(Updated With FCC Statement, Full Text Of DOJ Statement) Department Of Justice Moving To Block AT&T/T-Mobile Takeover

Updated: Thisismynext received a statement from FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and it’s not looking good for AT&T:

By filing suit today, the Department of Justice has concluded that AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile would substantially lessen competition in violation of the antitrust laws. Competition is an essential component of the FCC’s statutory public interest analysis, and although our process is not complete, the record before this agency also raises serious concerns about the impact of the proposed transaction on competition. Vibrant competition in wireless services is vital to innovation, investment, economic growth and job creation, and to drive our global leadership in mobile.  Competition fosters consumer benefits, including more choices, better service and lower prices.

We’re very short on details but Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal are reporting that the Department of Justice is attempting to block the AT&T/T-Mobile merger. The DOJ has filed an anti-trust complaint.

The Justice Department complaint was filed today in federal court inWashington. The U.S. is seeking a declaration that Dallas-based AT&T’s takeover of T-Mobile, a unit of Deutsche Telekom AG (DTE), would violate U.S. antitrust law and a court order blocking any arrangement implementing the deal.

“AT&T’s elimination of T-Mobile as an independent, low- priced rival would remove a significant competitive force from the market,” the U.S. said in its filing.

Developing…

Bloomberg

Justice Department Files Antitrust Lawsuit to Block AT&T’s Acquisition of T-Mobile

Transaction Would Reduce Competition in Mobile Wireless Telecommunications Services, Resulting in Higher Prices, Poorer Quality Services, Fewer Choices and Fewer Innovative Products for Millions of American Consumers

WASHINGTON – The Department of Justice today filed a civil antitrust lawsuit to block AT&T Inc.’s proposed acquisition of T-Mobile USA Inc.   The department said that the proposed $39 billion transaction would substantially lessen competition for mobile wireless telecommunications services across the United States, resulting in higher prices, poorer quality services, fewer choices and fewer innovative products for the millions of American consumers who rely on mobile wireless services in their everyday lives.

The department’s lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, seeks to prevent AT&T from acquiring T-Mobile from Deutsche Telekom AG.

“The combination of AT&T and T-Mobile would result in tens of millions of consumers all across the United States facing higher prices, fewer choices and lower quality products for mobile wireless services,” said Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole.   “Consumers across the country, including those in rural areas and those with lower incomes, benefit from competition among the nation’s wireless carriers, particularly the four remaining national carriers.   This lawsuit seeks to ensure that everyone can continue to receive the benefits of that competition.”

“T-Mobile has been an important source of competition among the national carriers, including through innovation and quality enhancements such as the roll-out of the first nationwide high-speed data network,” said Sharis A. Pozen, Acting Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division.   “Unless this merger is blocked, competition and innovation will be reduced, and consumers will suffer.”

Mobile wireless telecommunications services play a critical role in the way Americans live and work, with more than 300 million feature phones, smart phones, data cards, tablets and other mobile wireless devices in service today.   Four nationwide providers of these services – AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon – account for more than 90 percent of mobile wireless connections.   The proposed acquisition would combine two of those four, eliminating from the market T-Mobile, a firm that historically has been a value provider, offering particularly aggressive pricing.

According to the complaint, AT&T and T-Mobile compete head to head nationwide, including in 97 of the nation’s largest 100 cellular marketing areas.   They also compete nationwide to attract business and government customers.  AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile would eliminate a company that has been a disruptive force through low pricing and innovation by competing aggressively in the mobile wireless telecommunications services marketplace.

The complaint cites a T-Mobile document in which T-Mobile explains that it has been responsible for a number of significant “firsts” in the U.S. mobile wireless industry, including the first handset using the Android operating system, Blackberry wireless email, the Sidekick, national Wi-Fi “hotspot” access, and a variety of unlimited service plans.   T-Mobile was also the first company to roll out a nationwide high-speed data network based on advanced HSPA+ (High-Speed Packet Access) technology.  The complaint states that by January 2011, an AT&T employee was observing that “[T-Mobile] was first to have HSPA+ devices in their portfolio…we added them in reaction to potential loss of speed claims.”

The complaint details other ways that AT&T felt competitive pressure from T-Mobile.   The complaint quotes T-Mobile documents describing the company’s important role in the market:

  • T-Mobile sees itself as “the No. 1 value challenger of the established big guys in the market and as well positioned in a consolidated 4-player national market”; and
  • T-Mobile’s strategy is to “attack incumbents and find innovative ways to overcome scale disadvantages.   [T-Mobile] will be faster, more agile, and scrappy, with diligence on decisions and costs both big and small.   Our approach to market will not be conventional, and we will push to the boundaries where possible. . . . [T-Mobile] will champion the customer and break down industry barriers with innovations. . . .”

The complaint also states that regional providers face significant competitive limitations, largely stemming from their lack of national networks, and are therefore limited in their ability to compete with the four national carriers.   And, the department said that any potential entry from a new mobile wireless telecommunications services provider would be unable to offset the transaction’s anticompetitive effects because it would be difficult, time-consuming and expensive, requiring spectrum licenses and the construction of a network.

The department said that it gave serious consideration to the efficiencies that the merging parties claim would result from the transaction.   The department concluded AT&T had not demonstrated that the proposed transaction promised any efficiencies that would be sufficient to outweigh the transaction’s substantial adverse impact on competition and consumers.   Moreover, the department said that AT&T could obtain substantially the same network enhancements that it claims will come from the transaction if it simply invested in its own network without eliminating a close competitor.

 

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  • Wilma Flintstone

    Tmo NEEDS The Law Offices of Gary Martin & Hayes.  AT&T “Let’s Settle This One”

    • Angelita

      hahahhahah

      • iHass

        Dewey Screwya & Howe

    • Angelita

      hahahhahah

    • Dewey Cox

      Or Franklin and Bash….

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Nah, John Foy, The Strong Arm

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Nah, John Foy, The Strong Arm

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Nah, John Foy, The Strong Arm

    • Anonymous

      Call 
      Cohen Snyder McClellan Eisenberg & Katzenberg “The people’s choice”  LOL  +10 to anyone who knows that commercial.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        OMG LOL!!!

  • Anonymous

    SWEET!  A no from one of the big boys!  Thinks just got murkier for the merger…

  • Ted

    This was never a “done deal” like so many people posted here and elsewhere. There were always complaints from people high up in government and doubts by experts in the media. Any person who said “get over it, it is going to happen whether we like it or not” was saying that of willful ignorance.

  • Woohoo! This has really brightened up my morning!

    Now the big question, assuming at&t does fail: who’ll end up with T-Mobile? Sprint, or does Google or Microsoft have a chance?

    • Droidsoup

      I would like to see Google pick them up or actually have Yahoo give it a whirl

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Yo do realize that Yahoo is now Microsoft Owned right?

        • Hamster

          No it’s not. Microsoft just provides their search backend now.

        • Hamster

          No it’s not. Microsoft just provides their search backend now.

        • Jumbo

          No the acquisition never happened. Yahoo rejected the proposal by MS…….

        • Jumbo

          No the acquisition never happened. Yahoo rejected the proposal by MS…….

        • Jumbo

          No the acquisition never happened. Yahoo rejected the proposal by MS…….

        • Jumbo

          No the acquisition never happened. Yahoo rejected the proposal by MS…….

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Yo do realize that Yahoo is now Microsoft Owned right?

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Yo do realize that Yahoo is now Microsoft Owned right?

    • Droidsoup

      I would like to see Google pick them up or actually have Yahoo give it a whirl

    • Google ending up with T Mobile isn’t a bad idea actually. 

      • Wilma Flintstone

        The only issue I have with that is having ONLY Android devices from then on.  I mean, Android’s nice but I’d like to have a choice of OS

        • laggyNgroovy

          You would choose “choice” over “brand loyalty” ??? Bad consumer, bad.

        • laggyNgroovy

          You would choose “choice” over “brand loyalty” ??? Bad consumer, bad.

        • laggyNgroovy

          You would choose “choice” over “brand loyalty” ??? Bad consumer, bad.

        • laggyNgroovy

          You would choose “choice” over “brand loyalty” ??? Bad consumer, bad.

        • Wilma Flintstone

          LOL

      • Wilma Flintstone

        The only issue I have with that is having ONLY Android devices from then on.  I mean, Android’s nice but I’d like to have a choice of OS

      • Wilma Flintstone

        The only issue I have with that is having ONLY Android devices from then on.  I mean, Android’s nice but I’d like to have a choice of OS

    • Clifford891

      cablevision has been looking to get tmobile too

    • Clifford891

      cablevision has been looking to get tmobile too

  • Mshah75

    great news!!!!! (if it holds out). competition is always better for us consumers.

  • Sanjay

    This is very good news.  I always like T-Mobile like it was.  I am always trying to get friends and family to switch and have had some success.  This merger can’t in any way be good.  It will really reduce competition.  I have already seen some recent changes in the way T-Mobile is changing and I suspect it is related to their merger (even though they may deny it), contracts and all that…T-Mobile can be great on its own.  I have been their customer for many years now.

  • Sanjay

    This is very good news.  I always like T-Mobile like it was.  I am always trying to get friends and family to switch and have had some success.  This merger can’t in any way be good.  It will really reduce competition.  I have already seen some recent changes in the way T-Mobile is changing and I suspect it is related to their merger (even though they may deny it), contracts and all that…T-Mobile can be great on its own.  I have been their customer for many years now.

  • Sanjay

    This is very good news.  I always like T-Mobile like it was.  I am always trying to get friends and family to switch and have had some success.  This merger can’t in any way be good.  It will really reduce competition.  I have already seen some recent changes in the way T-Mobile is changing and I suspect it is related to their merger (even though they may deny it), contracts and all that…T-Mobile can be great on its own.  I have been their customer for many years now.

  • Anonymous

    Tears….

  • Anonymous

    Tears….

  • Anonymous

    Tears….

  • Anonymous

    Tears….

  • Anonymous

    Tears….

  • Anonymous

    Tears….

  • Jayel1983

    That’s what I’m talking about.. Keep TMobile alive..its better for android and phone development.. plus I am a loyal customer!

  • Jayel1983

    That’s what I’m talking about.. Keep TMobile alive..its better for android and phone development.. plus I am a loyal customer!

  • Jayel1983

    That’s what I’m talking about.. Keep TMobile alive..its better for android and phone development.. plus I am a loyal customer!

  • Jayel1983

    That’s what I’m talking about.. Keep TMobile alive..its better for android and phone development.. plus I am a loyal customer!

  • shaquana

    Finally some GREAT news. 

  • shaquana

    Finally some GREAT news. 

  • I can smell victory getting closer!

  • I can smell victory getting closer!

  • Stephanie29

    Thank you!  I love T-Mobile!  

  • Stephanie29

    Thank you!  I love T-Mobile!  

  • Anonymous

    I feel relieve from this news. Hope it get confirm!!!

  • Anonymous

    I feel relieve from this news. Hope it get confirm!!!

  • Dewey Cox

    If not now, when? If not them, who?

    It’s going to happen all over again to someone else if this gets blocked. 

    DT entered into this willingly, this was not a hostile takeover.

    • Well, look at the three most likely successful suitors:

      – Google – doesn’t have a cellphone network, so T-Google will be pretty much T-Mobile
      – Microsoft- doesn’t have a cellphone network, so MS-Mobile will be pretty much T-Mobile
      – Sprint – is a cellphone network, but has no GSM technology. Given the way the industry is going, I would suggest that Sprint taking over T-Mobile would be a reverse takeover, similar to Apple “buying” NeXT. T-Sprint would be more like T-Mobile than Sprint.

      All of these options (plus DT deciding that, actually, it’s not a bad thing to have a profitable US operation that excels in innovation and customer happiness) are fairly positive for T-Mobile users. I’m happy with ’em :)

  • Dewey Cox

    If not now, when? If not them, who?

    It’s going to happen all over again to someone else if this gets blocked. 

    DT entered into this willingly, this was not a hostile takeover.

