John Legere vows to go after T-Mobile “network abusers” on unlimited 4G LTE data plan

tmobilejohnlegere

Unlimited data plans are pretty rare in mobile industry nowadays, but T-Mobile is one carrier that does offer that option. Unfortunately, it looks like some Magenta users are taking advantage of that plan in extreme ways. Now John Legere has vowed to stop them.

In a new blog post, Legere says that there are around 3,000 T-Mobile customers — “thieves,” as he calls them — that are abusing T-Mo’s unlimited 4G LTE plan. The plan comes with 7GB of data for tethering, but T-Mobile has detected that these subscribers are utilizing workarounds to use waaaaaay more than that, in some cases up to 2 terabytes (2048 gigabytes) of data in 1 month. This could have an adverse effect on the network experience of other T-Mobile customers, an so John Legere says he’s going to going after the network abusers.

When contacting these offenders, T-Mobile will first give them a warning and hope that they stop gobbling up so much data on their own. If they don’t, they’ll be moved to an entry-level plan with a limited amount of 4G LTE data.

It’s kind of crazy to think that some folks out there are using 2 terabytes of data with their unlimited 4G LTE plan, and it makes you wonder what exactly they’re doing with all of that data. T-Mobile advertises its network as being “Data Strong,” but I doubt it had planned on some customers using 2TB of data in one month when it was talking up its network’s data abilities. John Legere always says that he’s all about “removing customer pain points,” and now he’s doing it again by going after customers that are abusing the unlimited plan so that they can no longer “compromise the network experience” for other T-Mo customers.

How much data do you typically use in one month?

Sources: T-Mobile (1), (2)

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  • David

    I use about 6-8 if you count the music streaming that doesn’t get counted because of music freedom. Still effects the network for purposes of this question. Otherwise I use around 2-5 Gbs.

    • Das_juden_adam

      That’s a reasonable amount. 2000 gb is not

      • David

        I mean I agree, I am on Wifi a ton though. Mostly because I don’t get service where I work. The most I ever used in a month was 10-12 GBs. I consider myself someone who is always on my phone too. I have seen people post here that they use like 70-80 GBs and just don’t get it sometimes.

        • For a start… No WiFi. Then usually it’s significant media usage. Social networks like Tumblr are image-heavy, and 1GB won’t get you too many 1080p YouTube videos. For me, my Subsonic media server isn’t covered by Music Freedom, so that’s more usage. I do all of those things on the go (no Wifi available, or vastly inferior public WiFi) and it’s pretty easy to hit 30GB. Sure, my usage would be lower if I connected to Wifi at home, but AT&T gives us 6Mbps and T-Mobile is at LEAST 60Mbps, so that REALLY isn’t an alternative. In my area AT&T goes “up to” 24Mbps and thanks to a stagnant US broadband market, there isn’t anything approaching T-Mobile’s 70-100Mbps LTE.

        • Data Hogs Suck

          Big Deal…. does anybody really need a connection that fast? I mean, the only time that much bandwidth is even necessary is when you have multiple people hitting the connection at the same time doing data intensive applications. I can have multiple users watching netflix and surfing the web and playing games on my Fios connection and it is only 25Mbps….. so my question is why does anybody need 75 or 100Mbps on their telephone anyhow unless they are sharing the connection with mulitple other data hungry devices?

        • Like I said, my options are 6Mbps or 100Mbps. I never connect to Wifi for that reason. And it’s really not about the sustained usage, it’s about the peak. If I can download an update for my phone in a minute as opposed to 20 minutes, I’ll take that.

        • JMccovery

          The original idea is ‘Race to Sleep’. A faster connection can allow a device to obtain needed data faster, allowing it to put the modem in standby quicker.

  • Dylan Gorski

    I use about 15GB of phone data and less than 1GB of tethered data in a heavy usage month. Glad Legere is going after those abusing the tethering limits. Chances are, if they’re using a workaround its not to use just 1GB more a month.

  • James Crusher

    Glad to hear. I have to live with my tethering limit, so should they. If it were me, I’d just terminate their contracts and let them go try and abuse someone else’s network.

  • On a light month I’ll use 10-30GB, on a heavy month I’ll use 30-50GB. No tethering. Just mostly YouTube and Tumblr, Google Photos backup, downloading apps, and streaming my media from my personal Subsonic server, which isn’t covered by Music Freedom.

    But my only concern with this move is if they account for false positives in any way. I know 50GB is a far cry from 2000GB, but if this is aimed at “tether spoofing” then it may be possible for their “technology” to pick up someone like me if I, say, decide to binge-watch Netflix in 4k. As long as that data was legitimately from my phone, it should be okay within the terms…

    • pdoobs

      why would you ever stream netflix in 4k on a smartphone? i can’t believe the netflix app even offers 4k streaming to a smartphone.

      • A bit hyperbolic, perhaps, but 4k screens will probably happen because of a VR push. Overkill, sure, but it shouldn’t matter because that would be within rights of mobile usage. I already stream YouTube in 1080p, it’s not unreasonable to assume 4k will happen on mobile soon since we already have 1440p.

        • There are no phones on the market with a 4k screen.

          There are also next to 0 content in 4k.

          The few 4k content that are available cannot be viewed for most people because it requires a 25 mbps stream and ISP throttle you at ~5mbps. So the best way to stream 4K is through a wireless connection where videos are not throttled(unless you’re on sprint)

          4K being viewed on a mobile device is a waste of data and battery life.

      • steveb944

        You could potentially cast it to the big screen.

    • These people are using their unlimited wireless connections and tether it to their home computer. Many are using it to torrent because it’s harder to track since you can jump to other towers and have a completely different IP address.

      So they’re not talking about the 50GB users that does a lot of videos because you can never get to 2,000 GB that way since those are supercompressed videos. They are going after the ones that root, jail break, custom ROM their phones to get unlimited tethering for their computers. They also save $70 a month because they don’t have to pay for home internet.

      Go on tech nerd sites. You’ll see these idiots defending it by saying “I paid for unlimited so I should get unlimited”. They always conveniently forget the illegal tethering part.

  • Jay Maranan

    I think Im a heavy user and use about 30-50GB a month. These include video and music streaming. I wish John will not police users just like me

    • You shouldn’t be unless you are using tethering hacks.

      • Christopher Olson

        That’s exactly what these thieves are doing. They’ve found a way to root their phones and use the device as an access point instead of tethering it for internet access at home. I fully support John in this plan because it’s people like this that ruin a good thing for everyone else. At least John isn’t just doing away with unlimited data altogether.

        • Yep. As long as legitimate use isn’t blocked because it happens to be high, I’m all for it. Using 30-50GB is fine if you do it entirely from your phone. Using 2000GB is unrealistic from one device.

    • yankeesusa

      If you are using this amount of data on your phone then that should be fine. This is specifically going after those that are tethering and going over 7gb and tricking the system into letting them continue using LTE after their 7gb is up.

    • Acdc1a

      My wife consumes about that much. I don’t think we have anything to worry about. 50GB is a long way from 2TB.

  • KenP

    I typically use 0.5 GB a month. I’m around wifi most of the time. I use about 75 GB on my cable internet. The hackers use of 2048+ GB is egregious. I saw John Legere’s periscope. He didn’t hold back and had several choice profanities for this theft.

  • yankeesusa

    This is good news. You really should not use your phone internet as your home internet. I can almost guarantee that most of this data is going towards torrent downloads or at least being used as their only internet service.

    • KBChick

      I have terrible home Internet. I live in the country. The best we can get is a max of 6mbps on our home Internet. There are no other options. I’ve looked into everything possible. Even the internet with satellites that’s on commercials say I’m not in their area for service. Sadly, I’m 30 miles away from charlotte. My home internet is still terrible. Therefore, I do use a lot of data on my phone. (I thought it was a lot until this post.) I use mine often as I would my home Internet. (Two people watching Netflix causes too much lag to watch anything.) Even then, I’ve used 28gb on my highest month. I’ve hit my limit on tethering once. Using it as you would home Internet isn’t bad. It’s a million times faster than my home Internet.

      • kbiel

        T-Mobile sells plans and hotspots for just your situation. Phone tethering is for the casual user, such as myself. I turn it on in the car on occasion for the kids to use with their wifi only tablets.

      • yankeesusa

        I don’t think the point here is that tethering is a worse or better option. The point here is that people are going above their tethering limit by cheating the system. If you want to use tmobile as your internet provider their are options that give you more data for just that. And they will let you do a separate unit so you don’t use your phone at the same time and have that freed.

      • PC_Tool

        “I live in the country.”

        Heh…by most user’s anecdotal BS accounts, you shouldn’t even have T-Mobile service. :-P

        They don’t offer service in anything but big cities, remember? (And definitely not indoors!)

        I call shenanigans. *grin*

        (This post is heavily laden with sarcasm and definitely not on topic)

      • Angel

        My home internet is around .7Mbps (700Kbps), I’d be happy to get 6M. So yeah try dealing with that. :P

  • J Cav the Great

    I use 8 – 10 GB per month. I watch a lot of YouTube, Netflix, and TMZ.

    • nmw407

      I get about 15gb on average mainly due to streaming Netflix. I like having netflix playing in the background while working.

    • I watch a few videos everyday and uses my phone for web surfing, facetime, etc… I only passed 3GB once. You would have to be on netflix 24/7 to get 2TB per month.

  • vinnyjr

    These data thieves are using T-Mobile As their home data connection and basically steal unreal amount of data. This kind of shit just ruins a great Network. I have unlimited everything, I have very very fast data speeds, I still choose to go WiFi when I can because it’s the right thing to do. I’m not anything special but I appreciate what T-Mobile has put together and I will not steal data, John Legere is absolutely correct, these Thieves must be stopped, the Network will only get better. I’m not against using data but holy shit it’s staggering the amounts of data that is stolen from T-Mobile. It must stop.

  • Chris Adams

    If they are legitimately using that mush data within the TOS then change the TOS if it’s impacting performance. If not boot them from the network. Seems pretty simple.

    • PC_Tool

      misread – my bad.

    • Acdc1a

      From the handset I don’t see how it would be possible to use 2TB in a month.

      • Ascertion

        Only if you’re torrenting on your phone, would it be possible. Is that against the T&C? Yes.

      • Angel

        Oh, I wouldn’t be surprise. I know people who download torrents on their devices because they have faster speed than their home network. If thouse same people where to get speeds of I don’t know 50Mbps thei’d reach the TB quickly And that’s not using the tether, that’s using their internal storage.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          And that’s why torrenting is already against the TOS.

        • Angel

          Hahaha the worst part is I’ve heard them complain when their speeds get stupid. I’m like “O.o really?”

  • D_Wall__

    I just updated my plan to the 10g for two lines for the same price i was paying for 3g. Why not. Good for Tmobile to get these abusive people gone. While i agree unlimited is unlimited. Abuse is another thing.

  • besweeet

    T-Mobile should first mess around with the abusers a bit. Limit their high-speed tethering usage to 56k speeds for an extended period of time, then see what they’ll say when they come crying in.

    • Ascertion

      T-Mobile’s T&C are already on their side. T-Mobile could deem it as “deprioritized” and let the abusers find a way to actually purchase a legitimate home service ISP.

  • Jak Crow

    If someone is abusing their tethering limit, that’s one thing, but this article seems to paint anyone with one of the truly unlimited plans as abusers if they use more than an arbitrary amount.

    • taron19119

      This article is very misleading and very wrong its people that steel data that’s going to be gone after

      • 21stNow

        I got that out of the article. Are you saying that the title is misleading?

        • taron19119

          Yes i am it make u think people on unlimited 4G LTE plans are going to be going after when it’s the people that steal data is the one that’s going to be going after

    • Ascertion

      The reason people have a tethering limit is because devices other than smartphones typically use a lot more data. If you’re using 4G LTE data on your smart phone, you won’t be called out on it. Even if you use a lot of data. The issue is when people are bypassing the tethering limit and torrenting large files over T-Mobile’s network.

  • Benben

    I am using 100-125 gig a month and 0 tethering

  • Richard Roma

    Well, then set a hard limit. This is ridiculous, very R | libertarian approved America, where an entity can sell something as one thing, but actually give the paying customer something else.

    • PC_Tool

      There is a hard limit.

      Unlimited users are limited to 7GB of tethering, per their data plan. They are using apps and services to use more tethering data than their plan allows.

      This is who Legere is going after.

      • taron19119

        Tmonews needs to use your comment as the article because this explains exactly what’s going on the actual article is very misleading and poor journalism

        • Frankenstu

          Seemed very clear to me:

          “The plan comes with 7GB of data for tethering, but T-Mobile has detected that these subscribers are utilizing workarounds to use waaaaaay more than that, in some cases up to 2 terabytes (2048 gigabytes) of data in 1 month.”

          Edit: Saw your comment further down. Misleading Title. Fair enough.

        • taron19119

          Yeah u get it and i get it but is alot of people that still think t Mobile is going after people on unlimited 4G LTE who uses a high amount of data not people who used workaround to use more than they allowed amount of tethering

        • Frankenstu

          I do seem to remember an article about him going after people who were consistently going over 25-30 GB per month and a big backlash about it. In the end I don’t really care since most of my unlimited data is coming from Wi-Fi so I rarely go over 5GB. My Teenage son however…

        • PC_Tool

          “going after” may be the wrong phrase here.

