ZTE Falcon 4G LTE mobile hotspot launching at T-Mobile on February 12

ztefalcon4gltehotspot

UPDATE: T-Mobile’s support page for the ZTE Falcon is live, and it reveals more information about the new hotspot. The Falcon has support for UMTS 850, 1700/2100, and 1900MHz as well as LTE bands 2, 4, and 12. It’s got 128MB of RAM, 256MB of ROM, and supports Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n.

 

ZTE today unveiled the Falcon, a new LTE mobile hotspot that’s hitting T-Mobile shelves later this month.

The ZTE Falcon 4G LTE is a mobile hotspot device that can connect up to 10 devices to T-Mobile’s network at once. The Falcon measures 105 x 60 x 16mm and weighs 110 grams (0.24 pounds), and it’s got a 2000mAh battery inside of that body.

 

Pricing for the ZTE Falcon will be set at $79.99. It’ll be available starting February 12 on T-Mobile’s website and in select retail stores.

Most smartphones and tablets can be used as a mobile hotspot, but doing so also depletes your device’s battery more quickly. That’s why some folks prefer to buy a dedicated mobile hotspot and use that to get other devices online, leaving their smartphone battery to be used for smartphone things. If that sounds appealing to you, you’ll be able to snag the ZTE Falcon later this month.

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  • besweeet

    Frequencies: UMTS/HSPA:
    AWS/850/1900MHZ and LTE band 2/4/12

    • BreakingData

      Thanks @besweeet:disqus you would think they would of put this in the actual post

  • Steve Griffin

    I don’t get what these hotspots are really good for. Do they help with a bad signal in the home or building? Do they work like the LTE Cellspot?

    • hawkstwelve

      I personally live in a rural area where the only internet option is CenturyLink and I would get an abysmal 1-2mbps. I use the TMO Hotspot to provide wifi to my house and I now get 15-20mb and pay $20 less a month.

      That would be the large benefit of these hotspots, in my opinion.

      • Steve Griffin

        So what your saying is, in your rural area you still get 4G LTE without the hotspot. It just spreads the signal in your home where the cell tower might not reach. Right?
        . I live in a rural area as well but I only get 2G signal from the towers. WiFi has to come from the local telephone company.

        • kgraham182

          No, where hawkstwelve lives they have limited dsl or cable internet choices. So it’s cheaper and faster for them to get internet service through T-Mobile using an hotspot device similar to this. If you live in an area that doesn’t receive 4G, this wouldn’t help you achieve an LTE signal through your household.

        • Steve Griffin

          Yeah but, isn’t there a limit to how much internet you can use going through T-Mo? At least through the telephone company (like me) or cable you have unlimited amount’s of data. It’s hard to imagine the cable or DSL would be really slow. If you’re a T-Mo customers ask for the WiFi Cellspot from T-Mo. I had mine for over a year and swapped it back in for the new 4G LTE Cellspot which gives me LTE in a 2G area.

        • VINN

          If you only get 2G signal from the tower, then this device will only have 2G speed to offer to the connected devices. The same thing you could do with a cellphone using the tether option.

          In other words, it is not for you.

          Thank me.

        • VINN

          Are you using a phone with all the T-Mobile bands?

        • Steve Griffin

          No, I have the Lumia 925 looking to get the 950 but might opt for the delayed Alcatel Fierce XL (WP) when it’s released.

        • VINN

          Then, I think you should wait and see if you get 4G signal with a phone that has all the bands, especially LTE Band 12. If you do get 4G then you could use this device.

    • kgraham182

      Think of it as a screen-less cellphone which only purpose is for tethering devices to. Since it’s dumb it uses less power should last longer on a charge, which it had a larger battery though.

    • Jimmy James

      Hotspot and Cellspot both use your home Internet access. The 4G LTE Signal Booster from T-Mobile uses cell towers and does not require a home Internet connnection.

      • Stefan Naumowicz

        No…. Lol. Hotspots pick up data signal from cell towers and share the data with WiFi devices

        • Jimmy James

          I am going by T-Mobile’s naming convention. Their Hotspot is called a Cellspot and uses the Internet. It even states on their page it uses the Internet. Their data signal from cell towers is called a 4G LTE Signal Booster. Please read their site before LOLing.

        • David Icke

          No – you are painfully wrong and idiotic The HOTSPOTS are portable wifi devices that use T-Mobile towers to share t-mobile internet with other WIFI ENABLED devices.

          Cellspot devices (Booster, Router, and Tower) are completely different – two of them (router/tower) need home internet to enhance coverage in your home/office.

