T-Mobile to throttle customers who use unlimited LTE data for torrents/p2p

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In an internal memo to staff, it’s been revealed that T-Mobile is going to clamp down on users taking advantage of their unlimited 4G/LTE plans for peer-to-peer file sharing and other misuse of their data allowance.

It reads:

“T-mobile has identified customers who are heavy data users and are engaged in peer-to-peer file sharing, and tethering outside of T-Mobile’s Terms and Conditions (T&C). This results in a negative data network experience for T-Mobile customers. Beginning August 17, T-Mobile will begin to address customers who are conducting activities outside of T-Mobile’s T&Cs.”

If you’re on any plan other than the Unlimited High-Speed Data plans, you don’t need to worry. Since your 4G LTE data is already capped at a set amount. This only applies to those on the old $70 unlimited or new $80 Simple Choice plan. If you are on one of those plans and need to know what is considered ‘misuse’, section 18 in T-Mobile’s terms and conditions makes it clear.

The following applicable scenarios are considered “misuse” of data (among other, more serious offenses like hacking/spreading malware/committing fraud etc.):

Using the Service in connection with server devices or host computer applications, including continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts, automatic data feeds, automated machine-to-machine connections or peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications that are broadcast to multiple servers or recipients, “bots” or similar routines that could disrupt net user groups or email use by others or other applications that denigrate network capacity or functionality.

T-Mobile’s steps for addressing misuse are outlined in the document also, making it clear that “only” unlimited customers are affected. And that it’s not a case of being throttled without warning.

  1. T-Mobile will contact customers to explain terms and conditions to them, and then advise them that data speed could be reduced until the next billing cycle IF they continue to misuse the data service.
  2. When the customer is contacted, T-Mobile will apply a ‘Misuse Warning SOC’ to their account.
  3. If behavior continues, the existing warning SOC is replaced by a ‘Misuse Throttle SOC’ and their data speeds get reduced.
  4. These SOCs are visible to customer care and other staff who access the user’s account, to make it clear to them why they might be experiencing slower speeds.

As previously stated, these measures will be put in place from August 17th. It’s likely that the number of people engaged in this is relatively small. And yet, it’s clearly a big enough problem to warrant a special “dedicated team” to address it.

In short, if you’re downloading torrents or constantly broadcasting online using your unlimited plan, now would be a good time to stop.  Leaked document below:

networkmanagement

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  • DoDaDum

    Not sure I like this idea…..

    • Adrayven

      Torrents are usually used for some form of piracy.. there are legit uses, but that is usually overwhelmingly overshadowed by it’s abuses. It’s a case of some few extreme abuses ends up hurting the legit users.. sucks, but valid concern…

  • areallytallguy

    Interesting. On a 3 gig simple choice plan on a Nexus 5 I have never even been able to use torrents on LTE or 3g. The download will start with super fast speeds but then slow down to 0 shortly after. I had assumed T-Mobile was already port blocking or throttling these downloads? The weird thing is when I previously used my Galaxy Nexus over 3g, torrents worked no problem. Can anyone comment or give advice on this?

  • GreatNews

    And now T-Mobile is starting with this BS?

    • Verizonthunder

      I read all the time about people using absurd amount of data on this site. While some may complain it’s in the terms of service which seems like most people fail to read.

    • TechHog

      Punishing people who violate the terms you agreed to is BS?

      • GreatNews

        I was referring to the throttling business, this belongs to Verizon, Sprint and AT&T not to T-Mobile, its uncarrier and not copy cats, T-Mobile should come up with a better way of punishing those people, cuz once we give the OK for T-Mobile to throttle people they will start with a good excuse than they will find another BS stories why to throttle other people. And then T-Mobile will be perfectly fit to marge with Sprint!

        • tamk3

          But T-Mobile already throttles people and no one has said anything about it. If you’re on a 5gb plan and go over for that month, you’re throttled until the next month w/o paying overages. At least they’re still letting them have data instead of cutting them off completely.

        • GreatNews

          That’s not called throttling, that’s a plan of 5GB, other carriers might call that “Unlimited” but its not, what I meant is the true unlimited plans not the set amount of GB per month!

        • JamesG

          How is hitting your 5GB cap then dropping to 2g speeds not throttling??? This only effects those who go against the TOS, you can do whatever you want on Tmobile network as long as you abide

        • TechHog

          First of all, the merger is dead. Second, the only other ways to punish them are to either charge them more or cut off their data, which have the same potential problems. Just stop torrenting and you’ll be safe

        • GreatNews

          I know the marge is dead, and I didn’t say that I violate the TOS, what I say is that once we give the green light to throttle then the carrier will take advantage of the green light!

        • TechHog

          Why give the greenlight for any punishment when the carrier will take advantage of the greenlight?

    • Alex Zapata

      Yes…..TMO is taking action when people violate the ToS they willingly agreed to…….

    • Paul

      I’ve abused my data a few times, but I was without cable so I was streaming videos in place of my TV and using the tether to surf the internet. I’m a fairly heavy use, but don’t consistently hit high data usage month to month.

      You get a couple warnings, and I bet you can call Magenta and clear things up if you’re not, say, torrenting.

      This scenario isn’t unreasonable or BS.

  • Jaramie Black

    I am perfectly fine with this. People who abuse their services should expect nothing less than this.

    • Verizonthunder

      It’s basically a DDoS

  • Good for them! Torrent’s are an abuse of the network and should be throttled by a wireless carrier. Look people – wireless carriers are NOT internet service providers and shouldn’t be used as such. With that said… ***cough*** VPN ***cough*** proxy ***cough***

    • Cam Bunton

      lol…

      • In my experience with a fast enough connection the speed hit you take from the VPN/Proxy overhead is negligible…

    • xmiro

      Sure VPN. And in 6 months when they realise they can’t put a lid on the abuse they’ll just yank the unlimited plan

      • meh – I’m not quite that pessimistic… but then again I may be a little biased…

        • xmiro

          then you need to read what John Legere said about the unlimited plan, to I believe it was CNET.

          If they’re doing this, even with about a million customers on the unlimited plan, it means abuse is rampant enough to warrant a change in ToC. And if that change doesn’t help the plan will most likely be removed

        • CalicoKJ

          Did I miss something about the ToS? This isn’t a change, they’re just going to enforce it from what I’m reading.

    • Kazonite

      “wireless carriers are NOT internet service providers and shouldn’t be used as such.”

      Odd…mine provides me with Internet service…

      Heck, they even offer a device that allows me to connect my PCs to the Internet via WiFi on their service.

      Sorry, Ben. If it walks like a duck… :)

      That said, while they do offer unlimited data, they do not, nor ever have, offered unlimited usage. This is a limitation on usage, not data consumption. As such, the throttling is a punishment for violation of terms of usage – not for data consumption.

  • Alex Zapata

    The level of transparency in terms of warning is actually rather surprising. In a good way of course.

  • netplayground

    Gee… this news just a week after I got my bot-net central controller smoothly sending out web cam pictures of my dogs every 30 seconds while hosting torrents of the week’s top ten pirated movies plus a spam relay mail server for some buddies based in Russia. All of it from my T-Mobile 4G LTE phone and unlimited data plan.

    Just kidding of course.

    I do have to say it is an odd (and satisfying) feeling to have an internet connection on my phone that routinely clocks in about twice as fast as my Comcast cable Performance tier internet service. (I still have Comcast internet for others in the family who chose ‘diet data’ plans on other carriers.)

  • Jason Walker

    This is actually reasonable

    • besweeet

      Not really if you’re throttled to 2G speeds…

      • TechHog

        Still reasonable. If you’re violating the terms you agreed to, T-Mobile has no obligation to provide you data at all. They’re being generous.

        • besweeet

          Staying away from throttling would be a very Un-carrier thing to do :).

          Just kidding.

        • TechHog

          Not enforcing ToS goes a bit beyond simply being “Uncarrier.” They might as well not have ToS at all if it’s not going to be enforced.

    • Kezorite

      It’s funny.

      While I agree the policy is reasonable, we’ve no-one here screaming “Net Neutrality!”…which would actually apply in this instance.

      Rather, we see those folks decrying “Music Freedom” as a violation, or one carriers recent decision to offer a FB or Twitter-only plan. (Neither of which apply)

      Gotta love the infinite variety of the internet, eh??

  • Craig Foster

    I remotely send the torrent to my home pc. When its done I take control of my pc remotely and move the content to the cloud, then download it to my phone.

    • JamesG

      That is certainly an impressive loophole

  • besweeet

    I guess internet isn’t internet anymore…

    Throttling should occur on a tower-by-tower basis. If one user on a site is “abusing” data, that wouldn’t automatically affect everyone else, I don’t think.

    Where you at, FCC?

    • TechHog

      Rolling in money from Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, and Time Warner. If you think the FCC cares about us, I really feel sorry for you. :/

  • Jose

    I average 70Gb/month, but I also have the Unlimited + 11Gb SPMH option. I’m worried T-Mobile is going to come after me and alter my already sometimes-shitty service. I don’t p2p, I simply have chosen to cut cost and see no reason to pay for Comcast’s shitty services at lower or about average of my T-Mobile speeds for at an unreasonable price. :)

    I hope they don’t. Because it would definitely change my perspective of them as a long going fan and customer.
    I understand, protect your assets. But don’t hurt your heavy players either.
    It’s be learned heavy data users do nothing to effect the service of a network. It’s up to the network to build the infrastructure and handling of congestion

    • Maximus

      First of all, if you are using 70 GB/month, you have way too much time on your hands. Get WiFi for Pete’s sake…

      • Scoop003

        Reading comprehension fail much? He’s saying he’s using his phone internet in place of home internet because it’s just as fast, and he’s already paying for the phone, so why pay Comcast also

        • Maximus

          They are addressing people that are using large amounts of data that goes against the official terms of usage. So there is no need to worry if you are just using large amounts of data for normal use.

        • Scoop003

          My response was to you telling him to get on Wi-Fi. I can read, and understand that they’re only throttling people that violate the T&Cs.

      • besweeet

        Why use Wi-Fi when you have fast LTE? There’s no such thing as having too much time for something. People are free to use their own time for whatever they’d like–who are you to judge?

      • T-Mobile LTE is faster than many ISPs.

        • Jamison Shaw

          Not for long if people continue to abuse the network.

      • Alex

        I use 40-50gb a month but my job has me sitting sometimes for 12-14 hrs in a day and I have nothing else to do but watch Netflix etc. but I choose to have unlimited data so that I can do this. And I have every right to. People bitch and moan way too much about data and who is using what and why. Really first world problems.

    • xmiro

      At one of the events, Neville Ray said they don’t want their service used as home internet replacement.

      If you’re going over your 11GB tethering limit you are breaking the ToS and affecting other users

      • Then again, Neville has also described TMUS as a mobile ISP…

        • xmiro

          and? They are providing data service aren’t they?

    • conservative_motorcyclist

      They are going after the people on the $70/$80 unlimited plans that intentionally use the wrong APN and/or programs like tetherMe to disguise their PC/Hotspot data as coming from their cell phone. They are also going after people with rooted android devices that have BitTorrent installed and running 24/7ToS.

      Basically, you are fine and have nothing to worry about. As long as your phone/tablet data comes from your phone/tablet and your PC data comes from your tethering bucket, you can do what you want with it.

    • Jamison Shaw

      No. No no no no no!! LTE is not, and can not become a replacement for a home ISP. It is not sustainable. The network can not handle that indefinitely. Even sprint could not offer unlimited on 2.5ghz with the massive 20 mhz chunks they’re deploying and scalable fiber backhaul. It does not, and can not work that way. The sooner you people accept that Tmobiles LTE is not a replacement for home ISP, the better. This kind of thinking is the reason that unlimited will ultimately end.

      It’s up to you, as a consumer of a product that you signed an agreement for, to not break those ToS and pay for what you use. Data is not free.

      • The goal of mobile communications is to replace the ISP. LTE-A will make this even more possible and likely.

      • derp hurr-durr

        “LTE is not, and can not become a replacement for a home ISP. ”

        Says who? No; really – where did you hear that? What reliable source in the business gave you that load of crap?

        Don’t worry – I already know the answer to that one.

        • Jamison Shaw

          Perhaps I should clarify. The current network we have, can not sustain unlimited and/or abusing of the network by consumers. Does that help?

    • redman12

      I don’t think you will have any issue. Peer to peer sharing are the one violating the terms.

  • CPPCrispy

    I think that this is reasonable as long as the only people that are affected are Torrent and P2P users and not just high data users. When compared to what Verizon thinks network management is, this is reasonable.

  • sushimane

    That’s how the cookie crumbles. If ur gonna use torrent at least do it on a WiFi network. U can’t expect T-Mobile not to notice people going gorilla on unlimited data for no reason. Its reasonable

    • Paul

      I agree, it would seem reasonable.

      • sushimane

        Don’t get me wrong the most I ever use was 20gb im somewhat a heavy user but i read people using like 60gb or in a month is crazy. I’m only using my data with combination of video stream off of Hulu and Netflix,music,YouTube,web,of social media for a month but I always have something in my back of my head ur using too much and there might be a consequence of using it.

        • Paul

          I suspect they are looking at 100Gig users. I’ve hit 40Gig when I was testing a ROM for a dev., along with movies, music, and web surfing. I’m become more aware of my data activity as my data use gets higher.

        • sushimane

          Yeah so do I. I don’t abuse my right to have unlimited data its more of a privilege then anything. if I do abuse and T-Mobile throttle me I deserve it point blank.

  • Jay J. Blanco

    Debbie downer. Hope people are reduced to 2G speeds.

    • Paul

      3G, at least. Back when Magenta trottled on a data cap the speeds were terrible. 2G would barely handle email these days.

      • Indeed, having experienced throttling to 2G abroad, it makes the phone sluggish and many apps and websites timeout.

        • Paul

          Drives me insane when basic apps time out on a 2G connection.

        • The experience is the same when I travel along the I35 corridor and there’s only 2G. It’s practically the same as no data connection.

  • Guest111

    Good! these crooks abusing data are affecting all users!

  • Maximus

    I can’t believe people are complaining about this. This will affect a very small percentage of customers and these customers really do need to be reigned in bit. These data gluttons have way too much time on their hands to be using that much data and it affects everyone else. Get a job or volunteer your time doing something productive in society. Geesh…

    • besweeet

      You seem to care a bit much about others, no? Though here you were taking the time to comment that on an article…

      Speeds are getting faster and faster. The time it takes to do certain things online is shrinking.

      Next.

      • Maximus

        The issue is not being on a website to make a comment. The issue is the need to use 100 GB of data in a month. I use 500 MB of data a month. Most people use maybe 2-4 GB of data/month. 100 GB of data is nuts. And clearly, some people are that are using this much are doing some shady stuff.

        • besweeet

          I personally don’t feel as though 100GB is too much. Sure, that’s a large number, but compared to home Internet usage, it’s not too bad.

        • At home, I use about 200GB a month, since I don’t have cake TV and rely on streaming for entertainment. I do this with my ISP. Doesn’t T-Mobile call itself a mobile ISP? So why cry foul when people actually use the service as a mobile ISP?

        • Maximus

          No, they don’t call themselves an ISP

        • John Legere called them an ISP at the last Uncarrier event.

