’m at 300mbps at home right now and I wouldn’t switch for this. (As curious as I am to see how it performs.)
    But if I was living in a small town with limited options or a place where a telecom company isn’t willing to run a line due to cost – this might be a winner. Being negative about it because you have better internet at home with cable/fiber is ridiculous. How about judging it for what it is right now and looking at what its potential is.
    It’s not perfect. But for a lot of people it’s a hell of a lot better than what they have available to them today. Will it get better? Yes. What will market pricing be? Who knows. What will speeds be like when it becomes a 5G service? “more than 100mbps” which might be amazing depending on where you live.
    There’s a lot to like about this as a starting point. Emphasis on start. Let’s see where it goes.

    • marque2

      Most people don’t need 300 mb/s 50 or so is nice. I have 20 mbs at my home and am charged 49.99 for it. Tmobile would be an improvement.

      And while they think a good target market is rural areas with zero competition, the reason Cox can charge me $49.99 for 20 mbs is because AT&T “u-verse” is still DSL in my area, and they will charge me $35 for 756 kb/s (yes, kilobits) so there is no competition. Tmobile will discover Urban areas are ripe for the taking as well.

      • Pal

        I’d happily pay $25 for home internet and my tmobile speeds with my phone hot-spot are only 3-10mbs. No other options available anyway.

    • Sharti24

      Good points made but the fact is, people who live in these remote/rural areas dont have tmobile cell phone service because tmobile has bad or no coverage in their area. How many people are going to switch to this home wifi concept and keep their Att/verizon cell phone plans?

      It’s a Great idea and once tmobile builds out their 600mhz network with more towers in remote areas i could see people interested in this and switching to tmobile cell service for a package deal

      • riverhorse

        I think when 5g underpins this, a package like you say of cell+tv+internet will be so convenient(should also do away with needing public wifi on the road).
        Hopefully the TV side is done right, so that no other streaming package needed. Although content providers will likely play hardball, as all the major ones are starting to make noises about doing their own streaming service.
        Pricing…guessing $150-200

      • Pal

        That is not true actually. I live in a rural area and have T-Mobile but no cable or dsl options. Only fixed wireless at 3-6mbs for $99 or satellite with horrendously bad lag and low data caps. I know the dsl about 2 miles down the road tops out at about 3mbs as well. They could get a lot of customers like me. And I’m definitely not out in the middle of nowhere. 5 miles from a 20k town and 15 from a 500k city and other assorted small towns of 5-15k all around me. Just a dead area as far as wireline is concerned. I would be fine with the internet I already have, all I use is my phones hot-spot anyway.

        • Sharti24

          What city do you live in?

      • Greg Dalin

        you are acting like all rural areas have no coverage at all, i am sure tmobile will not invite anyone to the pilot outside of known or poor coverage spots

    • SirStephenH

      Yeah, we live outside a rural small/medium sized town with a population of 15,000 and we’ll probably never use T-Mobile home internet to replace our $70/month 1Gbps/10Mbps (real life 850Mbps/14Mbps) internet even if gigabit internet is ever available from T-Mobile. It will be useful to many people though *if* T-Mobile builds out 5G to the deep rural areas where high-speed internet is needed, which I don’t see as likely.

    • Pal

      Yup, i’m in one of those boats, not even dsl much less cable or fiber. It’s either fixed wireless or satellite. I’m 5 minutes from a town of 20k and 15 minutes from a 500k city so it’s not like I’m even out in the boonies or anything. Just a dead area as far as Telecom is concerned.

  • SirStephenH

    “Speeds of around 50Mbps” in “rural and underserved markets”?

    LOL! Good luck with that. Rural areas usually get around half that on average.

    • info411man

      Not completely true I have gigabit internet for $70 mo in a town of 3000 and I have gigabit internet and phone for $105 mo in a town of about 40 people. This is in Cherokee County in SE KS

      • SirStephenH

        Sure, if you want to go off topic…

        T-Mobile is not able to provide these speeds in most rural markets.