          They are de-prioritizing those users on the network. Under normal conditions, this has no affect at all. Most people would be totally unaffected by this.

          If they happen to start using a tower that is highly congested, however, their data will be moved into the “slow lane”, so to speak, until the tower is no longer congested or they move to a different, non-congested tower.

          If I remember correctly, this was targeted at only the top 3% of data-users.

        • taron19119

          See thats not even true when there is a congestion point t-mobile will on throttle people who used 20 or more gigabyte only when there’s a congestion on athe network

      • Mitchel J Fetting

        Bull. There’s no way to t mobile can tell that’s tethered data, none.

        • PC_Tool

          Sure. You bet. Whatever you say, bro.

    • Acdc1a

      Have you ever bothered to read your terms of service? Nobody sold anyone anything that wasn’t disclosed.

  • bciocco

    I only use 79 G on my home network – with two of us living in the house and using NetFlix and using wifi on our phones when we are home.
    My mobile data is only a 1G of high speed plan that I have only gone over once.

    • Acdc1a

      That’s what most people use. It’s when you start file sharing and the like that you can get to 2TB. It’s insanity!

  • CPPCrispy

    2TB of data is amazing. I don’t think I use that much on my home internet connection. With that said, I use between 1 GB and 2 GB of data on my phone.

  • For the life of me, I can NOT understand why people feel the need to get up here and tell us what they are using their mobile connection for. if you aren’t a 2TB abuser, who TF cares. Get on with your life and enjoy your service. 20-50GB’s a month is not abuse so please understand the difference between 50GB’s and 2TB’s…i don’t care that your home internet connection sucks. This is not why you purchase T-Mobile/Sprint/Verizon/AT&T cellular service. If you don’t like it then MOVE – to a location that is better served for your requirements. Abusers should be dealt with swiftly. If I were JL, I’d shut them off completely and tell them to go to Sprint!

    • Android_God

      3k is such a small number but this forum is chock full of paranoid so I would imagine the comment section will make for great entertainment today!

    • Ascertion

      I agree with everything except for sending the abusers to Sprint.. They should buy a local ISP landline connection, instead of congesting wireless traffic elsewhere.

      • Drewski

        Agreed.

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      “If you don’t like it then MOVE – to a location that is better served for your requirements.”

      So a person using a cell provider as their isp because their traditional isp options are subpar is crazy, and you’re suggesting that where a person decides to live should be based on what internet providers are available to them? Just think about that for a minute.

      • Ascertion

        If their job depends on it, yes. These abusers will be the end of unlimited data.

      • Dustin Roe

        Not crazy for using it as an ISP. Crazy for thinking because they read unlimited in the title then it meant unlimited for all uses which is clearly limited tethering in the contract they sign. if You want to pay for 100GB of cellular data go for it and then you can tether 100GB otherwise don’t complain when they nicely ask you to stop violating your agreement or they will void the agreement and provide you a more limited option (which since it is T-Mobile you can walk away from if you don’t like it-no contracts)

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          I don’t disagree with any of that, I was just stating my opinion that the OP’s suggestion that a person should decide where to live based on what internet options are available to them is a little ridiculous

  • Ascertion

    As much as I hate to say it, I’m going to assume T-Mobile starts locking their phones down (bootloader-wise) to prevent further abuse. I’m certainly hoping it doesn’t come to this as I like to modify my phones, but it’s always the small fraction of people that ruin it for everyone else.

    • steveb944

      They tout BYOD so unlocked will always be welcome.

      • Ascertion

        True but with BYOD, you don’t get WiFi calling or VoLTE and in many cases, no B12.

        • steveb944

          Well if it comes to that point you’ll have to pick your poison.

  • Marto Manov

    I use about 10-15GB per month on my cell line. I dont understand how you can use 2000GB. On my home wife network we have 4 heavy users with a lot of gaming, streaming and what not. We use between 300-600GB per month!

  • john

    tmo is lying. it’s an attempt to to go after people who only uses max of 20gb or more.
    Don’t for a moment assume what TMO says is true. This should be fought back or they will even say use of 10gb is an abuse.
    it’s like asking for strict gun law and chicago has the most strictest gun rule in America. It is a communist city yet it has the most gun violence in US.

    • Dylan Gorski

      What they’re doing only applies to Tethering. It has nothing to do with how much data you use on your phone. Not to say they won’t do something in the future but this is only regarding those who use more than the 7GB they’re allotted to tether in their agreement with T-Mobile.

      • Mitchel J Fetting

        Lies, they cannot tell what data is being used normally or through tethering.

        • CSR2

          we definitely can tell when you are tethering, its called a separate APN, if your phone can tell you how much hotspot you use, why wouldn’t your cell phone carrier know? get it together!

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          Lmfao…no…no you cannot.

        • conservative_motorcyclist

          the Tethering APN is pcweb.tmobile.com. If you turn on Tethering it uses this APN. If you change it to the regular APN of your phone (epc.tmobile.com, for example.) their system can still separate the phone data from the PC data using heuristics such as UserAgent of the browser loading websites, UserAgent of email client, non-standard ports that are sending-receiving data, etc.

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          Stop lying to try and scare people. Unless they are using the built in tethering app, there is no way for t mobile to know what the data is being used for, none. Your attempts to say otherwise are laughable.

        • taron19119

          You have no clue what you’re talking about

        • dtam

          stop feeding the troll

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          How much is t mobile paying you?

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          Seriously, no actual customer gets mad at the people telling them the corporation can’t do something against them, you must work for t mobile, also nice of t mobile to unblock me from posting, I see every time I try and post something explaining why that can’t do this, it gets blocked. Why so scared of wjat I’m saying t mobile? Huh? Why care of I’m so full of crap? Why are you SCARED if I’m wrong?

        • Dustin Roe

          If you download two PC games from Pirate bay at 4 GB each then you are obviously violating your tethering agreement because you are transferring larger than your tethering limit in non- compatible software through your phone. Regardless of what you do on the phone end it is easy to look at the data content of the high users and determine intent.

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          Lmfao..I have a degree in computer science you twit, you aren’t fooling me…

        • taron19119

          Yes they can John said they develop technology to detect how people and what people are using data for

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          He’s lying, you twit.

        • taron19119

          You’re just a troll that doesn’t know anything about what you’re saying

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          You are an idiot with barely a grasp of English, I have a damn bachelor’s in computer science you twit, and I know this is all LIES.

        • Mitchel J Fetting

          This is nothing but a gigantic scare tactic.

        • Warning

          No it’s not a scare tactic. Face the facts otherwise be terminated

        • Don Goyo

          If they can…, then why don’t they just throttle them after 7 GBs just as they would to a regular customer????

        • taron19119

          They do but they use work around like rooting there phones or making it look like they’re using regular Internet and not tethering

        • Don Goyo

          You just agree that they can’t…

        • taron19119

          Ok

        • Eric S.

          They can definitely tell if it is not jailbroken. You can look it up right on the phone.

        • Moby

          Wrong. T-Mobile announced they have new technology. So they can tell the difference contrary to your false statement.

    • Android_God

      Really? Lying? Proof?

    • Ascertion

      I’m a part of the modding community. Almost every ROM has the option to bypass the 7GB tethering capability. This has been going on for awhile now and it’s been inevitable that Legere would crack down on these abusers.

    • Acdc1a

      Considering their promotional plan is 10GB per line and goes to 20GB with an upcharge, your scenario is absurd.

    • so we should assume one of the most open CEO’s in the country is just flat out lying but no chance some guy in the comments couldn’t be wrong?

      • Mitchel J Fetting

        You think CEO’s never lie? Are you retarded?

    • steveb944

      Loosen up the tinfoil hat once in a while.

    • Moby

      You have no evidence that they are lying about anything.

  • maybe because I have wi-fi in a lot of places but I think maybe once over the last year did I go over 5GB!

  • kgraham182

    So Johnny is complaining a few people are using more than the 7GB allotted to tethering with a select few using up to 2TB. How would 3000 or so people, I assume spread out through the country hurt the “Data Strong” network? If the people with this excessive data use are not in an area with de-prioritization, they are not hurting the network but Johnny’s pockets. The Blue and Red networks would love these so called valued customers.

    • Actually, AT&T is orange, as of the merger with Cingular.

      • Mitchel J Fetting

        Verizon is the “red” you twit.

        • No duh. I was referring to AT&T, not Verizon.

      • {{{AIRBORNE}}}

        AT&T is blue… My gf works for them

    • Creeper

      Hater. Please leave T-Mobile. You sound creepish.

    • steveb944

      “The Blue and Red networks would love these so called valued customers.”

      Yeah they would because those networks CHARGE for overages, since they don’t offer unlimited data let alone tethering.

    • Moby

      They won’t be paying for 2TB on the Blue or Red network.

    • Stone Cold

      Tethering over 7GB breaks the TOC plain and simple

  • Thatguy

    You people should be ashamed of yourself. 2TB really? I mean seriously? That ABUSE!!! PERIOD.
    There is no reason or justification to be using that much DATA.

    If I was CEO your services will be canceled and
    I would prosecute you to the fullest of extend of the law!

    • The Law…

      Really, seriously, let’s just start with canceling their service….

      • Acdc1a

        No, don’t want to lose their business entirely…let’s see them get by with 1GB monthly before being throttled into oblivion.

        • The Law

          Great ideal, however, I think the consequences should be more serious…depending on the level of abuse, for example,Terabytes.

      • Thatguy

        NO! T-Mobile must make example out of these people. I guarantee you threatening one person with ligation it will stop all others !!!

  • Cellphone Chris

    The workarounds to the tethering cap are well known, and nobody should complain if they’re abusing the network by tricking the system. Just don’t mess with me for using a lot of data without tethering, as I’m NOT gaming the system, just using my phone. I think I’ve done 60GB if data on the high end, 5-6GB on the low end.

  • lomsha

    Terabytes? I don’t even use that much on my home internet. This is why we can’t have nice things.

    • JaswinderSinghJammu

      There have been months where I never switched to WiFi at all and even If I switched devices and re downloaded multiple apps. I have never gone over 50 GB’s. For the last few months I haven’t even gone over 10 GB’s. Anything over 100 GB’s is pretty reckless but over 200 GB’s is criminal. These people are messing it up for others but I hope John goes after the real individual abusers instead of punishing everyone in a blanket move.

      • Dillon Hewitt

        Remember, there are 1000 GB’s in a single terabyte.

        • pengko

          1TB = 1024 GB

        • JMccovery

          1TiB = 1024GiB (binary)
          1TB = 1000GB (decimal)

        • ugh…1 TB is not 1024 GB even if you’re talking about binary

          1 Byte = 8 Bits
          1 KB = 1024 bytes
          1 MB = 1024 X 1024 MB
          and so on…

          1 tebibyte = 240 bytes = 1099511627776bytes

        • VernonDozier

          I still don’t believe any customer can get anything close to 2TB of data transferred in a single month over a T-Mobile connection. The coverage and capacity simply isn’t there.

          Of everyone I know, the only people whom could possibly get that amount of data would have to be an employee working for the company, and probably streaming video and music from the back office or lunch room.

          After all, T-Mobile’s biggest consumers of data are its own employees. Just stop in a store and ask. When you do, they will often point to an employee working in the store that has pulled down 100s of GBs on their employee phone.

  • {{{AIRBORNE}}}

    I just recently left working for T-Mobile and he’s right. John is the best CEO any company has ever had! I moved on for advancement opportunities with a new company but I’m sticking with my unlimited plan with T-mo. We don’t need a few idiots messing it up because they are using chromecast devices to steal data.

  • conservative_motorcyclist

    According to Sprint’s “Data calculation tool” if you stream 5 hrs of Pandora a day, that will add up to approx. 13GB of data over a 30 day period. For video streaming (hulu, youtube) at 5 hrs a day, it consumes approx. 84GB over the same 30 day period.
    if you max out their data calculator tool for “Websites, emails, and social media” it comes to approx. 113 GB of data. now I’m not saying what is reasonable or not, but I’d think that phone usage over 200 GB should raise some red flags internally.

    • Dustin Roe

      And T-Mobile doesn’t count Pandora, etc against the total used. I don’t know how many batteries you would need to stream 24 hours a day of video (403 GB per the tool) but it doesn’t sound like the data usage meets the usage agreement.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    You go John. 2 Terabytes. Seriously these people have to mess it up everyone. SMH

  • Mike Palomba

    2TB is crazy! On my phone I average 10GB per month and on my home internet I average about 300GB. It’s good that T-Mobile is going after these people.

    • Drewski

      Agreed Bro. Ridiculousness if you ask me. Anyways, how was your weekend?

  • Kevin

    Why does this need to be announced? All it is going to do is cause misinformation to be spread that won’t help T-Mobile. I’m not sure why they didn’t just handle this by sending out messages to the users informing them that they know they are using more then 7gb of Hot Spot that they signed up for.

  • neospade44

    Of my 8 lines, 4 are unlimited and 2 of those are high users…about 20-800GB monthly. I’m with Legere on this one…how can it be some of these abusers use up more internet than my monthly household broadband usage of a little less than 1TB used by around 8 family members?!

