T-Mobile G2 Will Not Support Tethering At Launch

Update 1: T-Mobile has provided an official statement regarding the tethering option:

“T-Mobile does not currently support handset tethering or offer a tethering rate plan.  Though tethering and Wi-Fi sharing will not be initially supported on the T-Mobile G2, we know that consumers are interested in these features and we are working to develop a solution to support them in the future.”

We’ve trying to confirm this one either way since the announcement of the pre-order and, fortunately, we received a few of the same screen shots showing that the T-Mobile G2 will NOT support tethering at launch.  We know that stock Android 2.2 does indeed support it however it seems that carriers will (as usual) have final say in what features actually make it into the handsets.  The upside, T-Mobile says acknowledges that users are requesting the feature so we can hope down the road this is something that can be offered via a software update.  Otherwise, you’ll have to find yourself hacking your brand new G2!

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  • rickb928

    So long as the G2 supports root, I’m in.

    If you can’t root it, you don’t own it.

  • David Betz

    Upgrade your ROM manually. I have both USB tethering and wireless portable hotspot “tethering” on my Nexus One. If anyone took that away from me, I’d move to AT&T immediately. T-Mobile is as anti-tethering as Steve Jobs is anti-Flash and neither will recant no matter what the pressure is because they would be too shamed to do so. IT would be embarrassing for them.

    T-Mobile wants you to buy their lame USB device… right… like that helps my iPad. My tethering on my Nexus One is PERFECT for my iPad. I watch Netflix in my car. I do hope T-Mobile realizes their mistake and fires the man who made the decision for anti-tethering (that’s the only political way to save face).

  • Jeesh

    Working on it.. all they have to do is flip the switch on the software. They’re just looking for more profit.

  • tmoled

    YOu don’t need to root to tether, there are apps that work without being rooted, rooting is not a requirement, don’t know where people are getting this. I don’t recommend getting rid of your current home connection, your phone will not replace this. Not only do you have a usage cap, but Tmo 3g is not fast enough to satisfy 90% of people.

    • Brian

      You need root to enable something like a hot spot as the tethering without root only connect to the phone via USB or BlueTooth and require a client for that specific device. Meaning that pretty much you only can tether 1 Windows computer or Mac computer. You can’t tether your iPad, iPod, or any other devices like that.

  • mingkee

    This is pretty unfortunate today.
    The wifi in the college is totally dead, so tethering actually saves my day.

  • badbob001

    I’m sure they will have a tethering pricing plan to go with that update.

  • Bulge

    Per my phone conversation with Tmob cust support: After checking with the Android Tech support team the answer was that, “the phone does not support tethering. However, you can go to the android app store and there is an app that will allow you to tether”.
    Sounds like you can with the app from the app store.
    Feel free to call them now that the phone is out.

  • aj

    Tethering your phone to a computer for internet access is against T-Mobile’s terms. I hope T-Mobile starts cracking down on all these people who tether. I hate it when some data hog is taking up my tower’s resources. If people don’t tether they’re more likely to use less data.

    • mingkee

      You’re wrong, totally wrong.
      If T-Mobile starts to crack down on tethering, they’ll surely get a rough awakening.

      • aj

        Read the TOS or at least the quote in this article.

        “T-Mobile does not currently support handset tethering or offer a tethering rate plan.”

        They officially don’t allow tethering. They are just currently taking a blind eye to it.

      • http://None Navixo

        I believe taking the tethering option out of the G2 would be them cracking down on tethering.

        Maybe I’m wrong….

      • helter

        I hope they’re cracking down on tethering. I hate it when some guy is hogging up all the bandwidth streaming Youtube or using it as their sole internet service. T-Mobile’s network isn’t all that great in the first place but while they’re adding capacity they should stop tethering or force people to pay. Then you also get people talking about how they never get throttled and have downloaded over 30 GB.

        It sucks when sometimes it takes a long time to check my email on my smart phone then wait a few hours and it’s quick again.

    • http://squarecat.com Scott B

      First of all, tethering is not forbidden by the TOS if you have the requisite (smartphone) plan.

      Second, if anyone is to blame for poor throughput, it’s the carriers. Their whole business model is based on concept that not everyone who uses their service will use it at once. Look what’s happened for years during a regional emergency (let alone a national one): cell service crumbles for hours. And, historically, that was just voice calls on rare occasions.

      Unfortunately, there’s no awards for conserving mobile service…

      • mingkee

        The logic from AJ is wrong and unfair.
        We all remember the network disaster on ATT after iphone 3g was released, did the disaster caused by tethering? Of course not!
        Other than very, very few, most of tetherers are considerate. They need this function for conveience.

    • Drew

      FALSE!!! T-Mobile has NEVER cracked down on tethering and in fact are one of the very few carriers I know who supported tethering to the standpoint of having a website instructing you HOW to tether your device. This is surprising as T-Mo has been in the past, and currently a “forward thinking” carrier. First to introduce Android, no hard cap on data (10GB soft cap) where they won’t shut you off, just throttle you after 10Gigs, one of the first to support (and still do) UMA. No tiered data plans…and NO tethering plan like AT&T, so this comes as bit of a surprise. Not sure if this was HTC’s idea or this was done as a request from T-Mobile.

