Uncarrier 5.0 event scheduled for June 18

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Invites are out, and it’s official. Uncarrier 5.0 is coming in June. T-Mobile today sent out invites to select members of the press to join them in Los Angeles on June 18.

The tagline – “we don’t play it safe and sound” – encapsulates everything about the Uncarrier movement so far. Gradually stripping away pain points customers have virtually considered just part and parcel of owning a smartphone. Whether that’s having subside phone pricing, international roaming costs, overages, data caps and more.

The worry for analysts and investors is that, so far, T-Mobile’s not yet making a healthy profit from the Uncarrier moves. Although its revenue returned to growth for the first time in years last quarter, it’s yet to turn the tide on its losses.

The question is: What will Uncarrier 5.0 be? Which pain points are left to change?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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  • BlackJu

    Device exclusivity…..I wish

    • Jesse James

      that is actually bad for consumers, its better for the consumers to select ther carrier on the services and price provided not the phone lineup.

    • N0 way! I wouldn’t even want that on our beloved Magenta, hurts the Industry as a whole and that’s not good for Anybody.

      • BlackJu

        Sorry sorry sorry….i meant ending device exclusivity. Damn my lazy tongue. If they could somehow leverage their growing share of sales or sell unlocked models by working directly with the manufacturer.

  • Start carrying Google play devices

    • bob90210

      Why? Just buy the devices from Google.

      • bkin94

        If tmo carries the device, you can pay with an installment plan. Some people want that

        • mikey

          and get next day delivery for replacement phoens with insurance, troubleshooting help in an actual store, not to mention actually try the phone before you buy it, and switch if you dont like it.

    • ChitChatCat

      Like the Nexus 5 and 7?

  • Jesse James

    I’m very uninterested in this but would really like to be. Since they started this uncarrier thing the only that has effected me was the switch to simple choice (which raised my bill) and no ETFs/contracts..

    • You were interested enough to comment! So you must be waiting and wondering like most people. It’s okay though, T-Mobile is a great company.

  • sushimane

    I wouldnt mind second hand phone from the jump program to be sold. But of course it should be inspected before selling I want myself a z1s. I know there’s a good bit of people that jumped to different phones.

  • Fr0stTr0n

    I wanna get a T-Mobile shirt somehow….

  • Matt

    Better coverage would very nice! It was a sad day when I had to port my number to AT&T GoPhone simply because coverage in my area is very poor. I’ll be back when T-Mobile improves.

  • rondo

    gosh i hope the iphone gets wifi calling.

    • jarellb

      this could be benifial.. we would be the only carrier with wifi calling on our iphones

  • Hudi G.

    data rollover and sharing across all lines on an account would be awesome!!!!

    • mikey

      who needs data rollover. I dont know anyone who uses less than 5 gb a month. My wife does facebook and instagram mainly with alittle milk music mixed in. She used 8 GB last month.

    • thepanttherlady

      Sharing? No, thank you. AT&T and Verizon offer those types of plans though. ;)

      • mikey

        I dont see how people can share 10 GB and not get overages. If you have a smartphone, its using data even when you are not doing anything by backing itself up, syncing emails, checking updates, etc

      • Hudi G.

        Sharing in that if some people use >250MB a month but others use 5GB they wouldnt even have to buy an added data option since everyone on the plan would get 1GB which is 5GB to share across your lines.

        • mikey

          how can anyone use less than 250 mb unless they have a flipphone. On my note 3, the androidos used over 300 mb of data by itself this month.

        • philyew

          You use Wi-Fi at home and the mobile network only when you are out of doors. It works well for some older smartphone users.

        • Hudi G.

          Using a windows phone my mom uses around 250mb a month, Windows phone sips data especially when using data sense to lower data usage.

        • mikey

          Windows phone is slowly going the way of the Buffalo

    • CDavisUnlimited

      Data rollover? The whole point of going with T-Mobile is having unlimited Data.

      • Hudi G.

        Unlimited but not at 4G speeds, depends on your plan but its slowed down after either 1GB, 3GB, etc.

        • mikey

          get the highest priced data plan, like $20 a month completely unlimited. I watch alot of netflix etc on my note 3, while at lunch or whatever, I used 23 GB last month all at 4G speed.