        • TMUS calls itself as “moving into the Mobile Internet Age” at goo{dot}gl/9EEfSX and that it is “playing the mobile Internet company game” at goo{dot}gl/1LVbSQ I think that it’s contradictory for TMUS to say that while limiting its customers to take it at its word by using it as a mobile ISP.

        • Kazonite

          They provide internet service.

          They are an internet service provider.

          Of course, it really doesn’t matter what you call them. The facts remain the same.

        • Darkbotic

          “Cake TV”. ROFL!

        • Gotta love predictive text…

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          So a company being designated an ISP some how invalidates their own service terms and conditions? They are just enforcing policies that have always existed, you seem to think they are creating new rules on the fly

        • David Thoren

          And when you started your service with your ISP, you agreed to certain terms and conditions. In this case, TMobile is cracking down on people who are not acting as they agreed to in the T&C.
          Heavy usage is fine…. within the terms of the T&C.

      • TechHog

        Everything you’re saying seems to be based solely on the assumption that T-Mobile’s real reason for doing this is to secretly throttle all unlimited users. We can’t say for sure if that’s the case. We’ll have to wait and see.

        • besweeet

          Was that in reply to the wrong comment?

        • TechHog

          How does what i said not apply to you? If that’s not what your concern is, what is it?

          I think that they’re checking for actual torrenting signs, not just excessive use.

        • besweeet

          Where did I imply that I was assuming that all unthrottled/unlimited users would be affected?

        • TechHog

          Okay, I meant all who use “too much data”

        • besweeet

          You’ve lost me now…

    • Because this kind of thing trends to be expanded. So, you may celebrate it because it doesn’t affect you, until you’re as arbitrarily considered a data glutton too.

      • Maximus

        This has nothing to do with normal heavy use. They are not throttling heavy users, just heavy users using torrents/p2p..

        • As I said, which users may be arbitrarily include yourself in the future. If TMUS can selectively and arbitrarily define who violates the terms of the contract, anyone can be included. Look no further than VZW’s arbitrary justification for doing so.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          There is nothing “arbitrary” about their definition of users who violate their service agreement; they are defined simply as those who are breaking their terms and conditions

        • Yes, there is. The contract terms are generic and applied to everyone, but TMUS is arbitrarily choosing to enforce such terms only those with unlimited data.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          Because the T&C are the only thing acting as a safety net for unlimited users. People on lower plans are going to be throttled at a certain point anyway, no need to enforce this on them.

        • That’s not what the contract says, so the decision to apply its terms selectively is arbitrary and therefore may be applied as arbitrarily in the future, including on you.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          I have no problem with T-Mobile enforcing any of the terms I have agreed to, now or in the future. If you do, that’s your own fault for accepting conditions you dont agree with. The only reason they have to do this is because enough people are violating their agreement that it became an issue. These people should be to blame for this policy now being enforced, not T-Mobile for not actively enforcing every single policy they have in place all along.

        • When a term is not enforced, its selective enforcement later on is unjust and weakens the contract itself. A lawyer could certainly argue that TMUS forfeited an unenforced clause. Think of it its silence as approval.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          They didn’t have to enforce it because it wasn’t a problem until now. Now that the exact situation they had these policies in place to avoid is becoming a reality, something must be done. It costs a company time and resources to have to micro-scrutinize their users like this, its completely reasonable for them to to not have bothered with doing so until it became a problem. Your view on the matter is very obviously biased.

        • My view is indeed biased: the consumer is innocent until proven guilty individually, not under broad, nebulous, arbitrary brushes as a group.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          “broad, nebulous, arbitrary brushes as a group.”
          There are exactly 2 ways you can be affected by this policy. 1) use your phone for p2p purposes that are expressly forbidden, and 2) bypass your plans restrictions on tethering via rooted hardware or third party apps, also expressly forbidden. 2 very specific scenarios being used for such designation is in no way broad or arbitrary. If you read the article, you’ll find that customers who “have been identified as extremely high data users and are engaged in these activities” are the ones who are going to be affected, so they are limiting this enforcement to people who have abused the service enough that its created a problem for other users that are abiding by their terms. To suggest a company should proactively enforce every single term of service on all users at all times or forfeit their right to do so later is ridiculous. The enforcement of policies like this cost money just like anything else, and the amount of money it would cost to have effective restrictions in place for every unauthorized activity across all users at all times would be so resource consuming that a company would not be able to function at all.

        • It is arbitrary in that customers without unlimited plans should also be affected, but rather only those with unlimited plans are being targeted. Honestly, it comes across as a ruse to kill unlimited plans, already a rarity in the industry. Not very uncarrier when TMUS starts behaving like any other carrier.

        • No, they arbitrarily enforce this clause only on those customers in unlimited data plans. While this clause also applies to those in other plans, they chose not to enforce it on them. This is the text-book definition of arbitrariness.

        • derp hurr-durr

          Logic – use it once. Please?

          Those “other plans” you speak of…are already throttled after a certain amount of use – hence; they won’t eat up all the bandwidth, willy-nilly, for the entire month. Nothing arbitrary about it – they just have a clue.

          Something you apparently forgot to bring to the table.

        • David Thoren

          Except this isn’t arbitrary… It’s in the T&C. You know, that thing you agree to when you start service?

      • derp hurr-durr

        Nothing arbitrary about it. p2p is specifically called out in their ToS.

        Id’ say try again, but you probably would…

  • taron19119

    At&t Verizon and Sprint already does this no surprise here T Mobile’s following suit

    • jeremyvbk

      Sprint does? not here to argue but I tested out the Sprint throttle by downloading 30GB of torrents, and yet to see any slow down, or throttle. Just saying I have yet to see it with such over the top “5GB” round limit

      • taron19119

        Yes Sprint does I have a friend that has Sprint and when they can get LTE they use torrent sites to download movies and when they got to 50GAb they internet was cut off

        • jeremyvbk

          Well that could of been the file he was downloading. If your friend didn’t shrink his upload speeds for seeding, he could of been caught by DMCA . Happens all the time to home ISP connections, seeding a file and boom, internet no longer works, because DMCA sent a request to X ISP and they shut it off to avoid a lawsuit. The ISP it self cares less if you download the illegal file, it just shuts you off to prevent a law suit

  • S. Ali

    I’ve seen people talk about running Xbox Live or playing MMO games over their phone connection. Not a very uncarrier move, but seems necessary as TMO grows in customers. However, I’m not sure how they are going to distinguish between legit uses of P2P (Skype is P2P traffic) and malicious uses

    • Paul

      That also crossed my mind. I would image it will involve the amount of data traffic and time. I don’t believe Skype would put out as much traffic as some P2P programs, but I’m not a network genius.

      • bakgwailo

        This is correct. Skype generally does a user -> user connection. Other services (torrenting) are much more intensive in resouces as you maybe connected to hundreds of peers at a given moment.

        • Paul

          Which leads one to think they there’s some measure they’ll use to figure out who’s torrenting and who’s just using a lot of data over a month.

        • JamesG

          They could most likely track it by noticing that one user is downloading/uploading from 100s of IPs at once.

        • Paul

          Exactly along the lines I was thinking.

    • donteatme

      When I’m away from WiFi I’ve used it for league of legends and Xbox live, but mainly because they don’t seem to take as much bandwidth as you’d assume. Xbox especially takes a miniscule amount. But I’m on the 3gb plan so I’m not affected either way.

    • KingCobra

      I played Call of Duty online using the phone’s personal hotspot for about 3 hours one day last week because my Time Warner service was down. Surprisingly it only used about 150MB of data.

  • Don’t the unlimited plans have a cap of 5GB on tethering? Why throttle then? Sounds not quite uncarrier…

    • Paul

      There are rooted phones that can work around that.

      • Anonymous

        I would admittedly be curious as to how. As anyone who has T-Mobile and has tethered before will tell you, upon reaching your cap, you are redirected, when attempting to access any site, to an upsell page (http://offers.t-mobile.com/tethering/upsell.do) encouraging you to upgrade to a plan with a higher cap on tethering.

    • I’m pretty sure this is P2P from the device, or people who aren’t using official means to tether so it appears traffic is coming from the device (which isn’t counted against a tethering cap).

    • jacky

      I know a guy uses 200 gb per month on t mobile tethering. 200 Gb

    • JamesG

      You do know torrenting apps exist right? Even if you aren’t rooted

  • Paul

    I just recently had a talk with my host server provider about a similar issue. Seems some idiot decided to attach a file on my server to a torrent. This drove my daily bandwidth through the roof! I had to upgrade, but figure out they found a random video I had saved on my server a couple years back-the name made it out to be the recent Lego movie when it was one my nephew made himself. This directly affected me financially and professionally since my site was severely throttled. As I check the traffic daily I still see IPs looking for a folder that doesn’t exist.

    I’m okay with this, even though I’ve used around 80 Gigs last month-movie streaming and ROM downloads. If you want to torrent then use your ISP provider.

  • RiZ

    So I average less than 1 gig a month, does my unused bandwidth go towards people that use more? If they punish heavy users, where’s the reward for those that use less?

    • Derelict

      Not being punished, I’d assume.

      • RiZ

        They treat bandwidth like a resource, so they should treat it like one, like when people who use solar panels and put energy back into the grid get paid for it. I pay full price for my service and average 300 minutes and 700 or 800 mbs a month, so I’m a pretty light cellular user since I have wifi almost every where I go. I’d like to donate my unused unlimited service to the heavy data users.

        • bookwormsy

          Why are you paying the extra 30 bucks a month for unlimited if you only use 7-800 MB?

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          They are cracking down on certain activities (p2p file sharing, unauthorized tethering) that are against the T&C’s. Its not based on bandwidth consumption. EVERYBODY has to abide by these terms, you can’t “donate” the ability to use your phone for unauthorized applications. Your “reward” for being a light user is you only need to buy a $50/month plan instead of $80.

        • Don Goyo

          Their not “cracking down on certain activities (p2p file sharing, unauthorized tethering) that are against the T&C’s”, they are specifically targeting Unlimited plans. Why this wont be applied to other plans?

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          They are cracking down on people who abuse the service AND are interfering with the ability to provide service to others. Since people without unlimited data already have data caps, if they decide to do this type of activity they won’t be interfering with others service, since they will be promptly throttled anyway. Everyone seems to think they are picking on unlimited users. The reality is that only this very small group are effecting the company’s ability to provide service, and there is no need to target any people who do such activity on a tiered plan.

        • Don Goyo

          If its a small group, then it shouldn’t really affect the company’s ability to provide service, more than the ones who are using 70 GBs a month. If you’re applying your T&C’s to penalize people you HAVE to do it on ALL plans. Whats next? Everyone using more than 20 GBs a month gets throttle?

        • KingCobra

          They’re breaking the ToS. What’s so hard about that to understand? T-Mobile has every right to crackdown on them and they rightfully should. Obviously those using lots of data on legitimate activities are not affected.

        • Don Goyo

          If you’re applying your T&C’s to penalize people you HAVE to do it on ALL plans. You cant just choose to pick on the Unlimited customers, one privilege after the other, and in some months en up restricting 4GLTE speeds to 20 GBs.

        • KingCobra

          A person not on an unlimited plan would have a hard time abusing the network and downloading bitorrents because they’re already throttled to 128kbps after 5GB.

        • JamesG

          Those who pay for a pool of highspeed data can do whatever they want since they would be throttled at a certain point anyway. If you are unlimited then their is no limit to how much strain you put on the network.

        • Don Goyo

          Exactly my point, then why go against the unlimited customers who should be able to do whatever they want with their data?

        • JamesG

          BECAUSE IT GOES AGAINST TOS!!!! Why is torrenting/P2P/improper use of tethering so hard to understand????

        • hit_the_lights

          someone needs to get their facts straight

        • JamesG

          Because they aren’t unlimited! How stupid are you?

        • dealbreaker

          yes they are my friend illegally tethering 250gb per month on t mobile network.

        • bakgwailo

          That isn’t how bandwidth works, or cell towers for that matter. Torrenting, while awesome, is extremely network intensive as it basically flood packets across the network. On land line based infrastructure is this kind of moot – you would have to have a massive amount of packets going (e.g. DDoS) to really have any effect on switches/routers/fiber/etc. Cell networks are very different. Each tower is a finite resource and one user flooding a tower via torrenting will degrade it for everyone else on that tower/node of the network.

        • That’s not true. The way that mobile protocols work, each user is guaranteed access to the bandwidth in a fair way. The issue, if any, can only happen in the backhaul, which often doesn’t belong to the carrier, but is contracted on bandwidth and usage terms from a third party.

        • bakgwailo

          http://www.digitalsociety.org/2010/10/effects-of-bittorrent-on-a-starbucks-att-hotspot/

          Plenty of other articles showing bittorrent’s effect on cell nodes/networks. Do you have a source/citation for your assertions?

    • Bob

      They’re punishing those that are breaking the rules, not heavy users in general.

      • Don Goyo

        No, they’re punishing those in Unlimited plans!

    • Jesse James

      if you use less than 1gb a month, your reward is paying $30 less than people who have unlimited plans

  • notyourbusiness

    Sounds fair, if you ask me. Constantly streaming torrents takes up a lot of resources. Won’t affect me since I’m usually around Wi-Fi and I use my data sparingly most of the time when I’m out.

  • JB

    I just need a bit of clarification on the video broadcasting bit. What do they mean by “continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts”?

    I’m probably a what they would identify as a heavy user, but I don’t torrent. I use Hangouts/Skype a lot when I’m not on wifi, so would that fall in that continuous broadcast category? Or are there actually people out there that uses their data plan to pretty much broadcast 24/7?

    • Once at a conference streaming to online viewers, the WiFi connection croaked and offered to provide the speaker with a connection. He asked me if it wouldn’t reach the cap in my plan and block me from accessing the Internet later. I replied him to not worry, for I had a 5GB cap and saved the conference!

      I used just 2.5GB broadcasting 4 talks in 2 days and still had plenty of the monthly allowance left afterwards. TMUS FTW!

    • Alex

      Using tmobile service to 24/7 to transmit data from security cameras. Don’t think this will effect anyone.

  • geek

    T-mo says no server apps. Even Google fiber has similar terms. Big ISPs are repeating the same refrain. Receive data quietly, pay us to broadcast, or go start your own ISP.

    I sounds like it’s time for communities to start connecting to each other directly instead of paying a handful of big backbones to do it. You know, like the internet was originally intended; A decentralized network with no single points of failure.

    The internet has morphed into the inter-tree. All the branches connect to a single trunk instead of connecting in a mesh or web-like fashion.

  • kev2684

    mixed feelings about this.
    on one hand, unlimited data plans have capped data tethering. some older unlimited plans have none at all (like me). so using it as your home ISP and abuse T-Mo’s unlimited data is illegal in the first place. on the other, how very “Carrier” of you.

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      A “carrier” move that will only affect certain customers that are interfering with their ability to provide “uncarrier” service to those who deserve it; ie those who are abiding by their service terms

    • xmiro

      your ability to constantly download does not mean you get to degrade my service

    • Goat

      This honestly just makes me nervous since I use an abundance of data. Even though none of it is ever for the purposes described here. We’ll see…

  • Justin Merithew

    I think it’s fair but I’m sure they’ll catch heat for it.

  • monkeybutts

    Hopefully that improves speeds in residential areas. Wonder what exactly would be caught on PC though.