    • Dustin Roe

      If you can show that you aren’t tethering then they will most likely let you continue. Problem is that the only way to use that much data on a battery powered device is to have it plugged in while downloading for a significant portion of the usage. I doubt that inconvenience would be something you would put up with while streaming 800GB into a 32GB of storage device. Your agreed to only use 4GB of data while tethering on the unlimited plan when you signed up. Anything beyond that or to actively mask the delineation between the two types of data could be considered fraud.

      • Patrick Horne

        4k porn? Lol

        • Adam

          Which phones support 4K HDMI? It sounds like I need an upgrade.

  • TK – Indy

    Isn’t is great what setting up your own private VPN on a home Linux box or on a cheap Amazon cloud server can do? Simple to do and not even the government can tell what you are up to.

    • Chris

      Unless government gets a warrant and asks Amazon to comply and give them all that they’ve got from you (i.e. server logs, network logs, etc).

    • Adam

      Amazon charges 9 centers per GB transferred. The 2TB guy must be rich.

      • TK – Indy

        Good point, maybe Amazon not the best solution in this case.

  • Jay J. Blanco

    I usually use 40GB. Including Hot Spot. Plus I work and finishing college. Who has that much time on their hands

    • Chris

      There are people that took advantage of the hotspot + workaround.

      i.e. cancelling their home ISP and using t-mobile hotspot as house wi-fi.

      They can leave a phone at home – plugged in to the wall with hotspot turned on. The whole family would just use that access point and boom.

      2 TB a month – chromecast, netflix, google play, movie downloads, etc.

      • Jason Mauai

        Probably more in the movie downloads range. Unless they run Netflix for background noise.

  • kgraham182

    I agree w/ Mitchel J Fetting there no way JL would know what you are using your data for unless you was using the built-in tethering. Phone data and data from tethering have different apn. T-Mobile can tell if you are tethering if you are using the dial-up network apn, but if you use an app that uses the default apn it would look like regular phone data. If you really want to stick it to them use a vpn service to hide all usage.

    #EstablishCoverage

    • Drewski

      Yes there are ways. Why are you willing to allow these users to abuse the network for? They love cheating the system way too too much Bro, which all and all is so uncalled for. Either follow the rules, otherwise you will officially be kicked off from evee being affiliated with T-Mobile anymore. It’s that simple. :)

      • Drewski

        ever*

      • kgraham182

        How is less than 3000 customers going over their allotted usage hurting the Data Strong network with 60M users. Unless they all live in the same location, this is not putting a strain on any network. 2TB is about 3GB an hour.

        • Drewski

          They are referring to hotspot users you idiot. And for those that are also on the Unlimited Data plan(have better learn to not abuse the network). If you or them cannot comply with rules/regulations, well then you and them will be prosecuted right off of T-Mobiles services Bro.

        • kgraham182

          I know the article is about people using excessive data by tethering. If T-Mobile know these people abusing the network, why doesn’t Johnny throttle them? He can’t cause they’re masking there data to look like ordinary phone usage. There’s no to tell how the data is being used unless you are using the built-in tethering feature. How are these less than 3000 people using excessive data effect you? It doesn’t only T-Mobile wallets. If the Data Strong network can’t handle 3k users abusing it, how will it handle 3M new subscribers.

        • Drewski

          Lies bro lies and more lies. Go to Sprint if you are unable to follow the rules/regulations. T-Mobile did not allow anyone to break no sort of rules. It is your responsibility to follow rules, otherwise you will be punished.

      • Adam

        It is T-Mobile that is allowing these user to break their terms of service, not kgraham182. There is a basic problem with creating a contract where the terms cannot be enforced. This is something that good contract writers keep in mind. Combine this lack of enforceability with people who’s morals think that it is their data, they should use it however they want and you have a recipe for abuse. T-Mobile should simply stop with the unlimited plans because they are just marketing BS.

        • kgraham182

          Thanks, I have no problem with T-Mobile canceling these people service. Including tethering allow trustworthy people to use there smartphone for internet access in emergency. Me personally would never using 7GB, I have Comcast with well over 100mb download and 20mb upload. I just don’t see how such few people using excessive data would hurt a network unless they are in the same location.

        • Drewski

          No they are not allowing any of it to happen. Its called simple restrictive rules/regulations. If people would read on what was said in their rules/terms of conditions none of this would have happen. So goodbye with your idiotic statement. lol Have a nice day there buddy. T-Mobile does not allow people to break rules, it is you people that are refusing to follow the rules.

        • Adam

          To clarify, by allow, I mean “to permit by neglect”, as stated on dictionary reference do com. I am pretty sure the hotspot cap violators are willfully violating the rules, rather than ignorant of the rules.

        • Stone Cold

          You get unlimited via phone only. 7GB if you tether it is in TOC

    • Don Goyo

      Exactly, if they knew they would just throttle them after 7 GB.

    • Chris

      You’re so naive if you think that they can’t know if you are using the tethering option. How do you think the data packets get from the device connected to the hotspot to the vast notes of the internet.

      • Adam

        Through an encrypted channel.

    • Jason Mauai

      Even if you hide the fact you’re tethering, it’s near impossible to use 2TB of data straight streaming w/ out it. Therefore it’s obvious you used tethering to get there. T-Mobile isn’t stupid.

    • Moby

      They have developed new technology. They can tell now. But go ahead and try to beat the system if you think you’re so smart. You’ll be bounced down to the $50 plan before you know it.

  • Dillon Hewitt

    I normally use 20-30 GB during a months bill cycle. Although this current bill cycle I’ve only used about 10 GB. Sometimes I wonder why I still pay for unlimited data. Lol.

  • VicRooLoo

    I thought I was an extreme user when I was throwing 40 gigs a month.

    I recently switched down from unlimited to save $20 bucks. Reason why is because I used my Android phone to download a lot of things. I sadly lost that option when I switched to iOS and am now barely breaking 4 gigs esp with the unlimited data using Spotify/Google Play

  • Finx

    Sometimes, customers ARE the pain point

    • Romdude

      Certain 3k customers are the pain point.

  • I use anywhere from 30 to 100 gigs depending on how mobile I am at any given time. I watch/listen to a lot of podcasts, and by a lot I mean 20 or 30 shows a week, probably half of them video, some in HD about 2 gigs a show. If I’m at home a lot, then most of my podcasts will download at home and I’ll only hit 30 or so. If I’m out and about a lot in a month, then I’ll be downloading on LTEs. There’s also the fact that I can’t use certain services on work’s wifi to save our bandwidth, so the more time I spend at work, the higher the cell data. Actually some of that data at work is used on Pandora, so I dunno how much I really use since it doesn’t track music streaming.

    I used to be without home internet service at home, but I still only used the allotted tethering data in emergencies (like to get access to my email on my laptop when it wasn’t working right on my phone or something)

    I accepted that my $20 unlimited (old, grandfathered) add on only came with 3 gigs of tethering included and I never really hit that limit except once anyway. Despite that, T-mobile gave me 2 extra gigs for free some time ago. They keep giving me more stuff without me having to pay more. Blows my mind.

    I really like how the unlimited data enables me to be mobile and not really worry about my data usage. Tethering for a bit is icing on the cake. hey, whaddya know, a cake I can have AND eat.

    I’ve been on the receiving end of being discriminated against due to my data usage, thanks to AT&T. Fought with them for months over whether I was tethering or not (hint: not). As long as T-mobile keeps their word and somehow has a way to only target the people they say they’re targeting, I’m cool with it. If they start treating big data users like the bad guy, then I’m out. Luckily I don’t have a contract, or a phone to pay off, so it’s all good.

    • AS118

      Well you’re not using even a Terabyte of data, so I doubt they would go after you.

  • Melissa Cardenas

    i agree i have the unlimited plan and use about 10-15 a month and thats with facebook,youtube everyday ,driving directions . i know some people that have unlimited also but use 50 or more a month and even brag about it, its like really .? you must have no life and then you wonder why the other companies got rid of unlimited cuz of people like that ,that they just ruined it for everyone one else.

    • thepanttherlady

      Love the assumption that someone who uses more data than you do automatically has no life.

      • protect yo net

        Panttherlady, Melissa is right. I just have one last suggestion for you. Get your house and family matters in order. You’re going to jail now!

        I have recommended to you in the past even pleaded with you to get home internet and use that instead of continually abusing the network, but no. No. You ignored my friendly suggestions and instead abused your mobile data plan to the max. Well, now the chickens come home to roost.

        #nomoredatahogs #roost #prosecute #gethomeinternet #B42L8

        • thepanttherlady

          OMG! OMG! OMG! Jail?!!? No, say it ain’t so! I’m sure my 11.50GB used this month is keeping Legere awake at night trying to figure out how to get me there.

          Seriously, if you don’t currently take meds please look into it.

          #stalkerisseriouslyobsessed #bettercheckyourselfbeforeyouwreckyourself

      • macman37

        Melissa is right, and what you quoted her assumption on was directed to more of T-Mobile and not their subscribers.

        What this basically boils down to is the accountability of how T-Mobile execs want to go about catching up with the Verizon and AT&T in terms of number of subscribers and expanding their network. By constantly touting that you will be promising unlimited data to your subscriber, existing and potential, you had be prepared and take into account that there will be those who misunderstand it and abuse it. The fault lies with John Legere in deciding to give this option. He and other T-Mobile execs did not care as to why AT&T and Verizon got rid of their unlimited data plans; and the next thing that we know is that Verizon and AT&T are being demonized by T-Mobile and Sprint for doing so. The simple fact is that when you, the carrier, gain more subscribers, the more you will you have to tiered data plans from unlimited. Continuing to give Unlimited Data when your network is gaining more subscribers is too hard to manage; and to call these individuals who use the most data “abusers” are unfair.

        Learn what to present and how to present the things that you will offer your subscribers and be more accountable to those who misunderstand instead of calling them abusers. Heck, even either David Beren or Cam Burton told us that some of the new options that you’re giving will not last long; it’s just there for the mean time to gather more subscribers.

        • thepanttherlady

          “i know some people that have unlimited also but use 50 or more a month
          and even brag about it, its like really .? you must have no life

          I can easily hit 40GB+ when I commute (1 1/2 to 2 hours each way, daily). I have a life, thank you very much. So no, this comment is based on her opinion. not fact.

          With that being said, the amount of data being used isn’t what this article is about. T-Mobile is going after those that abuse their tethering limits by bypassing them. I’ve used 3.17GB out of 5GB with 7 days left in my cycle. Definitely no abuse there.

        • macman37

          The more subscribers the carrier gains, the more they will have to move from Unlimited Data Plans to Tiered Data Plans. Now to punish those who use the most and call them abusers is very unfair. There will always be a portion of subscriber who don’t read certain terms and make mistakes like this which causes troubles like congestion for other subscribers. So account for this; and be more accountable with what and how you present things.

        • thepanttherlady

          This article is regarding tethering abusers, not users who use a lot of data.

          Tethering is not unlimited.

        • macman37

          Tethering is part of any data plan; and there will be those from time to time that go over their limit. They will generalize “Oh, it’s part of my data plan, and I have unlimited. So, don’t worry guys/gals.”

        • thepanttherlady

          Which is exactly why T-Mobile is cracking down on this.

          Why do I feel like we’re going in circles here? I have bigger issues right now like why in the hell I can’t differentiate between a dark chocolate covered blueberry and a dark chocolate covered cranberry as per the “visual guide” on my package. #fml

        • macman37

          When we have a application/program like MyVerzon, MyAT&T, MyT-Mobile, or MySprint installed on our phones or tablets to help us see if we are going over any of our limits, is there a section/indicator for Tethering? No. So, those who switch to T-Mobile for Unlimited Data are prone to making this type of mistake; and the result of the “Cracking Down” on these subscribers will be Carriers, learn how to present and be more accountable, and know that situations like this are going to happen. And Panther Lady, enjoy your longer workout today when you work off your frustration for those extra calories you gain from 1of those 2 deserts.

        • JMccovery

          Thing is, unless you modify the phone, tethering is throttled to 128kbps after you use the 7GB allocated on Unlimited plans.

          The issue that T-Mobile is having is that people are modifying their phones to bypass the throttling, and are consuming large amounts of data.

          So no, people that switch over to a T-Mobile Unlimited plan will not be hit by this, unless they modify their phones to bypass it.

        • macman37

          Interesting, the My Verizon does not have that. Good to know who more clear.

        • C W

          Thats because you use your data bucket on other carriers for tethering as well. Its shared with your phone’s data and will cost you overages. It’d be around $30k to do 2tb on any other carrier.

          If you go over the tethering cap then tethering is slowed down. Your phone will be unchanged. Tmo is very generous with their plans.

        • thepanttherlady

          “And Panther Lady, enjoy your longer workout today when you work off your frustration for those extra calories you gain from 1of those 2 deserts.”

          http://i.imgur.com/Cjn9Std.png

          You’re right. I’m thinking at least two hours for these and probably skipping dinner too, right? *rolling my eyes*

          Disclaimer: The fact that these 3 pieces look like Mickey Mouse’s head was purely coincidental. LOL

        • macman37

          With your position as Moderator, and your sarcastic instead of more professional remarks, it really shows how far you’re really going as well as how long it took you to get there. Thank God that I’m with Verizon.

