(Update: John Legere blog post) T-Mobile Corporate Discount changes: Current customers will be grandfathered in

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Well, talk about a change of heart. Just days after announcing that the monthly corporate discount would be disappearing for everyone except government and military workers, Mike Sievert – on his Twitter account – posted “Tomorrow we will announce that current (customers) can keep their corp employee discount.” The tweet was posted earlier this morning, and so we should expect a formal announcement tomorrow at some point.

Despite the fact that the changes were made to give fair and low prices to everyone, those who currently benefit from the promotion clearly weren’t happy about the new terms. In fact, here at TmoNews, the post became the biggest discussed change for months. There was even a formal petition created over at Change.org to get the Advantage Discount back.

And, while the plan isn’t coming back – as far as we know – those who currently do get monthly discount will be able to keep it, according to Sievert.

We’ll update as we hear more.

UPDATE: John Legere’s official blog post

As promised, John Legere has officially announced the changes that are going to take place. The company has listened to its disgruntled customers, and has changed its plan to removed the corporate discount from current subscribers’ accounts. Even better, anyone who applied to enroll before April 1st will get it.

I have to say, I’m impressed. T-Mobile is proving to be a carrier that knows how to listen to its customers, and act on what’s best for them. Even when that means back-tracking on its plans.

“Everyone enrolled in the Advantage Program or who applied to enroll before April 1st will be able to keep a rate plan discount as long as they work at a participating employer and remain on a qualifying plan.  All of our Simple Choice plans currently qualify.  We will be asking that customers participate in a simple annual online employer verification.  That’s it.”

As far as ongoing plans go, there will be no new enrollments in to the plan for anyone after April 1st. New customers in the corporate discount program will get a $25 reward card whenever they buy a new device, as stated during the original announcement. T-Mobile believes strongly that the monthly discount scheme is just another part of the industry that’s broken and needs changing to make pricing low and fair for everyone.

To read his full announcement posted today, hit this link.

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  • dontsh00tmesanta

    Sweet. I already came to term with my discount removal. Meant one less sushi night a month.

  • http://www.kdmstance.com BiGMERF

    great.. I can now stay without having to compare

  • Gabriel Martin

    Good day Mr. LEGERE & Mr. LUCERO,

    Our message will be short & concise…

    Based on thousands blogs, posts and tweets, people will ACCEPT the across the board SAME treatment to everyone especially for the FAMILY PLAN.

    Here is the one most people agreed:

    UNCARRIER 5.0 – $15/MONTH discount/credit to every FAMILY PLAN

    Individual plan will NOT get the discount as it is self explanatory & most of them can shoulder the monthly bill (they are mostly single with NO kids).

    I hope that T-MOBILE will consider this and people will wholeheartedly accept it rather than completely abolition of ANY discounts (Corporate & loyalty discounts)

    Thanks in advance & GOD bless

    • Boludo

      This guy does not speak for me. The nerve. No need to change anything else. Grandfather the discounts as they were originally in place. I’m not sure who elected Mr. Martin to speak for anyone let alone everyone. DISREGARD HIS ILL CONCEIVED MESSAGE.

      Mr. Martin, really? Don’t ever speak for me.

    • longtimeCustomer

      That’s the most flawed pile of logic I have read anywhere all week. First off, family plans already catch a break. Secondly, why would you assume single people don’t have kids? You sound crazy to me. Please shut up.

      • Boludo

        Totally agree. Very simple minded to say the least. Seriously, T-Mobile does right and then you hear this nonsense.

    • Alex P Keaton

      WTF? The sharing of this email would have been funny on April fool’s day, but now it is a bit crazy sounding.

      Hmm, maybe this dellussional clown shared that email bc he thinks he forced T-Mobile’s hand, so he wants everyone to applaud him. To give him a proverbial cookie.

      He doesn’t get math. Why settle for a dollar figure when a percentage figure seems fair for anyone – a single person or families.

      What’s the point of even sharing this when the status quo works for all current customers? Hahaha this is the strange, very odd post.

    • mahermusic

      You ruined your email by talking about your FAKE god…

      • Gabriel Martin

        Wow just WOW…

        Do you want a candy or award?

        “FAKE GOD” or whatever you want to say, STOP the bullshit…

    • mahermusic

      You ruined your email by talking about your FAKE god…

    • Gabriel Martin

      To all people saying this & that, WAKE UP!!!

      T-MOBILE needs to make money, they are NOT charity for God sake…

      They are now giving reprieve to those who has OLD Grandfathered Corporate Discount…

      So, to move FORWARD, how they can GET more subscribers for the FUTURE?

      LURE them in by giving discounts/promos that AMERICANS use to…

      LOOK @ what happened to JC Penny when Johnson made it more transparent & simple, people are not used to buying in your face prices even they lowered it to the point they are not making money that much.
      In almost 2 years doing that, they almost got bankrupt, so they ditched him and put the system back to where originally is and NOW it’s getting more people again.
      Here is the example he did: Made the price of 1 t-shirt from $19.99 to $14.00 then all products was priced with NO .99 cents with it and NO promos or discounts anymore… BUT Americans are not use to that kind of strategy for MANY decades, as they used to see $19.99 with 10% discounts and that’s $17.99 plus tax AFTER discounts. What is lower $14 or $17.99???