    • JamesG

      PC tethering is already limited anyway when abiding by the TOS

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    I don’t do any of the above mentioned things and I usually end up with about 20 GB’s for myself and I have 4 other lines and they all have minimal use. If all of these carriers continue their restrictions I would have to considers not using any of them at all and go with $3 per month newly introduced plan for .10 cents per minute/text. How about that T Mobile? My bill would be $12-15 per month instead the postpaid $150-$200 per month

    • xmiro

      you’re free to do what’s best for you

      • JaswinderSinghJammu

        Trust me. I am free to do as I please, choose what’s best for me.

        • Steven

          Don’t confuse that with the fact they are a business and are going to also do what’s best for the network and other customers. Are you done crying now?

        • JaswinderSinghJammu

          I am not crying. I pay for what I use and that’s what I signed up for. There are others who provide the same service. There are options out there.

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      You will be fine then. This update only affects people who do those activities

      • JaswinderSinghJammu

        Yeah sounds like it.

      • archerian

        it starts with people who do those activities… most probably Netflix traffic is somewhere near P2P traffic. Soon, Netflix will be throttled too.. unlimited data is not sustainable from a profitability perspective.

        • MaseW

          Netflix is nothing like P2P.

          It originates from one group of servers (not other “clients”), and the device receiving that stream, is not also simultaneously uploading the same data to other clients.

          In addition, no one watches Netflix 24 hours a day and 7 days a week. Torrents, on the other hand, do consume network resources 24/7.

    • jacky

      My friend illegally bypass t mobile tethering restriction on his phone and uses 200gb per month tethering with no throttle.

      • JaswinderSinghJammu

        I know someone who does that on Verizon. He downloads Blu Rays and has uses the phone as home internet etc. He uses probably 150 GB’s each and every month.

        • jacky

          Holy shit blame him for verizon throttling policy.

        • jacky

          Well blame him for verizon new throttle policy then hehe. Verizon throttling their unlimited plan this month.

        • jacky

          I remember there os this one guy racked up 400 gb a month on verizon unlimited data plan grandfather. Yea 400 gb a month and im not even joking.

  • Great news

  • shadlom

    Good.

  • Steve

    does this mean i can no longer download anything from utorrent?? i only use 2.5-5GB of data per month and im unlimited data

    • jacky

      No people like my friend who illegally bypass t mobile tethering on his phone uses 200gb tethering per month. He wont stop doing it unless t mobile does something to him.

    • JamesG

      Its possible you may get a warning. Just don’t seed

    • KingCobra

      If you’re doing it legitimately with the tethering data that T-Mobile authorizes on your plan each month then it should be fine. It sounds like this is affecting those who use 3rd party apps to bypass T-Mobile’s tethering limits to use their unlimited mobile data for torrents.

  • Dblock

    So much for unlimited

    • JamesG

      It still is you moron

  • Don Goyo

    This is just the beginning of the end of Unlimited plans for Tmobile, if they truly are targeting certain activities (p2p file sharing, unauthorized tethering) that are against the T&C’s, then they should apply the T&C’s to ALL plans! Not just the Unlimited ones. Whats next? Throttle people who use more than 20GBs a month because they considered it abuse???

    • jacky

      My friend illegally by pass tmobile tethering uses t mobile tether for 200 to 250 gb per month no throttle. If t mobile dont do something they will keep using 250 gb per month tethering. My friend wont stop unless t mobile intervens.

      • carcomptoy

        Wuuuutttt. How does your friend do it?!

        • KingCobra

          There are apps to bypass carrier tethering limits.

        • Don Goyo

          And Jacky is a very good friend, she just need to include her friends number…lol

        • dealbreaker

          you can bypass t mobile limited tethering, if you are tech savvy.
          like phone roms is it? yea i ifgure one of these days t mobile will find out about it and do something to those abusers.

        • dealbreaker

          what kingcobra said there are apps that by pass tethering limits.

        • carcomptoy

          Which apps? I know of FoxFi/PdaNet, but I haven’t been able to get it working at all ever since getting my HTC One M8.

  • Jamison Shaw

    Good.

  • Good!

    Also love the Simpsons picture chosen for the article.

    • Cam Bunton

      Hehehe.. I had to find one with a computer in the picture somewhere! ;-)

  • Don Goyo

    If its a small group, then it shouldn’t really affect the company’s ability to provide service, more than the ones who are using 70 GB’s a month. If you’re applying your T&C’s to penalize people you HAVE to do it on ALL plans. Whats next? Everyone using more than 20 GB’s a month gets throttle?

    • I imagine that it’s technically going to be applied to everyone, but realistically, these activities cause you to run out of high speed data so quickly that it doesn’t matter.

      • Don Goyo

        If you have a 5GB plan you can affect the broadband for a couple of days, even if just for 1 day, you’ll be using the service against the T&C, and the policies have to be applied uniformly. At the end of the day, both (limited and unlimited), will be inflicting in the same conduct, the consequences should be the same for everyone.

        • JamesG

          The capped users would be throttled anyway….

  • Eldric

    T mobile is heading down a slippery slope. So the plan was to get as many people as possible just to take away truly unlimited

    • KingCobra

      Most torrenting activities are illegal anyway. People downloading hundreds of GBs of data via torrents are breaking the TOS anyway since T-Mobile doesn’t offer any tethering plans that high. I agree with throttling them. They should get a real ISP.

      • matty black

        torrenting itself is not illegal in any way.
        torrenting copyrighted material IS.
        here’s an analogy: Shipping an item across state lines is in no way an illegal activity. Shipping 12 lbs of Mexican black tar heroin IS.

        • KingCobra

          Yes we all know torrenting itself is a legal activity. However let’s be honest, most torrenting is used for illegal activity. I’m not really questioning people who choose to use torrents for legal or illegal activity, that’s their choice. I’m mainly just stating how the rate at which torrenting uses bandwidth makes it pretty much impossible to use for very long without breaking the ToS by tethering illegally with apps to bypass T-Mobile’s limitations.

  • ggfb20

    It’s not against the terms of service agreement to own a router capable of doing the heavy lifting for you such as the asus rt-ac68r which I use at home. It can download torrents for you then just dl them or stream them from the hdd or ssd attached to the router. It can also double as a personal vpn. Now that setup does require you to have a traditional home isp. However, it allows you to still get your torrent fix without breaking tos. Also, because you would have your personal vpn which is very fast since only you and possibly members of your household would use it, which can be used to mask/hide tether usage. Also pdanet tablet version works without limitation between phone and tablet. If I’m not mistaken tethered tablet traffic may not be completely traceable…. Can anyone chime in?

    • Kevin Bissinger

      This is more for people who use programs like Popcorn time or livestream their phone as a webcam

    • MaseW

      As long as you are consuming the data on your smartphone or tablet, you are within the term and conditions.

      Tethering is a different story…you are consuming the data on a device other than your smartphone or tablet.

      Regardless of whether or not (you think) the traffic is obfuscated by some program, using your smartphone/tablet as a gateway for another device to consume data, you are NOT operating within the terms conditions…unless you are still under the “tethering allotment” that may be included in your plan.

      People are trying to make this complicated because suits there desires to do so. It’s very simple, if you are using your smartphone or tablet to provide internet access to another device, you are violating the terms and conditions, unless you have some type of tethering allotment on your plan. Once you pas that allotment threshold, and you continue to provide internet access to a different device, you are violating the terms and conditions.

      It is not about “detecting” whether or not a packet is being sent to another device or not. Your usage pattern is the dead giveaway to a carrier that you are using your phone to provide internet access to a different device. The average smartphone customer uses less than 2GBs of data per month. There is a certain percentage of “heavy but allowed” users that will use up to about 10-20GBs per month, but they are an extremely small percentage of total users.

      If you are consistently using over 50GBs of data per month, on a smartphone, you are tethering…period. The carrier knows this…and furthermore, you are putting yourself in a position where you are costing them more money than they make off of you, so they won’t care if you threaten to leave because they say you’re tethering. They’ll want you to leave because you cost them money and affect the network performance of everyone on the same site as you…you’re a net negative to them.

  • Mike

    I suddenly want to leave Netflix on, streaming all night every night.

    • Kevin Bissinger

      They’d be fine with that. Netflix is built to not annihilate bandwidth and has max transmissions speeds WAY below what caused this to happen. Like, you’d have to stream a dozen netflix streams to reach what p2p will do on a fast network.

  • helli

    If you don’t like it then leave its no contract, and dont give me the whole phone eip contract thing. Just pay it off and you get your phone unlocked and your free to go. But it kinda sucks because were you end up going will have worse policys than tmobile.

  • Ryan Wilkins

    Everyone who complains about unlimited needs to understand that it’s just a marketing term just as much as 4G is when referring to 42 Mbps HSPA. The term “Unlimited” has limits. Nothing is truly unlimited. Unlimited is meant to offer a consistent bill every month without paying attention to how much of the service is being utilized. Unlimited doesn’t offer a license to degrade the network for everyone else or unfairly monopolize network resources to the point that it’s unprofitable for a service provider to keep a person as a customer. Having worked as a Network Engineer for an Internet Service Provider currently and in the past, I know first hand what it’s like from the service provider side to have someone monopolize the resources. Most customers are pretty good about it but a few customers always decide that they should test the limits of unlimited and then complain loudly when called out on it. IMO, T-Mo is being very fair in their handling of the Unlimited abuse problem.

    • Kazonite

      It’s even simpler than that.

      Unlimited data actually does mean unlimited data. This is not a limitation of data consumption.

      This is a limitation of usage – spelled out in their ToS. It is an abuse of the service – not of anyone’s unlimited data consumption.

  • kolijboy

    What is truly said is that we have been had. When did unlimited ever mean limited? If something is marketed as unlimited, it should be unlimited. If Tmo does not have the network capacity to handle unlimited plans, then it should not market these plans as unlimited; it needs to use a different word in its advertising. If I pay for an unlimited 4G plan, I should not have to worry that I will be throttled. That is nonsense. I paid for the plan, and it should be no concern of mine that Tmo is struggling to provide the services they promise. I remember something similar from the early days of cell phones. I was with Ameritel and had all kinds of problems being able to connect when I needed to make a call. I had paid for my allotment of minutes, and I did not care that the company did not have the network that could handle the capacity. I also remember the very early days of dialup, as in AOL 1.0. You would try to connect with your modem and you would end up with incessant busy signals. Again, I did not care that AOL was having problems building out its infrastructure. I had paid for a service and expected it. As soon as I could I jumped ship from these two companies.

    My suggestions:
    1.Give customers what you promise, or you will become irrelevant in very short order.
    2. Under-promise and over-deliver. The converse does not end well for the long-term.

    My concerns:
    1. Slippery definitions.
    2. Uneven enforcement.
    3. Mega-corp gets to decide what words mean.
    4. Even if this particular unilateral action does not affect me, my experience is that whenever a company wants to address its financial and technical issues, the first place it looks is at its customer “contracts” in order to interpret them for its own benefit. First it’s “unlimited, data-hog” customers, then it’s the rest of us. Only a matter of time.

    FCC, where are you?

    • Cruise Guy

      Really. Please don’t blind others by this lack of logic. Yes, unlimited is unlimited until you find a way to cheat the system in a deceptive way. If I take my 4GLTE phone and connected it to three repeaters, I can easily power 2 or 3 offices of computers. In big cities where the download speed is a steady 20 or 30MBS, you could easily abuse the system, repeat out your connection, and have 20 people enjoy your $20 per month connection. This is not what it was designed for. It is actually unlimited for people who don’t abuse the system. You are the kind of person that goes to an unlimited buffet at Sizzler and brings six coolers and fills them up because it is unlimited. Its unlimited for what you can consume at a normal sitting, not trying to cheat the system as you advocate.

    • MaseW

      The definitions aren’t slippery, they are made painfully clear in the terms and conditions.

      The definitions not being what you want them to be, does not equate to any wrong doing on the part of the carrier.

      Go look at the difference in the terms and conditions for your “smartphone data plan”, and the terms and conditions for a “mobile broadband plan” that is sold with a mobile hotspot.

      The mobile broadband plan is structured to meet the needs of users that wish to share a connection with multiple devices or users. The smartphone data plan was not structure for this use, except for any tethering/mobile broadband allotment is included in the plan.

      Acting like you don’t understand the intended purpose of the product you purchased, is not the same thing as being sold a product that is not as described.

  • Mike

    I have mixed feeling about all of this. If you pay for “unlimited data” the it should be truly unlimited. The customer, once on a truly “unlimited plan” should be able to use as much data as they need/want. That’s what was offer by the carrier. Slower speeds after a certain amount sounds reasonable especially at the levels discussed as above. I leaned that when TMO advertises 4G/LTE they carefully craft a legal disclaimer that allows them to lower speeds based in a number of factors. You still have access to data just not at the higher speed. If you want to do questionable activities on your phone and require highest speed and huge amounts of data then get a real ISP. Don’t think anyone ever thought a phone would transfer 200gb of data when the “unlimited” plans were offered.

    • Kevin Bissinger

      You are getting unlimited data. The amount of data you can download is not ever limited. Only the speed at with which you can acquire the data, which was always being managed and throttled, and always has to be at some point due to the nature of data transmission.

      • The service is unlimited data at 4G speed. Unless the contract specifies specific conditions, which it does, it would be a violation to limit the speed of the contracted service.

        • Kevin Bissinger

          I see what you’re saying but 4g isn’t a speed and you’ll notice no wireless companies promise you a specific number for your bandwidth for that reason.. It’s a communications protocol standard. Like cable internet, it’s shared so you only get the remaining bandwidth available when you try to access it based on the usage of others. You can get lte and only get 1kbps and it’s still lte service like they contractually promised. But I don’t see them saying anything about changing the tier in this either way. The throttle might be at 20mbps which is still ridiculously fast for mobile in the usa

        • Fair enough, the throttling speed hasn’t been announced. However, it seems to me that whenever TMUS refers to this term, it means 2G-like speeds, or 128kbps, it often says.

        • Kevin Bissinger

          Oh God yeah I’d be super pissed if that’s true

        • MaseW

          It is unlimited data at 4G speeds, provided you are consuming that data on the smartphone or tablet that is attached to the plan.

          Tethering is providing internet access for a device that is NOT attached to the plan. Torrenting is using data to provide download access to other devices that are NOT the smartphone or tablet attached to the plan, or downloading massive files that aren’t going to be used *exclusively* on the smartphone or tablet (i.e. Blu-Ray rips that you’re going to watch on your laptop or media center PC).

          The intent of the terms and conditions are pretty clear. As long as you are consuming the data on the smartphone or tablet that has an unlimited 4G data plan, you will get unlimited 4G data. If you are using that device to provide 4G data speeds or file download access*, to other devices (mobile, tablet, laptop, desktop, server, etc.) then you are in violation of the terms and conditions, and T-Mobile is under no requirement to continue and provide you with 4G speeds.

          *-by download access, I don’t mean the small amount that may happen by transferring files between your own devices. I mean the large scale download access of seeding a torrent.

        • That’s what your assumption, not what the contract states.

        • MaseW

          Your Data Plan is intended for Web browsing, messaging, and similar activities on your Device and not on any other equipment.

          http://www.t-mobile.com/Templates/Popup.aspx?PAsset=Ftr_Ftr_TermsAndConditions&print=true

          No, you’re wrong…that IS what the contract states.

        • MaseW

          “Your Data Plan is intended for Web browsing, messaging, and similar activities on your Device and not on any other equipment. Except to the extent explicitly permitted by your Data Plan, other uses, including for example, using your Device as a modem or tethering your Device to a personal computer or other hardware, are not permitted.”