        • JB

          As a matter of fact, the MyTmobile app does, in fact, have a section showing you how much of your High Speed Tethering Data you’re using SEPERATE from your regular data usage, so you’re either full of it, or you don’t have T-Mobile as a carrier, or perhaps over just never used the app. I’d show you a screenshot, but links can’t be easily posted on TMoNews without having to be be approved.

        • macman37

          Well, that is very interesting! The My Verizon application does not have that indicator. Great to know which carrier is being more clear and which isn’t.

    • schweddyballs

      downloading a few large files (1-5gb files) in a day can be done while you’re out having a “life” as well

  • Adam

    All of which can be faked.

    • conservative_motorcyclist

      yes. My point was that it is not 100% “impossible” for T-Mobile to tell if you are tethering illegally or not like Mitchel J Fetting implies.
      Yes, there are ways to mask it. My point is that just changing the APN or “not using the T-Mobile Tethering app” is not enough, and that they can tell the difference.

  • LittleOtterPaws

    I don’t at all side with the people that are consuming 2TB of data a month, that is obviously not the intended use case of a mobile data package.

    BUT, if you think that these users are somehow constricting T-Mobiles bandwidth at all, you are sadly mistaken.

    • Jason Mauai

      They’d have to be running 6Mbps 24/7 for the month in order to reach 2TB. So in a way you’re right, depending when they do what.

  • NorCalOffspring

    I work 50+ hours per week from home, online game, and watch tons of stuff on iTunes via AppleTV and never consume more than 400GB on wifi/ethernet per month. If you’re using 2TB over 4G/LTE you need a life.

    • Zach B.

      Buy 4K compatible equipment and download ever more frequent 4K content. It quickly adds up. 160Gb average per file. ;)

      • Frettfreak

        and as long as thats within your contract, and on your phone, not tethered, there shouldnt be a problem.

        • Prod1702

          Yup, But most of these people have most likely rooted or jailbroken there phones to bypass the T-Mo tether setup. I have a friend that does this with this Android phone and uses about 300gb of data a month since he uses T-Mo for his home data.

        • Defcon_Foxtrot

          And this is why we can’t have nice things.

  • kanakamaoli

    Alex, you should add in your header(people abusing the 7GB tethering cap). John is not targeting the data plan usage itself, it is the tethering abuse he is talking about.

  • eanfoso

    That’s crazy with home Internet we never even reach our home limit of 250 gigs, with t mobile I barely hit 22 gigabytes and mother hits the 16 gigs

    • Prod1702

      I use about 400 to 600gb of data on my home PC, I do not have Cable TV and my wife and I use Netflix and Hulu Plus for everything. We also use our home 4k TV as my PC monitor so this makes 400+gb of data easy to hit

      • eanfoso

        Nice, I do use netflx and crunchyroll but I’m almost never home lol

  • Zach B.

    Didn’t the courts side against Verizon and ATT when they went after unlimited users? Pretty sure they said unlimited means unlimited and they can’t throttle or violate net neutrality. This is like Donald Trump and the other clowns blaming minorities and immigrants for the problems they had no part of creating. 2TB of data is nothing, but if T-Mobile thinks it is, they have bigger problems to fix then going after paying customers.

    • JMccovery

      They’re going after the people who use egregious amounts of data via tethering (whether using an app or modified APN), when they specify a specific amount of high-speed data that is allocated for tethering.

      It’s really odd, most sites/boards where people are discussing this, there are far too many people that somehow think tethering is ‘unlimited’.

      • Frettfreak

        this. i was on another site reading comments and there are WAY too many idiots up in arms about “unlimited means unlimited” when its VERY clearly stated that unlimited is from YOUR PHONE ONLY and you get 7gb of tether data…. i just dont understand what people dont understand about this… smh

        • Zach B.

          Before calling others “idiots”, one should first be informed on what the law states and the verdicts of previous court settlements. ATT was fined 100 million dollars when they illegally went after unlimited users and forced caps, even artificial ones like T-Mobile is proposing on users who paid for unlimited data. Same went with Verizon. Unlimited does mean unlimited, not unlimited unless you do ______.

        • itguy08

          I suggest you read the terms of the plan and then look in the mirror cause you are starting to look like that “idiot”….

          AT&T offered unlimited handset data and changed then throttled handset data. That is NOT what T-Mobile is doing. They are simply enforcing the terms of their contract.

        • samagon

          they are clearly two separate services that are offered:

          1: unlimited service to your cell phone
          2: 7gb hotspot data through your cell phone

          on the advertisements (check the website), they break it out separately, on the bill, they break it out separately.

          It’s
          Two
          Different
          Services

        • schweddyballs

          its clearly stated in the Terms and Conditions every user signed to get service. I’m sure the courts will favor tmobile in this situation.

        • Anon Adderlan

          Don’t bet on it.

          ToCs and EULAs are full of legally unenforceable conditions. For example, that bit where it says you void the device warranty if you root the phone? Totally invalid in the States. Yet there it is. And restrictions on benchmarking software? Not in NY you don’t.

          What is in a contract, and what is legally enforceable, are often two drastically different things.

    • itguy08

      IT’S NOT UNLIMITED USERS. The plan clearly states unlimited data from your handset and 7GB of tethering. Using apps to get around that is the issue, not the use on your phone. If you want to leave the phone playing Netflix on 4K all day that’s fine.

      • Ordeith

        Well, there’s one good reason the Miracast standard is better than Google’s proprietary chromecast nonsense.

    • Correct. In fact, every carrier except for US Cellular was hit with massive penalties for throttling unlimited users.

    • Moby

      T-Mobile isn’t going after unlimited users. They are going after those who hide their tethering usage (which is a violation of TOC). It has nothing to do with net neutrality as it has nothing to do with content.

      So if you’re violating the TOC, then you deserve to get busted.

    • theseanteam

      A big reason why people are attracted to T-Mobile is because of their awesome prices. If people abuse these policies it will end up hurting everyone.

  • eanfoso

    T mobile needs to make it understandable that unlimited means 100 gigs, there’s absolutely no reason for anyone to go over that limit.

    • theseanteam

      But people are obviously doing so… at least 3k or so are. What’s your thoughts on how to keep things in check while keeping prices low?

      • eanfoso

        Just have it in the terms of the contract, that 100 gigs is the cutoff limit and no buffers just simply cut off

  • Tony

    Since when has the simple choice unlimited plans come with 7 GB of tethering data? I always thought it was capped at 5 GB. I’m on the 4G LTE unlimited family plan promo (the 2 lines for $100 one) and when I signed up I’m certain it was a 5 GB limit. Did they increase it for everyone?

    • eanfoso

      Yes they did

      • Tony

        @eanfoso:disqus @Frettfreak:disqus thanks guys. Any links to the announcement? I can’t seem to find it. Maybe I’ll just have to chat/call CS to ask them what my limit is now for my lines.

    • Frettfreak

      they did. A couple months ago i believe. but not sure if it applies to all plans or not.

  • TK – Indy

    Mmm K, so you will throttle/change my unlimited prepaid plan? Next month, new SIM, different phone, back at it. T-mobile is the only carrier dumb enough to offer unlimited high-speed data to prepaid customers. For how much longer?

    • Prod1702

      I am sure at that point they will put some very high cap on the plan. Which only these ppl are able to hit.

  • Tmo

    2,000 GB is crazy. My iPhone 5 tethering didn’t stop the use after the limit and I was able to watch Netflix every night and leave it running. This worked for about 3 months and I never want over 70 GB on my plan each month. T-Mobile eventually sent a carrier settings update but it was nice while it lasted.

  • Nathan Casey

    Fuck you john legere. My data is my data. If I want to use it on the phone how is it different by sharing to my laptop? Same usage.

    • JMccovery

      Because you agreed that you had a set amount for tethering.

    • Thatguy

      and Yes my comment above was @
      Nathan Casey

      • Nathan Casey

        Carriers used to not nitpick like bitches. What’s the difference between watching YouTube on my laptop or my phone? A bigger screen is all. Still the same data that would have been used. Annoys me I can only use 7 gigs on MY data on other devices.

        • JMccovery

          If you want to get technical about it, you pay for access, not the data itself.

        • Ordeith

          It’s a possible net neutrality violation. But T-Mobile is no stranger to those (music freedom). It’s a shame the FCC made so many carrier exceptions.

        • theseanteam

          They say it right on their website:

          “In our efforts to make web access affordable for everyone we set our pricing based on the typical usage scenarios. In general, those whom share their phone’s Internet connection with other devices tend to use more data and at a higher rate. Please note that standard T-Mobile Terms and Conditions prohibit sharing your phone’s Internet data connection with laptops and other devices, but with the Simple Choice plans you are able to do this.”

          http://offers.t-mobile.com/tethering/admin/faq.jsp

    • T-mobile has to Protect…

      Yes, maybe, unless you elect to work around the system that violates T-mobile policy… I suggest starting your wireless company, then, you can offer unlimited, unlimited 24 hours/ 365 days a year of tethering services. Just saying, companies have to protect their bottom line to stay in business And so do we…

    • Ray Scott

      7GB is plenty generous for tethering….If you want more, buy a mifi and pay for it. But abusing the system hurts everyone.

    • RLB63

      No, it isn’t your data. You pay for unlimited phone data. PC’s just suck up data bandwidth. Screens are bigger and more data is displayed. For those that think YouTube data is YouTube data you are wrong. A dvd looks good on a laptop. A blue ray looks good on a 42″ screen. When you get to 70′ blue ray isn’t as crystal clear. Why do you think they came up with 4k tv’s?

    • Moby

      No, he’s saying you made an agreement to abide by the Terms and Conditions. And if you can’t do it, then he’s going to end your unlimited plan! So you deal with that.

    • David

      You signed an agreement to terms of service of tethering 7GB of data legally. If you tether more than that illegally, your service need to be terminated, period. Like it or not, or feel free to take your business to Sprint, Verizon and AT&T cause T-Mobile sure doesn’t need a customer like you to ruin it for the rest of us.

    • Not your data… OUR data. Youre just a line cutter.

    • Stone Cold

      It are part of the problem. Via phone you get unlimited 4G data. If you tether you get 7GB anything over that breaks the TOS you agreed to.

    • theseanteam

      If you are truly unhappy, you should voice your opinion with your wallet and change carriers…

  • Thatguy

    This little attitude of yours “My data I can Do What I please”
    is going change real quick when you are seating in front of judge be sue for FRAUD

    T-Mobile needs to make example out of YOU!

    • Ordeith

      Fraud is T-Mobile advertising Unlimited and trying to limit it.
      Just give it a data cap of 100GB or so, stop false advertising as unlimited, and call it a day.

      • JMccovery

        How is it fraud when they say it’s unlimited for smartphone use only, but tethering is limited to 7GB?

  • mingkee

    Even it’s unlimited, T-Mobile has to do some protective measure to prevent abusing from other three.
    This is possible the other three sending massive packets to jam up T-Mobile data traffic.

  • Scoop003

    Bunch of people whining about something that only affects 3,000 or so of T-Mobile’s millions of customers. They’re not coming after you for using 100gb of data. They’re going after the people who’ve clearly violated the terms of service because there’s no possible way you could use 2 tb of data on your phone only in one month. You people could whine about anything. You’re the type that could be given a free car and complain because you didn’t like the color. Smdh

    • Fuuuuuuuuu

      I’m affected. I used 28GB this month, and I saw a 50X speed reduction for about 6 hours the other day, and cust. service told me it was because I was over 21GB so I was “deprioritized” when network congestion issues came up.

      It affects a lot more legitimate customers than you think, so quit with the self-righteous attitude, bub.

      • kiiKane

        Unless you are using that 28GB via unauthorized tethering this doesn’t affect you negatively. The deprioratizing is a different issue. If clamping down on unauthorized tethering frees up capacity this could benefit you as towers would be less congested so you wouldn’t get slowed down as often.

        • Willie D

          And perhaps our 21GB prioritization limit would be removed, or raised to 50GB. This is a benefit by cracking down. Hell, I remember when companies (T-Mobile was one of them) were purposely capping Unlimited Data at 5GB. So let’s not all complain that 2TB users are being booted.

      • Scoop003

        Looks like kiiKane beat me to it. But exactly what he said. You’re beef is with a completely different issue. And when it comes to de prioritization, every company in the world chooses to side with the majority, instead of the minority when it comes to decisions such as that. The amount of people using 20+ gb a month, is way less than the amount of soccer moms surfing Facebook that use roughly 5 gb a month. If there’s congestion, they’d rather piss off one customer and throttle them as opposed to the majority of customers. It’s just common sense.

        • Gavriel Ostrow

          i disagree because when you pay an extra $30 for unlimited data plan and the total is $80 for a single line… that’s more than my home internet bill! so why get chased after for using my phone? and why should i get slowed down? i was promised UNLIMITED, that was the deal and they aren’t keeping their word. yes, i agree people should be so inconsiderate to others but if i use my phone like a regular person and not as a home internet line and pass the 100 GB barrier, why should i get penalized? youtube, music and many other things can push you over that threshhold. and i have every right to use my phone and not get cable inernet if i choose to do so.

        • Stone Cold

          They are read your TOS. This is about people using tethering to blow past the 7GB limit on Hotspot.

