T-Mobile outspent its competition on TV ads in July 2016

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Last month, T-Mobile launched a new promotion to give free Samsung Galaxy smartphones to customers. T-Mo has touted the offer as its “Most Epic Deal Ever,” and to get the word out about it, T-Mobile spent more on TV advertising than all of its competitors.

According to TV ad measurement firm iSpot.tv, T-Mobile spent $41.6 million on TV ads during the month of July 2016. That’s more than Sprint’s $36 million, AT&T’s $33.8 million, and Verizon’s $28.9 million.

 

T-Mobile spent its $41.6 million on 18 ads that ran 6,371 times during shows like America’s Got Talent and The Bachelorette. The top ad was “T-Mobile’s Most Epic Deal Ever,” which advertises the offer that’ll give customers a free Galaxy On5 or Galaxy J7 with qualifying rate plan. This ad ran 2,288 times, got 387.4 million impressions, and cost approximately $15.9 million.

When this deal launched on July 13, T-Mobile said that it’d be around “for a limited time.” T-Mo’s web store is still showing it, so if you haven’t yet taken advantage of it, you’ve still got time.

Source: FierceWireless

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  • brybry

    I’d say money well spent. They’re still growing in record numbers no?

    • Acdc1a

      Doubled their subscriber base in 4 years!

      • Charmed79

        Yeah, and the network issues are showing it!

    • g2a5b0e

      I’m with you. You have to spend (invest) money to make money. A little primetime advertising is a good place to start.

  • Jimmy

    Spend it on new cell towers instead!

    • John Wentworth

      They are putting a lot of money into new deployments. But the business reality is that they need to put this money into advertising as well in order to keep growing, which gives them the revenue to invest in infrastructure.

      If they slashed the advertising, their additions would slow down and with it their revenue which would slow down deployments eventually. Just be glad T-mobile is growing so fast and they are deploying band 12 so quickly to grow the coverage area.