      Even T-Mobile is giving subscribers lower rate plan than the competition, people STILL asking for discounts & promo!!!

      Because they still need to PAY for EIP, Rate Plan, Taxes, Fees, Insurance & so on…

      ONLY stupid will NOT realize this…

      We are asking them to put MORE towers BUT we want to get EVERYTHING from them (especially lowest possible price)…

      T-MOBILE needs MORE subscribers and to ATTAIN that is to give more BENEFITS to them…

      GIVE your viable suggestion NOT moronic insinuation that T-MOBILE should give MORE but you want to PAY LESS…

      IMBECILES…

  • Ashok Patel

    Are association discounts included in this arrangement? AAA”

    • longtimeCustomer

      Yes. I wrote T-Force

  • HawaiiD

    Where is this annual online verification page at?
    I want to get verified ASAP before this policy changes again?

    • Boludo

      When you find a time machine to go back before the cut off day, then hopefully you can use that link. Read the post dude.

    • Jason

      There is no annual online or offline verification process as of yet that was just a suggestion posted here as far as I know….

      • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

        It’s in Legere’s official update, but you’re right, it hasn’t been rolled out yet. We’ll probably hear more tomorrow.

  • Noor Mahmoud

    Darn. This kind of sucks. I agree that the discount has got to go.

    • Boludo

      “I’m going to flag you”… Hahaha – you clueless kids are funny. When you start paying your own bills, feel free to contribute.

      • Noor Mahmoud

        Flagged again. Seriously, is negativity your only reason for existing? You have to flame or troll every comment you see? It’d be one thing if you were a little kid, but you’re probably a grown man around my age which makes it sad.

        • Boludo

          Darn. I’ve been flagged.

    • Jason

      Did you read the title of the thread you posted in? It suks that new customers affiliated with companies prior that use to have the ability to get discounts won’t be able to be discounted but they had their chance i suppose….

      • Noor Mahmoud

        You’re misunderstanding. I’m of the belief that no-one should get a discount. My friend works at an unaffiliated company, and I work at a company that isn’t affiliated, so he gets a 15% discount while I don’t. Think of it this way. The majority of Tmobile’s customers then have to put up with worse programs and higher pricing because of the affiliated customers that get the discount. It isn’t fair and does more harm than good to everyone other than those select few.

        • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

          So by that logic, T-Mobile ought to eliminate paying off ETFs too? After all, some of us didn’t migrate from other carriers or were already finished with our contracts. We don’t benefit from that perk; only the few who fail to honor their contracts and / or refuse to pay their own ETFs. Do you disagree?

        • Boludo

          That sounds reasonable and logical. Not fair DAE, not fair to use logic :)

        • Guest

          What do ETF’s have to do with this? You can’t buy a $700 phone for $200 and expect to never pay that $500 you owe. You don’t get free phones…

        • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

          I’m thinking you’re misreading my comment. It’s about T-Mobile paying the ETFs for migrating customers still under contract with other carriers. I was asking whether you support that practice since it also doesn’t benefit everyone equally.

        • ScrewLogic

          Critical thinking and basic reasoning is weak with this one.

        • Noor Mahmoud

          Coming from someone named “ScrewLogic”

        • Boludo

          I work for a good employer that gets on behalf of its employees discounts at many places including but not limited to AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile, and probably the regional smaller carrier. I’ve earned that perk. Do you get a discount at any of the others listed above? If you do those options might be attractive to you. Maybe you should look into it. Sorry you don’t get a discount at T-Mobile, but it’s not unfair just because it affects you. You made that work decision, just like many of us choose where we get services from. And many of us were ready to move to another provider when we felt “unfairly” treated. Perhaps you should do the same.

          Now you might need to reconsider what the meaning of fairness means. Last I looked it doesn’t always revolve around the word “me”.

          Feel free to also flag this post bc that seems to get you off instead of discussing or having a reasonable response when prompted.

  • becca

    Does anyone know if this has an impact on student discounts?

    • Jason

      No impact on student discounts if you already have the discount applied….
      You would be grandfather’d in….
      I dont think the student discount was on the chopping block to begin with but until every thing is announced by TMo all is speculation…

  • adrian.transhire

    i think they realized that if someone was to seriously challenge the notion that EIP’s are not contracts and therefore they are not breaching the terms of contracts by removing the discount, that they would have lost that battle. if the FCC or a court was to look at the wording and structure of an EIP, and then see that the employer discount was applied to it, they would rule that it is a breach of terms to take the discount away before the EIP has been completed and would allow people out of their EIP’s without having to pay a dime. that would have been a huge failure and loss of money for t-mobile.

    • JB

      As it stands, EIPs are billed separate from the part of the plan you are discounted on, if i’m reading your comment correctly. You’re only discounted on the Voice/Text/Data portion of your bill…

      • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

        That’s true. It would be like financing an auto loan through Exxon. Even if they increased the price of their gasoline, you’re still responsible for the balance of your vehicle as the two services have nothing to do with one another except incidentally.