        • Hudi G.

          more like $30-$40 a month just for the data to be truly unlimited and i think even then its now supposed to be slowed after some amount of GB a month

        • mikey

          oh yeah forgot they raised the price for new customers another $10. , but truly unlimited is still never throttled. Its only throttled if you have the 1gb, 3gb or 5gb plan.

        • Alex Zapata

          They don’t throttle you after a set data amount. What they do is give higher priority to customers on tiered data plans.

        • CDavisUnlimited

          Got it. I guess I just assume that everyone on T-Mo uses the unlimited plan like I do. But I’m sure it doesn’t make sense for lots of people.

  • taron19119

    I hope its a real good move and if so 2014 Will be the year t-mobile becomes number 3 wireless carrier in America

  • Aurizen

    I wonder what it is… I hope it gets leaked lol

    • taron19119

      It has to be something that affects regular average customers

      • Aurizen

        hopefully something big! its 5.0

  • mnaz105

    All phones will be sold factory unlocked.

    • Joey

      And maybe also remove all the tmobile bloatware. Maybe stock rom.

    • mikey

      That would be a big hit. Then if phones have compatible bands they would be able to start selling phones with payments to the customers of other carriers, if bloatware from tmobile is removed that is. Regardless of what people say, there are major profits made on phones being sold at the high prices they are. I know, I work in the electronics retail field.

    • BlackJu

      Most Latin America variants are fully compatible with T-Mobile, so they could make this happen if they are willing to give up bloat.

  • S. Ali

    Probably something lame about VoIP or some fancy payment scheme, these events used to be exciting, the only thing T-Mobile could announce that would turn heads is coverage, coverage, and coverage.

    • philyew

      Which they’ve already announced, so the only thing really is a miraculous acceleration in the program…

  • philyew

    There’s a limited number of things they can do for existing customers that they haven’t already begun working on. My issue is the integrity of the Uncarrier campaign and specifically the claim that they no longer have contracts and associated ETFs.

    The reality is that the bubble payment from the EIP program can be even more onerous than a $200 ETF and effectively act as an anchor in the same way that a contract did.

    I’ve therefore begun to use Twitter to poke Legere, Sievert and Carter to change their policy and allow customers to continue repaying EIPs over the original repayment period, rather than collapsing into a one-off bubble. That way no one is getting anything free of charge. TM get their money and the customer gets a genuine contract and ETF-free service.

    It will surely help to win customers who want to make the change, but are intimidated by the prospect of a $1-2,000 bubble payment on a family of four with top-shelf smartphones, if it doesn’t work out for some reason.

    It would be nice to see this in Uncarrier 5.0.

    • bob90210

      T-Mobile’s main business is to sell cell phone service; they only sell phones so that they can sell service. They have no interest in financing a phone for you if you’re not buying service from them.

      • philyew

        I understand that completely, but they can’t have it both ways – at least not with my silent compliance.

        The EIP bubble payment is actually worse from a contractual point-of-view than the old ETF, because at least with the old system the customer had the right to have the ETF waived in certain circumstances.

        With the EIP, even if you wish to terminate service for a cause which would have justified the old ETF being waived, you are obliged to pay the bubble payment – which may be twice the amount of the capped ETF.

        • mikey

          I think that is tmobiles objective, sounds better cause its no contract on the plan just the phone, but don’t pay off the phone and you’re on the hook for way more than your standard etf would be in he same situation. So They have the capability to make alot more if you break the contract than they previously would have.

        • philyew

          And you don’t find that unacceptably inconsistent with the way they sell Uncarrier as the pro-consumer way of operating?

          They choose to market themselves as the consumer-friendly carrier and I’m going to try to make it stick ;-)

        • mikey

          Not at all. They are just making people pay off an electronic device they opted to purchase, instead of paying off for breaking a service agreement. Two different things. If you buy a $750 note 3 and decide to leave after a month you have to pay that $750, if you buy a $129 alcatel you only pay that $129. Much fairer than making both customers pay $250 or so wfor using the same service when they cost the company vastly different amounts of money for providing the phones they wanted.

        • philyew

          And I’m saying they should pay off every cent for the devices, just over the originally agreed time frame.

          The loss to TM is exactly the same regardless of device or contractual basis – it’s a loss of service revenue in either case. Under the old subsidy system, there wasn’t a huge difference in the actual subsidy whether it was an Alcatel for $0 down or Samsung for $199.