        • Jimmy James

          I be having that 4g LTE signal booster. I know what it do, cause I ain’t be havin home internet or router. Unless da wi-fi fairy came in and hooked me up. -idiot

  • Michael Barnes

    I’d rather have the Delphi like verizon has so everyone in my car is connected or when I am on site I can have my own kinda private office att has one buts it’s terrible and slow

  • VINN

    What about carrier aggregation specs?

    • VINN

      Never mind. I did a search myself and only the T-Mobile device page shows up.

      But I also noticed that it has a Mobile Device Unlock page, has anyone ever unlocked a T-Mobile Hotspot device?

      • nycplayboy78

        Can this be used Worldwide? o.O

        • VINN

          Once unlocked yes, but I’m not sure of this thing can be unlocked even though it has a Device Unlock page at TM’s site.

          And you/we have to see what other frequencies it has when the manufacturer publishes all the specs. Because with what it is listed here it may only work in Canada and Mexico.

    • enkay1

      No CA as per the FCC filing.

      • VINN

        Thanks. I saw that filing but didn’t understand it,

    • Jay Holm

      Does T-Mobile even have CA aggregation deployed anywhere? I live in Houston, Texas.

      • VINN

        I don’t know, but I want my devices to be ready.

        • Jay Holm

          I agree, it’s always best to future proof a device, and send a software update to it at a later time.

  • jonzey231

    I can pull my unlimited data Sim out of my N6 and pop it in. I wonder if it would come out of my unlimited or out if my tethering allowance.

    • Guest

      No it won’t work unfortunately.

  • Jimmy James

    I wish these articles would explain the difference between a Cellspot/Hotspot and 4G LTE Signal Booster, for people who might not know. A Hotspot is Wi-Fi and requires a home/business Internet connection from a provider like AT&T or Xfinity. It’s basically useless for someone at home with a family. They can use their Wi-Fi router for Internet and Wi-Fi calling/texting. There is no need for the Cellspot/Hotspot at home, as you are still being charged for data usage through T-Mobile while using the CellSpot/Hotspot, unless you have unlimited. This is why a Wi-Fi router is the best solution for home users.
    The 4G LTE Signal Booster requires no home or business Internet access, and acts as a cell tower repeater/booster. This is good for someone without a steady cell connection, or someone who is stuck on 4G, needs a stronger signal for LTE, and doesn’t have home Internet. It’s also good for someone with a phone that doesn’t have Wi-Fi calling. When contacting T-Mobile because you are getting a bad signal, and might not have Internet access at home, ask for a 4G LTE Signal Booster.

  • Jimmy James

    I wish these articles would explain the difference between a Cellspot/Hotspot and 4G LTE Signal Booster, for people who might not know. A Cellspot/Hotspot is Wi-Fi and requires a home/business Internet connection from a provider like AT&T or Xfinity. It’s basically useless for someone at home with a family. They can use their Wi-Fi router for Internet and Wi-Fi calling/texting. There is no need for the Cellspot/Hotspot at home, as you are still being charged for data usage through T-Mobile while using the CellSpot/Hotspot, unless you have unlimited. This is why a Wi-Fi router is the best solution for home users.
    The 4G LTE Signal Booster requires no home or business Internet access, and acts as a cell tower repeater/booster. This is good for someone without a steady cell connection, or someone who is stuck on 4G needing a stronger signal for LTE, and doesn’t have home Internet. It’s also good for someone with a phone that doesn’t have Wi-Fi calling. When contacting T-Mobile because you are getting a bad signal, and might not have Internet access at home, ask for a 4G LTE Signal Booster.

    • matt

      The primary number one reason why you would want the cell spot is because T-Mobile wants to basically give you a $200 to $300 802.11ac wireless router for your kind deposit of $25

      That’s what I heard.. But it’s been a while and I don’t know if that’s true for the current version

  • agent_smith

    If only they’d fix the connectivity and crash bugs in the ZTE Z915 before releasing a new one. Doesn’t seem like the new one offers much comparative advantage to the old one, and the old one has a bigger battery.

    • David Icke

      this one is a replacement for the Z64 which doesnt work in 700mhz markets.

      • agent_smith

        The Samsung SM-V100T couldn’t work in 700MHz or 1900MHz LTE either. Given the niche nature of mobile hotspots, it doesn’t make any sense why T-Mobile would bother releasing two very similar hotspots. The Z915 already does B2/4/12. It looks like the Z915 is going for $14 more than the Falcon’s MSRP. Makes no sense to even bother developing a product with that microscopic variance in pricing.

        • anon

          this is still the “budget” one – goes for $70, the 915 last i saw was $120. $40 difference.

  • matt

    this one doest have a screen, so i guess its a stripped down z915