        • adrian.transhire

          they are not tied together incidentally though, ie, you cannot have EIP without having service(voice,data,etc) which is where the discount is applied. your example doesn’t really make sense because you can buy your gas from somewhere else, while you cannot get you cell service from another provider while having a EIP with t-mobile. since they are truly tied together then the EIP finance agreement can easily be seen as a binding contract. your car payment is a binding contract even though you can pay it off early or make over-payments. EIP is no different.

        • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

          Because the phones are locked. Interesting. I hadn’t looked at it that way. I don’t think a court would necessarily rule that way, but that would be an interesting angle you could take. You actually might be on to something.

        • adrian.transhire

          exactly. they lock the phones to t-mobile while the EIP is in effect, even phones that should be unlocked like the Nexus get locked down under EIP.

        • philyew

          No the N5 doesn’t get locked down. I have one on an EIP and I’ve successfully tested it with an AT&T SIM. They tell you it’s locked, but it isn’t.

        • adrian.transhire

          interesting…. i sold one a few months ago and the buyer could not activate it on att and they were told it was locked. so i had to take it back. maybe they changed things.

        • philyew

          Strange. I bought mine about a week after they launched in TM stores, and tried it with an AT&T SIM almost immediately. Normally, locked phones prompt you for an unlock code when you insert an alien SIM, but in this case the phone happily registered on the AT&T network.

        • Jason

          Would it get esn blocked if eip wasnt paid and the owner of N5 stopped paying TMo?
          I thought there was a law passed in the U.S. that stated cell providers had to share blacklisted esn list….
          I also thought TMo put defaulted eip phones on the same list that assurion lost found stolen replacements go on?

        • philyew

          ESN blocking and carrier locking work in different ways, as far as I am aware.

        • T-Mobile Cares

          So it is not the ESN that gets blocked, it is the IMEI that gets blocked and that will prevent the device from registering on any carrier network. Any T-Mobile phone, in general, will work seelessly on AT&T’s network with their SIM card in our device. Just thought I would provide that feedback. Oh, and if you were to discontinue making your EIP payments, we will block that devices IMEI until the balance if the device is paid in full, or your past due balance is brought current. Hope this helps.

        • T-Mobile Cares

          So it is not the ESN that gets blocked, it is the IMEI that gets blocked and that will prevent the device from registering on any carrier network. Any T-Mobile phone, in general, will work seelessly on AT&T’s network with their SIM card in our device. Just thought I would provide that feedback. Oh, and if you were to discontinue making your EIP payments, we will block that devices IMEI until the balance if the device is paid in full, or your past due balance is brought current. Hope this helps.

        • JB

          Though I think where T-Mo would get us in court is if we didn’t EIP a device and receive a discount. Because you can BYOD and join Magenta sans contract, one could have technically still have gotten a corp discount prior to April 1, and not have been under an EIP. The same goes if one had a device already paid off.

        • adrian.transhire

          well imo, for anyone that pays full retail for a nexus or whatever, or does BYOD with t-mobile, i think they are the best deal/value and Legere is correct. the catch is, t-mobile doesnt want or expect people to pay full retail or to pay off their phones early. they actually discourage paying it off early and have a pop up that warns you not to on the website telling you that you will mess up your ability to use Jump! (they expect people to be dumb and not realize that they dont need Jump if they are paying off a phone) when people add in the EIP payments, especially people with family plans, the pricing starts to even out when you compare to att or verizon, and even if t-mobile is $10-15 less, most people who would be dropped from the discount program on t-mobile would still get a discount on att or verizon and in some areas get better coverage, so there would be more of a reason to leave t-mobile at that point.

        • JB

          Hmmm… Yea I see what you’re getting at…

        • philyew

          I think the more likely outcome of a legal challenge would be that a customer without service would be able to continue to honor the monthly repayment program for the EIP, rather than having to make a single balloon payment.

        • adrian.transhire

          that would make sense and actually be a fair solution. t-mobile is effectively using the single balloon payment as an ETF, and in many cases can be more than a traditional ETF, so they are kinda circumventing the termination rules that all the carriers and the FCC basically agreed to a few years ago.

        • philyew

          I hadn’t given this much thought before because I don’t have a problem paying off my EIP, as and when needed, but the way that the contractual commitment for the EIP is structured is actually worse than the old service contract provisions for ETFs and when they could be waived.

          The old service contract allows a customer to leave without an ETF falling due, if TM makes materially disadvantageous changes in their terms and conditions.

          The EIP contract says simply: ” You agree to maintain a T-Mobile voice service plan for any device purchased under this contract and any termination of that voice service plan will be a substantial default under this contract and we may declare the remaining unpaid balance of the contract immediately due and payable.”

          Technically, then, anyone signing this contract would be be guilty of a substantial default on the EIP contract, even if they cancelled their service contract under conditions that would have resulted in an ETF being waived.

          The subsequent wording, being permissive but not mandatory of TM declaring the remaining balance immediately due, would be the grounds on which a legal challenge could be raised: with the customer being willing to honor the original terms of the EIP contract.

        • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

          Good analysis. So this invites the question, what’s advantageous for the carrier under the old way of handling this that makes it better for them to do it that way? In other words, why haven’t the rest of the carriers followed suit?

        • philyew

          I think that it must be because they still get considerable leverage from the ability to offer subsidies, which they can afford to support better than TM because of their higher ARPU and margin.

          The general upward drift in device prices was making it impossible for TM to compete with the subsidies offered by AT&T particularly and the EIP approach was the only viable option.

        • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

          Let’s face it. In many cases, especially with respect to mid-tier devices, they also more than recoup the cost of the device as well.

        • philyew

          Yes, but TM effectively had a $20/month cap on the difference between value and legacy pricing from which to recover that subsidy. That meant a maximum of $480 over the course of a contract term.

          We know from the balance sheets released by Samsung in their court action with Apple that until a couple of years ago, TM was paying around $430-450 per unit wholesale for the top-shelf Samsung devices, with an MSRP about $80 more than that. Any margin above wholesale has to cover all their related operating expenses, before returning a profit.

          It doesn’t take a lot to determine that they would now be finding it impossible to offer a competitive subsidy on the $700+ new Samsung and HTC devices and make money on the devices, if they were still operating under the old regime.

        • 21stNow

          The other carriers are following suit. AT&T has made Next the sensible option for new customers. Existing customers on grandfathered plan may come out ahead with a two-year contract.

          Verizon Wireless is pushing Edge. I can never figure out what Sprint is doing at any given time, but I’ve heard that they have a full-price/device financing plan that they are pushing now, too.

        • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

          Yes, you’re right on that front. Specifically, though, I had in mind the “no contract” model, which philyew has painstakingly revealed to be increasingly likely to be more profitable than having contracts in light of the inflation of the cost of devices on the one hand and the consumer push to more friendly, value plans on the other. If philyew’s analysis is correct, and I think it is, then I have to wonder why AT&T and / or Sprint are not eliminating contracts as well. FWIW, I’m leaving Verizon out of this because, for the moment, they are somewhat immune to this problem by having a large enough subscriber base that is blindly loyal, allowing them to essentially say “F— you; we don’t need to change our prices because our customers will pay whatever we want them to pay” (a playful paraphrase that effectively summarizes what a Verizon executive said in an article I had read before BTW).

          Legere, also, is personally hellbent on getting the industry to conform to the “no contract” model of operation as well. His move to pay ETFs was a powerplay to expedite this transition. He himself admitted this, saying that by offering to pay ETFs, consumers can now behave AS IF they’re not bound by contracts (at least with respect to T-Mobile on one side and the other carriers on the other). Interestingly enough, there is now a rumor going around that SPRINT is offering to pay off the ETFs of competitors as well. If that’s true, I have to imagine that full-scale “no contracts” is around the corner. Once all of the companies are willing to pay each others’ ETFs off, then it’s only a matter of time before they collectively realize that ETFs are redundant.

        • 21stNow

          I’ve been a proponent of the no-contract model for some time now, and that is why I joined T-Mobile under the Even More Plus plan. However, my vision of the no-contract model doesn’t include these carrier financing plans. They essentially set up a financing contact in place of a service contract that effectively binds customers to the carrier for two years like the service contracts did.

          Part of the reason that I wanted to see the no-contract model is that I would like to see phone prices come down. With the financing plans, prices can remain high because customers aren’t being hit with $600+ price tags at the time of purchase. There was a subsidy model for computers at one time. That didn’t last long and desktop computer prices fell over time. I want to see that happen with cellular phones.

        • JBLmobileG1

          I was thinking that too… maybe even carry the unbranded phones as well so if you choose to, you will be able to use your phone with another carrier without having to get it unlocked.

      • Roger Sales

        Except the different between an EIP and a standard two year agreement on the other carriers is only how they are executed/structured. If someone asked you to describe the EIP plan from T-Mobile in other words, you would basically say it is a payment plan agreement over a 2 year period for a device in exchange for maintaining other payments for service on T-Mobile or until the payment plan is paid off at your choosing.
        If someone were to again ask you how Verizon, Sprint and AT&T operate their device subsidies, you would again say its based on an agreement that you get a certain price for a phone in exchange for maintaining payments for cellular services over 2 years, or until you agree to pay an ETF based on how much you “owe” minus the time you stayed on said carrier. Notice a difference? That’s because there isn’t much of one besides the fact that T-Mobile’s plans get immediately cheaper after the “EIP/Financial contract” is over.
        Yes, we save a lot of money being on T-Mobile for the most part with very few exceptions – it doesn’t mean they get to alter an agreement that is already in place.