  • Ted

    Who knows…with 3 billion, new free spectrum and maybe the iphone…could DT decide to not sell?

  • Ted

    Who knows…with 3 billion, new free spectrum and maybe the iphone…could DT decide to not sell?

  • Anonymous

    THis just made my day even better 

  • Ouch! That hurts! Poor AT&T… T-mobile will earn 8 billion when the merger get blocked.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forgtet the bonus spectrum package they get with the failed merger too.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forgtet the bonus spectrum package they get with the failed merger too.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forgtet the bonus spectrum package they get with the failed merger too.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you, Jeebus!

  • Anonymous

    Finally, after months of every one in the industry repeating over and over the meme of “It’s pretty much a done deal.” At least some real justice can come from the DOJ.

  • Lcg1519

    amazing news!!!!!! My hope is that google takes stab at Tmobile, but I doubt the DOJ would allow that either. They would say it would stifle anything not android. A boy can dream though. 

  • Anonymous

    BOOM DAT!

    All those “This is a done deal” people can STFU now.  Yeah you.

    • Anonymous

      6 billion dollars :)

      • Anonymous

        LOL well said!  Now SHOW ME 6 Billion Dollars.

        • Anonymous

          *cough cough* AT&T, your turn! LMAO!

        • Anonymous

          Lol

        • Anonymous

          Lol

    • Ash

      You forgot about all the people who jumped ship, and the people who signed contract wishing ATT will keep their rate plan and what not.

  • Justin Is Here

    I knew it!!!  I love T-Mobile!!

  • I’m so glad about this news, most of the Pro AT&T fanatics are riding AT&T cause they’re just iPhone thirsty anyways. Keep T-Mobile alive!!!

  • secretly, a tear dropped when i read this. im keepin my fingers, toes, eyes, and arms crossed!!!

    (sent from my samsung vibrant)

  • TMoFan

    This is FANTASTIC news! To those of us who are vehemently against this sellout, this validates ours concerns tenfold. I have said many times that DT has other options and still maintain that. We don’t need at&t as our savior! T-Mobile is a national network and like it or not a sellout that eliminates a national competitor will have harmful effects in the long term.

    Wow, I can’t stop smiling! T-Mobile has always been the best for me. They just called me again this morning to follow up because my coverage was out (it’s back for me now thankfully). Who else would follow up with the customer twice?

  • Kourage2

    No iPhone for Tmobile now. Sprint will definitely get it before they do.

    • Vincenz

      who gives a fck!!!!

      • LMAO took the words out of my mouth Vincenz

      • LMAO took the words out of my mouth Vincenz

      • BG

        HAHAHA! I keep chuckling at your response. : D  So true.

      • BG

        HAHAHA! I keep chuckling at your response. : D  So true.

    • Vincenz

      who gives a fck!!!!

    • Vincenz

      who gives a fck!!!!

  • Enoel69

    BOOYAAAAAAAA…..jumping with joy all over the place. I knew it i knew it…there is CELLPHONE GOD and he is on the side of keeping COMPETITION and INNOVATION ALIVE…thank u DOJ thank u. About time this DARK CLOUD over Magenta get lifted. 

  • Enoel69

    BOOYAAAAAAAA…..jumping with joy all over the place. I knew it i knew it…there is CELLPHONE GOD and he is on the side of keeping COMPETITION and INNOVATION ALIVE…thank u DOJ thank u. About time this DARK CLOUD over Magenta get lifted. 

  • I hope it does get blocked. AT&T…booooo!!!

  • I hope it does get blocked. AT&T…booooo!!!

  • RALPHEXANTUS

    i KNOW JESUS IS A GOOD TMOBILE CUSTOMER.

  • Brianyy

    Thank god!  Finally, they are using the old Anti-Trust laws!  The government is doing something for the little guy!!  I had emailed two senators on the committee to complain and I hope many people did as well.

    Deuche Telekom (germany) who owns Tmobile USA will most likely still sell to someone else but lets hope it’s to another big Euro phone group like ” Orange Mobile or Telefonica.  They would be awesome!
    IF this DOJ can stop the merger.

    We would then still have 4 major cell phone companies in the USA!

    The president of Telefonica (Spain) even said Deusche Telecom (Germany) was doing a terrible job of running the USA division.  So they must have better ideas.

  • Brianyy

    Thank god!  Finally, they are using the old Anti-Trust laws!  The government is doing something for the little guy!!  I had emailed two senators on the committee to complain and I hope many people did as well.

    Deuche Telekom (germany) who owns Tmobile USA will most likely still sell to someone else but lets hope it’s to another big Euro phone group like ” Orange Mobile or Telefonica.  They would be awesome!
    IF this DOJ can stop the merger.

    We would then still have 4 major cell phone companies in the USA!

    The president of Telefonica (Spain) even said Deusche Telecom (Germany) was doing a terrible job of running the USA division.  So they must have better ideas.

  • whosaidwhat

    sadly, this just means that T-Mobile will die soon. The mother company doesn’t want it anymore.

    • Anonymous

      With the $6B in cash and assets, either DT will change their mind or someone else will have more incentive to buy them.  I think either way we will be good.  

    • Anonymous

      With the $6B in cash and assets, either DT will change their mind or someone else will have more incentive to buy them.  I think either way we will be good.  

    • Yogi

      A failed buyout does not always mean the company is still for sale. Microsoft tried to buy Intuit the mid-90s, but the deal was canceled by regulatory disapproval. Intuit went on to remain independent and ended up beating Microsoft in the home and small business financial software market to the point that, just a couple of years ago, Microsoft exited the market altogether.

  • Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones…

  • Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones…

  • Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones..

  • Why Yahoo? They have nothing to do with phones..

    • Anonymous

      Yahoo! is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the tech arena. I think free email and a search engine (which is powered by Bing) will only get you so far.

    • Anonymous

      Yahoo! is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the tech arena. I think free email and a search engine (which is powered by Bing) will only get you so far.

    • Anonymous

      Yahoo! is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the tech arena. I think free email and a search engine (which is powered by Bing) will only get you so far.

  • TMOFtKnox

    While I am not a big fan of Obama’s DOJ, this is the greatest news I have heard do far today.  Since Crapple is going with a rumored “Sub 4″ display”, will not miss the iPhone on TMo.

  • TMOFtKnox

    While I am not a big fan of Obama’s DOJ, this is the greatest news I have heard do far today.  Since Crapple is going with a rumored “Sub 4″ display”, will not miss the iPhone on TMo.

  • Eric

    Isn’t it still ultimately up to the FCC to squash this merger? Hopefully the DOJ decision will have some weight on it.

    • Bahahahaha

      no the fcc and doj have equal power to quash the merger, easier for the fcc though dog has to sue to get it quashed but also have to agree to this going through which atm they don’t. :-)

  • Eric

    Isn’t it still ultimately up to the FCC to squash this merger? Hopefully the DOJ decision will have some weight on it.

  • Anonymous

    FANTASTIC NEWS. Happy to see that the government sees that this deal is VERY BAD for everyone except AT&T. It would be great if T-Mobile decides to make a strong effort to stay in the US market. T-Mobile customers who enjoy their HSPA+ speeds know how fast and reliable their Network really is. If they could increase their footprint to other parts of this country other customers could realize just how good they are. Try T-Mobile if they are in your area with their HSPA+ Network, you will never leave. In the Boston area their speeds are 5 times faster then anything AT&T can push out. That is the truth.

  • Anonymous

    FANTASTIC NEWS. Happy to see that the government sees that this deal is VERY BAD for everyone except AT&T. It would be great if T-Mobile decides to make a strong effort to stay in the US market. T-Mobile customers who enjoy their HSPA+ speeds know how fast and reliable their Network really is. If they could increase their footprint to other parts of this country other customers could realize just how good they are. Try T-Mobile if they are in your area with their HSPA+ Network, you will never leave. In the Boston area their speeds are 5 times faster then anything AT&T can push out. That is the truth.

  • Cellularcrazy09

    YAY!! Hate to be a killjoy, but I don’t quite think it ends at this…DT still wants T-Mo gone.  Just means stock is going to drop for T-Mo and its going to be sold off in pieces now.

    • ogopogo

      Rather than repeating what you have read, take some time to understand how business and economics works. It is unlikely that a company with a substantial subscriber base would be pieced out. Would DT sell? Maybe. If the price is right. But, the new owner/recipient would want TMO in its entirety. There are/were a number of other suitors that have shown interest in acquiring TMO – The most notable being TelCel, who are looking to expand into the US.

      I personally do NOT want this takeover to go through. TMO has provided the US people with a lower cost alternative to the other carriers, and they push innovation – This benefits us all.

  • Cellularcrazy09

    YAY!! Hate to be a killjoy, but I don’t quite think it ends at this…DT still wants T-Mo gone.  Just means stock is going to drop for T-Mo and its going to be sold off in pieces now.

  • Aaron Blain

    TMOBs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Aaron Blain

    TMOBs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    i pray and i hope this is for real.  Gmobile is looking better everyday. Everyone at tmo may still have a job!  thats the best news of all.

  • Anonymous

    i pray and i hope this is for real.  Gmobile is looking better everyday. Everyone at tmo may still have a job!  thats the best news of all.

  • Bob Carver

    This just means someone else will make a play for it, They want to sell.

    • ogopogo

      That is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact it would be good if anyone else purchases TMO than AT&T, and still allows the American consumer a choice between 2 national GSM carriers.

    • ogopogo

      That is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact it would be good if anyone else purchases TMO than AT&T, and still allows the American consumer a choice between 2 national GSM carriers.

    • ogopogo

      That is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact it would be good if anyone else purchases TMO than AT&T, and still allows the American consumer a choice between 2 national GSM carriers.

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

    • google buying T-mobile will be subject to the same antitrust complaint, they own the OS, hardware maker then the wireless carrier? Who’s to say they wont dump all other mobile platforms and just go with their own? Worst idea possible, better for someone without a vested interest to take tmo over.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Which is my only gripe with Google owning Tmo.  It’d most likely be nothing but Android phones on Tmo from then on.  Android is nice but I want a choice of OS.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Which is my only gripe with Google owning Tmo.  It’d most likely be nothing but Android phones on Tmo from then on.  Android is nice but I want a choice of OS.

        • Android is Open source so Google cannot pick and choice who uses it even if they did buy T-mobile which i think is unlikely going to happen.

        • Wilma Flintstone

          Uh, I mean I want choice of OS not choice of Manufacturer that uses Android.

          For Example:
          1. Android
          2. Meego
          3. WP7
          4. iOS
          5. WebOS

          Etc.

        • Anonymous

          May as well scratch no. 5 off that list though. :(

        • Wilma Flintstone

          True.  I was just giving examples though

        • Wilma Flintstone

          True.  I was just giving examples though

        • Android is Open source so Google cannot pick and choice who uses it even if they did buy T-mobile which i think is unlikely going to happen.

        • Anonymous

          Google buying T-Mobile just makes no sense from a business standpoint.  What do people want?  We already get the Nexus first.

        • Wilma Flintstone

          Exactly

        • Wilma Flintstone

          Well, minus the Nexus Prime maybe

        • Anonymous

          Google buying T-Mobile just makes no sense from a business standpoint.  What do people want?  We already get the Nexus first.

        • Anonymous

          Google buying T-Mobile just makes no sense from a business standpoint.  What do people want?  We already get the Nexus first.

      • Wilma Flintstone

        Which is my only gripe with Google owning Tmo.  It’d most likely be nothing but Android phones on Tmo from then on.  Android is nice but I want a choice of OS.

      • tm

        That’s not what antitrust is about. It’s about taking over a market, eliminating competitors which would not happen if Google bought TMO…not directly anyway right? Other companies can use other OS-es they are not eliminating competition like the ATT TMO merger directly does. Directly, that is…

      • tm

        That’s not what antitrust is about. It’s about taking over a market, eliminating competitors which would not happen if Google bought TMO…not directly anyway right? Other companies can use other OS-es they are not eliminating competition like the ATT TMO merger directly does. Directly, that is…

    • google buying T-mobile will be subject to the same antitrust complaint, they own the OS, hardware maker then the wireless carrier? Who’s to say they wont dump all other mobile platforms and just go with their own? Worst idea possible, better for someone without a vested interest to take tmo over.