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Back in the days of the BlackBerry Pearl (2006) we all have tethered our phones with third party programs.

    Back then you could even call T-Mobile tech support and they would walk you through using the Pearl as a modem (as tethering was called back then).

    However, the important distinction to make in all this is that T-Mobile has never officially offered tethering nor supported it.

    AFAIK this is because T-Mobile has always wanted to keep its options open on limiting or canceling a customer’s account who, in T-Mobile’s opinion, abused his or her data plan.

    Back then there were T-Mobile users (on the BlackBerry forums) who reported being in a geographic region where dial-up, satellite, or cable modem service was unavailable. So they were using their Pearls as modems to get a 24/7 EDGE connection, which at 100K+ was better than no connection at all.

    Those people reported that T-Mobile never contacted them to warn that they were abusing their data plans. Obviously this was because a few thousand people tethering was not a big deal since they did not tax the system at all.

    Now with “4G” coming about and tech changing to where people may have only a wireless connection in the house for EVERYTHING that happens in the house (meaning people won’t be using land line modems nor cable modem) this will all change.

    I fully expect that carriers will soon offer “4G” speed tethering plans as an alternative to one paying separate charges to AT&T or Comcast cable for a home “net connection.” At that point tethering will no longer be free at T-Mobile.

    And unlike 2006, in 2011-12 T-Mobile will monitor your account usage. If they see evidence of abusive tethering, it will 1) throttle your account; 2) cancel your account; or 3) impose monthly tethering charges.

    Sure, we will always be able to hack our phones and install a third party tethering program. But T-Mobile, like other carriers, will look at that as circumvention of one’s plan limitations, and the terms and conditions. At that point the user will have to decide which way he wants to go.

    I don’t care any which way. I look forward to using my T-Mobile handset for all my “Net connection needs” at home. As I predicted two years ago, by 2012 we will walk into our homes, place our handsets into a dock, and that will connect the entire home’s computers to the Net.

    And the connection will be fast enough that you will be able to even stream movies without lag.

    Eventually, carriers will offer a flat price for unlimited everything, tethering at home or on a notebook included. And if there’s another carrier war, we can expect to pay $50 to $80 for unlimited plans, without GB limits, etc.

    By the way, home DSL and broadband providers are freaking out. There’s a lot of money to be made providing home internet connections. These “hard wire” providers can see the writing on the wall, a land line or cable connection going the way of the pay phone, toward extinction.

    They know that the only thing stopping an exodus to what I call “wireless docking” is the completion of “4G” speed networks. Once that happens (Verizon has estimated its LTE won’t be nationwide until December 2012) hard wire net providers will have to come up with something other than speed advantage to stop defections.

    And that’s all I have to say about tethering. ;)

    • aj

      Ya, I sure hope T-Mobile will start monitoring data usage more closely to enforce their TOS. Just because you can tether unofficially doesn’t you should. If a door to a house was unlocked it doesn’t mean you should go in and steal stuff.

      • BJ

        That is a useless analogy. The operating system supports tethering and the company has been claiming (including many reps I talked to in person at official T-Mobile stores and over the phone) that the G2 will come with the stock, unaltered version of 2.2. In addition I was specifically told about wifi tethering without me even asking. T-Mobile should not claim features that are false. You mod the OS, you change the phone. Period.

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    I am going to try an experiment. I think I am getting the “awaiting moderation” message on my posts because I use parentheses in my posts. This site’s software thinks those are links that might be forbidden, so it automatically sends those comments to the moderator who has to approve them.

    I am going to repost my comment, this time without parentheses, to see if I don’t get the moderation message.

    I also had a slash in 24-7. Maybe that generated the moderation restriction, so I’ll delete that too.
    ____________________

    Back in the days of the BlackBerry Pearl, 2006, we all have tethered our phones with third party programs.

    Back then you could even call T-Mobile tech support and they would walk you through using the Pearl as a modem, as tethering was called back then.

    However, the important distinction to make in all this is that T-Mobile has never officially offered tethering nor supported it.

    AFAIK this is because T-Mobile has always wanted to keep its options open on limiting or canceling a customer’s account who, in T-Mobile’s opinion, abused his or her data plan.

    Back then there were T-Mobile users, on the BlackBerry forums, who reported being in a geographic region where dial-up, satellite, or cable modem service was unavailable. So they were using their Pearls as modems to get a 24 hour EDGE connection, which at 100K+ was better than no connection at all.

    Those people reported that T-Mobile never contacted them to warn that they were abusing their data plans. Obviously this was because a few thousand people tethering was not a big deal since they did not tax the system at all.

    Now with “4G” coming about and tech changing to where people may have only a wireless connection in the house for EVERYTHING that happens in the house, meaning people won’t be using land line modems nor cable modem, this will all change.

    I fully expect that carriers will soon offer “4G” speed tethering plans as an alternative to one paying separate charges to AT&T or Comcast cable for a home “net connection.” At that point tethering will no longer be free at T-Mobile.