          No, you’re wrong…that IS what the contract states.

          I had a comment that had a link to the terms and conditions that was sent to moderation. But this is outlined in painful detail section 11 “Data Plans and Other Features”…go look it up yourself.

        • That excludes tethering, which TMUS offers as part of the Simple Choice plans. How do you reconcile such a contradictory situation? Misleading advertisement? That clause is therefore unenforceable.

        • MaseW

          It says “Except to the extent explicitly permitted by your data plan”.

          That means if you have an a tethering option attached to your plan, then you are permitted by your plan to tether up to the limitations of the option’s allotment (i.e. the number of GBs the option allows).

          You are trying to justify something that is CLEARLY against the terms of service, and very poorly. If you look at section 18 of the terms and conditions, there is a section the SPECIFICALLY bans the use of P2P software or “server services” being run on your phone.

          Everything outlined in the article is ALREADY against the terms and conditions, T-Mobile is just choosing to more harshly enforce they already existing rules.

        • Fair enough, point taken.

        • MaseW

          Well that was unexpected…that’s not usually how these “internet disagreements” go. haha

          You have my appreciation and respect for that.

        • YOU have my appreciation and respect. You patiently argued your point and I am richer and, I believe, so are you through this give and take.

        • MaseW

          Agreed.

    • You didn’t sign up for an *unconditional* unlimited plan (hence “terms and *conditions*”). You have unlimited data provided that you adhere to the terms of the agreement and work within the conditions specified. In this case, it’s pretty clear, regardless of whether you decided to read the T&C or not at sign-up.

    • MaseW

      You are paying for unlimited “mobile data”, not unlimited “mobile broadband”…the two aren’t the same.

      Mobile “data” means bandwidth to be used and consumed by your mobile device (i.e. smartphone or tablet). It means that the data should be used by the operating system or applications running on that mobile device, primarily for use on that device.

      Mobile “broadband” is a wireless internet connection that is specifically designed to have data consumed by devices other than the device actually providing access (i.e. mobile hotspot or tethering).

      These are two completely different products, serve two completely different purposes, and are managed completely differently by the carrier. People seem to think that just because they have unlimited mobile data on their smartphone/tablet, that they also have unlimited mobile broadband…this is not the case and has not been for a very, very long time…basically every since the very early days of smartphones gaining more mainstream popularity.

      The reason for this distinction is that these two products have different affects on the network and its performance. That is the reason that a mobile broadband plan (purchased when using a mobile hotspot) is more expensive at $50/mo, than a mobile data plan, which ranges from $10-$30/mo.

      It is obvious that the reason for this pricing disparity is that mobile broadband users will, on average, consume more network resources than a mobile data user. That expectation of more usage directly equates to the higher price for service.

      The point is, if you are using the data connection on your phone/tablet to either provide internet access to a different device, or downloading (or uploading) massive amounts of data (in the form of files) that will be consumed by a different device, you are NOT a “mobile data” user, you are a “mobile broadband” user. If you wish to continue with those usage patterns, you need to purchase the product that fits your usage, and accurately accounts for your disproportionate use of network resources, compared to other users.

      The average mobile data device uses less than 2GB of data per month. If you are consistently using 10x that amount or more per month, chances are that you are not consuming all of that data primarily on your mobile device. Therefore, you are NOT using “mobile data”, you are using “mobile broadband” but not paying the associated costs for it.

    • Dakota

      That’s not what was offered though. It was excluded from the unlimited data from the beginning in the terms that customers agreed to upon signing up for the service

  • Brandon

    What’s funny is that I just used my phone tethered to my pc to download 120 GB worth of stuff off of Usenet last night while I’m waiting for Verizon to come on Monday and fix my connection.

  • Scoop003

    Just because you don’t read the terms and conditions of something before you agree to it, doesn’t mean you’re not bound by them after you sign it. It’s pretty clear that torrent downloaders are violating the terms and conditions, at least T-Mobile is sending out warnings first, and not just automatically throttling you or kicking you off their network. I’m not exempt from the torrent downloading crowd, but I also know, if I get a message about it, I’ll resort to only doing it on Wi-Fi.

  • blokeinusa

    Don’t forget your local ISP does this as well, you may not have reached the cap yet.

    • JamesG

      Local ISPs just charge you outrageous overages and usually the cap is around 300GB

  • Ordeith

    So T-Mobile’s abandonment of net neutrality tenants doesn’t look so good now that it doesn’t involve simply trying to decide music streaming winners and losers.

    • vrm

      ??

      So called music streaming uses anywhere from 28kbps-128 kbps ( in some rare cases 256 kbps). The (streaming) service itself throttles the speeds.

      Torrent downloads will use the full bandwidth available at all times.

    • Stone Cold

      Not abandoning anything they are enforcing their TOS policy.

      • Ordeith

        They abandoned net neutrality with the music streaming scheme. This is just a continuation of that.

        • Stone Cold

          How is it? By them enforcing the TOS?

        • TechAce01

          Because what T-mobile if doing regardless of it’s T&C violates the spirit of Net Neutrality. (That data should be treated equally)

  • T&C_Versions_Make_a_difference

    T-Mobile will have to take some care in implementing something like this when handling pre-simpleChoice grandfathered data plans. The version of the T&Cs that apply to each customer (as made clear by T-Mobile at the top of the page Cam linked to) depends on when a customer activated (or last renewed a contract).

    The Total Internet data plan existed prior to the 2008 T&Cs where the concept of throttling was introduced. Furthermore, that data plan actually allowed for usage from a laptop computer:
    -USB tethering to Dash and Dash 3G phones was supported by the phone’s built-in software.
    -The SIM was allowed to be moved to compatible data cards for laptops such as those by Sony Ericson.
    These were legitimate use cases for Total Internet at the time I subscribed to it and I continue to enjoy unlimited tethering to this day.

    I would think that unlimited tethering should remain allowed without throttling for all 2004 T&Cs customers that continue to hold old unlimited data plans such as Total Internet and T-Zones.

    (The use of P2P may be another matter and I am not going to argue about it being blocked.)

  • KingCobra

    I actually agree with this form of throttling. I applaud this move by T-Mo. If you want to download torrents and stuff then use your ISP not your cellular data. That’s pretty much the definition of abuse.

    • SF Biker

      Downloading a 600MB Linux iso via bittorrent is “the definition of abuse”, while watching a 1.4GB Netflix movie is not?

      What exactly is the definition of abuse?

      • KingCobra

        It’s pretty obvious that streaming Netflix doesn’t burn data at as fast a rate as bitorrents. 20GBs could be exhausted in just a few hours downloading tv shows/movies/music/games etc. (stuff that’s usually questionable in legality anyway) compared to how much data would 3 hours of Netflix burn?

        Obviously T-Mobile knows what activities their data abusers are using and that’s why bitorrents and p2p have been singled out. Video streaming through Netflix doesn’t compare to the load that bitorrents put on the network.

        We all have 3GB of personal hotspot data with our unlimited plans and within that 3GBs you can download your torrents. Problem is that 3GBs is gone in half an hour with torrents. So clearly most people who are using their phones for them are using some type of app or rooting to bypass T-Mobile’s tethering limits.

      • loopyduck

        1) We both know that the vast majority of torrent traffic isn’t Linux distros, so let’s just get that out of the way.

        2) The issue is rate, not total size. For the most part, a Netflix stream tops at around 3 Mbps. Do you think most folks torrenting are throttling their clients to that speed, or are they letting them run wild?

        3) A 600 MB iso is going to incur a lot more than 600 MB of traffic unless the leecher doesn’t seed to 1.0. There’s a special circle of hell for those folks.

        • Most people I know who run torrent clients limit the upload bandwidth so that they can continue using their connection undisturbed. As a matter of fact, most torrent clients that I know of default to some upload limit.

        • Most idiots I know actually turn those limits off. Me? I strengthen them, because I want to actually use my connection…

        • SF Biker

          If the issue is rate and not size, then what’s wrong with rate limiting everyone equally, regardless of what they are doing?

          Or is it because you “know” all bittorrent traffic is illegal media downloads, so hey, they may as well block it?

        • loopyduck

          Name another activity besides torrenting that a user might do on a regular basis that involves a *sustained* high-rate transfer. If you’re downloading an email attachment, usually that’s just a few seconds. Download an album off of Google Play or iTunes? Maybe a minute. These are cases where high-rate transfers won’t impact other users all that much. So yeah, I misspoke: size matters a bit, but only in relation to the transfer rate.

      • vrm

        its akin to tethering. peer networking shares not only files but the data connection so when you allow others to connect to your device, you are letting them use the carrier’s data network. There is no way for carrier to know if the others are also their customers; if they aren’t then they are using t-mobile data without paying.

        The only way for a carrier to know if the user is a customer is if the devices on the network are all registered with the carrier but then that defeats the purpose of tethering.

        Be thankful that tethering policies have become very liberal lately (even at&t includes it in their postpaid plans).

  • jdubb2600

    This is clearly for those who use torrents. Not going to affect my wife who watches netflix and streams music. no biggie

    • Dakota

      For now

    • Fabian Cortez

      Never pay attention to those who spread the FUD (Fear Uncertainty Doubt).

  • Cooper

    I’m not concerned about this, because I’m grandfathered in with the $20 unlimited data plan that is now $30. I do not use torrents on my phone. I stream music and that’s free. I stream Netflix and that is free. Never had an issued with throttling of my data. My average use is about 7-12 GB a month.

    • Jeremy Turnley

      Netflix is free?

      • hello

        If your friend give the password to everyone

      • Cooper

        No, I get charged the monthly fee from Netflix of $8.99 I think, but it doesn’t slow down my data speeds. I use iheart radio all the time and my data speeds remain the same. Very fast.

  • vinnyjr

    Dont blame T-Mobile at all. I enjoy my unlimited data plan but I do not and will not abuse it. Very long time T-Mobile customer who has always been treated very good by all of T-Mobile and customer support. This can only help T-Mobile customers who don’t abuse their unlimited data plans.

  • If you’re upset about this, I invite you to find for me in the fine or otherwise print where it indicated that your unlimited data plan was an *unconditional* one. Every plan has terms and conditions. It’s your responsibility to get familiar with them.

    • Dakota

      Just dont be surprised when those terms widen and your unlimited comes with more restrictions. That’s how the biz works. Tmobile already increased the rates once. Some people think the company is their best friend,. They’re a public company out to make a profit like any other. All of these were tactics by a last place carrier to gain market share. Nothing lasts forever but enjoy now if it works for you

      • Believe me, I’m under no illusions concerning the nature of business dealings of large corporations. That’s beside the point of this particular (non)issue though.

  • skittle

    This is a hot topic Cam, you should see much traffic for a few days ;)

    • Cam Bunton

      lol.. As people overreact and panic thinking that “only unlimited high speed data plan misusers” means “Oh, dear lord, I use a ton of Netflix, I’m gonna get throttled!!”

  • Rorison Meadows

    Good. Stop torrenting. It’s 2014, people.

    • Craig Foster

      What should we do instead?

      • KingCobra

        Pay for the media that you used to torrent.

        • lol, pay for something digital, dont make me laugh :P

        • Matt

          You obviously don’t care, but it’s stealing… same as walking into Best Buy and taking the DVDs off the shelf and walking out. But you keep justifying your theft whatever way helps you sleep at night.

        • No, it’s not, for one is then not depriving of anything another has. When a a digital copy is made, it subtracts nothing of the original.

        • guidomus_maximus

          It subtracts money from the wallet of the artist who created it.

        • No, it doesn’t. You might say that it doesn’t add to his wallet, but then it’d be akin to a “pre-crime”. Besides, the artist was already paid, it’s the distributor who collects sales revenue, though sometimes the artist gets a token, symbolic share of it.

        • Cam Bunton

          For me, it’s not about the theft. It’s more about the fact that we now somehow think we are owed everything for free. So, an artist/musician/movie maker/studio slaves its butt off for weeks/months/years to produce something that’s good to watch, and we feel somehow it’s our right to have access to that content for nothing. It shows a lack of respect for the work that’s gone in to it, and a huge personality flaw in people’s consumerist nature. You think you’re “sticking it to the man” but what you’re doing is actually making the industry worse, and ruining the very thing you enjoy.

          And there’s no excuse for it anymore either, so many subscription services let you watch or listen to whatever you want to for very little money. If you can’t wait for it to be available on one of those services, take your hand out your pocket and pay for it. You wouldn’t demand any other worker in any other business does their work for you for nothing, so don’t encourage that attitude in media creation.

          Stepping off my high horse now…

        • Gryphraff Gryphon

          There’s a decent body of evidence that shows, while there will always be piracy, if people are presented with an easy, reasonably priced method of purchase, they will purchase it.

        • Gryphraff Gryphon

          In some cases it’s not. I can’t walk into Best Buy and steal what they don’t have. I can’t steal what they refuse to sell.

        • The medium of torrented content is non-existent and free.

        • SF Biker

          Regardless of price, when it’s much easier to download a torrent of the shows you want to watch than to purchase a legal DRM unencumbered copy that you can play on any device you own, there’s little incentive to pay for media. And a lot of content is not available at all — when you don’t have cable, sometimes the only way to watch some show is to torrent it, regardless of how much you’re willing to pay.

          Why pay $9.99 to “buy” a movie from Amazon or iTunes when you can only play it back on devices that they approve, and if in 10 years they decide they don’t want to be in the movie business any more, then they might just pull the plug on the authentication server that lets you unlock the movie that you thought you “owned”.

        • The feds need to step in and order that all legally purchased content MUST be compatible with all devices and that the content must be DRM-free.

        • They did step in and enshrined DRM in law, as their owners… er, campaign contributors… er, constituents… wanted.

        • Rorison Meadows

          Because it’s still someone’s property.

      • donnybee

        How about you grow a pair and get some money to buy your way through life, rather than try to get everything for free. If nobody bought movies, guess how many movies would come out. Your way of living isn’t sustainable because it’s stealing. Plain and simple.

        And you try to use the same logic to say T-Mobile needs to reverse this decision, when it’s their network. You’re effectively stealing bandwidth when you use their network for acts that violate the T&Cs that YOU AGREED TO. You’re lucky they don’t just cut you off and be done with you. Instead they are still letting you use their service, and you can choose if you want full speed unlimited, or if you want to steal on their network and lose your full speed. Nobody can stop you from stealing, but they can stop you from doing it on their own maintained network. Come on man, be a little more ethical. And in this case..have some common sense. You agreed to not do it, and you’re doing it. Who’s in the wrong here?

        • Craig Foster

          Whoa whoa settle down Beavis. I agree with t-mobile on this one.

        • Wow, how could mankind have produced art for centuries without copyright laws? Hint: Bach composed a cantata a week; Madonna composed nothing a week.

        • Chris

          I agree with T-mobile that their network shouldn’t be used for torrenting and p2p. But man, torrenting isn’t just for downloading illegal movies. I use torrents to download Open Source software faster. You know like downloading a full CentOS server faster or Fedora, OpenSuse, Ubuntu. Torrenting and p2p has a lot of use; but yes I agree it should not be done on a mobile network.

        • Jay Holm

          How large of a file are these Open Source software?

        • Gryphraff Gryphon

          In response to getting things for free, it’s often difficult to purchase things. There are many artificial region locks on media. Region codes on video comes to mind, or the simple fact that a publisher won’t sell things in a particular country because of agreements or perceived limited profit.