    • google buying T-mobile will be subject to the same antitrust complaint, they own the OS, hardware maker then the wireless carrier? Who’s to say they wont dump all other mobile platforms and just go with their own? Worst idea possible, better for someone without a vested interest to take tmo over.

    • Juicebox

      That would be a great step towards vertical integration. Like Apple, they’d produce their phones. Unlike Apple, they’d provide their own telecom service.

      I agree with Ef Jay. While I believe G-Mobile would be a great idea, I also believe there needs to exist at least two GSM telecom companies that offer a wide range of mobiles on different platforms. This produces competition and allows consumer choice. Same thing goes for CDMA. If this condition is met, then I’ll be all for G-Mobile. (Of course, I’d be okay with Google purchasing T-Mobile and including other mobile platforms along with Android for purposes of competition.)

    • Juicebox

      That would be a great step towards vertical integration. Like Apple, they’d produce their phones. Unlike Apple, they’d provide their own telecom service.

      I agree with Ef Jay. While I believe G-Mobile would be a great idea, I also believe there needs to exist at least two GSM telecom companies that offer a wide range of mobiles on different platforms. This produces competition and allows consumer choice. Same thing goes for CDMA. If this condition is met, then I’ll be all for G-Mobile. (Of course, I’d be okay with Google purchasing T-Mobile and including other mobile platforms along with Android for purposes of competition.)

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

  • hellsh666

    Now is time for Moto-Google! G-Mobile looks good..

  • Nick

    Honestly never thought this would happen but glad the day is here.  Now about that $3 billion and spectrum from AT&T….

  • Nick

    Honestly never thought this would happen but glad the day is here.  Now about that $3 billion and spectrum from AT&T….

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

    • None

      Second that…

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

  • OKDave

    One word: HALLELUJAH!!!!!

  • MagentaMadness

    G-Mobile! Get it done.

  • MagentaMadness

    G-Mobile! Get it done.

  • I think that T-Mobile knew all the time that this deal was going to be blocked (even when they deny it and back it up all the time). Think about for a minute: they will earn 3 billion and more spectrum if the merger get blocked. It’s a weird strategy but it’s working…

  • I think that T-Mobile knew all the time that this deal was going to be blocked (even when they deny it and back it up all the time). Think about for a minute: they will earn 3 billion and more spectrum if the merger get blocked. It’s a weird strategy but it’s working…

  • I think that T-Mobile knew all the time that this deal was going to be blocked (even when they deny it and back it up all the time). Think about for a minute: they will earn 3 billion and more spectrum if the merger get blocked. It’s a weird strategy but it’s working…

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

  • Enoel69

    If DT doesn’t see that even though Tmo is not number one in the US, it is loved by 30 plus million loyal and long time customers. Now if they are still bent on selling…Google plzzzzz it is time to get out of the bushes/weeds where u have been waiting like some one wrote…partner with or buy Magenta to make it the true Android Hub where most vanilla Android devices come to play. With Tmos HSPA+ 42Mbps speeds beating some LTE speeds now…that will suffice till they figure out their LTE path in a year or two. IF they partner with Google i know we will get super speeds even sooner.

    • Anonymous

      How about selling to Apple?

    • Anonymous

      How about selling to Apple?

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I saw a review of an AT&T LTE hotspot and it was pulling about 13 Mbps. Decent, but not great, especially for LTE where Verizon has been pulling 37 Mbps in downtown Detroit.

      I don’t think AT&T can pull off LTE and do it well enough to satisfy.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

    • SemiSpook

      Well, broken clocks are right twice a day, after all…

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • AndrewF

    Apparently the government isn’t ENTIRELY useless – just mostly.

  • Swd_1220

    A man who travels a lot, I actually saw the merger as a good and bad thing.  Bad was the hit T mobile was going to take. The good, I can’t begin to describe the number of times I have not been allowered service on AT&T’s network because of the two of them’s competetivenesss.  Full Service with AT&T and all I would be allowed to do on the job is call 911 if I needed to.

  • Swd_1220

    A man who travels a lot, I actually saw the merger as a good and bad thing.  Bad was the hit T mobile was going to take. The good, I can’t begin to describe the number of times I have not been allowered service on AT&T’s network because of the two of them’s competetivenesss.  Full Service with AT&T and all I would be allowed to do on the job is call 911 if I needed to.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

    • DetroitTechnoFan

      I’ve roamed off AT&T’s network as recently as the beginning of this month. I was stuck on EDGE, but their EDGE was significantly slower than T-Mobile’s GPRS. I still (mostly) got my texts and calls, but even that was kinda sketchy.

  • Swd_1220

    A man who travels a lot, I actually saw the merger as a good and bad thing.  Bad was the hit T mobile was going to take. The good, I can’t begin to describe the number of times I have not been allowered service on AT&T’s network because of the two of them’s competetivenesss.  Full Service with AT&T and all I would be allowed to do on the job is call 911 if I needed to.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Enoel69

      Far off base….not gonna happen either. Tmo will not be bought by ATT or Verizon or even Sprint. 

    • Crazythunder1968

      even if verizon bought tmo, by the time it was completely over with, the sgs2 would be old news. dead theory. and absurd one.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • OKDave

    Okay, from the Paranoid Conspiracy Theory department: Verizon opts out of the SGSII, despite reports for months of their own version in the pipe. Less than a week after that announcement, DOJ files to block the merger, suggesting someone else will likely buy TMobile. Would Verizon have reason to buy TMobile just to keep it from Sprint, also realizing they’d be inheriting T-Mobile’s SGS2 and other phone options along the way? Not that Verizon is buying them strictly to get the SGS2, but their decision not to carry it was merely a downstream consequence of some inside knowledge that DOJ was going to act, and the possibility Verizon might be interested in acquiring TMob themselves.

    I know, I know, probably absurd speculation, but it might stir the pot of discussion.

  • BG

    Oh HELL YEAH!

  • Mfraney22

    Haha SUCK IT ATT!!!!!!!

  • AlealeG2

    Does this mean that tmobile will receive that $6 billion dollars because the merger was blocked? this would help them out with more spectrum!!
    WINNING

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forget, part of the concession if the merger fails is that T-Mobile gets some of AT&T’s spectrum.

    • PistolPete76

      3 Billion and a lot of spectrum that could be woth billions more,

  • Anonymous

    How can you block the number 2 carrier from buying the number 4? This is a buyout…..not a merger. DT willingly offered to sell TMO USA to AT&T for 39B. If TMO USA was successful, they wouldn’t be up for sale. TMO USA isn’t performing well in the market….With that being said, how can the DOJ cry wolf? There can be conditions put in place in order for this transaction to gain approval. We all assumed this would gain approval with conditions that would help level the playing field for other carriers. This doesn’t make sense. This move by the DOJ seems premature if you ask me.

  • Anonymous

    How can you block the number 2 carrier from buying the number 4? This is a buyout…..not a merger. DT willingly offered to sell TMO USA to AT&T for 39B. If TMO USA was successful, they wouldn’t be up for sale. TMO USA isn’t performing well in the market….With that being said, how can the DOJ cry wolf? There can be conditions put in place in order for this transaction to gain approval. We all assumed this would gain approval with conditions that would help level the playing field for other carriers. This doesn’t make sense. This move by the DOJ seems premature if you ask me.

    • Anonymous

      GSM monopoly.

    • Anonymous

      GSM monopoly.

    • Anonymous

      GSM monopoly.

    • TMO INSIDER

      Are you related to, and/or sleeping with Philipp Humm? Sounds like someone REALLY wants some rollover minutes…

    • Anonymous

      TMO USA is successful and they are making money.  Maybe not as successful as the top 3 but more so than the bottom 15.

      I don’t think ATT will be willing to give up enough to make the deal go through.  DOJ is apparently very against it which means that ATT would have to do a LOT in order to change their mind.

      • IT Guy

        They’re making money, but not enough for DT to keep putzing around with them. They’ve invested close to $60b and are eeking out maybe $2-3b a year. While that does sound like a lot of money, businesses don’t like taking 20-30 years to get a return on their investment. Especially when they need cash to upgrade their other holdings.

        DT still wants to dump T-Mobile USA, but now the DOJ has taken away their buyer. Have fun with what happens next. It’s liable to be ugly.

    • Raully61

      “We all assumed this would gain approval with conditions that would help level the playing field for other carriers”

      You joke…right?!?

    • CRT24

      I have no idea if this is a good or a bad thing for t-mobile employees. given the fact that DT obviously does not have a strong desire to keep its US operation, so who knows what they will do if the blocking of this deal holds up. But to say that T-Mobile is not a successful operation is just not accurate…..it did after all have almost 2 billion in profit last year while Sprint lost several hundred million with almost 20 million more customers. It is not just about customer base but more how you run your operation and it is no secret that T-Mobile was late to the game with high speed data but now it can be argued that it is ahead of every carrier but Verizon in this area. If DT decides to get behind its US operation rather than look for ways out then I think T-Mobile would be in a great position to be successful going forward….but that is a big IF. The parameters of this deal were suspect from the beginning given the fact that ATT paid more than double T-Mobile’s market value and their own leaked document stated that they could roll out LTE on their own for 1/6 of the buyout cost and 2 years sooner….this was obviously not just about getting the network but eliminating competition and the DOJ saw right through this with todays decision. I just hope some good will com from this for T-Mobile employees and customers alike.

    • CRT24

      I have no idea if this is a good or a bad thing for t-mobile employees. given the fact that DT obviously does not have a strong desire to keep its US operation, so who knows what they will do if the blocking of this deal holds up. But to say that T-Mobile is not a successful operation is just not accurate…..it did after all have almost 2 billion in profit last year while Sprint lost several hundred million with almost 20 million more customers. It is not just about customer base but more how you run your operation and it is no secret that T-Mobile was late to the game with high speed data but now it can be argued that it is ahead of every carrier but Verizon in this area. If DT decides to get behind its US operation rather than look for ways out then I think T-Mobile would be in a great position to be successful going forward….but that is a big IF. The parameters of this deal were suspect from the beginning given the fact that ATT paid more than double T-Mobile’s market value and their own leaked document stated that they could roll out LTE on their own for 1/6 of the buyout cost and 2 years sooner….this was obviously not just about getting the network but eliminating competition and the DOJ saw right through this with todays decision. I just hope some good will com from this for T-Mobile employees and customers alike.

    • CRT24

      I have no idea if this is a good or a bad thing for t-mobile employees. given the fact that DT obviously does not have a strong desire to keep its US operation, so who knows what they will do if the blocking of this deal holds up. But to say that T-Mobile is not a successful operation is just not accurate…..it did after all have almost 2 billion in profit last year while Sprint lost several hundred million with almost 20 million more customers. It is not just about customer base but more how you run your operation and it is no secret that T-Mobile was late to the game with high speed data but now it can be argued that it is ahead of every carrier but Verizon in this area. If DT decides to get behind its US operation rather than look for ways out then I think T-Mobile would be in a great position to be successful going forward….but that is a big IF. The parameters of this deal were suspect from the beginning given the fact that ATT paid more than double T-Mobile’s market value and their own leaked document stated that they could roll out LTE on their own for 1/6 of the buyout cost and 2 years sooner….this was obviously not just about getting the network but eliminating competition and the DOJ saw right through this with todays decision. I just hope some good will com from this for T-Mobile employees and customers alike.