      • Roger Sales

        Except the different between an EIP and a standard two year agreement on the other carriers is only how they are executed/structured. If someone asked you to describe the EIP plan from T-Mobile in other words, you would basically say it is a payment plan agreement over a 2 year period for a device in exchange for maintaining other payments for service on T-Mobile or until the payment plan is paid off at your choosing.
        If someone were to again ask you how Verizon, Sprint and AT&T operate their device subsidies, you would again say its based on an agreement that you get a certain price for a phone in exchange for maintaining payments for cellular services over 2 years, or until you agree to pay an ETF based on how much you “owe” minus the time you stayed on said carrier. Notice a difference? That’s because there isn’t much of one besides the fact that T-Mobile’s plans get immediately cheaper after the “EIP/Financial contract” is over.
        Yes, we save a lot of money being on T-Mobile for the most part with very few exceptions – it doesn’t mean they get to alter an agreement that is already in place.

    • Rhonda Griffeth-Bishop

      Eip and corp discount have nothing to do with the other. Any one whom added a corp discount prior to March of last year signed a 2 year contract for the discount not the eip so there would be no way to get out of paying for your phone.

  • Nearmsp

    Those of you who get the discount, might recall we had to sign on a 2 year contract in order to get that discount! So to just remove it would be AT&T style! I am happy John realized that for many customers it would be very hard to accept this sudden change. Over time, as people change companies, there will be fewer number of people on these plans. If John Legere asked their data analytics person to see the retention rate for customers who get the discount, and those who do not, he might find clearly that like frequent flier program, this benefit does bestow some loyalty and commitment without a contract. Very smart decision by John, compared to how Netflix went about something similar.

    • Roger Sales

      That’s not entirely accurate. I don’t know how it was for anyone else, but I was a T-Mobile subscriber first and much later on happened to join an honors society at my college which was a T-Mobile affiliate(one of many other companies that did business with them). You used to have to get a contract IF you wanted a phone subsidy, and because of the way things were back then there was almost no point in not signing a contract because prices didn’t change even if you bought a handset outright.
      When Simple Choice was introduced and migration was becoming a thing that needed to be done to keep things neater on the business/customer support end, it was up to T-Mobile to impose any restrictions immediately in regards to how advantage would work for people who already had it(they chose not to, probably because they wanted Simple Choice to succeed with as little controversy as possible).
      At the point I switched over it was free to migrate because it was more of a hassle for T-Mobile to keep people on a plan they could not change because it was no longer available(If I wanted to I couldn’t reduce my minute plan to save money like I used to be able to, etc).
      As a postpaid carrier you need to maintain consistency when a contract has been in play – the contract should protect the consumer just as it protects the carrier – not to screw people into forking over more money than they initially agreed to because you decided your bottom line isn’t being met under the old rules – rules that apply until the customer decides they don’t want it.

      People were pissed about this and rightfully so – because if you are a customer and you like your plan the way it is – they should only be able to change things if you don’t hold up your end of the bargain as you agreed to. No one agreed to willingly give up their discount for the duration of their financial contract/2 year agreement. Why would you?

    • Roger Sales

      That’s not entirely accurate. I don’t know how it was for anyone else, but I was a T-Mobile subscriber first and much later on happened to join an honors society at my college which was a T-Mobile affiliate(one of many other companies that did business with them). You used to have to get a contract IF you wanted a phone subsidy, and because of the way things were back then there was almost no point in not signing a contract because prices didn’t change even if you bought a handset outright.
      When Simple Choice was introduced and migration was becoming a thing that needed to be done to keep things neater on the business/customer support end, it was up to T-Mobile to impose any restrictions immediately in regards to how advantage would work for people who already had it(they chose not to, probably because they wanted Simple Choice to succeed with as little controversy as possible).
      At the point I switched over it was free to migrate because it was more of a hassle for T-Mobile to keep people on a plan they could not change because it was no longer available(If I wanted to I couldn’t reduce my minute plan to save money like I used to be able to, etc).
      As a postpaid carrier you need to maintain consistency when a contract has been in play – the contract should protect the consumer just as it protects the carrier – not to screw people into forking over more money than they initially agreed to because you decided your bottom line isn’t being met under the old rules – rules that apply until the customer decides they don’t want it.

      People were pissed about this and rightfully so – because if you are a customer and you like your plan the way it is – they should only be able to change things if you don’t hold up your end of the bargain as you agreed to. No one agreed to willingly give up their discount for the duration of their financial contract/2 year agreement. Why would you?

  • JB

    If I’m understanding correctly on the annual verification piece, it’s smart move on Legere’s part. That will weed out the ones who are getting a corporate discount long after they left the company that gave them the eligibility in the first place. They can remove the discount for the ones that aren’t entitled to it while still grandfathering those who are.

    • JBLmobileG1

      I agree and mentioned that they should have done this a few stories back. It’s a fair deal for both the customer who has worked with their company for a while and has been getting their discount. For Tmobile, its fair because the one’s who aren’t with a qualifying company aren’t taking advantage of the discount when they aren’t entitled to it. It’s a win win for both parties.

      • JB

        Ahhh I see we’re on the same page then. That thread got so out of control a few stories back, that your level headed comment must have gotten lost in the shuffle. LOL. I’m sure the reason T-Mobile was set to remove the discounts in the first place was for that very reason and they just didn’t think everything through. It makes you wonder how many people are getting a discount that they aren’t entitled to. Even without all their Uncarrier changes, you have to imagine it still hurts their bottom line when a few some-odd million is getting 15-25% shaved off their bill. Especially when you factor in subset of customers that should really be ineligible for a corp discount. Perhaps that’s why I’ve been so passive about the whole change, even if it did effect me personally.