      • theseanteam

        Maybe if this goes through, the people who are breaking the rules are booted off leaving enough bandwidth for legitimate users like yourself…

  • walt

    I wonder what the true cap is on Metro PCS’s $60 “unlimited plan”

    • Ordeith

      I think that’s measured in megabytes. :)

  • Gseltj

    I use between 2.5 and 4 GB a month. My other 3 lines use 1GB, 3GB, and 10GB. I have the 4 lines for $120 each with 10GB a month. To use 2000GB a month is plain abuse and the reason why we all have to pay high prices for things.

  • NardVa

    The real discussion should be why is T-Mobile’s unlimited data plan really a 21GB plan. Legere keeps tweeting that you can watch NetFlix all day on your cell phone and be legit. I watched Netflix all day and got throttled at 21GB. NetFlix was unusable.

    • Prod1702

      The 21gb is only while the network is under heavy load. I live in Minneapolis, MN and have this problem happen to me once. Once the network gets off the heavy load your speeds are back up again. I understand what you are saying and I am not saying this is ok to do but it is what it is.

      • NardVa

        I know. I got hit last month. The tower by my place stay loaded all day for several days. I couldn’t stream videos for the last week in my billing cycle unless it was in the middle of the night

      • Your old manager

        Your old manager says stop posting to blogs while at work Patrick…

        • Prod1702

          lol you should be working

      • NardVa

        Legere keeps saying you can watch YouTube and NetFlix all day and you are legit, but the truth is T-Mobile will slow you to a crawl at 21GB. At that point webpages take forever to load.

    • cloud strife

      I thought it’s just deprioritized? Throttling is like giving you water using a fire truck hose then giving you water using a straw. While deprioritizing means you are still given water using the hose but if there are also people asking for water, you need to get back of the line because you got yours already and need to wait till the line goes down. At least that’s how I understand things regarding the “unlimited” data.

      • NardVa

        Technically it’s De-prioritization, but it feels like throttling because some towers stay busy all day. Going with your example, it’s like waiting for water in a never ending water line.

      • Willie D

        Thats exactly what it is.

    • Willie D

      You’re not throttled! Say there are 10 people in a line at a buffet, and you are the FIRST customer and are paying MORE than all other customers because you have unlimited soda refills, but you’re taking all the time standing and not finishing your soda and keep refilling…sure you got unlimited refills, but at a point they gotta say, “hey, let others go too, this is not just for you” so they tell you to move to the back of the line. You’re not throttled, you just need to wait your turn to access the buffet and soda, or in this case, the data.
      Throttle would be if you stood at that machine and took all the soda, and they made the soda come out slower, in a trickle, in hopes you pay for more or leave.
      Prioritization and throttle is not the same thing, you have access to the data, but since you arent first in line anymore, IF and WHEN the cell site is used by others en masse, you may be impacted in getting your data after others have had their turn. After all, you had plenty of times being first. This is not a net neutrality issue, this is a fair clause issue.

  • Fuuuuuuuuu

    It’s probably bastards that hack the tethering that cause me, an unlimited data user, to start noticing throttling at around 21GB of normal usage. I use between 15-30GB a month, typically. Mostly Netflix, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Play Store, Google Play Music, YouTube, web browsing.

    A lack of priority for me pushed my data speeds from 50 meg on average down to 1. I saw a 50 times speed decrease. I couldn’t even refresh my facebook feed in less than 30 seconds. Checking my snapchat stories…forget about it.

    It was just startling because I legitimately thought there was a network issue because of how slow I was operating on the network.

    I hope that whatever is causing the congestion is dealt with, because I didn’t like my throttling experience, considering I’m a legitimate, rules-abiding data and tethering user who is paying for unlimited.

    • Walt

      I believe if you turn off your LTE and only use HSPA you will not have the issue of slow internet and being deprioritized. Give it a try next time your LTE speeds are slow on a congested tower :)

      • Willie D

        Its detected per line/per account, the network type being GPRS, EDGE, UMTS, HSPA, HSPA+ or LTE is irrelevant. They know based on the information of how much data has been transferred, but in addition to not just how much, how quickly the data has added up in a specific time frame, and how a device, even running HotSpot using the legal limits, AND phone were both downloading high intensive data sessions cant equate to what a computer or server can – that is how they tell. Taking the maximum amount of data throughput that can be offered in a device and see that 2TB is unusual when a device at MOST could pull in 100GB per month (as an example Im saying 100GB) – So they know its tethered, then they see that people are running multiple devices on the hotspot with work arounds. Also computers and Roku, Chromecast, etc, they all put out an identifier that states “Mobile”, “Computer Browser”, “Multimedia Stick” etc. that T-Mobile sees..if you hide it, they can compare the data usage against what your phone limit by hardware is physically capable of and determine that way. It’s really not hard if you understand it, but the average person cant comprehend it.

        • Walt

          Good explanation but i wasnt talking about tethering. I was talking about if you are using your cell phone for normal use and LTE is “congested” to try switching/forcing your phone to HSPA because there’s no way that’s congested too!

    • mikejones1876

      I use between 40 to 60gb never slow down

    • Anon Adderlan

      Bastard tethering has nothing to do with it, and most users who get deprioritized are legitimate users like yourself. Personally I’d rather have reduced but steady bandwidth all month than ridiculous bandwidth I couldn’t fully utilize unless I was tethering and then pitiful bandwidth I couldn’t use at all after deprioritization. I suspect it’s not the existence of, but the degree of dropoff that’s annoying users

      The way it works (as explained to me by T-Mobile) is you get deprioritized based on how many users are using a particular tower, and how much data you’re using in relation to them. And being deprioritized means you have to wait for ‘normal’ priority requests on that tower to be serviced before yours are. Don’t worry though, you’ll still be getting your delayed packets at 4G LTE speeds.

      So if you’re on a tower where everyone else is using kilobytes, you’ll be deprioritized, but shouldn’t notice a delay because of it. And if you’re on a tower where everyone else is using terabytes, then you won’t be depriorotized to begin with, so won’t notice a delay because of it. But if you’re on a tower where everyone is using the same amount of data relatively speaking, then nobody can be effectively deprioritized, so any delay you notice will be due to how congested that tower is.

      That last problem will only get bigger as the data people consume becomes larger, the ads more obnoxious, and the websites more bloated, regardless of tethering. The only reason tethering is being made an issue is because it’s the only contractually legitimate way T-Mobile can go after heavy users, and they can charge additional fees for it. Because practically speaking tethering restrictions take extra work to implement and makes a device more complicated, error prone, and insecure that it would be otherwise. Also there’s a high chance such restrictions aren’t even legally enforceable in the U.S., but that may require a precedent (and a little push from the FCC) to establish.

  • cloud strife

    How do or will detect it? Is it the through their stuff in their stock roms? Through registered imei? Will using an unlocked phone or custom rom matter? Not that I’m planning to but just curious. Can’t believe someone tethered that much data. The phone would be so hot you could cook something on top. XP

    • Schweddyballs

      The my tmobile app can detect if youre rooted, tmobile doesnt care if you just simply root. However The only way to tether more data than allowed is to root and use a custom rom OR a 3rd party app. Tmobile will flag you if you use a ton of data via tethering. They dont care if youre rooted, or using an unlocked device.

      • Steven S. Smith

        Not true, no root required. Download Android sdk, enable USB debugging, run adb shell, then setting global tether_dun_0, or something very similar. Basically Android has 2 virtual internet ports. One is the phones data and the other is tether. Changing that setting makes tethering indistinguishable phone data.

        • FILA

          I thought you needed root for this? No. And do we know for sure this is a definite thing to get around this? I heard it was and T-Mobile can’t detect it, but can they now?

        • Steven S. Smith

          This method has been around the whole time, but only posted online in how to rather recently.
          I would imagine to inspect the information in the data for tethering would be costly and need upgrades to there networks. Other wise they would have done so already. Based on all the info I have read it is based solely on data usage.

        • Are you certain? I recall that they look at the traffic for a browser agent? Tried this myself with great success.

          http://androidforums.com/threads/solution-to-wi-fi-tethering-issues.454393/

        • Ordeith

          T-Mobile embeds carrierIQ. They know everything the phone is doing. It lets them distinguish.

        • Steven S. Smith

          Not true. I run the nexus 5 from the play store. And not true for most models even from T-Mobile. But as soon as you flash a custom rom even if you had it it’s gone.

        • Ordeith

          Wake up.

    • Ordeith

      T-Mobile is using CarrierIQ. It tells them everything. There was an outcry against it a while back and T-Mobile made some grandiose gesture about not using the spyware anymore, but they quietly started embedding it on handsets and using it again once the media coverage died down.

      • Is this true about T-Mobile using CarrierIQ? If so, I’ll be going elsewhere after the year ends.

        • Crucifixion Cruxi

          Same. I will not tolerate carrieriq

        • david0123

          carrier iq is used by all carriers now, even prepaid services use them, so the main thing to do is use a non carrier phone

        • Rob

          Or just root it and install a ROM with it removed…

  • Ray Scott

    I use between 15 GB and 25 GB on the phone and 2GB legal tethering. I wonder how some one could use 2TB.

    • theseanteam

      Streaming 4k video / torrents / bit coin mining… while tethering.

  • StankyChikin

    Go Johnny Go!!!!!

  • TK – Indy

    Let us not forget that the reason these people were stopped at 2TB was because that is the undocumented hard cap for T-mobile unlimited data (search xda for the thread that documents this). Many of them would have used much more than that if it were possible. With 4K video and other apps that are using vast amounts of data, 2TB will not seem like unrealistic usage for too much longer.

  • Harp

    I have 10gb and hardly go 5 gb

  • Rob

    I have unlimited and I use on average 2GB a month between my line and my roommates line. The only reason we have unlimited is because we got the 2 lines for 100 bucks.

    Things like this tick me off though. T-Mobile has been open to allowing root even when you trade in a device that will tattle on you for it… Things like this can easily cause T-Mobile to take an anti-root stance and remove my freedom to do what I want with my device. I’m amazed they even let the data usage get that far. Try doing that on Comcast and see what happens… I used 750GB one month and was amazed we didn’t get a phone call about it… Although we have a 205 a month cable, Internet, and phone bill so we would be low priority for them to go after for usage.

  • user

    I think 50GB sounds better than Unlimited.

    T-Mobile should end Unlimited plans.

    The plans should be something like 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50…

    • Totally agree, and I said that on this very board when they started pushing unlimited. It’s not practical, doesn’t scale. $50Gb. $50 bucks. All in!

      • Not $50 for just 50GB alone, lol. They can keep the prices they have now, and just make unlimited plans 50GB plans. That, I can work with. I barely everage over 5GB of data, but I love having the comfort of having access to use more when necessary.

    • besweeet

      What happens after you hit the limit? No data? Overage? Low-speed data (which would still be “unlimited”)?

      • user

        I was thinking about high-speed data allotments.

        I personally like the low-speed-unlimited at 128kb. I used it last month after I depleted my high-speed data, with it I could still check emails and websites on my computer, not good for video though.

        I just think t-mobile should embrace the idea of people using the service as home internet if they want or need. That means people can tether all their data if they want or need. Just be clear about it.

        On the Simple Choice I’m thinking 2Gb for $50, 5 for 60, 10 for 70, 20 for 80, 50 for 90.

        On Simply Prepaid 1 for 40, 3 for 50, 6 for 60

        Just my thoughts I wanted to share.

        Thanks.

        • besweeet

          Agreed. If people want to tether as a home Internet replacement, so be it, so long as they don’t work around the low-speed throttle.

        • theseanteam

          They already have plans for this… it’s called mobile internet. You can purchase wifi hotspots exactly for this purpose.

        • user

          I have one of those hotspots, but I don’t use it because I like having one plan and one device.

          I might use the hotspot if t-mobile one day decides to give discounts or promotions to those who already have a phone plan and makes hotspot devices unlockable.

          My idea of 50Gb including tethering, for example, is about simplifying the plans and services, that way they don’t have to worry about those bypassing the tethering cap, because there won’t be a tethering cap. When the user uses up all their high-speed data they will be slowed to 128kbps. If they bypass that then have the lawyers call them.

        • theseanteam

          There is already a discount… you can match the data of your voice plan up to 5gigs for just $10.

          http://www.t-mobile.com/landing/free-mobile-internet-data.html

          As for 50gigs, I don’t think that will be happening anytime soon.

          I could see a 20gig plan (total usage)–as that’s what the prioritization is currently set at at perhaps a higher price. But even then, I wouldn’t hold your breath on that…

  • IUseMyConnectionAsHomeInternet

    Wow, lots of hate for people who use their cellphone for their home internet. Has anyone thought to think that maybe, just maybe, they can (within their limit, of course)? That’s what I do. Suppose I use an average of 50Gb a month. Am I an abuser of the service? I think not. Just because I decide to use 7Gb of tethering for home internet and the rest of my 43Gb on my phone doesn’t make me an abuser. There are HDMI features on cellphones, so watching netflix, youtube, downloading files, heck even torrenting is on mobile phones.

    I hear from everyone if I spend my data on my phone, it’s okay. Well, that’s what I do. I don’t use a laptop very often and don’t game.