    • CRT24

      I have no idea if this is a good or a bad thing for t-mobile employees. given the fact that DT obviously does not have a strong desire to keep its US operation, so who knows what they will do if the blocking of this deal holds up. But to say that T-Mobile is not a successful operation is just not accurate…..it did after all have almost 2 billion in profit last year while Sprint lost several hundred million with almost 20 million more customers. It is not just about customer base but more how you run your operation and it is no secret that T-Mobile was late to the game with high speed data but now it can be argued that it is ahead of every carrier but Verizon in this area. If DT decides to get behind its US operation rather than look for ways out then I think T-Mobile would be in a great position to be successful going forward….but that is a big IF. The parameters of this deal were suspect from the beginning given the fact that ATT paid more than double T-Mobile’s market value and their own leaked document stated that they could roll out LTE on their own for 1/6 of the buyout cost and 2 years sooner….this was obviously not just about getting the network but eliminating competition and the DOJ saw right through this with todays decision. I just hope some good will com from this for T-Mobile employees and customers alike.

  • Anonymous

    How can you block the number 2 carrier from buying the number 4? This is a buyout…..not a merger. DT willingly offered to sell TMO USA to AT&T for 39B. If TMO USA was successful, they wouldn’t be up for sale. TMO USA isn’t performing well in the market….With that being said, how can the DOJ cry wolf? There can be conditions put in place in order for this transaction to gain approval. We all assumed this would gain approval with conditions that would help level the playing field for other carriers. This doesn’t make sense. This move by the DOJ seems premature if you ask me.

  • Anonymous

    How can you block the number 2 carrier from buying the number 4? This is a buyout…..not a merger. DT willingly offered to sell TMO USA to AT&T for 39B. If TMO USA was successful, they wouldn’t be up for sale. TMO USA isn’t performing well in the market….With that being said, how can the DOJ cry wolf? There can be conditions put in place in order for this transaction to gain approval. We all assumed this would gain approval with conditions that would help level the playing field for other carriers. This doesn’t make sense. This move by the DOJ seems premature if you ask me.

  • Anonymous

    Or DT could’ve not been cheap from the beginning and bought more spectrum……and who’s to say DT would invest that money in tmo usa? They may just take the money and run.

    • IT Guy

      I’m quite sure that’s exactly what they’ll do.

  • Anonymous

    Or DT could’ve not been cheap from the beginning and bought more spectrum……and who’s to say DT would invest that money in tmo usa? They may just take the money and run.

  • Anonymous

    Or DT could’ve not been cheap from the beginning and bought more spectrum……and who’s to say DT would invest that money in tmo usa? They may just take the money and run.

  • Anonymous

    Or DT could’ve not been cheap from the beginning and bought more spectrum……and who’s to say DT would invest that money in tmo usa? They may just take the money and run.

  • AlealeG2

    YAY! and we get to keep Carly!!

    • None

      I agree to that one..

  • AlealeG2

    YAY! and we get to keep Carly!!

  • Anonymous

    On one hand, I’m glad for the DOJ block. I see the proposed buy out as a reduction in consumer choice. But, on the other hand, T-mobile is still on shaky ground due to DT closing their wallets. Personally, it seems like a lose-lose situation to me. Best wishes, tmo customers.

  • Anonymous

    On one hand, I’m glad for the DOJ block. I see the proposed buy out as a reduction in consumer choice. But, on the other hand, T-mobile is still on shaky ground due to DT closing their wallets. Personally, it seems like a lose-lose situation to me. Best wishes, tmo customers.

  • Anonymous

    On one hand, I’m glad for the DOJ block. I see the proposed buy out as a reduction in consumer choice. But, on the other hand, T-mobile is still on shaky ground due to DT closing their wallets. Personally, it seems like a lose-lose situation to me. Best wishes, tmo customers.

  • Anonymous

    On one hand, I’m glad for the DOJ block. I see the proposed buy out as a reduction in consumer choice. But, on the other hand, T-mobile is still on shaky ground due to DT closing their wallets. Personally, it seems like a lose-lose situation to me. Best wishes, tmo customers.

  • EWIL

    Now GOOGLE please step in and buy T-MOBILE now that would be a AWESOME move right there, come on GREEN MACHINE!!!!!!!! Happy T-Mobile sales rep!!!!!!!!!

    • IT Guy

      The problem is that Google has no interest in T-Mobile.

    • IT Guy

      The problem is that Google has no interest in T-Mobile.

    • IT Guy

      The problem is that Google has no interest in T-Mobile.

      • Flashy4bb

        on top of it google does not want to upset its partners.the major carriers will maybe turn to apple and allow htc to come up with their own os on top of sense. don’t know if google will like it.

  • —-

    Pound sand AT&T!!

  • IT Guy

    Well that’s quite a move. And it does absolutely nothing for the consumer.
     
    Before anyone gets too excited, keep in mind that DT still has absolutely no desire to remain in the US market. This doesn’t change for one second that fact that they want to get rid of T-Mobile USA so they can concentrate on their European holdings and that they have no intention of sinking more money into this network.

    I would not be surprised if you start hearing talk from DT about pulling the plug and selling off what they can at this point. Do you really think after a slap in the face like this from the DOJ that they want to invest MORE money in the US?

    • Flashy4bb

      who cares? don’t you think us companies have more investments in germany and across europ? just take it easy. they will all be fine as long as you pay your bills every month.

    • Flashy4bb

      who cares? don’t you think us companies have more investments in germany and across europ? just take it easy. they will all be fine as long as you pay your bills every month.

    • Flashy4bb

      who cares? don’t you think us companies have more investments in germany and across europ? just take it easy. they will all be fine as long as you pay your bills every month.

    • Jays_on

      Tmobile is not looking like a co that wants to go out of business. They just introduced the unlimited plan deals which are amazing. Looks like they are still trying to get customers!

    • Sikety

      Why would this be bad for Dt? They are in line to get 3 billions cash and another 3 billion in spectrum.

    • Sikety

      Why would this be bad for Dt? They are in line to get 3 billions cash and another 3 billion in spectrum.

    • Anonymous

      can you do some simple math?

      let’s stipulate that dt will sell t-mobile usa.  if dt sells tmusa to another national domestic carrier, you are left with 3 national carriers.  if dt sells to another telecom, but not necessarily domestic (like telmex, telus, rogers, three, orange, telefonica, etc.) there are still 4 national carriers.  if dt sells tmusa to a business that is not a telecom, there are still 4 national carriers.

      the way that the doj is looking at this from what we know from their statement, they prefer having 4 carriers because 3 carriers is less than 4 carriers and they want more choice.  they also prefer not having one carrier have a monopoly on a particular cell technology because one carrier will influence what technology is in the phones.

      this tells me three things: there must me significant concessions on the part of deathstar in order for the merger to move forward as it stands now and i now do think that a possible merger with sprint could happen with phones being sold as world units (activate sim cards for those with tmusa accounts or activate the phone for sprint accounts) until sprint rolls out lte (if they ever do) or if that doesn’t happen i can see the doj allowing another worldwide telecom to buy out dt’s interest in t-mobile.

  • guest

    great! so now sprintell can now get what they originally wanted..to buy TMO and really force all the TMO customers to switch to cdma phones! out of pocket consumer cost ….where as with the tmo/att merger….

    • ogopogo

      How did you come to that conclusion? In the PAST, Sprint had made a play for TMO, but has since been under financial strain. They do not have the cash on hand to buy TMO. It will most likely be an outside (foreign) source that is looking to expand/establish a footprint in the US. Rumors abound around TelCel, and Rogers Canada as potential suitors.

    • ogopogo

      How did you come to that conclusion? In the PAST, Sprint had made a play for TMO, but has since been under financial strain. They do not have the cash on hand to buy TMO. It will most likely be an outside (foreign) source that is looking to expand/establish a footprint in the US. Rumors abound around TelCel, and Rogers Canada as potential suitors.

    • ogopogo

      How did you come to that conclusion? In the PAST, Sprint had made a play for TMO, but has since been under financial strain. They do not have the cash on hand to buy TMO. It will most likely be an outside (foreign) source that is looking to expand/establish a footprint in the US. Rumors abound around TelCel, and Rogers Canada as potential suitors.

  • Silk7412

    I keep telling people. This is not a done deal. But we still have a long road ahead. With the DOJ not wanting it. the FCC has gotta look at it real hard.
    Don’t stop filing at the fcc. Keep telling them how you feel!

  • tm

    good news for today.

  • TMO INSIDER

    Anyone who thinks Google or Apple is going to purchase T-Mobile lacks common sense. If that were the case, every phone would be Android or an iOS device and would leave no room for competitor’s devices. The idea behind stopping this acquisition is to continue driving competition. Besides…I don’t think the iPhone Flip is on its way anytime soon…

    • Silk7412

      Google yes. Apple No.
      Apple would not be right to buy tmobile(why think of how restricted tmo would become- forget about tethering)

      This would be a prime time for google to come in and buy tmobile( more open and we would get the best androids)

    • Silk7412

      Google yes. Apple No.
      Apple would not be right to buy tmobile(why think of how restricted tmo would become- forget about tethering)

      This would be a prime time for google to come in and buy tmobile( more open and we would get the best androids)

      • Wilma Flintstone

        You mean, we get the ONLY Androids.  If Google bought Tmobile, Verizon, At&t and Sprint would pull from Android due to it now being a competitor

        • CM Punk’s Text

          Same way Apple pulled from Verizon because of the marketing campaign?
          If it makes you money, you don’t abandon it.  Google would likely be with all the carriers because of pre-existing contracts with the carriers and manufacturers.

        • CM Punk’s Text

          Same way Apple pulled from Verizon because of the marketing campaign?
          If it makes you money, you don’t abandon it.  Google would likely be with all the carriers because of pre-existing contracts with the carriers and manufacturers.

        • CM Punk’s Text

          Same way Apple pulled from Verizon because of the marketing campaign?
          If it makes you money, you don’t abandon it.  Google would likely be with all the carriers because of pre-existing contracts with the carriers and manufacturers.

        • CM Punk’s Text

          Same way Apple pulled from Verizon because of the marketing campaign?
          If it makes you money, you don’t abandon it.  Google would likely be with all the carriers because of pre-existing contracts with the carriers and manufacturers.

        • CM Punk’s Text

          Same way Apple pulled from Verizon because of the marketing campaign?
          If it makes you money, you don’t abandon it.  Google would likely be with all the carriers because of pre-existing contracts with the carriers and manufacturers.

        • CM Punk’s Text

          Same way Apple pulled from Verizon because of the marketing campaign?
          If it makes you money, you don’t abandon it.  Google would likely be with all the carriers because of pre-existing contracts with the carriers and manufacturers.

    • Silk7412

      Google yes. Apple No.
      Apple would not be right to buy tmobile(why think of how restricted tmo would become- forget about tethering)

      This would be a prime time for google to come in and buy tmobile( more open and we would get the best androids)

    • Silk7412

      Google yes. Apple No.
      Apple would not be right to buy tmobile(why think of how restricted tmo would become- forget about tethering)

      This would be a prime time for google to come in and buy tmobile( more open and we would get the best androids)

    • I don’t think Google would buy any phone company outright, but I can see them investing up to a 40% stake in T-Mobile, Sprint, or both.

  • tm

    Very successful companies do buy out each other. They do it so that principals (managers etc) can make $$$. It’s mainly for individuals. In this case it’d be for stockholders of DT, and ATT of course.

  • Anonymous

    Looks like AT&T can’t buy off the politicians. Good job DOJ. Tmobile may not be competition to the big boys but they did force Verizon and AT&T to up the ante on 4g phones and expand their 4g network. Tmobile brought the 4g war to the forefront.

    • Flashy4bb

      you got it right buddy and on top of it, the rates are much more affordable. that’s what we all need.

  • Anonymous

    Looks like AT&T can’t buy off the politicians. Good job DOJ. Tmobile may not be competition to the big boys but they did force Verizon and AT&T to up the ante on 4g phones and expand their 4g network. Tmobile brought the 4g war to the forefront.

  • Anonymous

    Looks like AT&T can’t buy off the politicians. Good job DOJ. Tmobile may not be competition to the big boys but they did force Verizon and AT&T to up the ante on 4g phones and expand their 4g network. Tmobile brought the 4g war to the forefront.

  • Whylee77

    I can breath a sigh of relief!

  • Whylee77

    I can breath a sigh of relief!

