(Updated With FCC Statement, Full Text Of DOJ Statement) Department Of Justice Moving To Block AT&T/T-Mobile Takeover

Updated: Thisismynext received a statement from FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and it’s not looking good for AT&T:

By filing suit today, the Department of Justice has concluded that AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile would substantially lessen competition in violation of the antitrust laws. Competition is an essential component of the FCC’s statutory public interest analysis, and although our process is not complete, the record before this agency also raises serious concerns about the impact of the proposed transaction on competition. Vibrant competition in wireless services is vital to innovation, investment, economic growth and job creation, and to drive our global leadership in mobile.  Competition fosters consumer benefits, including more choices, better service and lower prices.

We’re very short on details but Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal are reporting that the Department of Justice is attempting to block the AT&T/T-Mobile merger. The DOJ has filed an anti-trust complaint.

The Justice Department complaint was filed today in federal court inWashington. The U.S. is seeking a declaration that Dallas-based AT&T’s takeover of T-Mobile, a unit of Deutsche Telekom AG (DTE), would violate U.S. antitrust law and a court order blocking any arrangement implementing the deal.

“AT&T’s elimination of T-Mobile as an independent, low- priced rival would remove a significant competitive force from the market,” the U.S. said in its filing.

Developing…

Bloomberg

Justice Department Files Antitrust Lawsuit to Block AT&T’s Acquisition of T-Mobile

Transaction Would Reduce Competition in Mobile Wireless Telecommunications Services, Resulting in Higher Prices, Poorer Quality Services, Fewer Choices and Fewer Innovative Products for Millions of American Consumers

WASHINGTON – The Department of Justice today filed a civil antitrust lawsuit to block AT&T Inc.’s proposed acquisition of T-Mobile USA Inc.   The department said that the proposed $39 billion transaction would substantially lessen competition for mobile wireless telecommunications services across the United States, resulting in higher prices, poorer quality services, fewer choices and fewer innovative products for the millions of American consumers who rely on mobile wireless services in their everyday lives.

The department’s lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, seeks to prevent AT&T from acquiring T-Mobile from Deutsche Telekom AG.

“The combination of AT&T and T-Mobile would result in tens of millions of consumers all across the United States facing higher prices, fewer choices and lower quality products for mobile wireless services,” said Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole.   “Consumers across the country, including those in rural areas and those with lower incomes, benefit from competition among the nation’s wireless carriers, particularly the four remaining national carriers.   This lawsuit seeks to ensure that everyone can continue to receive the benefits of that competition.”

“T-Mobile has been an important source of competition among the national carriers, including through innovation and quality enhancements such as the roll-out of the first nationwide high-speed data network,” said Sharis A. Pozen, Acting Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division.   “Unless this merger is blocked, competition and innovation will be reduced, and consumers will suffer.”

Mobile wireless telecommunications services play a critical role in the way Americans live and work, with more than 300 million feature phones, smart phones, data cards, tablets and other mobile wireless devices in service today.   Four nationwide providers of these services – AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon – account for more than 90 percent of mobile wireless connections.   The proposed acquisition would combine two of those four, eliminating from the market T-Mobile, a firm that historically has been a value provider, offering particularly aggressive pricing.

According to the complaint, AT&T and T-Mobile compete head to head nationwide, including in 97 of the nation’s largest 100 cellular marketing areas.   They also compete nationwide to attract business and government customers.  AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile would eliminate a company that has been a disruptive force through low pricing and innovation by competing aggressively in the mobile wireless telecommunications services marketplace.

The complaint cites a T-Mobile document in which T-Mobile explains that it has been responsible for a number of significant “firsts” in the U.S. mobile wireless industry, including the first handset using the Android operating system, Blackberry wireless email, the Sidekick, national Wi-Fi “hotspot” access, and a variety of unlimited service plans.   T-Mobile was also the first company to roll out a nationwide high-speed data network based on advanced HSPA+ (High-Speed Packet Access) technology.  The complaint states that by January 2011, an AT&T employee was observing that “[T-Mobile] was first to have HSPA+ devices in their portfolio…we added them in reaction to potential loss of speed claims.”