    • Pal

      I get 10 in the middle of the night and 1/3 of that during the day, but I would pay $25 for the speed I have now no problem.

      Edit: Most options here run $60+ for 3-6mbs or you have to go satellite with horrendously bad lag for comparison.

  • marque2

    You are right people tend to overestimate speed needs. I have 20mbs for the family because we don’t watch movies in 4k (computers and TV are 1080p) that is more than enough. It only seems slow on the rare occasion I need to download software.

    Granted the cable companies provide charts hinting email might not even work without 50mbs – so they can sell the more expensive plans.

  • Pal

    I think they are seriously in the dark as to what people in semi rural areas with no options would accept for a service. Sell it $1 per mbps and let your customers pick the speed they want. Cap the max at 50mbps right now and increase it as capacity and speed becomes available.

    Just specify that all speeds may not be available in all areas or during peak usage and let people self regulate.

    Later on the could make it a nonlinear increase in price as more competition comes in.

    • Probablynot

      As long as the connection speed is there, I don’t think anyone in an unconnected rural environment would bat an eyelash at $50. What does 3kb/s cost using dial up, like $30? Only other option in a lot of places is Hughes net, which is a) more expensive and b) has like 2 second latency or more making it useless for VOIP calling and gaming.

      • Pal

        Yeah, my local telco charges $50 for a phone line. They do not offer dsl. I would need microwave $60/2mbs or satellite(2 seconds of lag, ICK) if it wasn’t for my Phone hotspot. 4 lines at 14GB/line/month. I don’t usually hit it because I login to wifi at work on my laptop and pre-download any netflix shows or movies we want to watch. Yeah, SERIOUSLY. If I needed to download my Steam library off my phones only it would take over a year. Newer games would use up all my data in a month so I download them at work on my laptop, back them up and then reinstall on my desktop from the laptop… FML

  • Philip

    1. Is this the future? 2. This is good news as it bring more competition.

  • warpwiz

    Really?
    We live in a TMo 2-bar ghetto that is in a “rural and underserved market”. Without cable wifi capabilities on the phones and cellspot , we’d be stuck with Verizon.

    I cannot imagine there are other TMo customers in similar locations that could begin to rely on wireless for internet – that is, unless they want a replay of the DSL experience (at best!)

    I get 50Mbs+ reliably on my cable internet for $60 per month. I wouldn’t think of swapping that out (look at me – pledging allegiance to a cable service. Oy!) for a “we’ll give your 50Mbs sometimes, but be prepared for less” just to save $10.

    Try again, Legere!

    • FryChickenIsha

      Where do you live? I’m paying $60 for AT&T Fiber Internet with 300Mbps+ In Los Angeles CA
      Went from 50mbps for $90 with Spectrum

      • warpwiz

        I live in SW Georgia. I’m about a mile from an interstate (allegedly TMo’s strongest coverage area) and 10 miles from the nearest city.

      • eagleye_1@msn.com

        I’m getting 50mbps for $15 per month with Spectrum. I’m in a rural Village of around 4,500 people, 40 miles south of Buffalo Ny.

    • Chris Collins

      I live in a large metro area and this is attractive. I only have one provider that’s over 3Mbps DSL. Cox charges $66 a month for 30 Mbps and $84 for 100 Mbps. They also data cap at 999 GB to prevent cord cutting. Now if I sign up today these prices would be $40.00 and $60.00. But they recently have cut back on giving these discounts to long term customers so I need an alternative to switch to for 3 months at which point I would get the discount back for 3 years. Now interestingly enough family in other areas with cox and other service providers that compete still get them to give the discount without resigning up. Got in an argument with a customer serivce manager over it. At which point he told me they have a computer system that calculates if you should get a discount based on address and other info.

  • Chris Collins

    I have to agree I dropped to 30Mbps when I realized for 1080 and you tube etc I never need more then that.

  • Whitey Johnson

    This is pretty cool

  • Jax

    I use spectrum for home, My problem is my cell service sucks where I live. How about expanding more towers to serve more “rural and underserved areas”? That is what T-Mobile should be focusing on. I can’t take my home router with me in the car.