    Suppose for a moment that home internet can be provided by a service like ATT, Verizon, T-mobile, Sprint, etc via cell phone. I don’t see Cox or Comcast in any hurry to upgrade their infrastructure. Best I can get from local ISPs is a friggin 1.5Mbps connection. 1.5Mbps! That’s it! And for more than DOUBLE what I pay T-mobile. All I did was add another line for 30$ and bam, get plenty of extra data and at much greater speeds around 20Mbps. Phone just sits at home in tethering mode, but hardly gets used in that area. Am I a crook? Am I affecting your service? Don’t be surprised if this type of setup becomes a reality some day. I’d love to have a 50Gb plan for $30 and then hey, slow me down to 128kbps once I reached that limit. For now, I just use my feature-rich phone for all my media, for which I have UNLIMITED DATA. I don’t see how anyone can use over 100Gb! oh my! gosh 100Gb. No wonder my bro’s Cox connection is so slow because you’re using like 500Gb of their bandwidth a month. Don’t be so hasty to bash on people who legitimately use the network and still use it as a home internet.

    • Crook? No. It’s sort of like peeing in the pool, just because you can get away with it doesn’t mean you should do it you know. We live (for now) in a world of finite cellular bandwidth, and some of us may actually traveling past your house and unable to use our share bandwidth because you’re using it up. Don’t be that guy man. Anyone who’s smart enough to do the things you’re talking about is also smart enough to make enough to pay for… and then some.

    • mrpickem

      Chances are you tether mote than 7GB. It’s hard to use 50gb on a cellphone. But, if you really use 7GB tether and the rest through you’re cellular device then you are well withing your rights and I see no issue. A friend I know watches baseball live & netflix everyday on his Note 4 with Unlimited Verizon. That his only mode on entertainment and he really uses the crap outta it and still only averages 30-45GB. He does no tethering and I dont think you can use much more with out tethering or torrents(Which Tmobile is the only big carrier that even allows tethering). Pretty soon Tmobile will have locked bootloaders like red & blue and rooting will be so much harder. They can tell if you’re rooted easily and they know that’s the only way you can bypass their tether limits. So if you’re device is rooted I don’t think you can convince them you’re not tethering. That being said…for an unlimited account 40 or 50GB may be ok and not even be flagged, If you’re at 100GB or more I’m sure you will be flagged.

    • NardVa

      Technically you are within the TOS, but the reality is you are using your T-mobile plan to replace home Internet and cable TV.

    • Kogashuko

      Just wait until you can play 4k on your home TV by plugging in an HDMI 2.0 cable. In theory carrier agrigation and the higher speed result is suppose to make this possible. Someone watching a 4k netflix on their phone could easily top 20gb. The answer isnt “you are abusing the service” the answer is really Tmobile didnt invest in good enough backhauls and enough spectrum. They shouldnt have had such a pitiful participation in AWS3 and refusal to pickup more spectrum while still luring in customers with promises of unlimited data like a child molester with puppies in a van.

      • theseanteam

        So far people who are in trouble are those who are tethering… when someone gets their plan changed who is using their service within the T&C, then your point might be valid.

      • Eek

        I agree with you completely. When I got molested all I got was a crappy Werthers Original. I would have loved a puppy!!

    • philyew

      Use of TM as a substitute for home ISP has been outlawed in the T&Cs for over 5 years (going back to the 2010 version). One of the listed prohibited uses is: “using the Service as a substitute or backup for private lines or dedicated data connections.”

      Potentially, therefore, you are an “abuser” of the service. As long as you use the service within the limits of your data plan, however, it shouldn’t be a problem. You just have to remember that your limit tethering other devices isn’t more than 7GB, depending on your plan.

  • David

    For people that use more than what’s allowed for tether (written in black and white on paper), they’re violating the terms of their wireless service and t-mobile has every right to terminate their service and block them permanently. Don’t like that? Well, you have the option to go Sprint, or Verizon or AT&T.
    These people are causing congestion on the network and ruin it all for the rest of us. The argument of my data is my data is BS, your data is unlimited on the phone but only 7GB when tethering. If you bypass the tether metering illegally, you’re violating the term of service and essentially stealing.

    This reminds me of Costco’s return policy on electronics. People are buying large TVs to use just for the holiday season then return them right afterwards. Costco used to take returns no matter what, now they’re limiting return to 3 months.

    Same goes for air mattress at Walmart. People by them for weekend camping trip and return them right after. Now if it’s opened, you can’t return it no more. Ruined it for the rest of us, what if I opened to take a look and doesn’t like it?

    Companies sometimes put very relaxed policies in place at the beginning but a small group of bad apples always like to test the limit and abuse the policy.

    • Kogashuko

      Problem is there are many places in the country that you still cant get home high speed internet. Verizon does this on purpose to keep you buying their tiered data.

      • theseanteam

        But that’s not a T-Mobile problem. Didn’t know that high speed data was a right.

        • Kogashuko

          Well it is when you sell unlimited data in a market with no wired option when the FCC now considers the internet as a public utility. Thats why ATT got fined 100mill and the same thing would happen if your locality cut your water off for filling your swimming pool other than during a locality mandated water restriction. Or the power company cutting your electric off because you run strip heat when it is cold outside.

        • theseanteam

          But the unlimited is for your phone–you are free to use all the data on your phone. If you tether, you are limited. It is pretty blatantly stated.

          As far as your water example, don’t you pay for water by the amount you use? It’s not unlimited for a set price. At least it is where I live.

          Not to mention the electric company charges more during different times during the year–notably when you need to use the A/C or heater.

          Nobody cuts it off… unless you try to do illegal stuff like trying to pull power or cable from your neighbor.

          Finally, T-Mobile is not cutting it off, they are just putting you on a different plan. You can still tether all you want…

        • Moby

          Then maybe T-Mobile should turn off the tower in your area. Problem solved.

        • Kogashuko

          They dont have a tower in my area. That is why I left them. I am quite happy with my AT&T 10gb service that actually works here, is cheaper than my old tmobile unlimited service, and has Volte. I am currently on comcast blast service that clocks in at 175/25 without packet shaping in my market with the option for 500mb symmetrical fiber. So when I speek for some people I am not speeking for myself. Tmobile is pedeling unlimited service to customers in rural areas with no other good options or budget services to cities and the ghettos. They simply cant compete as a nationwide network with their current buildout vs roaming agreements and subscribers vs capacity. They are also no longer competitive price wise.

        • Truth

          Speak, Spoke, Speaking, Spoken

        • Moby

          Right…they are no longer competitive which is why they added over 2 million new lines last quarter. They are actually very competitive.

      • David

        T-Mobile clearly stated tethering data is limited. If you bypass the legal tethering mechanism, then you’re using data illegally.
        How is not having internet in your part of the country a Tmobile problem? Get satellite internet instead.

      • Moby

        Nobody forces you to live in the country.

    • Truth

      Sooooo, how many times have you actually returned an air mattress at Walmart??

  • Thumbs up @johnlegere! I have long thought it’s fucked up that my mobile experience is reduced by some idiot watching Netflix at home on his TV with his phone because he’s too cheap to get a home data plan.

    • NardVa

      I thought everybody was de-prioritized at 21GB, but it appears in low traffic areas people can go pass 21GB and not get slowed down. There are people who do 50GB or more every month and don’t get slowed down.

      • besweeet

        It seems rare that people are deprioritized/throttled after 21GB. I’m at 52GB used with 10 days to go and have had 0 slowdowns in some pretty busy areas.

      • carol argo

        If you are the only client ,maybe the deprioritising doesn’t not come online.like I said tmo need to verify how they re doing things first .i suspect its a small loop hole tmo didn’t think about.

      • Gavriel Ostrow

        if so why should anyone care? they are not taking away from the public if there isn’t any use in a certain area! and mind you the plan clearly states… truly unlimited.

        • Ascertion

          Because at some point, it’s costing T-Mobile more to keep the customer than to let them go. They have peering agreements with T1 ISPs and those don’t come cheap on a per gig rate.

      • Isn’t that the nature of de-proritizaion? When you’re de-prioritized, you’re only slowed down IF the network is congested. If you’re not in a crowded area de-prioritization wouldn’t necessarily ever slow you down.

  • @johnlegere my vote is kill the unlimited plans, have realistic high caps, and let us use the data as we please. “$50Gb your way for $50 bucks” would be amazing, and I don’t think most people would really us more than they do now anyway but it’d really clamp down on the abuse. Or even better, if you can just set people on a lower and lower priority based on how much they’ve used? Why does a carrier CARE how we use our data?

  • That is Fair….

    Simply said, why should the masses suffer for a few? I prefer John Legere’s approach, that is, address the abusers straight up… with the option of moving them to an entry-level plan with a limited amount data.

  • RLB63

    If you are using 2tb you are probably downloading tons of video to a server or having multiple devices tethered at the same time. My daughter a teenager can watch videos all month most of the day and she just topped 50gb. Thankfully that is the exception. This month not sure she will hit 10gb.

    Call them and ask them to explain how they are using so much data without tethering. Mobile data was never intended to fully replace home internet.

  • Steven S. Smith

    Why not just be honest and call the plan what ever it is. Is it 10gb, 21gb, 2tb plan. If they just stopped calling it unlimited and called it what it was this would not be a problem. If I bought 5gb of data, whether I used it on my laptop on my cell phone it would impact the network just the same. Instead of trying to sound good why don’t they sell something they can actually support.

    • Ascertion

      People are often making comments without reading the article.
      Legere is going after people that are bypassing the Tethering limit. It’s impossible to legitimately hit 2TB/month on a smartphone. You’d have to keep a connection going, even overnight. In which case, is yes, a violation to the T-Mobile service agreement.

      • Steven S. Smith

        I have read the article. T-Mobile is having problems with people tethering more than they are suppose to. It’s not impossible. I can download all I want to my phone and move the files to my pc. That is allowed. I have unlimited data and is very possible. I do it all the time. I use 200gb of data a month. Each YouTube video is about 700mb to about 1gb for about 30mins of video. I can watch between 7 to 10hr of video a day between Netflix and YouTube. I’m not violating any tos by doing so. Say I do this for a month and I use 600gb legitimately and their network can’t handle the traffic. They wrote a check their butt can’t cash. This is false advertising. Even if I let my phone download over night or fall asleep while streaming movies it’s still within my rights. Don’t get me wrong I feel for the people that have a slow connection because of this, but the fact that T-Mobile sold me something they can’t deliver really bothers me. If they can’t support true unlimited data then why sell it at all, like I said before, call it what it is. They obviously need to sell whatever they can support, Weatherby 21 gigabytes of data a month 50 or 100 gigabytes.

        • JayMo86

          Unless you’ve received a notice…again this article does not refer to you. It’s talking about tethering abuse. You apparently dont fall into that category. So your gripe belongs in a different thread I’m afraid

        • Steven S. Smith

          The argument is directly connected. To say it’s not is a troll attempt to win a losing battle.

        • JayMo86

          Tethering does not equal smartphone data usage. And just because I disagree wit you does not make it an attempt at trolling

        • Ascertion

          Even if you’re using 600gb with that, it pales in comparison to the abusers using 2TBs. Obvious abuse. Yes, you can download to the phone and transfer it to the PC, but the main point is people are tethering. They’re using numerous devices at once on a hotspot. This drastically uses more data and people are cancelling their home internet service because they’re using T-Mobile as a substitute. If you’re willing to stream movies overnight (sigh) on shared network, then people with your mindset will be the end of unlimited data for all.

          There’s unlimited data, then there’s abuse.

        • Ordeith

          2TBs. That’s your first sign T-Mobile is lying.
          Using 2TBs of data in a month would require a month-long SUSTAINED connection speed of 400mbps.
          My experience with T-Mobile is that I am lucky to maintain 10mbps for an hour if I’m stationary. There is no way a single device transferred that much data over T-Mobile’s network in the time frame they are reporting. It’s just not possible.

        • VernonDozier

          Do you think there are additional problems with the way they’re accounting their data..? I actually wonder if they’re counting MegaBits as MegaBytes.

        • Ordeith

          Maybe. Someone pulling 2Terabits of data a month is at least plausible, if not entirely possible.

        • JMccovery

          If it requires a ‘sustained 400mbps’, how was it possible for my family to pull 2TB in a month with just 50mb from Comcast?

          95% of that usage was just Netflix/YouTube.

          I live in one of the smaller T-Mobile markets, and was able to keep 35-50mbps solid for a few days (used up 50GB just from gaming and videos) while there was a major cable outage in my city.

        • Ordeith

          I made a conversion mistake. Corrected. Thanks.

        • JMccovery

          You still don’t understand exactly how much data can be consumed in a 30-day period.

          At a sustained 10mbps:

          10mbps = 1.25MB/sec
          1.25MB/sec * 3600 (1 hour) = 4.5GB/hr
          4.5GB/hr * 24 hours = 108GB/day
          108GB/day * 30 days = 3.24TB in a 30-day period.

        • Truthjd

          Finally someone gets it.

        • Sectime

          You need to get out more.

        • theseanteam

          Try it and let us know if T-Mobile goes after you.