          Average Joe isn’t going to deal with some shady Singapore VCD sales company to get a particular show he wants to see, he’ll just download it. I’m not saying torrenting is justified, but I see it as more of a symptom of a broken system, than the actual disease itself.

        • hello

          thats what itunes what created for

        • Gryphraff Gryphon

          iTunes is a very limited selection of media, and (while it will work on other things,) works best in the closed Apple ecosystem.

          iTunes isn’t a solution, it’s a band-aid for the greater problem of fragmented, locked, profit-driven distribution methods.

        • Gryphraff Gryphon

          iTunes has a lot of artificial restrictions on where you can purchase things. One of my former co-workers had a booming side business selling US iTunes cards to foreign customers.

        • Rorison Meadows

          Region locks are usually due to laws and agreements with publishers. Don’t try and make it a sap case.

      • Rorison Meadows

        Support the families of employees that produce the content.

    • JamesG

      Not sure what torrenting has to do with the year? It beats using kazza and limewire

      • Rorison Meadows

        Buy.

    • Phil

      If anything that means torrent more.

      • Rorison Meadows

        Keep up the stealing.

    • matty black

      it’s 2014, people.

  • TONY ALDO

    Use a VPN, problem solved.

    • ケビン ボウイ

      How would you do that for a mobile Tethering? I need to learn these new tricks now.

      • FILA

        Go to ProXPN, get a account, pay makes it faster. You can either connect through a VPN on android or download the app. It will work either with WiFi or T-Mobile data. You can connect and disconnect at any time

        • bronxlcswr

          Sometimes when I get home and I arrive at my FiOS 300 megabytes per second connection I forget to turn on the wifi on my galaxy note 3. I live in an area of New York City that gets like well over 40 megabytes per second on T Mobile’s LTE network. So sometimes I’m always surfing watching YouTube videos looking at Netflix videos and HBO on the road and at home.

        • bronxlcswr

          So I can easily go past 20 to 25 gigabytes per month. And I hardly ever use my allotted five gigabytes of monthly hotspot. And they never use peer to peer to download torrents. Oh and I forgot I do a lot of speed testing but I read somewhere that T Mobile is not going to count speed test against your allowance as they’re doing with the streaming radio services. So in summary I can count on not ever being throttled if I do not download torrents root my phone to use illegal either. So if I go to say 30 gigabytes in one month and none of these things apply I should be okay right.

      • TONY ALDO

        I never tried it using tethering but I’m going to assume once you connect to a VPN tunnel all traffic flowing in and out of your phone will go over the VPN.

    • Paul

      There aren’t reliable free VPN providers. If there are, PLEASE share. I’ve yet to find one.

  • TotalInternetUser

    T-Mobile will have to take some care in implementing something like this when handling pre-simpleChoice grandfathered data plans. The version of the T&Cs that apply to each customer (as made clear by T-Mobile at the top of the page Cam of tmonews.com linked to) depends on when a customer activated (or last renewed a contract).

    The Total Internet data plan existed prior to the 2008 T&Cs where the concept of throttling was introduced. Furthermore, that data plan actually allowed for usage from a laptop computer:
    -USB tethering to Dash and Dash 3G phones was supported by the phone’s built-in software.
    -The SIM was allowed to be moved to compatible data cards for laptops such as those by Sony Ericson.

    These were legitimate use cases for Total Internet at the time I subscribed to it and I continue to enjoy unlimited tethering to this day, which I use at reasonable levels when away from my home internet connection, and not as a substitute for home internet.

    I would think that unlimited tethering should remain allowed without throttling for all 2004 T&Cs customers that continue to hold old unlimited data plans such as Total Internet and T-Zones.

    (The use of P2P may be another matter and I am not going to argue about it being blocked for everyone.)

  • TonyTone

    Verizon-Mobile

  • SF Biker

    Why not just use traffic shaping for everyone – if 100 people are sharing 100mbit of celullar bandwidth, everyone gets a 1mbit slice of the bandwidth, regardless of the whether they are torrenting, watching a movie, or listening to Spotify.

    • Teats

      No.

    • bronxlcswr

      I have had T Mobile for the last three years now in fact I’m using my unlimited data right now to send this post. My worry is that T Mobile eventually turn into simple mobile. Simple mobile started throwing me for just watching YouTube and Netflix.

  • Stone Cold

    Bottom line T-Mobile TOS says no p2p or torrents. So if you are not using any of those to violate then you are fine.

  • donnybee

    I don’t get everyone on here. Did you not agree to refrain from these activities when you signed up? It’s in the T&Cs for cryin’ out loud.

    Look, you aren’t losing unlimited data. Just losing the ability to break the T&Cs unlimitedly. This is industry-wide to not permit these types of abuses to the network. Luckily for you, T-Mobile won’t just shut you down when you do this stuff..they’ll just slow your data. I’d say that’s not so bad considering it’s you who is breaking the rules.

    I don’t do any of that and easily hit 10+GB of data a month. I don’t worry about getting slowed down or stopped because I’m just using it the way it’s intended. And I have another line who uses as much as they want. I enjoy my unlimited data within the guidelines I agreed to, which by the way, aren’t too restrictive. If you can’t enjoy the internet without torrenting, maybe it’s time to get home internet. Just saying. Now stop bitching.

    • TechAce01

      Sorry, but most of the T-mobile customers didn’t sign a T&C with that. (Mainly If they were with T-mobile before 2010) Neither of them was in it and I haven’t been notified of a change to it yet. I’m not counting on being notified because T-mobile two months before they publicly started throttling people, they reduced the throttle limit from 10Gbs to 5GBs. In the T&C, but told NO ONE! I only found out because I averaged 9 Gbs on my Touch Pro 2 during that time. (isn’t it strange that they can change their T&C without our knowledge, but if we are still required to follow them to the letter even if we don’t accept the changes?)

      The problem isn’t that T-mobile co called fight on p2p, but they’re slowly leading down a path where they and only they can dictate what you can do with data that YOU pay for. So much for being neutral with data…

      Those ends ALWAY start with small steps. Sure it looks like there’s nothing bad about this, but the frog in the boiling pot don’t recognize the water is cooking it until it’s too late.

      Oh Yeah. Some people may not have an option for another Internet connection so their phone is their only connection. Should they now have to suffer?

      • Fabian Cortez

        T-Mobile reserves the right to change their terms of service at any time.

  • Ashton3002

    I feel if I pay for unlimited I should be able to download whatever I decide I want to download..but that’s just me.

    • chreez

      Good luck ever getting any phone company ever to agree to your terms, though.

      • Ashton3002

        Well you won’t be paying for it so it’s none of your business.

        • Guest

          wait so to be clear, people are downloading torrents to their PHONES? not abusing their tethering to do so?

        • Ashton3002

          I don’t know what people do because i dont download torrents or anything like that but I’m saying if it’s truly unlimited then it’s truly unlimited. So when you said “good luck ever getting any phone company to ever agree to your terms” it sounded like you were saying to me Tmobile doesn’t offer Truly unlimited..and if they don’t or are going to throttle for doing something certain atleast say it really fast in the commercials..that’s what I’m saying..and when I said your not paying for it so it none of your business I meant your not paying my bill anyway so therefore it’s none of your business what i do with my unlimited data and if any carrier agrees with “my terms” nevermind that when you said part because at first it said your were chreez now it says guest.

        • chreez

          Just to be clear, I am not “guest”. I sign my posts.

          With that said, if you’re going to make a complaint about abusing their system publicly, it becomes open for debate. If you think you should get anything you want for a simple price, don’t get all mad when your illegal activity gets you in trouble.

        • Ashton3002

          Well like I’ve said before I don’t download torrents. So it doesn’t matter and I don’t have tmobile so it doesn’t matter…and if I did download them it’s still my business not yours because you don’t pay my monthly bill every month I Do..

        • Singleweird

          the point is that you’re NOT paying for it. tmobile sold you unlimited data with caveats which you signed. if there was an unlimited P2P plan, youd be paying for it.

        • Ashton3002

          I’m talking about my monthly bill..and I don’t have t-mobile anyways so it doesn’t matter..i just like what tmobile is doing and come here to support and see what they are doing because i am currently in the market for a new carrier and i like to research carriers and get to know everything and what they are doing to improve their network and all that stuff..

    • Jay Holm

      Same here.

    • Paul

      It’s not that you can’t download whatever you want; they’re looking to knock out torrent users and P2P users. Most of these users are sharing illegally.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Read your terms of service next time before you sign the dotted line.

      • Ashton3002

        Why would I need to rad the dotted line for….

    • Kazonite

      You pay for unlimited data.

      You do not pay for access to unlimited usage.

      They could limit your usage to Facebook and still call it unlimited data.

      You may not like it, but them’s the facts.

      • Ashton3002

        So if unlimited data doesn’t mean unlimited usage of my data why call it unlimited data? And I guess you people can’t read when someone’s says “I feel like”

        • Kaoznite

          ” And I guess you people can’t read when someone’s says “I feel like”

          I don’t care how you “feel”. Facts are facts.

          Unlimited data refers to the amount of data you consume. Nothing more.

          This is not a limitation of that.

          It is a limitation of how the service is used – something you were *NEVER* led to believe was “unlimited”.

          (If you choose to believe it [u]should[/u] be unlimited, that’s entirely up to you, but irrelevant to the issue at hand)

        • Ashton3002

          Well the sense of “Feel” is an opinion I was stating my OPONION!! and Idgaf how you feel you don’t pay MY bill…use MY phones..I do so I can have an OPONION on what I want..and yes the reps in the store make you believe that you can use YOUR data on whatever YOU want…

  • skittle

    Bad boyz bad boyz whatcha gonna do, whatcha gonna do when dey throttle u !! ;)

    • Paul

      Yo NEtflix ain’t gonna play!!
      No Hulu for you, no way!

      • skittle

        Love it :)

  • Sorry y’all, I have no sympathy for anyone using torrents or P2P. Its in the terms of service, if you don’t like it go to another carrier.

  • Antonio JcRM

    I’m on the UNL $80 prepaid plan and every time I reach a certain amount weather its 5GB or 10GB they throttle my speeds. Then when I call to complain they assure me that they don’t throttle the unl plan. I am tethering, doing normal web browsing, youtube & Netflix, but it doesn’t make sense when the $80 unl plan comes with 5GB of tethering anyway. So it’s not like i’m abusing the network. I’m better of with $70 plan or below. At least I’ll know when ill be throttle.

    • Singleweird

      your tethering is throttled after 5gb. data on your phone is not throttled as long as you have unlimited LTE. if it is throttled, you’re not on that plan or you need to visit a corporate store and have us get in touch with TS.

  • Dakota

    This is how it always starts. Here’s the question. If these customers are violating terms, why throttle. They should get a warning ⚠ and if they continue, their account should be cancelled. That’s what others do. Then you wouldn’t start the hysteria (although it eventually will happen) that Tmobile is going to limit data again

    • Paul

      Because canceling their account means T-Mobile loses the customer. The idea is to retain the customer and lower the data usage. Customers = pay.

  • Singleweird

    GOOD! the only people who will scowl at this article are the ones abusing the network or rooting their phones, also known as STEALING.

    • Jeremy

      Since when does rooting a phone equal stealing?

      • Jesse James

        i think he means rooting to try to unlock the free tether, either way his comment was dumb

        • jefski

          Regardless of free tethering, you have paid for the data already.how you choose to use it, its the customers business. ..

        • Jesse James

          except when using that data in a way that breaks the law.

      • Singleweird

        Rooting to circumvent the terms you agreed to by using more tethering than you paid for is stealing. Any more questions?

        • Chris

          Rooting is not stealing. Rooting gives you abilities on your phone that the manufacturer intended for you to have but carrier didn’t most of the time, but the thing is, not everyone buys their phone from a carrier at retail (not that that matters). If they have unlimited data and the phone is capable of tethering, it’s still the same data being used on the network. I’m not saying torrenting abuse shouldn’t be dealt with, but rooting isn’t the issue.

        • jefski

          Rooting gives the person the complete control over their phone that they paid for. If your not rooted, you have no say on what you want on your device or what personal info each app is looking in on you! Dont hate cause you cant root!

  • HM

    I use a sling box. I wonder if that is an issue.

    • Cam Bunton

      Interesting thought. I don’t know if that violates any T&Cs. I guess you’ll find out if they contact you.

      • Paul

        It shouldn’t as it’s would fall under streaming; netflix, hulu, etc.

        • Cam Bunton

          Yeah, that was my thought. It shouldn’t.

        • Paul

          I imagine they’re after users that use 100s of GB. I doubt even the 2-50GB users will be glanced at. Knowing that torrents transfer a ton of info at high rates, and consume network resources, I think it’ll be easy for Magenta to figure out who to hit.

  • Teats

    VPN.

  • FanboisSuck

    “including continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts”

    I wonder if watching my foscam remotely counts? It sucks down a TON of data

  • goma

    When does tethering illegal? It was free when it was a feature…then Phone carriers just made people pay for it…there must be really heavy users out there…i get to 20gb a month sometimes watchin netflix and youtube…p2p sharing to an extent defntly is wrong but people will still do it in wifi…cutting these will make people go to other carriers….

    • Jesse James

      tmobile doesn’t have a problem with netflix and youtube. But most of what is shared on p2p and torrents is illegal software and Tmobile doesn’t want people to clog their network up with it.

      On my non tmobile laptop connection i easily use over 100gb a month. I can imagine there are tmboile users doing over that on their network.

      • goma

        I dont get that much…100gb damn lol…i just imagined how heavy these guys use…

        • Jesse James

          but a high quality tv episode torrent like the #1 pirated game of thrones finale can be 2.5gb. 100gb = 40 episodes. 10 episodes of stuff a week. Not that much but it adds up and thats not counting what you are uploading

    • guest

      Coincidentally, I can’t speak to T-Mobile tactics but T-Mobile may want these users to defect if they are a heavy load on the system.

      By the way, most carriers have some type of policy and program to limit abuse and rid their network of these types of customers.

    • To

      And were exactly will they go for data???

  • So, it looks like T-Mobile is finally seeing what the BIG TWO went through and WHY they specifically got rid of Unlimited data. if you offer it, they will come and ABUSE it. People aren’t stupid. They will fly under the radar for as long as they can, until management slaps their hand. And then they have the nerve to get mad about it when they get caught.
    I mean come on, I use just up to 10GB’s of data on my GN3 ($70 orig plan) alone, without tethering. AFAIR, I don’t even use my phone to tether on my home PC.That’s what TWC is for.
    I may have given a few people access to use my connection via WiFi Tether Router on my device, on their phones when their Boost or Pre-Paid plans were out of money or they had a phone with no service, but that’s about it. And I still hadn’t even come close to 2GB’s of usage on that! So you already know – that these ABUSERS are exploiting the system and I wholeheartedly stand by T-Mobile on this one!

  • Jaramie Black

    Is streaming netflix on your device going to be affected?

    • Cam Bunton

      No, of course not. That’s not P2P.

      • Jaramie Black

        Thank god!