    And unlike 2006, in 2011-12 T-Mobile will monitor your account usage. If they see evidence of abusive tethering, it will 1 – throttle your account; 2 – cancel your account; or 3 – impose monthly tethering charges.

    Sure, we will always be able to hack our phones and install a third party tethering program. But T-Mobile, like other carriers, will look at that as circumvention of one’s plan limitations, and the terms and conditions. At that point the user will have to decide which way he wants to go.

    I don’t care any which way. I look forward to using my T-Mobile handset for all my “Net connection needs” at home. As I predicted two years ago, by 2012 we will walk into our homes, place our handsets into a dock, and that will connect the entire home’s computers to the Net.

    And the connection will be fast enough that you will be able to even stream movies without lag.

    Eventually, carriers will offer a flat price for unlimited everything, tethering at home or on a notebook included. And if there’s another carrier war, we can expect to pay $50 to $80 for unlimited plans, without GB limits, etc.

    By the way, home DSL and broadband providers are freaking out. There’s a lot of money to be made providing home internet connections. These “hard wire” providers can see the writing on the wall, a land line or cable connection going the way of the pay phone, toward extinction.

    They know that the only thing stopping an exodus to what I call “wireless docking” is the completion of “4G” speed networks. Once that happens, Verizon has estimated its LTE won’t be nationwide until December 2012, hard wire net providers will have to come up with something other than speed advantage to stop defections.

    And that’s all I have to say about tethering. ;)

    • David, Managing Editor

      Still random, I only have particular words or phrases blocked, other than swear words, the phrase “slow news day” is blocked!

    • HaVoKteK

      Welcome back words of wisdom. The only poster that illicts true knowledgable responses!

  • Barry

    I nominate “fail”, “epic fail”, “I’m going to sprint,verizon,at&t” “r*tard” “first comment” (although I haven’t seen that in a while) If I think of anymore I’ll pass them along lol

  • remixfa

    i nominate anyone that posts a question or crazy uninformed statement without reading the responces first to see if its already been answered or corrected… lol :)

  • Barry

    Like the, there are certain prerequisites to run gingerbread ??? I swear if I see that comment/statement again I’m gonna spaz out lol

  • yoshi

    even if tmobile dose not support this officially the internet is called unlimited android net for a reason meaning i can use it as much as i want in what way i want i pay for it i use it

    • jo

      Too bad you didn’t pay for tethering. T-Mobile explicitly says you can’t use your device to provide internet to other devices. That means at any point in time T-Mobile can cancel your contract if you tether. That’s what you signed and agreed to.

      • Chameleon Skin

        Really? *Really?* And where did they say this, exactly?

        Care to quote the part of the contract that says your service can be cancelled for tethering? Or are you just basing your assertion on the fact that some rep at T-Mobile said verbally that they don’t “support” tethering (which, even should this dubious hearsay be true, is entirely different than saying it is “contractually disallowed”)?

        I’ve had a data plan with T-Mobile since they first offered one. I never signed anything that disallowed tethering, the terms of my contract haven’t changed, and if they ever did want me to sign something that disallowed tethering I would immediately switch carriers.

        I pay for unlimited bandwidth, and as far as I’m concerned unlimited means “unlimited”. It’s ridiculous for a carrier to assert how I should use the bandwidth that I pay for; this is no different from the traffic shaping that net neutrality laws are designed to prevent.

  • Riopato

    I’ve been with T-mobile for 13 years and always had a windows mobile phone with data plan. To this day I’ve been tethering as long as I’ve had this service. If these Androids and iPhones cause carriers to change or create rates for tethering I will be very upset and is another reason why I hate all of these retard proof smartphones!

  • Tianna

    I just downloaded PDANet from the Android Market on my myTouch 3G (out of the box…no rooting or hacking) and I’m tethered right now. No problem.

  • skeeter

    You know that all of the blackberry’s tether, right? For those hardcore tmobies out there, you do relize over 70% of the network is leased from at&t, Right? So maybe the anti-tethering policy is end user cost control?

  • Dmanx1030@aol.com

    I have a tmob G2 and it came with a setting for a wireless hotspot on it, no app or rooting needed. I use it to tether my ps3 and play black ops fine and tether my comp to stream netflix ( I’m on the Hspda+ network (tmob’s 4G) and I get speeds average 2.5mb but as high as 6mb untill I hit the throttle limit of 5gb!( that’s shitty) then my speeds are cut to dial up! 56-60kb or .o6mb and its basicly useless ,tho I still get a decent ping and can even play COD, no DL speed at all. Youtube won’t even work on my phone. I’m wondering if once I have been throttled down in speed rooting will somehow overlook that and still give me speeds capable of streaming netflix. Not sure exactly why you would want to root a G2 otherwise, they are very fast(no need to overclock) they already tether free, no app. When my ps3 connects thru my g2 tether it has trouble playing some games because the Upnp is off and the nat type is 3.(universal plug n play, & nat3 is not an open network (you want nat 2 or 1 to play any rockstar game like red dead redemption. If I root could I connect to nat 1 or 2? Does anybody know?