        • NardVa

          You can download all the data you want to your phone and stream all day everyday, but that’s not what people are doing. They are tethering their data to another device and the data is not going against the limited 7 GB tether bucket. It’s being masked and going against the regular unlimited data bucket. Data gets consumed at a higher rate when you can tether it to other devices. Hence the 7GB tether limit on unlimited plans. They are not advertising or selling unlimited tether, because they can’t support it.

        • Moby

          They can support your type of usage. They are not saying that you need to change your usage pattern. Enjoy T-Mobile’s unlimited which they have guaranteed will be in place until March 2017 at least.

      • Correct…Tethering Limit

        Correct, Correct…T-mobile is addressing those John Legere are people are bypassing the Tethering Limit.

    • Sectime

      Tethering isn’t unlimited and isn’t advertised as being so.

      • realuglysteeve

        Exactly. I think they are generous , not only they still offer unlimited smartphones plans , they also include 7 Gig for tethering.

  • Lindy Hendrickson

    Just got the notification from T-Mobile. I usually use around 100-120gb per month

    • thepanttherlady

      Will you please provide a little clarification?

      What notification did you receive?
      Is your usage cell use only, tethering only or a combination of both? If you’re tethering, how much tethering are you doing?

      Thank you!

      • Lindy Hendrickson

        The plan for line ####### on your account includes unlimited 4G LTE data on-smartphone only. It also comes with up to 7GB of 4G LTE data for Smartphone Mobile HotSpot to share your phone’s internet with other devices. T-Mobile’s systems have detected that this line has actively used methods that conceal Smartphone Mobile Hotspot usage and, as a result, significantly exceeded the 7GB limit on its plan. This activity violates our Terms and Conditions. To enforce our Terms and Conditions and protect the network experience for all our customers, continued violation will result in the line being ineligible for its current plan and moving to our 1GB limited 4G LTE plan. Details at http://t-mo.co/1J4PTjw

        • Ordeith

          I would love to see a few plaintiffs come out of this that will call T-Mobile out on potential violation of FCC net neutrality rules.

        • Sectime

          Guess you and others can’t read. The tethering is limited in the plan descriptions. Bypassing the limits requires user action. Both are covered in the T&C.

        • Truth

          Thank goodness for T-Zones T&C circa 2001. Tethering is allowed. No limits.

        • Kogashuko

          Not just the net neutrality issues but the issues of snooping the traffic on a public utility. If any of it is VOIP or other traffic carrying audio they could be looking at a USC Title 18 illegal wire tap. Not to mention the 100 million dollar fine the FCC just dolled out to AT&T for doing far less.

        • Ordeith

          T-Mobile embeds the CarrierIQ spyware in their branded phones, they do not need to do any kind of traffic snooping to know what you’re doing with the handset.

        • David

          What’s wrong with you? What do you possibly gain if T-Mobile is done? We all go back to the dark ages where Verizon and AT&T charge whatever they want. Remember not long ago our phone plan was like 500min limit with 500MB data only and every kb over that is overage charges?
          Why do you try to take advantage on the nice guy and are too scared to fight with the big bullies?

        • JBrowne1012

          What is to gain if T-mobile is forced to treat all data the same of which is the basis of net neutrality is that they will have to play fair and justice will be served.

        • David

          sure, say tmobile will be forced to treat all data equal, then what’s gonna happen? T-Mobile will end unlimited data plan all together like Verizon & AT&T have done. It’s their right to offer unlimited data or not play the game at all. Then sadly, for the vast majority of people on the unlimited data plan that do play by the rules, our sweet plan is ruined by a few bad apples.
          Again, if you’re not satisfied with Tmobile, please switch and join verizon or AT&T and tether all you want on their network.

        • z

          Data is treated ALL THE SAME, Once you hit a soft cape ALL DATA is slowed down.
          You also agree to the terms of service by signing up for service. Which you can clearly read but like most consumers reading is “:boring” and they dont.
          This has nothing to do witih NN.

        • Ordeith

          T-Mobile doesn’t need to get ahead with deceptive advertising and lawbreaking, and such actions aren’t acceptable just because they’re an underdog.

        • philyew

          How is it that you are not aware that there is a stipulated limit on tethering for all plans? You’ve been around this and other forums where this has been debated for years.

          The OP admits to using 60-70 GB on tethering, which is almost 10-times the limit. How is TM wrong for addressing this?

        • Ordeith

          You can’t contract for things that are illegal. The limit on tethering may not be legal in the face of net neutrality. Data is data.

          I don’t think T-Mobile is wrong for addressing this, just that they are wrong in how they are addressing it.

        • philyew

          I think it has to be a pretty twisted interpretation of net neutrality that prevents a carrier from limiting this abuse of their service. When the cell phone is functioning as a hotspot, it is operating as a router, allowing multiple devices/users to consume data concurrently.

          The T&Cs going back as far as 2010 (at least) contain the following definition of a prohibited use: “using the Service as a substitute or backup for private lines or dedicated data connections.” That means not using your device as a substitute for an ISP.

          Net neutrality is essentially about two things in my view (a) preventing ISPs/carriers from discriminating between services to the detriment of competitors and consumers and (b) ensuring that the Internet remains equally accessible by everyone, not just the corporations who have systematically moved their traffic from private VPNs to the public Internet over the last decade.

          I don’t see how trying to stretch the definition to allow multiple users to share a single line account or replace an ISP service for their home even comes close to the real objective of net neutrality.

        • Ordeith

          if your phone could pull 20mbps using it as a hotspot doesn’t make it suddenly able to pull more than 20mbps. T-Mobile provides you with a connection at a set speed, that is the maximum rate you can consume data. It shouldn’t matter what you do with that data, and the carrier can’t prioritize one use case over another. THAT is net neutrality.

        • Rene Shabastari

          But they say they won’t care if your phone is pulling in this data, [which they actually lie about and also do] so watch netflix on your phone and connect it via HDMI to your TV or torrent on your phone. Then everything should be fine. T-Mobile is claiming breach of ToS because tethering through Wifi/USB/BT is being abused and they have that right. Deal with it.
          However, I do also know for a fact that if you did things “legit”, through the phone, after 21GB they will throttle you. That part, I agree is BS and goes against established net neutrality laws.
          I think it makes sense to give up the abuse of throttling, which everyone agreed to in the ToS, and fight for truly unlimited, non-throttled 4G using the phone itself.

        • Ordeith

          What’s the difference between a WiFi hotspot to a laptop and an HDMI connection to the TV? With WiFi the phone receives the data and forwards it on to the tethered device. With HDMI the phone receives the data and forwards it on to the tethered device.

          The Phone is pulling the data in both cases. The only difference is that T-Mobile can’t as easily tell that you are connected to another device using USB OTG or HDMI. If they could they would probably try to restrict that as well.

        • Rene Shabastari

          I don’t think there’s much of a difference, but T-Mobile actually has a case due to iffy legalese in the tethering argument.
          The problem is they fight both, the one they have some dodgy claim over and the one where they lie.
          I feel all efforts should be poured into fighting the blatant lie one, we can also come up with dodgy legalese ways to get the results that we want. Gotta play by their rules and be just as evil as they are.

        • z

          Incorrect it does not go against “Net Neutrality” rules.
          Data is not Throttled against one service, BUT ALL. which is nothing to do with Net Neutrality.

        • philyew

          It does very much matter what you do with your data. Independent studies have established that the pattern and nature of static Internet usage (i.e. from PCs and streaming devices) differs greatly from mobile usage.

          For example few, if any, will engage in substantial torrent download to their phone. The physical constraints of the devices themselves mean it just isn’t practical. Take that activity to a PC and everything changes.

          In certain circumstances, people will stream video to their phone and cast it to a larger screened device using tools like Chromecast or Miracast. That’s within the rules constrained by the tethering limits. But many, many more would simply use their device as a router and enable services like Sling TV, Tablo, Netflix, Vudu, Watch ESPN etc etc on a Roku device, if they had unlimited access to tether static devices to their phone. At that point, they would be using their mobile service as a full-on replacement for a home ISP and that has been explicitly prohibited for years. Most of those services require a constant connection to support streaming. That pattern of usage is nothing like what occurs on the majority of cell phones.

        • Ordeith

          And yet there are hybrid phones coming out this fall with the ability to work in a desktop interface.
          It all converges, and data remains data.
          Though if T-Mobile hasn’t planned their network to handle the near future I can see why they might have trouble with it.

        • philyew

          No one in the US has built or is in the process of building a mobile network seriously capable of replacing large-scale terrestrial ISP service.

          However it may converge, it isn’t going to do so using only currently available licensed spectrum. We are another technological step away from mobile service providers being able to compete with terrestrial ISPs.

          When that step arrives, then perhaps we will see a different approach to data management. Until then, TM still has one of the best portfolios of tethering services and I feel no sympathy for anyone who feels hard done by for being cut off when they have quite deliberately breached the T&Cs that they signed up for.

        • Ordeith

          “No one in the US has built or is in the process of building a mobile network seriously capable of replacing large-scale terrestrial ISP service.”
          Verizon has cellular ISP plans today. And in my market Comcast business customers have the option of using Verizon as a secondary connection for increased throughput and redundancy.
          So I wouldn’t say “no one”. All we know is that T-Mobile sure isn’t capable of it.

        • z

          Bull shit
          You agree to the TERMS OF SERVICE. WHICH STATE YOU CANNNNNNOT REPEAT CANNNNOT USE THE DAMN PHONE AS A TETHER MOBILE HOT SPOT PAST X and X condition.
          GET THAT THREW YOU GUYS HEAD.
          Dont like it leave. Simple as that.
          Data is not data.
          There is limited spectrum, and you using your mobile phone as a home net connection ALWAYS ON is ruining the network for all.
          You agree to these terms, that you SHOULD OF READ before agreeing to have service.
          Theres 3 other carriers go to them if you do not like it.

        • zo

          BECAUSE WANNN WANN THE DATA PLANS UNLIMITED IT DOESNT MATTER THAT MY CONTRACT OR TERMS OF SERVICE STATE LIMITED TETHERING WAN IM A SELF ENTITLED BLEEP WWHO WANTS TO HAVE UMLIMITED TETHERING WANNNN

        • VernonDozier

          The problem is that the FCC heard the case.

          When in reality it was a false and misleading marketing statement. A complaint should be filed by the Federal Trade Commission. FTC has oversight to false and misleading advertising.

          Likely back then, the FTC had a conflict of interest with AT&T. So, FTC should be able to hear the case against T-Mobile.

        • Zearl Clark

          They did, back in 2014 t mobile came to an agreement on a settlement in a class action lawsuit involving false advertisement.

        • Mary

          What kind of internet plan did you have? Preferred Android Unlimited?

      • Lindy Hendrickson

        This was a text notification from “456.” Of course, this is from s lot of tethering. Probably 60-70 go tethering per month.

        • VernonDozier

          Really..?

          I mean talk about a cheap company. Especially if they can’t afford to send a physical letter.

  • vinnyjr

    I say if you dont like T-Mobile, try stealing data on Verizon or AT&T, You wont. Dont steal data. T=Mobile has every right to protect from thieves using their phones dat for their home internet connection. T-Mobile isnt stupid, they know what is going on. People with rooted phones and Apps to disguise their data use. Quit stealing data.

    • Kogashuko

      If I remember the last company that tried this got slapped with a multimillion dollar fine. Hopefully, the FCC will end them on this one.

      • no2apple

        Stop watching 4k porn you dumbo

      • VernonDozier

        The FCC couldn’t assess a fine that made sense.

        In order for T-Mobile to properly service those 6,000 customers, let’s say a new cell site has to be built in order for T-Mobile to make good on it’s “unlimited” claims.

        At about $250,000 per tower and antenna, (average price), bumping 6,000 customers will save the company $1.5B The last time T-Mobile had money to upgrade its network was several years ago.

    • Bill Berry

      I prefer to call it, I pay $43.98 on Straight Talk to use up to 5GBs of LTE data with one caveat; as I see fit. Period!!! I don’t enjoy companies telling me how I have to use the data I purchase or be made to buy a separate plan for tethering when the device I have suffices perfect for the task at hand. After that, I either pay for more data or watch snails crawl. As I just stated a moment ago, they’re not thieves, the definition of unlimited data is, UNLIMITED. What they’re doing is legal. Now, there’s a solution to all of this and that’s flat billing and data users pay for every bit and byte of data they use. Now, do I think T-Mobile is exploiting users on the low end, you bet I do. Prices for a half-gigabyte of data are simply insane compared to higher uses, so don’t tell me that on the other end there aren’t users not being robbed by T-Mobile. If 5GBs is $50, the math works out pretty well don’t you think? So if there’s someone out there using 2 Terabytes, then they pay $2000.00. That said, someone who uses only 100 megabytes, benefits from the same pricing, they pay exact one dollar. How hard is this? Flat billing; we all pay the same rate. I’m not one to argue whether it’s right or wrong, but neither is it illegal; it’s legal. T-Mobile steals too when you look at rates for those who use little data.

      • izick

        Project Fi

        • Ordeith

          I would rather not have to pay for my connection with my privacy.