    • JamesG

      Only torrenting/P2P and breaking the tether limit

  • TotalInternetUser

    Is tethering (to a total usage of 15GB per month including direct phone use) on a grandfathered plan abuse when some stream that much to their phone? Total Internet actually allowed use of aircards and USB tethering, although I don’t know if TMobile remembers this. How will Total Internet users be treated for normal tethering (not P2P)

    • Cam Bunton

      Like I mention in the post, it’s just P2P users. Tethering isn’t the problem. And, you’re not on one of the “unlimited high speed” plans, so you’re not included anyway.

      • TotalInternetUser

        Tethering is mentioned in the screenshot as abuse. How much tethering (with ordinary HTTP / FTP downloads) is abuse on my plan? What about for a family member with TZones?

        • Cam Bunton

          Not tethering per se. It’s tethering outside the terms of service. Using it for things you shouldn’t. It doesn’t say so explicitly, but I’d imagine that’s directed at people who root/jailbreak and find a way to make their tethering undetectable. I say that because once a customer goes over their tethering limit, they can’t tether anymore and therefore can’t misuse it. And even the unlimited high speed plans have a tethering limit.

        • TotalInternetUser

          I think tmobile has forgotten about those aircards and USB tethering allowed under my plan. I had to install TetherMe on my iPhone so I could even turn on hot spot for the first bytes of the month. I have been with TMobile so long that when I check the T&Cs I am directed to click back to the 2004 version, which had nothing about throttling, data limits, or tethering. So I figure I am legitimately allowed to tether.

        • jefski

          With all due respect Cam, people who choose to root/jailbreak their phone for tethering, why shouldnt they? Why should the customer have to pay for the data twice.home internet doesnt charge for wifi,same scenario…im rooted and have both the tether plan plus the “other” tether app. I dont abuse it though, anywhere from 5-8 gigs per month

        • Windy

          Terms of service.

  • Cam Bunton

    Let’s not overreact here. 1) If you’re not downloading masses of files of P2P, you won’t be affected. 2) Using tons of data to stream music/video etc over your mobile network is fine. It’s within the rules. It’s still unlimited 4G after all. It’s people misusing the 4G that’s the problem.

  • golbez352

    As a employee I have seen a few customers with 200gb+ data usage and they still had a week left in cycle. That’s more than just watching Netflix.

    • Teats

      I use 1TB+ a month on my home WiFi and I don’t torrent.

      ISP tells me I have a cap of 350GB but that don’t do anything about it since their competitor offers unlimited.

      I back up my PC once a month to the internet and watch tons of media.

    • Kazonite

      “That’s more than just watching Netflix.”

      You bet! (But it still doesn’t mean torrenting)

      We have 5 devices with them – 4 of those carry unlimited data. Of those four, all are used by separate individuals. [u]None of us use torrents[/u]. We stream constantly – music, video, hangouts, you name it.

      I won’t even bother telling you how much data we used last month – but it blows your 200 out of the water.

      Much of our streaming is over our home WiFi, which is through Comcast (chromecast – we ditched cable T-V), so; no – we aren’t using it as our “home internet” – through it would be well within the terms of use.

  • david

    Never in a million years would I have figured the “Uncarrier” company to be the biggest enemy of net neutrality. Dropped… like my signal when I go indoors.

    • Fabian Cortez

      These are the terms of service that you agreed to when you signed up.

      If you didn’t read them then that’s on you.

      • tmohater

        Moron

        • Fabian Cortez

          :)

        • tmohater

          Sorry for the name. Tired of seeing people make excuses for this Turd Company run by an anti labor union hating vulgar Moron

        • Fabian Cortez

          Who’s making excuses.

          The TOS is there for you as an individual to read. Nothing more. Nothing less.

          Let’s move along now.

          It’s sounding like most people are butt hurt because they can’t illegally download anymore. 0_o

  • John

    Wow. Some people are ridiculous. I read a couple of comments mentioning net neutrality. Some people just don’t truly understand certain issues and throw them out. While I do not agree with this decision, I completely understand.Illegal P2P downloads/torrents, can lead to many legal problems for both T-Mobile and the subscriber as well. T-Mobile is covering themselves legally, which I understand. People mentioning fast lanes, this has nothing to do with that. This is a consequence to an abuse, not a preference over another user or service. HUGE difference.

    • roy bot

      It only qualifies as ‘abuse’ if you accept the doctrine that we don’t have the right to copy our files. What’s happening is the providers are offering something they can’t sell – unlimited data – and backtracking by going after those that are actually claiming what they’ve been sold. Downloading gigs of ‘illegal copies’ or public domain kitty videos has the same impact on the network. Data is data.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Go back and read the terms of service that you agreed to.

        • kalel33

          I thought Legere said “no limitations” on data, because they are the uncarrier.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Terms and conditions.

          This is nothing new.

          You signed. Maybe you should have read all the fine print. :massiveeyeroll

      • John

        Yes they do have the same impact, but the point is not the data itself. At least i assume it is not, otherwise netflix would be thrown in this as well. Going by your logic. The point is that they are penalizing those that use torrents to illegaly download media. Not all torrents downloaded are illegal, but torrents are synonomously know with pirated material. That is the pint of this penalty. Of course this is my assumptuon. T-MOBILE IS SIMPLY TRYING TO PREVENT THEIR SUBSCRIBERS FROM USING THEIR SERVICES TO CONDUCT ANY FORM OF ILLEGAL ACTIVITY. Tethering is a whole dofferent story.

        The term abuse might not be the optimal word, but I would also penalize any person that uses my service to do something illegal (if I could of course). I don’t agree with many copyright laws and I do not agree with the huge support that production companies receive from our government, but I understand that illegal torrents can become an issue for service providers. That is how it is until we change it. If the day comes, where P2P sharing of movies and other media becomes legal, then I would be extremely dissatisfied with any similar choices by an ISP or mobile service provider.

      • derp hurr-durr

        They sell you unlimited data.

        Not unlimited usage.

        They are limiting your usage, not your data consumption.

        The throttling is punishment for violation of usage terms.

        You may not like it, and that’s fine; but that’s what it is.

  • Irfan

    These days due to Unlimited data offer its is noticeable that Tmobile speed is slower then when they lunched LTE last year , At&T still faster in my area because they do not have much unlimited users as T mobile have and this effect network and pulling network on loud ,but in normal practice unlimited mean free on any means in this case if users are pulling some apps on phone like torrent application it will effect uploading and here they worried because u need better uploading speed for Volte and future Video over VOLTE, i am totally disappointed over t-mobile behavior where i thought T mobile act differently and where other providers Raping customer ( John Legere), other hand Note3 like big phones are coming and cellular data will be in use more then ever in upcoming days so mean we will get more warring like this soon …

    • Fabian Cortez

      Is that one long sentence?

  • roy bot

    I have a three letter response for this corporate ‘behavior’; VPN.

    • Fabian Cortez

      These are the terms of service that you agreed to when you signed up.

      If you didn’t read them then that’s on you.

      • roy bot

        Oh I read them, I just know how to get mine. Piss off, troll.

        • Fabian Cortez

          People like you who want something for nothing or who are always trying to cut corners and scam the system never live fulfilling lives.

          Good luck in your endeavors.

      • StankyChikin

        You just got called a troll by a troll :)

  • MuthaFuckinStephen

    People really use their phones to P2P? And then bitch when their cell provider confronts them? Yeah this is the world we live in today. Whatever happened to using your home internet for that? But I guess I’m the only person in the world that still uses my home internet to torrent.

    • Andrew Paul Moulton

      Unfortunatley people think- oh I get unlimited LTE on my phone. why do I need broadband? I’ll just run everything forever through my hotspot. and the network suffers :(

      • donnybee

        And unfortunately those same people think a plan title is more important than reading terms that they’re signing. Sad that everyone here is so angry at the stuff they agreed to.

  • Glad to see this! When Legere fist started pushing unlimited, I was concerned it was unsustainable… and I was right. Wireless bandwidth is a finite resource, and “all you can eat” plans just encourage abuse that hurts everyone. In fact, I wish they’d just have bigger limits than “unlimited so the abusers would go to Sprint!

    • Bryce

      It seems Sprint has the same thing in mind though. They’re enforcing network monitoring to try to get the network abusers to go to T-Mobile.

      • Good point. I guess the realities of physics are finally sinking in with the marketing guys!

      • S. Ali

        Sprint doesn’t have a network capable of being abused.

  • fizdog

    Here’s a solution use wifi. I’m sure most homes today have it..then again they’ll just bitch about their isp

    • Mike Mac

      where i work we don’t have it so i have to use data for youtube etc. but if i can i try to if it wasent for that id drop down a tier or so to save money

      • Justin Merithew

        YouTube won’t be throttles, only P2P/Torrents. So as long as you don’t P2P when you’re off Wi-Fi this won’t affect you at all.

      • fizdog

        Wasn’t talking about work cuz even I don’t have it but that’s because I’m behind a trash truck and only really use data when I’m not home.

  • kolijboy

    Lots of apologists on here. I guess that’s what I get for engaging a Tmo worker’s site.

    My real beef is that these corporations can play fast and loose with rules and definitions and then boatloads of sheople will defend them. And we wonder why we are becoming a cynical society.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Stop illegally downloading.

      • StankyChikin

        Just because they are using BT doesn’t mean they are illegally downloading.

        • Fabian Cortez

          We all know that. But let’s not split hairs now.

        • StankyChikin

          Huh? you are assuming that he is downloading illegally..

        • Romdude

          Yes, I see what you did there, I forgot most porn on the net is legally downloaded…

        • StankyChikin

          So that proves that this guy downloads illegally? All those World of Warcraft kiddos using p2p to update their game are illegal downloaders? As I said, not everyone uses p2p to download illegal stuff.

        • Romdude

          Pray-tell what are the legal stuff? I really want to know. No sarcasm, really. And there are terrabytes worth of legal stuff? This is being incredulous, not sarcasm. If I knew what is worth downloading, hook me up.

    • JayMo86

      That’s a huge statement on “society” based on just several posts…kinda hypocritical…

    • donnybee

      Explain how T-Mobile has been “fast and loose” with the rules of the T&Cs that were already drawn out and agreed to. They didn’t rewrite the terms. They aren’t describing activity that wasn’t laid out perfectly in those terms. So you really have no ground for complaint. In fact, be glad T-Mobile let you break the rules for so long. I sure would like to be able to go as fast as I want on the road, but I’m am adult and I agreed to abide by the law when I joined society on the roads. Surely any other competent adult can also understand that once you agree to terms of use on a private network, you’re bound by them whether or not you actually read them. T-Mobile could have kicked everyone off that violated those terms, but they’re instead only slowing the speeds.

      So before you go bashing on the adults who understand life and how usage agreements work, you should look over your paperwork. Unless maybe you need someone to read it to you..in which case you have bigger problems than this.

  • Travis Tabbal

    I’m not sure how T-Mobile is changing the rules. I’m reasonably sure this has always been in the T&C for the current unlimited plans. My only issue with it is that I think playing wack a mole with particular protocols is a poor way to do it. It seems to me that the better solution is to use usage as a type of reverse QoS. If the tower and/or border router is over some level of utilization, requests are served based on how much traffic each client has used recently. So someone who is requesting a webpage after not using their phone for a while is higher priority than someone who has been pushing data around non-stop for the past week. Then they don’t need to know or care what the protocol or payload is. Yes, I have unlimited, no I don’t torrent or tether any significant amount.

  • Gryphraff Gryphon

    One of the biggest problems is the vague wording – “automated machine-to-machine connections” covers just about everything I can think of. In my mind, this covers things like cloud backup, which could use an immense amount of data.

    For example, I use BitTorrent Sync, a program that uses a single peer connection from my phone to my home computer. It doesn’t connect to multiple peers, it doesn’t act like a torrent client, it can’t download anything you don’t have on your phone or computer already. It does, however, use the BT protocol as it was designed by the same team that originated BitTorrent. I can imagine this program is suddenly going to become worthless.

    I know the T&C says programs that broadcast to multiple peers, but I doubt that’s going to save my bacon when I get throttled for using a cloud backup service that happens to look funny.

    • Baxter DeBerry

      are you on a unlimited plan.. if your on a bucket plan it doesnt affect you… thats the main thing here..

    • Fabian Cortez

      “Machine-to-machine” is M2M.

      T-Mobile is just covering all of their bases so that they keep in check people like the majority of the whiners in the comments section.

      In other words: if you’re using a smartphone account to do M2M, then you should really be on an M2M account.

      They’re keeping honest people honest.

      • Gryphraff Gryphon

        Yes, M2M is typically service purchased by a company and used to provide resold data services to devices. I’ve had a few M2M enabled devices, including one where the reseller just shut down one day without warning, all while telling the media “they were told a year ago we were going to do this.”

        However, and it may be unrelated, a few months back all of my BTSync cloud backups just suddenly failed over Cellular, but worked fine on wifi. Speaking with tech support, I was told that all Bittorrent-related activities were going to/being blocked. While it came back, I saw that as foreshadowing of a time when it would truly be blocked.

        If what I have waddles and quacks, but it’s actually a goose, will that save me when I can no longer use the backup programs that I rely on?

        • randomnerd_number38

          Probably not. Maybe you should look into other solutions that don’t use the BT protocol?

  • sorandkairi

    I ain’t stopping ish… Lol! Just be happy I’m not using 100 GBs.

  • jasmin

    good. this will eliminate the data hogs

  • I do have one interesting question. I live in a rural area where no other internet is a possibility, and ive used wifi hotspot for gaming on my xBox. Anyone that knows gaming knows that the only data shared when gaming multiplayer in COD is where you and the other players are on the map. The maps are already installed on the system, so very little data is actually used while playing. IE: MAYBE 300-400 mb in a 3 to 4 hour period. So, does tethering for gaming “Technically” break the terms of service. Ive looked and gaming doesn’t look to be specifically mentioned for tethering.

    • KingCobra

      Gaming is different. The transfer rate for online gaming is slow and normal compared to torrents. Torrents can transfer several GBs of data in just a few minutes. That’s mainly the reason for them going after torrent users because torrents transfer so much data at such a high rate that it actually slows down the network.

  • kalel33

    According to the article it appears that Google Hangouts(video) and Facetime would also be considered in this as well(Web camera posts or broadcasts”. Also, automatic data feeds include podcasts, both video and audio.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Stop with the FUD please.

      T-Mobile made it clear that they allowed FaceTime over cellular while AT&T didn’t.

      • kalel33

        Of course, but they can throttle you if you do it too much, which is the whole point of the article.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No.

        • kalel33

          That’s a very well thought out and informative rebuttal.

        • JayMo86

          Still makes sense…if ur only concern is video chatting and downloading a movie or two per month, I seriously doubt they will be targeting you. Torrents and p2p usage is waaaay more usage than that

    • Dood

      The quote in the article stated “continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts”. Yep, omitting that first word makes quite a difference in the meaning. Webcam chats are not continuous. Broadcasting your webcam pointed at your fishbowl 24/7 is.

      • kalel33

        A video chat can run continuously for an hour. Yep, no need to include that part because it doesn’t change a thing.

        • Josue

          That’s not a continuous broadcast. If you webcam chat 3 hours a day and don’t the other 21 hours then it’s not continuous. Continuous broadcast examples: radio/television stations. Why? They continuously broadcast all day every day.

        • Continuous broadcast is a legal term for identifying unicast/multicast services that transmit forever. Hangouts and Skype do not do this. Neither do podcasts or webcasts.

  • jason

    I’ll.just go back to the basic plan and save $30 extra a month, I joined tmobile because it is the best deal.out there, I only down load a movie or two a month, and use the 5 gig Hotspot I pay for, so I don’t know if it will affect me, but I’m sure that’s why alot of people left Verizon and att.