  • turtle6988

    I’m glad he listens to customers but it would be nice if he listened to employees

  • Cam Bunton

    I have to admit, I think – along with many reasonable folk – that if it makes it better value for everyone in the long run, getting rid of the discounts was a good thing. On the flip side, removing it from people who already received it was never a wise move, and one that would inevitably cause a backlash of some kind. It was a good decision to give it back to those. After all, not having the discount for some could mean the difference between being able to afford the monthly cost, and not being able to.

    • http://www.philosophicalreflections.com/ D.A. Elliott

      My #1 complaint throughout has been that I believe there were better alternatives that would’ve been more beneficial to both parties, T-Mobile and longstanding subscribers, such as a modest loyalty program among other compelling ideas. Right now, they have nothing in place to encourage multi-year uninterrupted service (i.e. loyalty), effectively turning us all into mercenaries (because of no contracts) opting for the immediate best value for our needs. But who knows? Maybe it should be that way in the marketplace?

    • D Nice

      Cam explain this to me on how getting rid of corporate discounts was a good thing? I can’t speak for everyone else but the less I pay is a good thing to me. I mean wireless service is already ridiculously priced. To be honest in IMO if T-Mobile got rid of these discounts all around, Verizon and ATT would have been a better value. On ATT new $160 plan you could use a corporate discount. My 25% discount on top of that would save me almost $50 compared to TMO.

      • Tmo1082

        With AT&T the discounts only apply to the primary voice line.

        • D Nice

          Are you sure?? I was told otherwise by a rep. I even called ATT customer service and they said the same.

        • guest

          You are both wrong. It only applies to the data portion at both att and vz. data plans are “shared” at att an vz so do the new math hence why most complaining the last few days have been very wrong on price benefit assumptions if they were to leave

        • D Nice

          No that is incorrect please do your research.

      • Cam Bunton

        Simple math. If you stop offering a discounted monthly rate for a select number of people, you can keep value low for everyone. It’s better business. If ATT and VZW stopped it, they could do the same.

        • Roger Sales

          AT&T and VZW can’t really stop it even if they wanted to, theres a lot of one percenters in their vast corporate deals that would throw a hissyfit and end their contract with them/go to the carrier that does cater to them. What AT&T and VZW lack in affordability, they try to make up in ‘image’.

        • Cam Bunton

          Yeah. I agree. It’s easier for T-Mobile to take these risks. It’s not the #1 carrier, and its identity recently has all been based on its ability to make unconventional decisions. Whether it’s marketing, plans, offers, CEO behavior… It’s Un-carrier in almost every way.

    • Roger Sales

      John Legere was way too bold and brazen about how getting rid of corporate discounts was that it benefited people who didn’t need it because they are big and powerful. One of the organizations that did business with T-Mobile was Phi Theta Kappa – the international honor society for two year colleges and the reason I got a 13% corporate discount. The people of PTK who use T-Mobile advantage are by no means rolling in dough – if anyone is deserving of a bill credit to save some money it’s college students that are trying to get their degree and move up in the world – no silver spoon’s here. I save about 15 dollars or so on my family plan for month and every little bit helps when you are on a tighter budget.

    • pboggini

      I’m not sure I agree with this. In one sense, yes, having the same price for everyone is a good thing but like others have said in other forums, the best time would have been to do this when Simple Choice started. If he wanted to do this going forward, I would have suggested saying:

      “We are trying to level the playing field here and reward all of our customers. So, starting XX/XX/XXXX, we will remove corporate discounts (and government BTW, why oh why should we give government employees something that those of us in the private sector don’t get? Talk about unfair!) but we are going to make up for it by changing our fee structure just a bit. The first Simple Choice line will now be $45, the second will be $25, the 3rd through 5th will remain at $10.”

      Heck, they could also say that lines 6 and 7 could be $10 as well to sort of undercut Sprint’s Framly efforts. Anyway, you are now giving folks who didn’t have a discount a 10%. The bigger discounts would obviously suffer (sounds like most are 15% or so) but you’d help single and dual line holders out a bit. Just a thought.

  • MarcusDW

    “a simple annual online employer verification.”

    Welp, there goes my discount.

    • TechHog

      I don’t think T-Mobile would be the one at fault in this situation.

  • Chad Dalton

    Now y’all can’t stop whining about it, geesh!

  • mloudt

    THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN 2014!

    • Singleweird

      totally agreed. i feel like legere was like “what are you guys doing over there? stop.”

  • Fred

    Wheeee glad they decided too keep it after all ! Because I was getting ready too head on over too AT&T who offers a discount too my employer

  • Liz

    what about association discount?

  • Gus

    That move honestly save me as a customer.

  • Philip Totaro

    Just signed up for the corp discount last week. Made it under the wire. Whew.