  • David

    Imagine this. A oil company advertise a plan for $100/month, you get unlimited gas for your car only (by VIN # for example) nationwide at all of its gas stations and you have 7 gallons of gas to share with other cars.
    You sign up for the unlimited plan, but bring in a fleet of 18 wheeler to pump gas and tell the oil company all gas was consumed by your little V4 toyota.
    Does it sound like a right thing to do? Does it violate the terms of service? Is it considered stealing? People don’t see data as a commodity. John is correct, it is stealing and it’s causing the rest of us to suffer economically because we all end up having to pay for more expensive plans in the future.

    • Hold on

      Your analogy makes no sense, if you’re comparing apples to apples you can’t just throw oranges in and expect it to work. The toyota v4 is your cell phone an 18 wheeler would have to be your cellphone as well. Doesn’t matter how you use your gas it goes through your engine first. Usingyour vin # as you say would be your phone number or IMEI. Even your example proves your theory incorrect.

      • Cat Lind

        How so? Why does the 18 wheeler have to be a cell phone? I can tether my phone via USB to my laptop or PC and use it’s internet connection, or I can tether it to my broadband to go hotspot and then run 5-10 electronic items off the hotspot – now tether 7 hotspots, you end up with 35-70 PCs using data on a mobile network, all gaming. Hardly the same data usage as a cell phone. Most internet service providers wouldn’t allow you 2TB data a month without paying in the extreme – I pay over $200 for unlimited data and with 2 gamers on hardwired PCs, 5 laptops, 2 tablets and 5 cellphones, not to mention streaming through a set top box, and I don’t come anywhere near 2TB a month.

        • Ndnd

          They point was that the Internet is cell phone derived. You missed that in his rebuttal.

      • samagon

        Here’s a better analogy:
        you find a rate plan for electricity that is unlimited for your house.

        Yet you decide to just run extension cords from your outlets to your neighbors and hide that you are doing so.

        • Ordeith

          No, that’s also a terrible analogy.
          What’s the difference between the bits to Netflix on my phone or on a computer?

          In your electricity example, said power company provides a 100 amp services to the home. No matter what “unlimited” plan you are on you can’t really use more than 100 amps as it is not available. What difference does it make really if you use your capacity to run an electric arc-welder in your garage all the time or choose to install exterior lighting that illuminates the property surrounding your own? Are your neighbors really “stealing” that light?

          Power companies have to size their grids accordingly, shouldn’t cell phone companies have to do the same?

        • Truth

          You see that makes sense, almost. You see T-mobile can see how many IP addresses are utilizing your data. Now sharing it with the neighbors would mean multiple IPs. The data heavy users are tethering to a laptop or desktop and downloading massive files like torrents or streaming Netflix all day. The data is still being used by the same person. They are just using many times more than the average user. This is in now way like sharing with neighbors. Still under the definition of unlimited in my dictionary.

        • AnthonyReyes

          The difference is mobile network wasn’t built for these users in mind. So an analogy that would show what is the problem would have to count for the user who is using this as a home network is congesting the network for other users on that tower so they see lower speeds while using the network.

        • Eduardo Ruiz

          If you actually the terms and conditions Of the service agreement, that you as a consumer sign at intial start up you’ll see that using the data in terms of tethering illegally is against the terms and conditions. So t-mobile has the right to boot these customers out for violating the terms and conditions

        • AnthonyReyes

          Don’t know why you felt you needed to reply to me about it since I agree with what T-Mobile is doing.

        • Power companies know everything that runs over their lines. They even send signals every day out to check for diagnostics and amount of power needed to be presented.

    • That would be the stupid oil company making a bad choice. Not the customer.

  • user

    Thanks for the link, great promo, I’ll think about it.

    I wish there was a similar promo for prepaid for a second line of voice or data.

  • FILA

    I tried that before and it failed for me. T-Mobile stopped me after the 5GB tether limit.

  • guest

    For me it is very clear.

    If tethering is caped at 7GB, then that means your Unlimited high-speed data is meant to be used by your phone only without tethering.

    If that’s difficult for people to understand or for t-mobile to enforce then Unlimited high-speed data should go.

    Still I already like my idea of a 50GB high-speed data plan with tethering and unlimited low speed. And end Unlimited high-speed plans, except for grandfathered plans from people who use it like they are supposed to.

    Not 20GB as someone suggested to be the top of the line but 50GB, why? because we already heard 20GB on TV.

    What do you think?

    What would be your solution?

    Or what would you like to happen?

  • Bill Berry

    Look…this isn’t about whether it’s legal or it’s illegal; it’s legal and some users are doing it. As to whether it’s right or it’s wrong; it’s a matter of degrees. We’ve been having this debate ever since T-Zones was exploited. There’s a simple solution to all of this and that is charge a flat rate. For example charge $1 for 100 megabytes, $10 for 1 gigabyte, $50 for 5 gigabytes, $100 for 100 megabytes, $1000 for 1 terabyte and so forth…problem solved!!! This nonsense will stop!

    • Charmed79

      It is unlimited through phone use, not tethering, my God some of you people are so cheap! Sign up for unlimited phone data and use it to power all devices in your house, and then complain when they catch on!

    • VernonDozier

      Yeah, T-Zones was one of the plans…

      Sidekick dataplan was another, and so was Blackberry… But I think the $2.99 plan only included 1 meg of data; on a text-based web, 1 meg was more than enough to check your horoscope.

  • Romdude

    About time, I’m paying for unlimited high speed, not unlimited intermittent speed because somebody decided to use an illegal tether for torrenting and use it as a cable broadband for their whole house. It’s not fair to those who pay for the option for unlimited highspeed and don’t break the TOS.

    • MisterSuperGod

      Agreed!
      i think the offenders should be dropped as customers, frankly.
      i mean, hell, it’s theft.

      • Joe Blow

        You’re a stooge to think that. They’re using the same networks as many landlines lol

        Wake up.. Don’t buy into this crap.

      • Even if an offender uses 1000GB that is roughly the service cost of .1 cent per GB. They still make money as long as it is over their towers.

  • morbid

    Them trying to charge extra for tethering and trying to enforce controls on it is just problematic. They need to go back to the way it used to be, where you just had data. You could tether if you wanted, or you didn’t have to… it was just data and it was your data — they didn’t used to charge extra for tethering.

    Now the issue is that T-Mobile created the real unlimited plans a while ago, and realized that was a mistake. They’re now trying to figure out how to reel that plan back in, without the FCC coming down on them.

    • Truth

      Data is the commodity now, the T-zone users saw that awhile ago. Now data is where they make their money. It used to be in texts and minutes, now everything goes via “internet data” including voice and texts. This is why you now have unlimited texts and minutes, because it costs them next to nothing to facilitate the connection. Heck even texts used to be sent on the “back diagnostic channels” with some carriers. Those text charges were pure profit for the carriers back in the day.

  • VernonDozier

    I know exactly how this works because T-Mobile wanted me to purchase a bigger rateplan several years ago. T-Mobile’s servers intercepts packets and specifically looks for the browser’s “User Agent String”.

    Back when I had the original iPhone on T-Mobile service, I actually preferred to view the “Desktop Version” of websites. Many mobile versions of websites didn’t have everything I was looking for. I found a plugin, which would simply change the “User Agent String” to match a desktop computer, and then the website server would send the desktop version of the same website.

    So one day towards the end of my billing cycle, I got on, and a strange message appeared on my iPhone, it read that I was using “Tethering” and that I had exceeded my “Tethering Allowance” for the month or something. So, I switched the User Agent back to default settings (iOS and Safari) and then the internet worked again.

    So it’s not rocket science. But I am concerned that a lot of people may have had family install similar software so the websites look familliar and could be read.

    At the end of the day, however, you really can’t fault a paying customer for using the service and data in a manner which it’s advertised. Unlimited is a very special word in the English Dictionary. It means “no limits”. Introducing limitations while also calling a paying customer a “Thief” isn’t exactly how a German-based company should conduct business in the US.

    • Ordeith

      All T-Mobile really has to do is let their tiered plans run full speed and their unlimited plans be rate limited and let the customer choose their priority.
      Either they get 10GB at 20mbps then throttled to 160kbps after or they get the unlimited plan at 8mbps all the time. They wouldn’t have to differentiate tethering or any other data. Maxing out an 8mbps connection for a month would effectively limit you to under 50GB.
      Why does T-Mobile have to get all sketchy with net neutrality by classifying data or try to change the definition of “unlimited”?

      • VernonDozier

        I completely agree. Data is data and is measured in Bits and Bytes. Those “unlimited” Bits and Bytes are my decision on how they’re used. If they are used for email or browsing the web on laptop screen or a phone screen, it doesn’t matter. All bits and bytes use the same measurement. As a customer you either get “unlimited” to use as I see fit, or I don’t. It’s really an easy argument to win in a public forum or even in a court of law.

        Then, as @adam pointed out, they use the word “truly” in such a way to deceive users.

        It’s terrible marketing.

        • Joe Blow

          It’s all bs!
          Why don’t landlines do this? Cable or dsl, never had this issue. The cell phone industry in my opinion is the biggest rip off industry going. The service and the cheap Chinese garbage phones being sold for $500+ is a joke.

    • Adam

      In order to remove the confusion between dictionary terms and marketing terms (for example 4G), T-Mobile added the word ‘truly’. It came as a surprise to many people that adding the word truly means to use the marketing definition instead of the dictionary definition.

      • VernonDozier

        So it’s like when you say “Here’s the truth” in a sentence; it implies that something stated prior to saying “Here’s the truth” is a lie…

        Either way, that sounds like something Doug Chartier would do. He was always a bit of a creep.

  • Isaiah Davenport

    The problem with T Mobile is their unlimited data advertising is
    deceptive. When in reality you are getting limited data not unlimited as
    advertised. Their is a 21GB soft cap which T Mobile can change at their
    discretion.Then you are deprioritized on the tower that is not as bad
    as being throttled but is a limit and that is not what you bought into
    with their advertisements and the supposed uncarrier. For people who say
    it is for network management, than why do you not treat all the people
    on the tower the same instead of users who go over 21GB of data. It does
    not matter if it happens to very few users less than 1% of time that is
    not what they bought into. Depending on what type of data you use it
    could be thrown into three categories. First Category Music Freedom
    certain music applications will not count towards your soft data cap.
    Second Category tethering which is limited at 7GB than throttled up to
    128kbps. Third Category is the limited data they advertise as unlimited
    which will count toward the 21GB Softcap. These are in their terms of
    service and in very small fine print in their commercials like they do
    not want you to see it, but that is not what they are advertising when
    you watch the commercial’s/advertisement’s and the customer buys into
    that product/brand to find out that is not what he or she is getting.

    • Joe Blow

      It doesn’t matter! It’s false advertisrment period! They are using unlimited advertisement to ‘steal customers’ from thier competitors so who’s really the thief here? LoL

      John is douche bag.. period.

  • atlvideoguy

    Do people not realize that unlimited data will end in the next 2-3 years on T-Mobile. I see T-mobile changing the unlimited data option to 20GB for $80. I should have jumped on crickets network when they were offering 20GB for $55.

  • Kahlayoh

    I’ve been experiencing really slow speeds at .08mbs on downloads for a week now. I called on Wednesday, and the guy can’t seem to know why I’m running such slow speeds after trouble shooting everything. He tells me he’ll write a ticket up and I will get a call in the next couple of days. Well it’s Sunday night and I’m still experiencing my .08mbs. I call again and speak with the overseas people and they tell me it’s because I’ve used more then the average user which is 15gb. This is crap…..I paid for unlimited 4G LTE so I expect 4GLTE. She tells me I’m being prioritized due to my usage of data, but I look at it as being throttled. Cause everytime I try to check my instagram or facebook, I have to wait for a minute or sometimes it just won’t load at all. Sick or this crap, I turned my home Internet off cause I can’t afford it, now I can’t enjoy the services I’m paying for with T-Mobile. I hardly ever tether, but I haven’t even used a half of TB of data with my phone. I’ve been getting irritated with Tmobile ever since I’ve upgraded my phone to this Galaxy S6 edge.

    • Isaiah Davenport

      T Mobile’s unlimited data advertisement’s are misleading if not outright false advertising. They offer limited data and depending on what traffic you use your data for it will either be, towards the soft cap which you hit at 15GB, if you use tethering you have a 7GB hard cap which will be throttled after 7GB and or no caps music freedom.

  • NardVa

    I guess using 21GB (no tethering) or more a month is considered an abuser. I understand T-Mobile slows your data down (de-priortization) on busy towers, but my home and work place is by a busy tower so I’m slowed down all day everyday until my bill cycle ends. To me that is throttling.

  • Zearl Clark

    You know, I am a prepaid user and I use about 50 gigs a month of smartphone data (not tethering) and I don’t get any notices saying I’ve gone over what constitutes an “an acceptable usage”. Maybe it’s because I don’t abuse tethering usage. If I want to download a large file for my pc, I’ll do it on my phone and transfer the file via USB. Win win for me, it allows me to use my tethering for other things, like Netflix to Chromecast. That’s another thing, t mobile offers ” binge on” but I can’t have it??? Because I’m prepay unlimited??? If binge on is supposed to be free data streaming with participating companies like Netflix, does that count for tethered usage too? If so, I’d like to have that. Then again, maybe not, because I like my HD movies better than “compressed” and “optimized” movies.

  • Unlimited LTE customers paying for Unlimited data are abusing their Unlimited LTE.