    • I can’t imagine that your level of use would be a problem. Let’s wait and see?

  • StankyChikin

    I use around 10GB to 15GB a month on my unlimited plan.. 2-3 of that is usually tethering.. Rest is streaming music or video chatting with my son when I’m away from home.

    • KingCobra

      Then you won’t be affected by this

  • Keisar Betancourt

    since i’m paying for “unlimited”, the term abuse only applies how and why i say it does.

    • Moby

      You’re on T-Mobile’s network. So what they say is abuse, is abuse.

      • Keisar Betancourt

        i see english isn’t your first language. the word “unlimited” means “no limits”, not “some limits”

        • donnybee

          I see English isn’t your first language either since you agreed to the terms and are now confused. Besides, it’s still unlimited..just slower unlimited. They at least didn’t cut off all the abusers entirely.

          So entertain us some more about how endless data, regardless of speed, is somehow not unlimited..

        • Popo Signs

          Unlimited data.

        • Romdude

          Terms of service.

        • Popo Signs

          Says unlimited data

        • Keisar Betancourt

          Yeah, so whether you impose a speed cap or an amount cap or a certain type of days that’s disallowed or a day of the week that’s not included, those things, ALL of those things, are limits. That means there can be no valid contract because they are not offering what they said they were offering. Legally that’s called bait and switch and it’s illegal. Ethically that’s called Fucking Assholes!

        • donnybee

          Let’s talk about bait and switch. Explain what you think that means..
          First off, you aren’t bound by a contract, but rather terms of use. Entirely different.
          Second, their network is unlimited use for the intended use. Your actions that violate will still be unlimited but it’s slower. Lucky you.
          Third, you agreed to use THEIR network for this intended use. Now you don’t want to hold up your end? Yeah, real ethical..

          Tell me again who the asshole is.
          I understand you’re not happy, but the unlimited never came with a free for all “use how you want” scenario. The network had an intended use, and was (and still is) unlimited inside that use case. You agree that by using a network that isn’t free, that you’ll follow their rules. It’s simple really.

        • Romdude

          Don’t let the door hit you on the way out. The ones staying will surely appreciate better connections after you go. Besides, it still unlimited just slower so in a way… that’s if you wanted to talk semantics.

        • Stone Cold

          You violate TOS you get throttled.you still get your data so if you aren’t using P2P or torrents you are fine.

        • Josue

          It does mean no limits. As long as you follow their terms and don’t abuse as specified above.

        • Moby

          I see that reading the terms and conditions that you agreed to is not your strong suit. Perhaps you can have an attorney read it for you, and then they will TELL you how T-Mobile defines unlimited.

    • Paul

      Perhaps you should research how contracts and agreements work.
      Also, Throttling still delivers unlimited but at slower speeds.

      • david

        I really hope you’re not doing this for free.

        • Paul

          And I hope the same for you.

  • GreatNews

    So let’s make it clear here, if I use 50GB a month by just watching stuff on my phone ONLY like YouTube, TV Portal, Showbox etc is that considered P2P and I will get throttled or since its all on my phone and its like Netflix and Hulu I won’t be throttled?

    • Josue

      Nope. That’s not P2P. P2P is like torrent sharing, when you’re constantly sharing your files to others from Peer 2 Peer.

    • Paul

      They’re not terribly worried about 50GB from streaming. They’re mostly looking at 100s of GB. Also, probably the traffic amount and possibly IP connections…like how torrents work.
      I doubt you’d be on the radar.

    • jacky

      Yea there is this one guy racked up 400 gb a month on t mobile. One of my friend illegally tether t mobile lte on his laptop racked up 200 to 250 gb a month on t mobile.

  • Kyle Jeter

    For those complaining about not getting unlimited data, the plan is for unlimited data on your PHONE! Why do you think there aren’t any UNL Hotspot plans? Exactly! T-Mobile doesn’t want that kind of usage load on their network. Here’s an idea. How about we just let everyone use their data however they want (unlimited tether, P2P, etc.) and see what happens to everyone’s data speeds. Why should people who are using their plan as designed suffer for those who want to abuse their plan? If T-Mobile allowed this and speeds inevitably slowed to sub-GPRS speed then everyone would be saying how much T-Mobile sucks.

  • Startswithaj

    I usually torrent from my home connection so this won’t really apply to me, but, I like that they plan to be upfront with people who are abusing their network.

  • donnybee

    Oh man! I’m so butt hurt that I agreed to not do this stuff and now I’m getting in trouble for doing it!

    ^^thoughts off all those who are angry^^

    And you aren’t even in trouble. T-Mobile is just making it so you’re less efficient on breaking the rules. So give me a break all you whiners.

    And next time you decide to not abide by the rules, maybe think about not agreeing to them. It will make your life much easier and none of us will have to hear about how immature you are.

    • butthurt

      such an elietest know it all response meant to inflate your own ego by way of contributing something at all rather than something worth saying… lol

      • Paul

        Your pretentious statement does the same thing. ;)

  • Justin Merithew

    Throttling some unlimited users is a necessary evil to keep speeds reasonable for everyone. I’m glad T-Mobile is doing it in a way that’s been covered by their ToS for a while, and not how all the other carriers do it. Sprint, and soon Verizon, have the right to throttle you use over 5 gigs. I’m not 100% sure on AT&T’s policy so I won’t bring them into this.

    I’d much rather be throttled for blatantly abusing my plan than using more than 5gigs. I use a lot more than that and that’s without P2P.

  • oh7dp

    Thank goodness. The torrent folks are ruining the network for the rest of us. Just step up to the counter and plunk down some money like a man. Pull your weight, slacker cheapskates. Quit stealing.

    • pooflavoredwater

      with how much data costs in our country, the real theft is commited against the data service customers.

    • fetaera

      Considering that LTE is -considerably- more expensive than an ADSL or even a fibre line, I find it hilarious and an obvious statement of your inability to comprehend the true situation here.

      • Jamison Shaw

        LTE is not a replacement for a home ISP. It is not sustainable, and the network can not handle it.

      • oh7dp

        Sprru dude, but nothing is unlimited. Not LTE, ADSL or any of the other acronyms. So I’m glad they’re nuking the network abusers who ruin it for the rest of us, the ones who want to use the so-called unlimited data for legit purposes. Pay your share. Pull your weight. Quit being a leech.

  • fetaera

    So many rage posts, geez. Just TOR your P2P client. Problem solved.

    • S. Ali

      Don’t run P2P over TOR, that isn’t what its for.

      • fetaera

        TOR is for -anything- that you wish to anonymise.

        • arrano

          No, it really isn’t. Tor was not designed to handle P2P. It can’t handle the load, and it is frightfully easy to learn the real IP of a BitTorrent client connected to it.

        • fetaera

          Sure, it was not -designed- for it, but given the speed of connections these days, it’s really no big deal.

        • You don’t get it. Tor doesn’t anonymize the data inside the packets, only the headers themselves. BitTorrent sends IDENTIFYING INFORMATION as part of the packet data! It has to, or otherwise the protocol fails to work properly.

        • fetaera

          No, it does not. What it -does- do, however, is essentially ‘secures’ data packets. The issue presented here has nothing to do with TOR’s intended purpose. It’s plainly obvious that even attempting to mask/obfuscate/hide you IP address to your OWN ISP is just dumbness at its max. The actual intent here (as per my suggestion) is to simply use the protocol to obfuscate directly to your ISP. Bottom line: I’ve been doing this since LTE was initially released and I hit upwards of 100GB a month and I have never had a single problem. Ever.

        • donnybee

          If you don’t like the rules, why agree to them? You think it’s cool that you found a way to cheat the system, and get around the intended purpose of this network and what they don’t want to have happen.

          If you don’t like the rules, why agree to abide by them?

        • fetaera

          It’s hardly ‘cheating the system’ – Have you -any- idea just how good LTE is how much raw bandwidth it can support? Sure, the ISP’s can argue that P2P is gonna harm them, but given LTE is quite literally 10 times faster/better than even the top fibre providers in the world…

        • fetaera

          Hell, even 3GPP (The precursor to our current ‘LTE’ is faster than what we currently get). You do realise that LTE has a theoretical max of half a GIGABIT per second, right? Bottom line: The technology supports absolutely anything we throw at it. It’s just a classic case of being anally purged for our bucks to feed these hunger-mongers.

        • donnybee

          I’m not arguing the capabilities of the system. I agree that the technology can support it, on the theoretical side. In all actuality, we have spectrum bandwidth, we have radio bandwidth, and we have network back-haul. I’m not going to say that any of these are getting clogged all the time, because I don’t have those numbers. Neither do you, so you can’t say everything is fine. In a perfect environment, all things being equal, LTE is just as you say.

          The issue is that this isn’t a free network. This is a privately owned network by a public company. You can only use it by agreeing to it’s use case. The rules aren’t specific to the type of tech, but the network as a whole. If it wasn’t a problem, it wouldn’t be a problem.

        • fetaera

          Yep. Very fair comments made and I would stand by these in a general setting, but honestly… I am really just not seeing the issue here, if I was honest. Sure, I agreed to the terms and while I can wholly appreciate any concerns outlined on this thread, it is my belief that said concerns are unfounded and without reason nor fact. Simply put, I fail to see why there is even an issue given the aforementioned facts.

        • fetaera

          To elaborate somewhat: No, the rules are not specific. This I wholly support and agree with, but to what end? Are we to be shackled by our ISP for no other reason than they ‘told us to’? I’m certainly not going to bow down to that, especially given they get over a hundred bucks a month from me. We’ve been waiting for this technology for long, long time and truth be known: I’m simply not going to abide by their ‘rules’ just because they want to make a -lot- of money from people, just like you and I.

        • bakgwailo

          Mobile broadband is different from landline based broadband, in that cell towers are extremely limiting and the tons of packets that are sent out via bittorrent can easily saturate the node, screwing it up for everyone else. Also, DON’T BITTORRENT OVER TOR. You are just exposing exit nodes, flooding Tor with packets, and fucking it up for everyone else.

        • Brian Branson

          LTE equipment broadcasts the wireless signal between the cell tower and your phone. Your data then enters whatever landline system services the tower and then is routed wherever it needs to go. Most LTE cell sites have been upgraded to fiber optic cable. Point being: LTE data IS carried by the fiber providers. Google “backhaul”

        • Singleweird

          when TMO rolled out LTE, they only used fiber. it was our CTO’s first project.

  • PassionateTmobiles

    Its really shitty that the “data police” have to come in and tell us how to spread our data around. No one is saying that porn is a problem, but p2p is? Why even have a network? Why not just go back to aluminum cans and bits of string. Seems like a real bait and switch. I’d drop their service and go to a different network, but they all suck.

    • Fet

      You dont understand what bait and switch means.
      You dont understand what terms of service are.
      You dont understand much about much. Stop typing and go back to the basement.

    • Jamison Shaw

      They have to come in and tell you people how to spread your network around because there are people out there consuming hundreds of gb’s a month by illegally tethering. Get over it. That is against the ToS, and detrimental the network. If 20 people do that per sector, there would be no network at all. Edge speeds is what you would be dealing with.

    • Paul

      So it’s wrong of them to enforce their contract that you agreed to, and enforce laws against illegal behavior like P2P sharing and Torretning illegal materials? Right. Not sure you understand how contracts work, what a bait-n-switch is, or that a lot of digital materials are illegal to share.

  • Alex Zapata

    “I have read and agree to the Terms and Conditions”: biggest lie ever apparently……..

    • donnybee

      It’s amazing, isn’t it?

      I’m blown away really. This isn’t rocket science. This isn’t bait and switch. This isn’t changing the terms. This isn’t rewriting terms. This isn’t taking away endless data.

  • Jake Lewis

    But don’t P2P users channel thru an encrypted VPN (at least those that are sharing copyrighted material). I fail to see how T-Mobile will be able to differentiate between this traffic and someone who is connected to their corperate VPN and is downloading spreadsheets or whatever else T-Mobile consider fair use.

    • JamesG

      Spreadsheets normally aren’t 10GBs

      • niftydl

        It isn’t even the size of the downloads, but the frequency and amount of data packets P2P uses. A single data stream from a server to the phone is not putting nearly as much load on the networking/tower gear as a single phone talking to 20+ other peers at the same time.

  • 1. Why does T-Mobile persist in the opinion that when you use pear to pear, that you are an illigal downloaded.
    I am a software tester and i test multi Linux versions per day, which i download.
    2. I also use pear based Dropbox like solutions for my corporate customers utorrent sync, T-Mobile is only able to see the difference if they were to inspect (deep package inspection) our confidential data. It’s not there business to look at our data.
    3. Since the whole Nsa /Snowden affair, many overseas corporate customers don’t like the cloud so much anymore, they are not sure if either the Nsa or other state agencies see there cloud solutions as a free shopping candy mall, distributed pear to pear solutions are rapidly becoming a standard way to protect from spying eyes. Not everybody believes that the Nsa does not work together with the big American multinationals.

    • Applebag

      Peer. PEER.

    • Jimbo831

      It doesn’t say these downloads are illegal at all. It violates their terms of service. Legal or illegal, they feel it causes network congestion problems. Why don’t you just download these using your home internet connection?

      • fizdog

        Exactly what I said but I wouldn’t use a phone for any of that nonsense

        • TheCudder

          People with rooted phones tend to use unlimited data plans to also serve as their home WiFi.

    • Mikey Donohue
    • Slurms.Mckenzie

      Sounds like BS to me. If you’re a software tester, why are you relying on your T-mobile connection to download multiple Linux distros every day?
      If it’s for a job or business, why are you relying (and paying and breaking the TOS) on a consumer grade connection?

      • Why BS ? If i buy an unlimited connection, and later they try to change it to limited then who is breaking the rules ? If you cant keep your promise of unlimited then don’t sell it as such. and try to change the rules AFTER people have bought your product.

        • PS. Not everybody lives in an area where there are highspeed landlines, nor should it matter in this discussion.

        • bakgwailo

          Well, they aren’t changing the rules since it was in the contract you signed, and you should be using a real (business class) connection if you are running a company. Seriously serving up files to client on a server connected via a mobile link? Really?

          Also, as a (supposed) tech person, you must realize the insane amount of damage bittorrent does on cell networks due to the crazy amounts of packets get sent out. Mobile cell towers are limited, they are not like land line infrastructure.

        • 1. Lets agree to disagree on the rules. I think if they advocate unlimited, it should mean unlimited. you think companies should be allowed to mislead customers by burying it in the little letters.

          2. From a technical point of view i do not disagree with you, however p2p technology ( legal or illegal) is a technology that is actively being used by many users and companies. It is not up to the providers to dictate what technologies we should or should not use. I agree that current mobile base stations are nowhere near being optimized for this, but why should this be a problem for the consumer ? These are problems that need to be solved technically and financially and thus a problem for the providers. You can not blame customers for the fact that the corporations do not want to sufficiently invest. They rather take some people and turn them into black sheep just to keep them from performing the necessary investments.