  • Jazzmanmonty

    lets take a little vote.  As we all know DT wants to get rid of tmobile and i’m sure they will find one way or another to do it.  Now, would you all rather see tmobile purchased by ATT or Sprint? Honestly i hate both, but if it came down to it, i’d have to say ATT would be my choice.  Actually like someone said below, Google needs to purchase tmobile!!!!!!! 

    • I’m about 90% sure Sprint buying T-Mobile would be a reverse takeover.

      Look, here’s the deal with Sprint. It’s rolled out a massive amount of infrastructure that’s non-standard and largely obsolete (the three technologies it’s using are CDMA2000/cdmaOne, iDEN, and WiMAX.) It doesn’t have “clean” spectrum. It has poor customer service. It doesn’t offer a particularly reliable system. And it needs something or someone to swoop in and fix it.

      Sprint isn’t wanting to buy T-Mobile for the customers, or for the spectrum. It wants the company, in much the same way as Apple needed NeXT (Apple bought NeXT, and NeXT took over Apple. True story: for the first few years as iCEO/CEO, Steve Jobs used a Thinkpad running OPENSTEP.) T-Mobile has its own problems, but it’s a well run company with reliable services and good customer service. Anyone in Sprint’s position would be a fool to ignore it.

      With the AT&T buyout, that would have been it. T-Mobile would no longer exist, any more than the original AT&T Wireless existed once Cingular bought them out.

      But yeah, I’d prefer G-Mobile too…

    • Anonymous

      Between AT&T and Sprint, Sprint hands down.  In fact, when it was rumored that Sprint and TMo were in talks, people supported it and backed the idea of a merger between them.

      The problem with the AT&T acquisition of T-Mobile is the fact that it’s AT&T.

      Now if Google got into the game as a cell phone carrier, I will be there day 1.

    • ItsMichaelNotMike

      I vote for Sprint.  AT&T is a lousy corporate citizen (look up AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, as one example).

    • ItsMichaelNotMike

      I vote for Sprint.  AT&T is a lousy corporate citizen (look up AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, as one example).

  • Jazzmanmonty

    lets take a little vote.  As we all know DT wants to get rid of tmobile and i’m sure they will find one way or another to do it.  Now, would you all rather see tmobile purchased by ATT or Sprint? Honestly i hate both, but if it came down to it, i’d have to say ATT would be my choice.  Actually like someone said below, Google needs to purchase tmobile!!!!!!! 

  • Jazzmanmonty

    lets take a little vote.  As we all know DT wants to get rid of tmobile and i’m sure they will find one way or another to do it.  Now, would you all rather see tmobile purchased by ATT or Sprint? Honestly i hate both, but if it came down to it, i’d have to say ATT would be my choice.  Actually like someone said below, Google needs to purchase tmobile!!!!!!! 

  • Anonymous

    That’s how it’s done. Removing 25% of nationwide cellphone providers would’ve definitely increased prices in services. Glad the DoJ sees that. Monopolies suck.

  • Anonymous

    Looks like I’m not hoping carriers for now. Works for me.

    Their profits might be down quarter-over-quarter but I think T-Mobile USA can still do a ton of business and is very clearly an essential competitor in the US mobile landscape. They’ll be seeing a huge amount of assets from ATT once this deal officially falls through.

    Let’s hope DT sees T-Mobile USA for the opportunity it is~~ or at least court a more appropriate buyer.

  • Jaythe01

    REOICE! THE FEDS DO SOMETHING RIGHT!!!

    Realisticall speaking there will be suitors but this is a HUGE victory for TMO US and its loyal customers. A key area is addressed, roaming/service, that has plagued TMO since its prior agreement went caput causing some folks to bail.

    At this point from my following of the situation Google may not be in a viable position to buy TMO.The Moto deal will cripple faith within its investors and bottom line for the next couple of years. So unless they have something up their sleeve, they are out.  I would love nothing more than the Goog to start delving into the market to really push the envelope on delivering data service and the Android platform.

    Possible suitors that would be next in line (in no particular order): CENTURY LINK, CABLEVISION, COMCAST, SPRINT (THINK OF ORANGE AND TMO UK ALLIANCE), ORANGE, TELEFONICA.

    I could explain everyone of these in detail and why it could happen but Id write a book. If anyone is interested drop a email…..

  • Vdawg

    I love the way the DOJ is using T-mobile’s own words in fighting this merger. Tmo said that they were the low price, high innovation and best customer service network in business so I guess the DOJ is holding them their words.

  • Vdawg

    I love the way the DOJ is using T-mobile’s own words in fighting this merger. Tmo said that they were the low price, high innovation and best customer service network in business so I guess the DOJ is holding them their words.

  • Vdawg

    I love the way the DOJ is using T-mobile’s own words in fighting this merger. Tmo said that they were the low price, high innovation and best customer service network in business so I guess the DOJ is holding them their words.

  • Cmfn904@gmail.com

    Maybe $3 billion that DT receives for failed transaction would be enough to keep T-Mobile in USA.

    • Jasonbiggs

      They also get complete AT&T leave coverage for roaming as well as all of AT&T’s AWS spectrum for the deal failing.  This leaves DT in a better position to sell the company to a another Euro cell giant.  AT&T will have to give MAJOR stuff to DK (Tmo USA). 

      I don’t think AT&T every expected the deal to fail or they wouldn’t have put so much in the contract if it failed to pass.

    • IT Guy

      Unfortunately that money goes to DT not T-Mobile. DT still wants out, and I think that the $3b is just a buffer against them selling out at a lower price than the att offer.

    • IT Guy

      Unfortunately that money goes to DT not T-Mobile. DT still wants out, and I think that the $3b is just a buffer against them selling out at a lower price than the att offer.

    • IT Guy

      Unfortunately that money goes to DT not T-Mobile. DT still wants out, and I think that the $3b is just a buffer against them selling out at a lower price than the att offer.

    • IT Guy

      Unfortunately that money goes to DT not T-Mobile. DT still wants out, and I think that the $3b is just a buffer against them selling out at a lower price than the att offer.

    • IT Guy

      Unfortunately that money goes to DT not T-Mobile. DT still wants out, and I think that the $3b is just a buffer against them selling out at a lower price than the att offer.

  • Ben

    “Moreover, the department said that AT&T could obtain substantially the same network enhancements that it claims will come from the transaction if it simply invested in its own network without eliminating a close competitor.” – EPIC!!!!!!! BEST QUoTE OF ALL!!!!! :)

    Take that! AT&T liars!!! :) yay for the justice department!

  • Steve

    I agree that the merger would not be good for consumers.  What happens next?  The Obama Admin is going to be tarred by the GOP as anti-business with this one.  

  • Steve

    I agree that the merger would not be good for consumers.  What happens next?  The Obama Admin is going to be tarred by the GOP as anti-business with this one.  

    • Anonymous

      The Obama Admin was anti-business WAY before this ever happened chief.  This might actually be a good thing for Obama’s administration for a change…. You’re totally backwards on this one.

    • Anonymous

      The Obama Admin was anti-business WAY before this ever happened chief.  This might actually be a good thing for Obama’s administration for a change…. You’re totally backwards on this one.

  • NBIQ

    This is good news, totally!

    But, small comment from the peanut gallery:
    Too bad the DOJ didn’t step up to the plate when Exxon and Mobil ha their unnecessary “merger”. 
    I suppose the Big Oil industry had better lobbyists….

  • NBIQ

    This is good news, totally!

    But, small comment from the peanut gallery:
    Too bad the DOJ didn’t step up to the plate when Exxon and Mobil ha their unnecessary “merger”. 
    I suppose the Big Oil industry had better lobbyists….

    • Guest

      That was under a different Administration – not Obama.

    • Guest

      That was under a different Administration – not Obama.

    • Guest

      That was under a different Administration – not Obama.

  • NBIQ

    This is good news, totally!

    But, small comment from the peanut gallery:
    Too bad the DOJ didn’t step up to the plate when Exxon and Mobil ha their unnecessary “merger”. 
    I suppose the Big Oil industry had better lobbyists….

  • NBIQ

    This is good news, totally!

    But, small comment from the peanut gallery:
    Too bad the DOJ didn’t step up to the plate when Exxon and Mobil ha their unnecessary “merger”. 
    I suppose the Big Oil industry had better lobbyists….

  • Sandles

    What’s funny is how everyone complains how terrible T-Mobile has become since ATT first proposed the acquisition, however, if ATT is denied the opportunity then T-Mobile will be much worse. T-Mobile was already a struggling company before this all happened and they will surely be struggling if they are declined. T-Mobile won’t be looking to reclaim itself as their own company. DT will be looking to sell them to the next highest bidder and most likely this won’t be a good thing for customers.  The company could be split up and who knows how that would end up. I guess time will tell. Until then, enjoy the roller coaster ride!

    • Jeffreygreen1315

      Give me the rollercoaster ride as long as it doesn’t involve AT&T

      • Guest

        I soooo agree.  Anybody but AT&T.  Been there.  They are not nice people. 

    • Jeffreygreen1315

      Give me the rollercoaster ride as long as it doesn’t involve AT&T

    • Martinspr

      Any of the big European Telecoms buying Tmobile USA is better than AT&T buying it.  It will leave 4 US Cell phone carriers.  Trust me…DK will find a buyer in Europe or South America.

    • Martinspr

      Any of the big European Telecoms buying Tmobile USA is better than AT&T buying it.  It will leave 4 US Cell phone carriers.  Trust me…DK will find a buyer in Europe or South America.

    • Martinspr

      Any of the big European Telecoms buying Tmobile USA is better than AT&T buying it.  It will leave 4 US Cell phone carriers.  Trust me…DK will find a buyer in Europe or South America.

  • Sandles

    What’s funny is how everyone complains how terrible T-Mobile has become since ATT first proposed the acquisition, however, if ATT is denied the opportunity then T-Mobile will be much worse. T-Mobile was already a struggling company before this all happened and they will surely be struggling if they are declined. T-Mobile won’t be looking to reclaim itself as their own company. DT will be looking to sell them to the next highest bidder and most likely this won’t be a good thing for customers.  The company could be split up and who knows how that would end up. I guess time will tell. Until then, enjoy the roller coaster ride!

  • Sandles

    What’s funny is how everyone complains how terrible T-Mobile has become since ATT first proposed the acquisition, however, if ATT is denied the opportunity then T-Mobile will be much worse. T-Mobile was already a struggling company before this all happened and they will surely be struggling if they are declined. T-Mobile won’t be looking to reclaim itself as their own company. DT will be looking to sell them to the next highest bidder and most likely this won’t be a good thing for customers.  The company could be split up and who knows how that would end up. I guess time will tell. Until then, enjoy the roller coaster ride!

  • Sandles

    What’s funny is how everyone complains how terrible T-Mobile has become since ATT first proposed the acquisition, however, if ATT is denied the opportunity then T-Mobile will be much worse. T-Mobile was already a struggling company before this all happened and they will surely be struggling if they are declined. T-Mobile won’t be looking to reclaim itself as their own company. DT will be looking to sell them to the next highest bidder and most likely this won’t be a good thing for customers.  The company could be split up and who knows how that would end up. I guess time will tell. Until then, enjoy the roller coaster ride!

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Some great comments in here, but many people are confused about what’s going on with the DOJ lawsuit (what it means).  I am working on another matter, but will weigh in on this later.

    For now, as much as many people hate Sprint, you all should be kissing Dan Hesse’s feet.  He pretty much has led the fight in opposing this deal (he even has a war room dedicated to this fight) and the court filing indicates the DOJ “adopted” Sprint’s arguments. (Always flattering when someone does that.)

    Knowing the DOJ had the biggest foot to squish AT&T’s acquisition bug, Hesse has been pushing the DOJ to file an antitrust suit.  Hesse was so sure his prodding the DOJ would pay off that when in July 2011 DOJ antitrust chief Christine Varney announced her August departure to Cravath Swaine (a white shoe law firm), Hesse went on record that he had confidence the antitrust division and Varney’s successor would block the deal. Looks like Hesse was right.  Hesse must be absolutely giddy right now.

    By the way, the government is NOT saying T-Mobile can’t do a deal, it’s saying that AT&T can’t be the buyer.