The complaint details other ways that AT&T felt competitive pressure from T-Mobile.   The complaint quotes T-Mobile documents describing the company’s important role in the market:

  • T-Mobile sees itself as “the No. 1 value challenger of the established big guys in the market and as well positioned in a consolidated 4-player national market”; and
  • T-Mobile’s strategy is to “attack incumbents and find innovative ways to overcome scale disadvantages.   [T-Mobile] will be faster, more agile, and scrappy, with diligence on decisions and costs both big and small.   Our approach to market will not be conventional, and we will push to the boundaries where possible. . . . [T-Mobile] will champion the customer and break down industry barriers with innovations. . . .”

The complaint also states that regional providers face significant competitive limitations, largely stemming from their lack of national networks, and are therefore limited in their ability to compete with the four national carriers.   And, the department said that any potential entry from a new mobile wireless telecommunications services provider would be unable to offset the transaction’s anticompetitive effects because it would be difficult, time-consuming and expensive, requiring spectrum licenses and the construction of a network.

The department said that it gave serious consideration to the efficiencies that the merging parties claim would result from the transaction.   The department concluded AT&T had not demonstrated that the proposed transaction promised any efficiencies that would be sufficient to outweigh the transaction’s substantial adverse impact on competition and consumers.   Moreover, the department said that AT&T could obtain substantially the same network enhancements that it claims will come from the transaction if it simply invested in its own network without eliminating a close competitor.

 

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  • http://twitter.com/EzzyNYC Marc Klein

    Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones…

  • http://twitter.com/EzzyNYC Marc Klein

    Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones..

  • http://twitter.com/EzzyNYC Marc Klein

    Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones..

    • Anonymous

      Yahoo! is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the tech arena. I think free email and a search engine (which is powered by Bing) will only get you so far.

    • Anonymous

      Yahoo! is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the tech arena. I think free email and a search engine (which is powered by Bing) will only get you so far.

    • Anonymous

      Yahoo! is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the tech arena. I think free email and a search engine (which is powered by Bing) will only get you so far.

  • TMOFtKnox

    While I am not a big fan of Obama’s DOJ, this is the greatest news I have heard do far today.  Since Crapple is going with a rumored “Sub 4″ display”, will not miss the iPhone on TMo.

  • TMOFtKnox

    While I am not a big fan of Obama’s DOJ, this is the greatest news I have heard do far today.  Since Crapple is going with a rumored “Sub 4″ display”, will not miss the iPhone on TMo.

  • Eric

    Isn’t it still ultimately up to the FCC to squash this merger? Hopefully the DOJ decision will have some weight on it.

    • Bahahahaha

      no the fcc and doj have equal power to quash the merger, easier for the fcc though dog has to sue to get it quashed but also have to agree to this going through which atm they don’t. :-)

  • Eric

    Isn’t it still ultimately up to the FCC to squash this merger? Hopefully the DOJ decision will have some weight on it.

  • Anonymous

    FANTASTIC NEWS. Happy to see that the government sees that this deal is VERY BAD for everyone except AT&T. It would be great if T-Mobile decides to make a strong effort to stay in the US market. T-Mobile customers who enjoy their HSPA+ speeds know how fast and reliable their Network really is. If they could increase their footprint to other parts of this country other customers could realize just how good they are. Try T-Mobile if they are in your area with their HSPA+ Network, you will never leave. In the Boston area their speeds are 5 times faster then anything AT&T can push out. That is the truth.

  • Anonymous

    FANTASTIC NEWS. Happy to see that the government sees that this deal is VERY BAD for everyone except AT&T. It would be great if T-Mobile decides to make a strong effort to stay in the US market. T-Mobile customers who enjoy their HSPA+ speeds know how fast and reliable their Network really is. If they could increase their footprint to other parts of this country other customers could realize just how good they are. Try T-Mobile if they are in your area with their HSPA+ Network, you will never leave. In the Boston area their speeds are 5 times faster then anything AT&T can push out. That is the truth.

  • Cellularcrazy09

    YAY!! Hate to be a killjoy, but I don’t quite think it ends at this…DT still wants T-Mo gone.  Just means stock is going to drop for T-Mo and its going to be sold off in pieces now.

    • ogopogo

      Rather than repeating what you have read, take some time to understand how business and economics works. It is unlikely that a company with a substantial subscriber base would be pieced out. Would DT sell? Maybe. If the price is right. But, the new owner/recipient would want TMO in its entirety. There are/were a number of other suitors that have shown interest in acquiring TMO – The most notable being TelCel, who are looking to expand into the US.