        • May i point out that by this whole Snowden NSA affair, many non us companies are switching to p2p technologies. Not because they are afraid of doing something illigal and wanting to hide it, but who is to say that some nsa employee(s) do not sell their secrets to a US competitor(s) So there you are as a non US company, seeing another company with products from your R&D. This whole affair of snooping and denying it has a lot of companies worried. There are quite a few suspicious cases out there that suggest this may have happened more then once. ( airbus boeing incident) These companies are actively looking to p2p solutions to distribute their corporate data. Thanks to the U.S. government ( and telcoms providing selling them data) p2p is only becoming more mainstream.

        • bakgwailo

          1. But it is unlimited either way. For things not against the TOS, it is unlimited bandwidth. For things that violate the TOS (which you signed), it is still unlimited, but throttled at lower speeds.

          2. What? Cell node technology has advanced quite a bit. It is technically limited by number of connection to the tower and its packet handling which is all dictated from spectrum and doing things over the air. The current technology is what is limiting the consumer, and over coming this will take a long time to research, and even longer to deploy. So yeah, as a consumer you are directly limited by the current generation of technology that may or may not be overcome. You, as an individual consumer are being selfish torrenting, as you are destroying every other user connected to that node’s experience. It is what it is, and if you want to use bittorrent, then pony up for a real land line connection that uses technology that can handle it.

        • 1. We disagree.
          2. You are talking about a cell tower not being able to handle the multiple radiowave connections. The solution ? Add more towers/stations. no more problems. In the post below i am arguing that p2p tech is a normal technology used in many apps fields from messaging to file sharing. A few bad people having bad ideas and doing thing illigal do not negate the fact that p2p technologie is here to stay, it is being used widely by more and more applications, people and conpanies ( see post below) .

          The only way to determine what is what is to inspect the data. You can not criminalize a few people because you do not want to. unfortunate p2p tech is build to withstand these kind of deep packet inspections. The world is changing, and it can not always be perfect, but it’s even more immoral to criminalize people for using a common technology. I do not disagree with the fact that you should do anything illegal, however if we create a habit of prosecuting people solely based on the tech they use it is discrimination pure and simple.

        • Windy

          At the end of the day, a business has the right to set terms of use. For whatever reason, T-Mobile has decided that p2p is not an acceptable use of their 4G service. It’s in the contract. A customer’s reasons for not wanting to abide by a contract he has already signed are irrelevant and invalid. If the customer disagrees with that limitation, they can decline to contract with T-Mobile. Once the contract is signed, you agree to the terms, regardless of your philosophies or reasonings for why alternative terms would be better. That’s what a contract is — two parties agreeing to abide by the terms of a business transaction. If you need a service that allows you to access unlimited p2p sharing, T-Mobile is not the service to use. Whatever their reason, it’s in their TOS, and no, the fact that it’s not advertised in their commercials and on billboards doesn’t take away from that. Contract law 101, know what you’re signing. If you don’t, that’s your bad. If you think T-Mobile should choose a different business model, vote with your pocketbook by choosing another carrier. That’s the ethical way to protest. Agreeing to something and then disregarding it or complaining about it later is not ethical. If you don’t like it, don’t agree to it — before entering into a legally binding contract.

        • Ant Modrow

          what makes me wonder is you can get LTE but no landline cable/dsl service. seems like the companies need to get there head out of there ass.

    • roy bot

      “Pear to pear” .. you really should proofread your English. ;)

      • Ant Modrow

        Lol

  • i say good. slow those fools down. they’re abusing it.

  • Bryann Pena

    What is torrenting? P2P?

    I just use my unlimited plan to watch videos from time to time on youtube ( 2-4 videos a day), use facebook and twitter and an anime forum where i discuss with other people, i always use from 3 GB to 7 GB a month, also my unlimited plan comes with 5 GB of hotspot, would i be affected by this?

    http://i.imgur.com/5ZpWyjC.png

    • Manny

      Nope. P2P and Torrenting is very specific.

      • Bryann Pena

        Alright thanks

    • trapdoo

      Popcorn time app for Android. Google it

  • I would be all for data-throtling and fair use policies if they would pay back the people that use internet just 2 times a week to check their emails. and not use more then my 80 year old grany, Are there not a lot of customers that are overpaying ? are there not a lot of customers that use waaay less then the average ? should they not be reimbursed ?

    This sounds like a very one-sided story to me.

    They extort a large amount of cash from the very casual user. in fact they make more money on them, then the relative few abusers. Besides, the market creates the abusers , if the content companies would have reasonable prices andor would adapt their business model to the current day and age and what the market demands, we would not have abusers…. just more users, and this point would become a non issue.

    So now we are in a situation, were the media companies and internet providerscable companies) try to label regular internet users to criminals because they are to lazy to change their model(s), and the providers are hypocritically trying to give the downed user another kick by penalizing them and users that that legally use the same technologies. while profiting from users that use way less then the average. To me this has the sound of hypocrisy written all over, and thus NO.. T-Mobile should not be allowed to throttle users, by unilaterally changing the contractual agreements.

    • donnybee

      “unilaterally changing the contractual agreements”

      You signed the paperwork. You have copies. T-Mobile didn’t come to your house, find the paperwork, and change it. You agreed to it.
      And in the case of market vs. abusers – the abuse also sends the cost of the goods to go up. Litigation to protect property isn’t cheap. Losing money because people steal, costs money. So in effect, the abusers who complain about the cost of the produced work, end up causing the market prices to go up from their abuse. It’s a circle that will never end, but one thing is certain..there are unethical and illegal things that people do consciously that can’t be justified. Nobody is making them do illegal things. So that argument isn’t valid.

      Back on topic: this isn’t a free-for-all network. This is a network of users who have all agreed to use it in a certain way. The internet is huge. The restrictions are small. If your life is ruined because you can’t find anything else to do online except for those handful of activities that you agreed to not do, then that’s your fault. The majority of us have plenty of things to do using this network that all fall under the intended use. If you don’t like the policies, don’t agree to them. If you don’t like the consequences, don’t break the rules. If you can’t use this network without breaking the rules, maybe you should switch.

      Sorry, but I don’t take pity on any of the rule-breakers. Nobody forced you to agree to the terms.

      • roy bot

        ha ha all you do is root, edit a .db file, unlimited tethering data. there will always be a workaround for use-of-bandwidth limits, they know it and don’t really try to fight it. so, I don’t know what tools/haters like you think they’re accomplishing by trying to scold people – because nobody cares. NOBODY, including the tel. co. so, STFU maybe?

    • Dumbass

      You know they have different plans, right?
      It’s their own damn fault if they see they only use 500MB a month but continue to pay for a substantially higher plan.

  • Benny

    T-Mobile should have done this long time ago. To make it simple, T-Mobile should discontinue unlimited high speed 4G plan. People can always find ways to get around to limitations.

    • donnybee

      The thing that gets me is this has been in their terms for a while now. They had said it’s against the rules. People chose to break the rules. So by not enforcing this before now, T-Mobile effectively let the rule-breakers get by.. And now those same rule-breakers are angry?

      HOW CRAZY!

      They should be thankful T-Mobile let them skate by unaffected while they did! You agree to use someone else’s network in it’s intended use, but then violate it left and right, and have the audacity to get mad when they start restricting you?

      And I’m sick of hearing how you’re somehow not getting unlimited data now. Regardless of speed, you’re getting unlimited data. Do you think people covered by only EDGE speeds aren’t getting unlimited data just because they’re restricted in speeds? Sure, it’s not a SOC that’s restricting them, but network performance is a restriction in and of itself. So unlimited doesn’t refer to the speed, people. It refers to the amount!! Get it through your head! You still have unlimited. You still have terms of use. Nobody is cheating you, so stop trying to cheat them!

      This is a simple subject. You break the rules, you don’t get all the benefits. You don’t like it? Quit breaking the rules, or leave. Either way, the network will be much stronger and better for those of us who follow the rules.

      • Mike

        They said unlimited LTE speeds. Therefore, they cannot reduce that now.

        • Singleweird

          remember when you took an electronic pen and signed your name after -not- reading your service agreement? me neither.

      • Aaron

        Yeah it’s not there network, I pay into it do its mine to. You pay for a membership into the tmo family so makes it your network…

      • Mike cook

        Haha!! This guy just went on a bout throttled data being Un limited….UN….LIMITED…that word literally means no limit on data…It does not specify speed or amount..Therefore it’s false advertisement…period!

    • Popo Signs

      wow sir you are dumb as they come. Thats like saying hey let’s hold back civilization. No the answer is to upgrade the networks and make everything free and open. GEEZ

    • You should talk to at&t. Not to T-Mobile.

  • fetaera

    I have to reiterate here: P2P is simply -not- harming the network. Not for you, the person who reads emails once daily, nor for you, person who does so 100 times daily, youtubes constantly, is connected to a VPN/server/whatever on a permanent basis. LTE is better than 95% of fibre optic links available anywhere in the world. Bottom line: It’s nothing more than scaremongering in order to sustain and gain further $$$. Simple.

    • That’s dumb to say. Virtually all internet goes through land lines.

      • p2p.killah

        no, whats dumb is calling 50gb excessive. ffs, standard def movies on play can excees 2gb each!!! one per day exceeds your retarded 50gb fictional limit!!! stop spreading lies and fud, moron!!

        • I would talk to at&t.

        • And in any case. Comcast only lets you watch TV on Verizon or through WiFi. I is annoying. So, no matter the data limit you would need to break the agreement.

  • mingkee

    T-Mobile is pretty aware of excessive network usage.
    Not so long after LTE has been deployed in Downtown Brooklyn, I start to see it’s overloaded, and I have hard time to use VoLTE with Note 3 (chopping or losing voice).
    I usually use 20-30GB a month due to massive file transfer (downloaded from home through traditional FTP) and Youtube/Livestream/Simple TV watching, but I still under the radar.

  • I think that if they make a lot of money on people that have very little data consumption, you lose a little with a few that have a large consumption. The payed in the beginning for unlimited as was advertised. otherwise they should have advertised: “unlimited for a limited time only”.

  • dustin

    Well, i use about 60-100 gigs a month. I watch a lot of streaming, and i do download torrents a few times a week. For me it’s economical because i don’t have wifi, and if I’m paying for it, they shouldn’t have a right to slow me down. I’ve never done anything else but use alot of data! I barely use my hotspot service.

    • 50 is excessive if it degrades their systems. But if you are not causing a problem than they l let you use any amount.

      • p2p.killah

        50gb is far from excessive. I can get 50gb down in a few hours on LTE…..that’s nothing!!! just going through device setup after a rom flash uses over 1gb…building and testing roms can mean having to do that dozens of times a day…now multiply that by, say, 10 updates in a month, which is very normal if the android version you are using is new or buggy, and you’re WELL over that 50gb fictional ‘limit’ in a week!!!

  • Popo Signs

    Wow look at you pussies. Bitching over this. T-mobile needs to be the first to offer unlimited hotspot and get over it. You think that’s not the next step? It is. You heard it here first.

    • roy bot

      they already do you just have to be smarter than the machine, so it’s self-limiting. works for me.

      • p2p.killah

        there is only one true method that works, and i’ll assume it’s the one you are using. if i’m correct, it works for me with unlimited torrenting….fyi

  • HeWhoGameZ

    Most people can pretty much ignore this. Tmo is cracking down on people using TB of torrents and such. Using 100GB on torrents will not get you throttled.

    • youngj0308

      How can you be so sure?

      • HeWhoGameZ

        I’ve tested it and talked to Tmo support about it. I’ve used 2TB before with no repercussions. Although I do not reccomend going past about 5TB. A few hundred GB will be more than enough for acceptable data usage.

        • roy bot

          yeah rep on the phone told me the same thing, said everyone there does it too.

        • him

          Lies! I’m at 53 Gb this month without p2p usage and they are throttling me to dial up speeds. So much for unlimited. .

    • him

      Lies! I’m at 53 Gb this month without p2p usage and they are throttling me to dial up speeds.

      • Anonymous_DNS

        No its not lol i’ve used 110gbs and Im still not throttled

        • It depends on where you are. In my area I can use an excessive amount of data at extreme speeds and they won’t throttle. They even gave me a third line on the two line unlimited old 20 dollar plan at 20 dollars for unlimited.

        • John Moore

          You guys are small frys! I’ve used upwards of 600gb in one month, and routinely use 250gb-350gb. and I’ve never been throttled. Those of you who THINK you’re throttled, probably aren’t. They said they will send you warnings via txt and email first. None of you said they got those. So you are just a victim of the fact Tmo’s network is the worst in the nation. As a side note… My new BLU DASH 5.5 (model D470U) does not seem to report wifi tethering AT ALL! It reports ALL USAGE AS PHONE USAGE! YEE HAW FUCKERS!!!

        • p2p.killah

          same…all torrents, too. it’s not a matter of location, but knowing how to hide your usage

      • p2p.killah

        i’ve used well over 100gb exclusively on torrents and never been throttled. learn to hide your usage and you can get truly unlimited too

  • Joe

    Can we use p2p sharing on 2g?

  • So basically they are saying if you are a heavy user AND you are doing p2p we do not like that, however if you are a heavy use without p2p it is good. So basically t-mob is dictating to me what technology i should use. i agree that you would hit people that download movies over bittorrent, but also legit users that use the same tech for good purposes. so to sum it up, you are allowed to have a gun, because the person behind is pulls the trigger, but when you apply this to p2p tech one does not want to permit it.

    t-mob does not have the right to dictate which tech i should or should not use. Period.Yes they put it in there disclamer or conditions, that however does not make it valid.

    • P2P degrades their servers.

  • Again, it is not the illegal downloading that i am advocating, it is the abuse of a large provider to dictate the public what technology is “good” and what is “bad” and thus is criminalized.

  • Joe

    P2P Such as Torrenting can cause quite a bit of network congestion when more of the users of the network are involved. They aren’t really prepared for a large portion of their customers to be running at full speed 24/7 it would be like traffic in chicago vs the autobahn.

  • me

    I’m at 53 Gb usage this month and tmobile has started to throttle me to dial-up speeds. I don’t use torrents or p2p downloads so wtf? So much for unlimited!

    • 50GB is the ceiling. Please read the terms. And 50 is excessive for a phone.

  • Luis Cisneros

    Same here 60Gb every month and I notice they
    always switch me to edge every now and then.
    I’ll still find a way lol

    • 50 GB is the max limit ceiling before they take action to make you stop using excessive amounts because it degrades everyone else.

  • Sowalnut Pov

    I’m at 14 gb in my new cycle and they are throttling me right now they mine as well cap me at 60 gb and give me my speed back

  • p2p.killah

    hahaha…throttle…right!! i’ve used 100s of gb in a billing cycle and downloaded torrents like a crackhead and never been throttled. so much for that threat!! tmo can’t keep track of you if you are smart about hiding.

    • Karan Bhullar

      how do you hide your usage though?

      • yardie

        Pda net
        but I’ve been throttled this month. Which means they are throttling you regardless if they think it’s legit or no

    • rob

      Really though comcast cost less than tmobile for 300gb which I fly through. . I luckily only use around 40gb on phone

  • Mrichey

    I need help. I have Rooted Lgl9 w unlimtd plan 80$ 5gb tether/hotspot what do i do so i can use unlimited tether to my pc via usb.

    Ty in advance. I am a noob but can follow texhnical instructions well.

  • Noah

    50 GB’s? excessive? what kind of drugs are they on I can use 60 GB’s in month just by watching videos/movies from Google Play or Youtube.

  • Dan Lodi

    I m glad they are cracking down on it….it’s idiots like you that screw up the experience for the rest of us

  • Lu Padula

    I was lied also