    This is devastating news for T-Mobile (DT) because DT really, really, really, really wanted that $39 billion.  No one else is going to offer that kind of money.  T-Mobile is realistically worth about $12 billion to $15 billion.

    The AT&T deal was going to save some people at DT from being fired.  I expect to see their heads rolling now. Don’t feel any sympathy for them.  They were basically willing to sheetcan T-Mobile employees and screw over T-Mobile customers simply to save their jobs and hand a windfall to DT shareholders.

    • Mmmaxheadroom

      So what you are saying Michael and correct me if I am wrong. Hesse has better conections with this DOJ staff than at&t? Or perhaps this DOJ staff is less willing to roll over for the evil empire? Either way it doesn’t look good for tmobile customers because DT could simply limp by with a just good enough attitude and one way or another screw the consumer with poor service. Problem is we won’t see or here anything from tmobile until the end of the merger one way or the other.

    • CM Punk’s Text

      So, what you’re saying is that T-Mobile will make 1/4-1/5 as much as what they’re worth if they’re not bought out?

      No way is that correct.  In all honesty, this may be a good financial move by DT, especially if they were pushing for this not to go through the whole time.  Not saying that was the case, but with the corporate world, you never know what their true intentions are.

      If T-Mobile gets that 3B+ for the acquisition falling through, you have to figure that’s more profit than they would have expected from the fallout of customers in the 6-9 months since the news and that means they can be incredibly more aggressive with marketing, and, most importantly, building infrastructure!!!

    • CM Punk’s Text

      So, what you’re saying is that T-Mobile will make 1/4-1/5 as much as what they’re worth if they’re not bought out?

      No way is that correct.  In all honesty, this may be a good financial move by DT, especially if they were pushing for this not to go through the whole time.  Not saying that was the case, but with the corporate world, you never know what their true intentions are.

      If T-Mobile gets that 3B+ for the acquisition falling through, you have to figure that’s more profit than they would have expected from the fallout of customers in the 6-9 months since the news and that means they can be incredibly more aggressive with marketing, and, most importantly, building infrastructure!!!

    • CM Punk’s Text

      So, what you’re saying is that T-Mobile will make 1/4-1/5 as much as what they’re worth if they’re not bought out?

      No way is that correct.  In all honesty, this may be a good financial move by DT, especially if they were pushing for this not to go through the whole time.  Not saying that was the case, but with the corporate world, you never know what their true intentions are.

      If T-Mobile gets that 3B+ for the acquisition falling through, you have to figure that’s more profit than they would have expected from the fallout of customers in the 6-9 months since the news and that means they can be incredibly more aggressive with marketing, and, most importantly, building infrastructure!!!

      • Gordo G

        You Sir I believe have it pinpointed to a T. I think that it is highly likely they don’t want the merger to happen in the first place..DTE is a huge company running a massive profitable wing in the US. The only reasoning they give for wanting to get out of the US is hmm what? They have not given any real reason that I have gathered other than they don’t have an interest in the US market anymore and want to sell? It doesn’t add up? Why would a profitable company all of the sudden want to get out of a market that is sustaining itself? I think this could have been a ploy by DTE all along to re position there stance and make a name for themselves.The majority of Americans have not payed attention to this possible acquisition until today. This issue has now been clearly blasted to the mainstream masses and what is inevitably a huge blow for AT&T was dealt. Whatever the result of the merger their brand has been tarnished by the DOJ’s public assault of this plan. I think that DTE more than likely saw this sort of scenario happening an thus hedged themselves properly to win either way. I am not sure how many companies get to profit from a proposed sale even if the deal does not happen. If this deal gets shot down and T Mobil stays they would be in a prime position to turn the ship around quickly esp if they get the iphone. The newly acquired spectrum and cash coupled with their current price points could be the shot in the arm they have sorely needed to take a real stance in the market.. If they land the iphone with 4g or (hspa+) speeds, customers would flock and the mass exodus would cease and T Mobil could sustain a network build out to accommodate the higher network demand. What a perfect world.. It would be nice if they were plotting this scenario all along. If Apple knew T mobil was going to remain on its own than they would surely have no reason to hold out the iphone from the carrier. Same goes for the Nexus line.

    • CM Punk’s Text

      So, what you’re saying is that T-Mobile will make 1/4-1/5 as much as what they’re worth if they’re not bought out?

      No way is that correct.  In all honesty, this may be a good financial move by DT, especially if they were pushing for this not to go through the whole time.  Not saying that was the case, but with the corporate world, you never know what their true intentions are.

      If T-Mobile gets that 3B+ for the acquisition falling through, you have to figure that’s more profit than they would have expected from the fallout of customers in the 6-9 months since the news and that means they can be incredibly more aggressive with marketing, and, most importantly, building infrastructure!!!

    • Guest

      The DOJ could settle. Don’t forget that. This is not the first time the DOJ has sued to prevent a merger and the merge still took place… 

      See: Comcast – NBC merge.

    • Guest

      The DOJ could settle. Don’t forget that. This is not the first time the DOJ has sued to prevent a merger and the merge still took place… 

      See: Comcast – NBC merge.

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Some great comments in here, but many people are confused about what’s going on with the DOJ lawsuit (what it means).  I am working on another matter, but will weigh in on this later.

    For now, as much as many people hate Sprint, you all should be kissing Dan Hesse’s feet.  He pretty much has led the fight in opposing this deal (he even has a war room dedicated to this fight) and the court filing indicates the DOJ “adopted” Sprint’s arguments. (Always flattering when someone does that.)

    Knowing the DOJ had the biggest foot to squish AT&T’s acquisition bug, Hesse has been pushing the DOJ to file an antitrust suit.  Hesse was so sure his prodding the DOJ would pay off that when in July 2011 DOJ antitrust chief Christine Varney announced her August departure to Cravath Swaine (a white shoe law firm), Hesse went on record that he had confidence the antitrust division and Varney’s successor would block the deal. Looks like Hesse was right.  Hesse must be absolutely giddy right now.

    By the way, the government is NOT saying T-Mobile can’t do a deal, it’s saying that AT&T can’t be the buyer.

    This is devastating news for T-Mobile (DT) because DT really, really, really, really wanted that $39 billion.  No one else is going to offer that kind of money.  T-Mobile is realistically worth about $12 billion to $15 billion.

    The AT&T deal was going to save some people at DT from being fired.  I expect to see their heads rolling now. Don’t feel any sympathy for them.  They were basically willing to sheetcan T-Mobile employees and screw over T-Mobile customers simply to save their jobs and hand a windfall to DT shareholders.

  • Ben

    Not to worry, there is an evil MBA somewhere plotting a way to engineer a career boost and a big bonus from a merger or acquisition involving T-Mobile. Once they’re in play it’s just a matter of time.

  • Ben

    Not to worry, there is an evil MBA somewhere plotting a way to engineer a career boost and a big bonus from a merger or acquisition involving T-Mobile. Once they’re in play it’s just a matter of time.

  • Lcc1_

    wheres google when TMo needs a buyer? Theyve pretty much bought everything else…come on google.

  • Lcc1_

    wheres google when TMo needs a buyer? Theyve pretty much bought everything else…come on google.

  • Guest

    I think ensuring AT&T doesn’t get a hold of T-Mobile is a victory. I’m not sure we’re out of the park, yet, but it’s a step in the right direction. 

    TMobile customers are not out looking for big huge fees, which is what AT&T will provide, they are seeking the best deal. This is NOT the best deal. 

    DT wants to get rid of TMobile. They’ve said it and they WILL do it. The question isn’t what will happen to Tmobile, it’s what will happen to its customers… 

    • Anonymous

      We will all die !! Look other companies have an interest in TMO . Even Google inquired . 39 billion dollars shut out everyone . TMO is worth much less than 39 billion . It was a power move . If the merger goes through they will get to raise rates . Verizon will go right along . Sprint would die . They are just to in debt to even merge . 

    • Bladesjunk

      Businesses should never be run by consumers.  That was T-Mobiles first downfall.  Consumers want cheap and free but don’t care about what it takes for a business to be profitable and stay afloat.  In the end, the consumer screaming that they don’t want AT&T to buy T-Mobile are the individuals that have been the cause of the company’s poor profitability.

      People responsible for the company will continue to attempt and have the company bought.  DT is putting them in a position to do so.  It is bad business to keep sinking money into a company that does not turn a profit or even keep itself flat.

      If DOJ wins then it will be impossible for any other mergers/buyouts.  The company will slowly bankrupt itself and then the subscribers will be forced to move onto either the main wireless companies (Verizon/AT&T) or the ‘prepaid’ companies (Cricket and Metro).  

      I suspect that if the merger, acquisition, does not take place, then T-Mobile will take the MetroPCS style of service.  They will shut down all call centers, shut down stores, hire uneducated salespeople, have local HR/IT/Engineers, low-end devices for full MRSP, no bills, no frills.  It is the only way for them to even be able to keep the company in the game.

    • Bladesjunk

      Businesses should never be run by consumers.  That was T-Mobiles first downfall.  Consumers want cheap and free but don’t care about what it takes for a business to be profitable and stay afloat.  In the end, the consumer screaming that they don’t want AT&T to buy T-Mobile are the individuals that have been the cause of the company’s poor profitability.

      People responsible for the company will continue to attempt and have the company bought.  DT is putting them in a position to do so.  It is bad business to keep sinking money into a company that does not turn a profit or even keep itself flat.

      If DOJ wins then it will be impossible for any other mergers/buyouts.  The company will slowly bankrupt itself and then the subscribers will be forced to move onto either the main wireless companies (Verizon/AT&T) or the ‘prepaid’ companies (Cricket and Metro).  

      I suspect that if the merger, acquisition, does not take place, then T-Mobile will take the MetroPCS style of service.  They will shut down all call centers, shut down stores, hire uneducated salespeople, have local HR/IT/Engineers, low-end devices for full MRSP, no bills, no frills.  It is the only way for them to even be able to keep the company in the game.

  • Guest

    I think ensuring AT&T doesn’t get a hold of T-Mobile is a victory. I’m not sure we’re out of the park, yet, but it’s a step in the right direction. 

    TMobile customers are not out looking for big huge fees, which is what AT&T will provide, they are seeking the best deal. This is NOT the best deal. 

    DT wants to get rid of TMobile. They’ve said it and they WILL do it. The question isn’t what will happen to Tmobile, it’s what will happen to its customers… 

  • Guest

    I think ensuring AT&T doesn’t get a hold of T-Mobile is a victory. I’m not sure we’re out of the park, yet, but it’s a step in the right direction. 

    TMobile customers are not out looking for big huge fees, which is what AT&T will provide, they are seeking the best deal. This is NOT the best deal. 

    DT wants to get rid of TMobile. They’ve said it and they WILL do it. The question isn’t what will happen to Tmobile, it’s what will happen to its customers… 

  • Susank

    Tmobile can be bought by Orange Mobile (France) or Telefonica /Spain (both bigger than AT&T). Both run their companies better than the Germans (DT) too.

  • Therealmikebrown

    Let’s go Google. Time to get into wireless.

    • Guest

      No! Google is big enough. They are invasive enough. They are nothing short of corrupt. I would not like a carrier full of Android phones and little else, either. 

      • “They are nothing short of corrupt.” I call BS on this statement. None of us know how much corruption, if any, is in any of these companies. Google competes with Apple, RIM and Microsoft in the phone/OS business. They compete with Microsoft, Yahoo, Ask and AOL in the search business. They compete with Microsoft, Apple, Roku and others in the TV software/entertainment business. They even compete with Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Blockbuster, Netflix, Barns & Noble, MySpace, Facebook and many more in the book, movie rental, social networking and app businesses. What says Google is any more or less corrupt than any of the others? People choose what they like best in any market, and it would be the same if Google got into the phone carrier business. I don’t believe they would get into this business, though, because they want all the carriers to provide Android phones throughout the world. This would not be as likely to happen if Google owned their own carrier.