  • PO’D

    Why does T-Mobile charge $20 a line to replace a SIM card when AT&T and Verizon do it for free? Also, if I want to upgrade my device in store, I cannot choose the “basic” 1GB plan. The store reps refuse to sell you a phone unless you choose a data plan above the 1GB threshold. This does not sound like un-carrier to me. T-Mobile should give free SIM cards to current customers who switch devices and should not force a paid data feature to those who want a new device, whether paid in full or through EIP. Un-Carrier my a$$!!

    • yoda

      they dont charge. the $10 sim starter kit is supposed to give you unlimited replacements. only certain stores and third party dealers charge, but corporate stores are not supposed to. when i was working with tmobile we used to sell them an accessory and tell them it would take care of the sim only to bring our accessory ratio up. dont be fooled, call customer care and have them notate the account for a free sim.

      • tmo rep

        Actually we are no longer allowed to give cards for zero dollars unless tech issue with current sim card we are being written up for not selling at 19.99

        • yoda

          Again, that is not tmobile policy, but something implemented by your manager or district manager. a simple call to customer care would solve any issue with sim cards. Tmobile actually states that the sim started kit gives you access to sim replacements.

        • Guest

          T-Mobile policy is that if you are having issues with service, the SIM card can be replaced for free. However, if you lose your SIM card it’s $19.99 for a replacement.

        • Guest

          I don’t get why people think everything should be free or discounted in the wireless industry. You don’t see people at the supermarket asking for free milk for their cereal because they have been shopping their for 10 years…. Or better yet ask the gas station for free or discounted gas because you refuel your vehicle their. Only in America people think everything should be free. If companies do that they will be out of business in no time.

        • Guest

          Thnk you! Ive gotten into it with customers over this time and time again. Ive even used those exact arguments.

        • Guest

          I don’t get why people think everything should be free or discounted in the wireless industry. You don’t see people at the supermarket asking for free milk for their cereal because they have been shopping their for 10 years…. Or better yet ask the gas station for free or discounted gas because you refuel your vehicle their. Only in America people think everything should be free. If companies do that they will be out of business in no time.

        • Guest

          Reps, store managers and district managers do not benefit in any way shape or form from charging customers for SIM cards. It’s policy to charge for a lost replacement. Only if you are having network issues then it is free.

        • Guest

          Reps, store managers and district managers do not benefit in any way shape or form from charging customers for SIM cards. It’s policy to charge for a lost replacement. Only if you are having network issues then it is free.

        • m

          Check T-Comm to know the poilicy before you post

        • yoda

          Again, that is not tmobile policy, but something implemented by your manager or district manager. a simple call to customer care would solve any issue with sim cards. Tmobile actually states that the sim started kit gives you access to sim replacements.

    • yoda

      the 1gb of data is also not true, that is not a requirement of t mobile. certain reps will say that the 1st month is required, but that is bs. tell them you are going to do it online instead and they will gladly activate it for you

      • Ryanide

        “Well, perhaps we can make an exception! Let me go see if my supervisor can approve that!” Then grinds their teeth pretending to go to ask said supervisor, while complaining to that supervisor that the customer is stingy with their money! LOL

    • CRT24

      The charge is $10 for the sim if you are activating but replacement sim cards are free….they default to zero when scanned so you might want to make sure you are going to a corporate store. The price can be manually overridden however and some non corporate stores will do this for extra revenue….they shouldn’t be whether corporate or otherwise

      • tmo rep

        Actually its 20 dollars in the corporate store as well

        • CRT24

          That may possibly still be the written “policy” and the only time a customer may be or should be charged is if they are abusing the courtesy. …$10 is the charge at activation but there is no charge for replacing a sim for trouble shooting network issues or for when they purchase a phone with a different size sim.

        • notovernight

          When I switched to the Nexus 5 and needed the nano sim, I was told it would cost $10. I had to have the store employee call customer care to get the fee waived. I have ben a T-mobile Customer since 2000.

        • notovernight

          When I switched to the Nexus 5 and needed the nano sim, I was told it would cost $10. I had to have the store employee call customer care to get the fee waived. I have ben a T-mobile Customer since 2000.

        • BryanB

          In Corporate retail stores they ring out as $0. The rep will manually have to change the price. Which is just sleezy if they were to do that. Branded retail stores sometimes charge $25 for SIM cards. They also sometimes charge a bill pay fee. Both of which are horribly stupid policies IMO.

        • Singleweird

          corporate stores do not charge for sims unless manager directed. (and it would be a pretty extreme circumstance)

        • jmclma

          they’re free if they have php or jump, otherwise you can charge them for the sim.

        • Singleweird

          it must vary by state or something, because sim cards are always free. im in colorado.

    • CRT24

      The charge is $10 for the sim if you are activating but replacement sim cards are free….they default to zero when scanned so you might want to make sure you are going to a corporate store. The price can be manually overridden however and some non corporate stores will do this for extra revenue….they shouldn’t be whether corporate or otherwise

    • Roger Sales

      Rep’s will try to upsell you but by no means can they force you to take a plan over 1GB. Obviously they want you to take the biggest data plan, but it’s how they earn their living.