      I personally do NOT want this takeover to go through. TMO has provided the US people with a lower cost alternative to the other carriers, and they push innovation – This benefits us all.

  • Cellularcrazy09

    YAY!! Hate to be a killjoy, but I don’t quite think it ends at this…DT still wants T-Mo gone.  Just means stock is going to drop for T-Mo and its going to be sold off in pieces now.

  • Aaron Blain

    TMOBs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Aaron Blain

    TMOBs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    i pray and i hope this is for real.  Gmobile is looking better everyday. Everyone at tmo may still have a job!  thats the best news of all.

  • Anonymous

    i pray and i hope this is for real.  Gmobile is looking better everyday. Everyone at tmo may still have a job!  thats the best news of all.

  • Bob Carver

    This just means someone else will make a play for it, They want to sell.

    • ogopogo

      That is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact it would be good if anyone else purchases TMO than AT&T, and still allows the American consumer a choice between 2 national GSM carriers.

    • ogopogo

      That is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact it would be good if anyone else purchases TMO than AT&T, and still allows the American consumer a choice between 2 national GSM carriers.

    • ogopogo

      That is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact it would be good if anyone else purchases TMO than AT&T, and still allows the American consumer a choice between 2 national GSM carriers.

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

    • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

      google buying T-mobile will be subject to the same antitrust complaint, they own the OS, hardware maker then the wireless carrier? Who’s to say they wont dump all other mobile platforms and just go with their own? Worst idea possible, better for someone without a vested interest to take tmo over.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Which is my only gripe with Google owning Tmo.  It’d most likely be nothing but Android phones on Tmo from then on.  Android is nice but I want a choice of OS.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Which is my only gripe with Google owning Tmo.  It’d most likely be nothing but Android phones on Tmo from then on.  Android is nice but I want a choice of OS.

        • http://twitter.com/mahmoud824 Mahmoud Shaaban

          Android is Open source so Google cannot pick and choice who uses it even if they did buy T-mobile which i think is unlikely going to happen.

        • Wilma Flintstone

          Uh, I mean I want choice of OS not choice of Manufacturer that uses Android.

          For Example:
          1. Android
          2. Meego
          3. WP7
          4. iOS
          5. WebOS

          Etc.

        • Anonymous

          May as well scratch no. 5 off that list though. :(

        • Wilma Flintstone

          True.  I was just giving examples though

        • Wilma Flintstone

          True.  I was just giving examples though

        • http://twitter.com/mahmoud824 Mahmoud Shaaban

          Android is Open source so Google cannot pick and choice who uses it even if they did buy T-mobile which i think is unlikely going to happen.

        • Anonymous

          Google buying T-Mobile just makes no sense from a business standpoint.  What do people want?  We already get the Nexus first.

        • Wilma Flintstone

          Exactly

        • Wilma Flintstone

          Well, minus the Nexus Prime maybe

        • Anonymous

          Google buying T-Mobile just makes no sense from a business standpoint.  What do people want?  We already get the Nexus first.

        • Anonymous

          Google buying T-Mobile just makes no sense from a business standpoint.  What do people want?  We already get the Nexus first.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Which is my only gripe with Google owning Tmo.  It’d most likely be nothing but Android phones on Tmo from then on.  Android is nice but I want a choice of OS.

      • tm

        That’s not what antitrust is about. It’s about taking over a market, eliminating competitors which would not happen if Google bought TMO…not directly anyway right? Other companies can use other OS-es they are not eliminating competition like the ATT TMO merger directly does. Directly, that is…

      • tm

        That’s not what antitrust is about. It’s about taking over a market, eliminating competitors which would not happen if Google bought TMO…not directly anyway right? Other companies can use other OS-es they are not eliminating competition like the ATT TMO merger directly does. Directly, that is…

    • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

      google buying T-mobile will be subject to the same antitrust complaint, they own the OS, hardware maker then the wireless carrier? Who’s to say they wont dump all other mobile platforms and just go with their own? Worst idea possible, better for someone without a vested interest to take tmo over.

    • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

      google buying T-mobile will be subject to the same antitrust complaint, they own the OS, hardware maker then the wireless carrier? Who’s to say they wont dump all other mobile platforms and just go with their own? Worst idea possible, better for someone without a vested interest to take tmo over.

    • Juicebox

      That would be a great step towards vertical integration. Like Apple, they’d produce their phones. Unlike Apple, they’d provide their own telecom service.

      I agree with Ef Jay. While I believe G-Mobile would be a great idea, I also believe there needs to exist at least two GSM telecom companies that offer a wide range of mobiles on different platforms. This produces competition and allows consumer choice. Same thing goes for CDMA. If this condition is met, then I’ll be all for G-Mobile. (Of course, I’d be okay with Google purchasing T-Mobile and including other mobile platforms along with Android for purposes of competition.)

    • Juicebox

      That would be a great step towards vertical integration. Like Apple, they’d produce their phones. Unlike Apple, they’d provide their own telecom service.

      I agree with Ef Jay. While I believe G-Mobile would be a great idea, I also believe there needs to exist at least two GSM telecom companies that offer a wide range of mobiles on different platforms. This produces competition and allows consumer choice. Same thing goes for CDMA. If this condition is met, then I’ll be all for G-Mobile. (Of course, I’d be okay with Google purchasing T-Mobile and including other mobile platforms along with Android for purposes of competition.)

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

  • Nick

    Honestly never thought this would happen but glad the day is here.  Now about that $3 billion and spectrum from AT&T….

  • Nick

    Honestly never thought this would happen but glad the day is here.  Now about that $3 billion and spectrum from AT&T….

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

    • None

      Second that…

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

  • MagentaMadness

    G-Mobile! Get it done.

  • MagentaMadness

    G-Mobile! Get it done.

  • http://twitter.com/Darknicks Darknicks

    I think that T-Mobile knew all the time that this deal was going to be blocked (even when they deny it and back it up all the time). Think about for a minute: they will earn 3 billion and more spectrum if the merger get blocked. It’s a weird strategy but it’s working…

  • http://twitter.com/Darknicks Darknicks

    I think that T-Mobile knew all the time that this deal was going to be blocked (even when they deny it and back it up all the time). Think about for a minute: they will earn 3 billion and more spectrum if the merger get blocked. It’s a weird strategy but it’s working…

  • http://twitter.com/Darknicks Darknicks

    I think that T-Mobile knew all the time that this deal was going to be blocked (even when they deny it and back it up all the time). Think about for a minute: they will earn 3 billion and more spectrum if the merger get blocked. It’s a weird strategy but it’s working…

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

    • Anonymous

      How about selling to Apple?

    • Anonymous

      How about selling to Apple?

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I saw a review of an AT&T LTE hotspot and it was pulling about 13 Mbps. Decent, but not great, especially for LTE where Verizon has been pulling 37 Mbps in downtown Detroit.

      I don’t think AT&T can pull off LTE and do it well enough to satisfy.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

    • SemiSpook

      Well, broken clocks are right twice a day, after all…

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • Swd_1220

    A man who travels a lot, I actually saw the merger as a good and bad thing.  Bad was the hit T mobile was going to take. The good, I can’t begin to describe the number of times I have not been allowered service on AT&T’s network because of the two of them’s competetivenesss.  Full Service with AT&T and all I would be allowed to do on the job is call 911 if I needed to.

  • Swd_1220

    A man who travels a lot, I actually saw the merger as a good and bad thing.  Bad was the hit T mobile was going to take. The good, I can’t begin to describe the number of times I have not been allowered service on AT&T’s network because of the two of them’s competetivenesss.  Full Service with AT&T and all I would be allowed to do on the job is call 911 if I needed to.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

  • Swd_1220

    A man who travels a lot, I actually saw the merger as a good and bad thing.  Bad was the hit T mobile was going to take. The good, I can’t begin to describe the number of times I have not been allowered service on AT&T’s network because of the two of them’s competetivenesss.  Full Service with AT&T and all I would be allowed to do on the job is call 911 if I needed to.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Crazythunder1968

      even if verizon bought tmo, by the time it was completely over with, the sgs2 would be old news. dead theory. and absurd one.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • BG

    Oh HELL YEAH!

  • Mfraney22

    Haha SUCK IT ATT!!!!!!!