    • Guest

      No! Google is big enough. They are invasive enough. They are nothing short of corrupt. I would not like a carrier full of Android phones and little else, either. 

  • William Cron

    So, if AT&T is the Death Star, does that make Sprit the Rebel Alliance?

    • TouchedMeHere

      no it makes them the Hutts.

  • tmofan99

    Suck on that AT&T, and pay up! Time to build up the network and crank up that LTE. I’m pumped!

  • tmofan99

    Suck on that AT&T, and pay up! Time to build up the network and crank up that LTE. I’m pumped!

  • tmofan99

    Suck on that AT&T, and pay up! Time to build up the network and crank up that LTE. I’m pumped!

  • technerd

    Does this mean T-mobile iPhone soon? It better! I’m tired of EDGE speeds!

  • Anonymous

    This is excellent news to hear. It’s doubtful that AT&T can win this court battle. According to former FCC chair Reed Hundt, he says “The Department of Justice will prevail. The Justice
    Department in its entire history has never lost a telecom case of this
    sort.” To which I say, oh yeah! Also, as David recently updated, the current FCC chair has serious concerns about the deal as well.

    T-Mo will continue to operate and may have others attempt to buy it but until that happens, DT has no choice but to continue to let it run. They can’t just dissolve the company as it would be a huge loss for them. Either someone who is not AT&T will pick them up, or they will be the same company we have known (only hopefully with more aggressive marketing and they’ll stop changing plans every 2 months).

    Personally, this news has made my day. Now give us Nexus Prime, iPhone 5, and actual specs on the upcoming Hercules and we’ll be happier customers.

  • just got REAL!!  GOod job United States Government(for once)).  ha, not so Fast Att!  ; P

  • just got REAL!!  GOod job United States Government(for once)).  ha, not so Fast Att!  ; P

  • this is good news, thanks DOJ for protecting the consumers not these greedy bastard AT&T company

  • this is good news, thanks DOJ for protecting the consumers not these greedy bastard AT&T company

  • i’d rather see tmo vanish from US market than being owned by another US carrier, be it AT&T or any company. why? i will save on ETC, but i still prefer TMO to stay

  • i’d rather see tmo vanish from US market than being owned by another US carrier, be it AT&T or any company. why? i will save on ETC, but i still prefer TMO to stay

  • Steve

     Interesting News Article about T-mobile’s Woes
    NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department’s move to block AT&T Inc. from buying T-Mobile USA is motivated by the desire to keep a low-priced competitor in the game. But that’s a game T-Mobile is losing.Despite low prices and a peppy pitchwoman in a polka-dot dress, T-Mobile customers have been fleeing to other carriers in the last year and a half.T-Mobile’s 33.6 million customers may be relieved that the federal government is trying to block the merger, so they can keep their wireless service plans. But in the long run, T-Mobile is in an unsustainable position. Analysts say the company’s past decisions have painted it into a corner.The No. 4 wireless carrier is being squeezed by competitors from two directions. At the high end of the market, it can’t compete with Verizon Wireless and AT&T Inc., the market leader and no. 2, respectively. At the low end, T-Mobile is struggling against competitors like Sprint Nextel Corp., which sells government-subsidized “lifeline” service, and MetroPCS Holdings Corp., which targets urban, working class consumers with cheap “unlimited” plans.Essentially, T-Mobile is seen as a cheap brand by those who can afford better, and as an expensive one by those who pinch every penny.”We’re stuck in the middle from a brand point of view,” T-Mobile CEO Philipp Humm said in January.The most valuable customers, the ones who buy smartphones and sign up for two-year contracts with lucrative data plans, are leaving T-Mobile the fastest.It’s not because T-Mobile’s customers are particularly dissatisfied with the service — they like their provider better than AT&T customers theirs, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index.Instead, the lure of the iPhone and wider network coverage is what draws high-paying customers to AT&T and Verizon.So, even though T-Mobile is profitable, its revenue is shrinking fast — in the latest quarter, it was down to the level of 2007.Customer flight could speed up even more this fall, if Sprint gets to start selling the iPhone, as The Wall Street Journal reported recently. That would make T-Mobile the only one of the four national wireless carriers that doesn’t sell Apple Inc.’s coveted phone.In about two years, T-Mobile will face another problem: limited wireless spectrum, or space on the airwaves. While other carriers have been bulking up their spectrum holdings in the last five years, T-Mobile stayed mostly on the sidelines. That means growing smartphone data use could fill up T-Mobile’s airwaves in a few years, according to the company’s own estimates.Even before AT&T’s $39 billion deal to buy T-Mobile was announced in March, T-Mobile’s corporate parent, Deutsche Telekom AG of Germany, said it’s not interested in investing more in its U.S. subsidiary. It gave CEO Humm a mission to stop customer flight and start growing revenue, but he’ll have to do it with the U.S. subsidiary’s own resources.Recon Analytics analyst Roger Entner traces T-Mobile’s current troubles in part to Deutsche Telekom’s unwillingness to invest in T-Mobile’s spectrum and network in the last few years. It waited until 2009 to start building out a wireless broadband network, several years behind Verizon Wireless, AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp.Entner said Sprint, the industry’s No. 3, is a good example of a carrier that has overcome a lot of adversity. It has slowed subscriber flight in the last few years through improvements in customer service.”The US market is competitive and companies can come back from near death when they do things right. The problem is that T-Mobile USA’s parent Deutsche Telekom is not committed to the US market the same way its competitors are,” Entner said.When the AT&T deal was announced in March, it came as a surprise. Industry rumors, instead, hinted at a linkup between T-Mobile and Sprint. If AT&T fails its appeal, that buzz could reemerge. But T-Mobile and Sprint use different network technologies, which would make any merger difficult.Sanford Bernstein analyst Craig Moffett also thinks the Justice Department’s reasoning in the AT&T case would preclude a Sprint-T-Mobile merger.There would be a silver lining for T-Mobile if the deal falls through. AT&T would have to pay T-Mobile $3 billion in cash and transfer to it some unused spectrum. In addition, T-Mobile would get a renegotiated roaming agreement with AT&T. None of those are likely to change Deutsche Telekom’s reluctance to invest in T-Mobile.

  • Steve

     Interesting News Article about T-mobile’s Woes
    NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department’s move to block AT&T Inc. from buying T-Mobile USA is motivated by the desire to keep a low-priced competitor in the game. But that’s a game T-Mobile is losing.Despite low prices and a peppy pitchwoman in a polka-dot dress, T-Mobile customers have been fleeing to other carriers in the last year and a half.T-Mobile’s 33.6 million customers may be relieved that the federal government is trying to block the merger, so they can keep their wireless service plans. But in the long run, T-Mobile is in an unsustainable position. Analysts say the company’s past decisions have painted it into a corner.The No. 4 wireless carrier is being squeezed by competitors from two directions. At the high end of the market, it can’t compete with Verizon Wireless and AT&T Inc., the market leader and no. 2, respectively. At the low end, T-Mobile is struggling against competitors like Sprint Nextel Corp., which sells government-subsidized “lifeline” service, and MetroPCS Holdings Corp., which targets urban, working class consumers with cheap “unlimited” plans.Essentially, T-Mobile is seen as a cheap brand by those who can afford better, and as an expensive one by those who pinch every penny.”We’re stuck in the middle from a brand point of view,” T-Mobile CEO Philipp Humm said in January.The most valuable customers, the ones who buy smartphones and sign up for two-year contracts with lucrative data plans, are leaving T-Mobile the fastest.It’s not because T-Mobile’s customers are particularly dissatisfied with the service — they like their provider better than AT&T customers theirs, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index.Instead, the lure of the iPhone and wider network coverage is what draws high-paying customers to AT&T and Verizon.So, even though T-Mobile is profitable, its revenue is shrinking fast — in the latest quarter, it was down to the level of 2007.Customer flight could speed up even more this fall, if Sprint gets to start selling the iPhone, as The Wall Street Journal reported recently. That would make T-Mobile the only one of the four national wireless carriers that doesn’t sell Apple Inc.’s coveted phone.In about two years, T-Mobile will face another problem: limited wireless spectrum, or space on the airwaves. While other carriers have been bulking up their spectrum holdings in the last five years, T-Mobile stayed mostly on the sidelines. That means growing smartphone data use could fill up T-Mobile’s airwaves in a few years, according to the company’s own estimates.Even before AT&T’s $39 billion deal to buy T-Mobile was announced in March, T-Mobile’s corporate parent, Deutsche Telekom AG of Germany, said it’s not interested in investing more in its U.S. subsidiary. It gave CEO Humm a mission to stop customer flight and start growing revenue, but he’ll have to do it with the U.S. subsidiary’s own resources.Recon Analytics analyst Roger Entner traces T-Mobile’s current troubles in part to Deutsche Telekom’s unwillingness to invest in T-Mobile’s spectrum and network in the last few years. It waited until 2009 to start building out a wireless broadband network, several years behind Verizon Wireless, AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp.Entner said Sprint, the industry’s No. 3, is a good example of a carrier that has overcome a lot of adversity. It has slowed subscriber flight in the last few years through improvements in customer service.”The US market is competitive and companies can come back from near death when they do things right. The problem is that T-Mobile USA’s parent Deutsche Telekom is not committed to the US market the same way its competitors are,” Entner said.When the AT&T deal was announced in March, it came as a surprise. Industry rumors, instead, hinted at a linkup between T-Mobile and Sprint. If AT&T fails its appeal, that buzz could reemerge. But T-Mobile and Sprint use different network technologies, which would make any merger difficult.Sanford Bernstein analyst Craig Moffett also thinks the Justice Department’s reasoning in the AT&T case would preclude a Sprint-T-Mobile merger.There would be a silver lining for T-Mobile if the deal falls through. AT&T would have to pay T-Mobile $3 billion in cash and transfer to it some unused spectrum. In addition, T-Mobile would get a renegotiated roaming agreement with AT&T. None of those are likely to change Deutsche Telekom’s reluctance to invest in T-Mobile.

    • Richardthegrape

      I thought this was a post from @ItsMichaelNotMike:disqus for a second ha-ha. He always posts super long ones like this…

    • Richardthegrape

      I thought this was a post from @ItsMichaelNotMike:disqus for a second ha-ha. He always posts super long ones like this…

    • Richardthegrape

      I thought this was a post from @ItsMichaelNotMike:disqus for a second ha-ha. He always posts super long ones like this…

    • Richardthegrape

      I thought this was a post from @ItsMichaelNotMike:disqus for a second ha-ha. He always posts super long ones like this…

    • A lot of people have left just because they do not want to be an AT&T customer. If the sale is stopped, T-Mobile could see their numbers go up again. Also, AT&T will have to pay a few billion to DT if the deal is stopped. DT would also get a couple billion in spectrum and a billion in roaming costs. That should help them boost T-Mo’s business a bit.

    • A lot of people have left just because they do not want to be an AT&T customer. If the sale is stopped, T-Mobile could see their numbers go up again. Also, AT&T will have to pay a few billion to DT if the deal is stopped. DT would also get a couple billion in spectrum and a billion in roaming costs. That should help them boost T-Mo’s business a bit.

      • 3 Billion cash + 3 Billion in spectrum. It’s like a big party!