      • JBLmobileG1

        Which would make it better not to be commission based. While you still want your paycheck you shouldn’t have to lie and say otherwise to get it.

    • Roger Sales

      Rep’s will try to upsell you but by no means can they force you to take a plan over 1GB. Obviously they want you to take the biggest data plan, but it’s how they earn their living.

    • Roger Sales

      You do realize that while T-Mobile charges you just 10$ for that SIM card, AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint charge you 36$ just for choosing to upgrade(seperate from the device)? There are no longer any such fee’s at T-Mobile. You’re mad because you are paying 10$, I’m happy that I’m saving 26 because I didn’t choose anyone else. Food for thought, good sir.

      • Spanky

        That’s not entirely true. If you’re on AT&T’s value plan (no subsidy/no contract) and get a device on an installment plan, there’s no $36 upgrade charge. Contracts are a different story.

        • MaxPowers .

          That upgrade fee sent me through the roof. I got it credited after yelling at Verizon for a while, but the idea of it is stupid. Now with Edge I don’t have to worry about it anymore.

    • Roger Sales

      You do realize that while T-Mobile charges you just 10$ for that SIM card, AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint charge you 36$ just for choosing to upgrade(seperate from the device)? There are no longer any such fee’s at T-Mobile. You’re mad because you are paying 10$, I’m happy that I’m saving 26 because I didn’t choose anyone else. Food for thought, good sir.

    • elmodern

      i just got a new sim card in January and it was free

    • David Lebron

      Lol those definitely aren’t T-Mobile policies. I’m a rep for a corporate store and that’s a sales pitch (both the sim card and the data feature) for boosting revenue – I don’t personally agree with it so I don’t participate. Instead, I’m honest with my customers and offer them the data for the first month free and let them know why (we can credit the bill) – this way I get paid my spiff, and they don’t get charged anything extra.. Win win :) Remember, whenever you feel something isn’t right, just call customer care right from the store :)

      Yours truly,
      One of the honest T-Mobile reps

    • JDB

      I have replaced at least 4 sim cards on my family plan and never paid a dollar.

    • Singleweird

      sim cards are free at t-mobile.

      -tmo rep

  • John TM

    Hoping that my AAA discount will continue as I’m still a member but not an employee. I think I’ll just keep a low profile unless anyone can shed any light on this.

    • longtimeCustomer

      I was told by T-Force that the AAA discounts are included and will stay. That doesn’t make it true, it’s just what they told me. :)

      • John TM

        Thanks for the insight. I’m optimistic that the AAA discount will remain but had my concerns when John Legere’s statement referred to participating employer and employer verification. I’m not complaining though as I admire T-Mobile for what they’re doing and I would rather be with them than any of the other 3 major carriers.

  • Singleweird

    uncarrier 5.0: WE WILL LISTEN TO OUR CUSTOMERS. T-MO for life!! :)

  • Singleweird

    uncarrier 5.0: WE WILL LISTEN TO OUR CUSTOMERS. T-MO for life!! :)

  • m

    To any T-Mobile employee saying sim card replacements are not 19.99, check T-Comm and you will see the policy that is in place

    • yoda

      how about you check it. i was working with t mobile not to long ago. search for tmobile sim starter kit and it will tell you that you get access to the tmobile network and unlimited sim replacements. i know your a rep and benefit from this, but please stop lying

      • Jason

        I’ve walked into stores where it was free, stores that have charged, and have walked into stores where I’ve been told it’s free if I buy an accessory….
        Policy depends on individual stores integrity I would conclude….
        All carriers have this problem due to commission and whoever managing the store :)

    • Nurdface Gamerhandz

      How about you check community and with your leadership team. Its free under almost all circumstances: if you have insurance, if you have tenure, if you’re nice to us and we can find a community link backing it up, etc.

  • MaxPowers .

    I still don’t understand how they didn’t see this coming. Not exactly a hard reaction to predict. I switched the day before they announced this, so they lost me and probably lost a lot of other people too in the interim. If they want to maintain the image of the “Uncarrier,” then continuing to act like it will be critical going forward.

  • http://www.facebook.com/unfazedrebel Jé Be (Here but Gone)

    Happy class

  • Nick

    Maybe it isn’t going away, but they are asking for verification in the form of paystubs etc. I used to ge the discount, contracting for Microsoft. Now, the badge is not sufficient, and they are asking for paystubs as well!

  • Chris Incognito

    Interestingly, today several coworkers and myself who have dealer plans through T-Mobile received text messages from “BelSpecialAccount@tmobilesupport.com” announcing that our “phone benefit” would be ending in June. Probably just phishing, but doing some research led me here.

  • Chris Incognito

    Interestingly, today several coworkers and myself who have dealer plans through T-Mobile received text messages from “BelSpecialAccount@tmobilesupport.com” announcing that our “phone benefit” would be ending in June. Probably just phishing, but doing some research led me here.

  • ash

    “According to our records, you are currently enrolled and receive a monthly discount through AAA MEMBER DISCOUNT. Unfortunately, this organization no longer has an Advantage Program partnership with T-Mobile, and this discount is no longer available.”:

    They told me I would grandfathered in. Now this!!