  • Steve

     Interesting News Article about T-mobile’s Woes
    NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department’s move to block AT&T Inc. from buying T-Mobile USA is motivated by the desire to keep a low-priced competitor in the game. But that’s a game T-Mobile is losing.Despite low prices and a peppy pitchwoman in a polka-dot dress, T-Mobile customers have been fleeing to other carriers in the last year and a half.T-Mobile’s 33.6 million customers may be relieved that the federal government is trying to block the merger, so they can keep their wireless service plans. But in the long run, T-Mobile is in an unsustainable position. Analysts say the company’s past decisions have painted it into a corner.The No. 4 wireless carrier is being squeezed by competitors from two directions. At the high end of the market, it can’t compete with Verizon Wireless and AT&T Inc., the market leader and no. 2, respectively. At the low end, T-Mobile is struggling against competitors like Sprint Nextel Corp., which sells government-subsidized “lifeline” service, and MetroPCS Holdings Corp., which targets urban, working class consumers with cheap “unlimited” plans.Essentially, T-Mobile is seen as a cheap brand by those who can afford better, and as an expensive one by those who pinch every penny.”We’re stuck in the middle from a brand point of view,” T-Mobile CEO Philipp Humm said in January.The most valuable customers, the ones who buy smartphones and sign up for two-year contracts with lucrative data plans, are leaving T-Mobile the fastest.It’s not because T-Mobile’s customers are particularly dissatisfied with the service — they like their provider better than AT&T customers theirs, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index.Instead, the lure of the iPhone and wider network coverage is what draws high-paying customers to AT&T and Verizon.So, even though T-Mobile is profitable, its revenue is shrinking fast — in the latest quarter, it was down to the level of 2007.Customer flight could speed up even more this fall, if Sprint gets to start selling the iPhone, as The Wall Street Journal reported recently. That would make T-Mobile the only one of the four national wireless carriers that doesn’t sell Apple Inc.’s coveted phone.In about two years, T-Mobile will face another problem: limited wireless spectrum, or space on the airwaves. While other carriers have been bulking up their spectrum holdings in the last five years, T-Mobile stayed mostly on the sidelines. That means growing smartphone data use could fill up T-Mobile’s airwaves in a few years, according to the company’s own estimates.Even before AT&T’s $39 billion deal to buy T-Mobile was announced in March, T-Mobile’s corporate parent, Deutsche Telekom AG of Germany, said it’s not interested in investing more in its U.S. subsidiary. It gave CEO Humm a mission to stop customer flight and start growing revenue, but he’ll have to do it with the U.S. subsidiary’s own resources.Recon Analytics analyst Roger Entner traces T-Mobile’s current troubles in part to Deutsche Telekom’s unwillingness to invest in T-Mobile’s spectrum and network in the last few years. It waited until 2009 to start building out a wireless broadband network, several years behind Verizon Wireless, AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp.Entner said Sprint, the industry’s No. 3, is a good example of a carrier that has overcome a lot of adversity. It has slowed subscriber flight in the last few years through improvements in customer service.”The US market is competitive and companies can come back from near death when they do things right. The problem is that T-Mobile USA’s parent Deutsche Telekom is not committed to the US market the same way its competitors are,” Entner said.When the AT&T deal was announced in March, it came as a surprise. Industry rumors, instead, hinted at a linkup between T-Mobile and Sprint. If AT&T fails its appeal, that buzz could reemerge. But T-Mobile and Sprint use different network technologies, which would make any merger difficult.Sanford Bernstein analyst Craig Moffett also thinks the Justice Department’s reasoning in the AT&T case would preclude a Sprint-T-Mobile merger.There would be a silver lining for T-Mobile if the deal falls through. AT&T would have to pay T-Mobile $3 billion in cash and transfer to it some unused spectrum. In addition, T-Mobile would get a renegotiated roaming agreement with AT&T. None of those are likely to change Deutsche Telekom’s reluctance to invest in T-Mobile.

  • Steve

     Interesting News Article about T-mobile’s Woes
    NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department’s move to block AT&T Inc. from buying T-Mobile USA is motivated by the desire to keep a low-priced competitor in the game. But that’s a game T-Mobile is losing.Despite low prices and a peppy pitchwoman in a polka-dot dress, T-Mobile customers have been fleeing to other carriers in the last year and a half.T-Mobile’s 33.6 million customers may be relieved that the federal government is trying to block the merger, so they can keep their wireless service plans. But in the long run, T-Mobile is in an unsustainable position. Analysts say the company’s past decisions have painted it into a corner.The No. 4 wireless carrier is being squeezed by competitors from two directions. At the high end of the market, it can’t compete with Verizon Wireless and AT&T Inc., the market leader and no. 2, respectively. At the low end, T-Mobile is struggling against competitors like Sprint Nextel Corp., which sells government-subsidized “lifeline” service, and MetroPCS Holdings Corp., which targets urban, working class consumers with cheap “unlimited” plans.Essentially, T-Mobile is seen as a cheap brand by those who can afford better, and as an expensive one by those who pinch every penny.”We’re stuck in the middle from a brand point of view,” T-Mobile CEO Philipp Humm said in January.The most valuable customers, the ones who buy smartphones and sign up for two-year contracts with lucrative data plans, are leaving T-Mobile the fastest.It’s not because T-Mobile’s customers are particularly dissatisfied with the service — they like their provider better than AT&T customers theirs, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index.Instead, the lure of the iPhone and wider network coverage is what draws high-paying customers to AT&T and Verizon.So, even though T-Mobile is profitable, its revenue is shrinking fast — in the latest quarter, it was down to the level of 2007.Customer flight could speed up even more this fall, if Sprint gets to start selling the iPhone, as The Wall Street Journal reported recently. That would make T-Mobile the only one of the four national wireless carriers that doesn’t sell Apple Inc.’s coveted phone.In about two years, T-Mobile will face another problem: limited wireless spectrum, or space on the airwaves. While other carriers have been bulking up their spectrum holdings in the last five years, T-Mobile stayed mostly on the sidelines. That means growing smartphone data use could fill up T-Mobile’s airwaves in a few years, according to the company’s own estimates.Even before AT&T’s $39 billion deal to buy T-Mobile was announced in March, T-Mobile’s corporate parent, Deutsche Telekom AG of Germany, said it’s not interested in investing more in its U.S. subsidiary. It gave CEO Humm a mission to stop customer flight and start growing revenue, but he’ll have to do it with the U.S. subsidiary’s own resources.Recon Analytics analyst Roger Entner traces T-Mobile’s current troubles in part to Deutsche Telekom’s unwillingness to invest in T-Mobile’s spectrum and network in the last few years. It waited until 2009 to start building out a wireless broadband network, several years behind Verizon Wireless, AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp.Entner said Sprint, the industry’s No. 3, is a good example of a carrier that has overcome a lot of adversity. It has slowed subscriber flight in the last few years through improvements in customer service.”The US market is competitive and companies can come back from near death when they do things right. The problem is that T-Mobile USA’s parent Deutsche Telekom is not committed to the US market the same way its competitors are,” Entner said.When the AT&T deal was announced in March, it came as a surprise. Industry rumors, instead, hinted at a linkup between T-Mobile and Sprint. If AT&T fails its appeal, that buzz could reemerge. But T-Mobile and Sprint use different network technologies, which would make any merger difficult.Sanford Bernstein analyst Craig Moffett also thinks the Justice Department’s reasoning in the AT&T case would preclude a Sprint-T-Mobile merger.There would be a silver lining for T-Mobile if the deal falls through. AT&T would have to pay T-Mobile $3 billion in cash and transfer to it some unused spectrum. In addition, T-Mobile would get a renegotiated roaming agreement with AT&T. None of those are likely to change Deutsche Telekom’s reluctance to invest in T-Mobile.

  • CJ

    Just remember they let the merger of United-Continental go through and i think that did more damage to consumers than ATT and T Mobile. In my opinion it will go through this is just a political game right now.

    • The DOJ filing to put an Axe to the merger gives it to the Courts, and out of the Halls of Congress. 

  • Someone should say sorry to Carly right about now. Just making a point!

  • Someone should say sorry to Carly right about now. Just making a point!

  • BigMixxx

    and the report ends with…

    “What is somewhat unusual about what’s happening with the AT&T/T-Mobile deal is the timing of the Justice Department’s lawsuit. Typically, the Justice Department waits as long as possible to file such claims, according to a lawyer who has worked for the agency but didn’t want to be named. The merger was only announced in March. For the Justice Department to come to a decision to file suit in August, essentially suggesting that the agency sees no way that concessions can be made to make this deal palatable, is unusual, he said.”

    Remember, there is no SEC in this.  only the FCC and the DOJ hurdles.  DOJ has filed a lawsuit blocking it.  the FCC has never ruled against the DOJ….that’s the precedence that ATT as the deal with.  

  • josue cifuentes

    google should buy t-mobile after this is over

  • ConspiracyTheory

    Let me tell you the real story!  Tmobile has gotten real shady and EVIL!  The firing sprees have gotten out of control!  They are on the rampage firing tenured reps and supervisors for the smallest things that would normally result in a verbal warning, some ppl have been fired for things that arent even an issue!  we all know the real reasons here is to either avoid paying severence to tenured employees or to deflate the operational costs by eliminating people!  This is not where the evil stops though, it gets worse!   T-Mobile fights all unemployment benefits!  Leaving people in a bad economy HOMELESS!  yes HOMELESS!     Do not be surprised when you start reading about thousands of lawsuits against t-mobile for their unconscionable acts of wrongful termination!  The numbers will speak VOLUMES!

    • Jcj1

      Do you have proof? Yes there have been people let go, but without facts it is just opinion. People have been upset about the buyout and have been leaving T-Mobile, hopefully now with this news they will come back. Your name says it all, you are trying to stir up trouble. 

  • Dave Macias

    Any other carrier could be better than AT&T, you not only have Vodafone, Orange, O2, Movistar but also carriers most people here in America never heard of like Telenor, Telia Sonera and TATA Docomo even the big Japanese ones like SoftBank, Docomo and KDDI could be better, it is sad to know that because of a phone (iPhone) and low end devices(although the new TMO lineup is very good) my favorite carrier is going down…if they want competition then DT finds another player besides AT&T like i said i would not mind using the carriers i mentioned before, we still would have 4 carriers and competition will be better for the best of consumers.

  • AT&T doesn’t need T-Mobile to deploy 4G LTE nor do they need T-Mobile’s spectrum to grow. Simple as that, the merger needs to be blocked. AT&T can use its 39 BILLION dollars to deploy 4G LTE. The United States government, knows this and they will NOT put the United States of America’s economy in more jeopardy, than it already is just because AT&T doesn’t want to compete fairly. So AT&T and T-Mobile merger, say GOOD BYE! If T-Mobile wants to sell, its free to do so, just not to ANY of the current national wireless carriers in the United States. That means Verizon, AT&T nor Sprint Nextel can be potential candidates for T-Mobile. So DT, owner of T-Mobile, my advice for you is to find yourself another buyer that’s not in the United States!

    • But T-Mobile Needs At&t for its customers to have 4g

      • Lelik827

        idiot

  • JustSomeGuyThatWorksForTMOBILE

    Ok here is the only thing I gained from that

    Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said he was “disappointed in the Justice Department’s decision,” citing Tuesday’s announcement from AT&T that it intended to return 5,000 outsourced call center jobs to the United States if the deal went through.

    Another Texas Republican, Rep. Pete Sessions, called DOJ’s decision “the latest example of the Obama administration’s continued assault on the American economy.”

    First of all, ATT is a Texas based company. With that being said I am pretty sure Sen. Cornyn knows what he is talking about when he stated that. Which (moving call centers) is something Obama has been saying he is going to do for years. Second of all these are TWO people from the RIGHT side. This doesnt mean the entire right party follows two people let alone ONE person. Texas has the best economy as an indevidual state. So if this guy says we CAN benefit from this take over I believe it. Plus the Senatory was ONLY quoted on being disapointed. Obama in fact was for this take over he just never said it on the record. But if you want proof then google it, im not going to spoon feed you. I think the FCC needs to regulate the a## out of ATT so they cant drive up prices, dont ruin jobs for 20k+ people, and get our damn call centers back in the USA….. Thats ONLY if ATT is going to have their way, we should regulate.

    This forum is for T-Mobile News, lets keep it that way and keep politics out!!!!
    Well US politics that is :-P

  • Funny how everything said here is opposite of what we see in those ATT commercials.

  • “T-Mobile has been an important source of competition among the national carriers”   …   The a big slice of bologna. TM has been heading down the drain for 2/2.5+ years now or whenever the first iPhone came out, that was the killer.

  • I despise AT&T and have dumped them in the past. I have no desire to ever be a part of them again! I’m currently a T-Mobile customer. I love the service (I’m happy with my Android phone) and will be really ticked if the merger goes through. If it does, I’m saying hello to Sprint!