        • bob90210

          The loss is not the same. Since the phones are financed at 0% interest, they are taking a loss on the interest but they will do it since they will make money on the service. If the customer has is not paying for the service, T-Mobile will not pay for the interest.

        • philyew

          TM were taking the hit on the interest anyway, even if the customer stuck around. By continuing to pay over that agreed schedule there is zero impact from the EIP, the loss is – as I said – in terms of service revenue.

        • bob90210

          T-Mobile is willing to pay the interest on the device if you buy service since the money from the service will more than offset the loss on the interest. If you don’t buy service, then they won’t take the loss.

        • philyew

          It’s still a loss of service revenue. The mechanism for recovering the EIP and therefore the transactional profit/loss is exactly the same in either case.

        • bob90210

          I could show you the math but if you think that paying the interest for 24 months is the same as not paying the interest then it’s probably not worth it.

        • philyew

          You think I’m missing the point, and I think the same of you LOL!

          I’ll try it once more; the original EIP agreement involves paying the balance over time after deducting the down payment and with no interest charged. Only sales tax in full is added to the down payment.

          I’m proposing that, rather than paying off the outstanding balance in a single bubble payment, the departing customer continues to pay according to the original program. Thus, at the end of 24 months, they have paid exactly the same amount for the EIP as they would have done had they remained a customer.

          The loss to TM is therefore the service revenue, not the interest on the EIP, since that wasn’t being paid anyway.

          Do you get what I’m saying now?

          Under the old contract and ETF regime, the maximum that TM could recover against that loss in service revenue (which by the way they actually justify as the recovery of the phone subsidy, not lost service revenue) was $200. But in some circumstances, the customer was entitled to that fee being waived entirely.

          Not so now. Regardless of how TM may be to blame for the break down in the service arrangement, they can still recover the full MSRP on the device, even though that will exceed their wholesale and associated supply chain costs.

        • UMA_Fan

          Because T-Mobile isn’t in the business of just selling devices for manufacturers. They are a SERVICE provider. If they went by what you stated there are millions of people out there who would just open up service lines, cancel them, and continue to make payments on devices. The financing is a PERK of getting service with them. If you’re not with T-Mobile you don’t get the financing. Pretty simple.

        • philyew

          You call it a perk, I call it a pragmatic response to not being able to continue offering subsidies.

          Without EIP, the company would be doomed, with no ability to support competitive subsidies.

        • steve

          I understand your argument. But you are stuck in the past. You are bound by the contractual obligation you have now. Not what was offered. Yes T-Mobile would allow you out of your contract if you could prove there was no signal where you moved to. They have not offered that in years. Why would they add that to their EIP if it’s not something they have allowed in years? At the time they were the only carrier I am aware of that would even offer that.

          You are saying the balloon payment is unfair. If I were to purchase a Samsung Galaxy S5 from VZW and leave in 6 months I would pay $440 in ETF plus my cost of the device I paid in store. If I leave TMO after 6 months I’m paying $498 in a balloon payment. I hardly see how they are not consumer friendly. A $58 dollar difference isn’t that great for a device you can then unlock and sell recouping your costs or use on another network.

        • philyew

          It was never just a matter of allowing people to leave without penalty, if they moved to an area without a signal, but just to be clear, they allowed me to cancel my daughter’s line without ETF just a few months ago in exactly those circumstances.

          The issue, however, is much more substantial. Here is what was in the last contract issued before they moved to no-contract plans:

          “WE CAN CHANGE ANY TERMS IN THE AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME. YOU MAY CANCEL THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (if applicable) IF: (A) WE CHANGE YOUR PRICING IN A MANNER THAT MATERIALLY INCREASES YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE(S) (the amount you agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging, which does not include overage, pay-per-use or optional services (such as 411, or downloads), or taxes and fees); (B) WE MATERIALLY DECREASE THE SERVICE ALLOTMENTS WE AGREED TO PROVIDE TO YOU FOR YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE; OR (C) WE MATERIALLY CHANGE A TERM IN THESE T&Cs OTHER THAN PRICING IN A MANNER THAT IS MATERIALLY ADVERSE TO YOU.”

          Moving from that to a simple contract which says you have to pay for the device in full, in an accelerated payment, if you cancel service, means that they can increase prices, cut service allotments, and/or make other detrimental changes and still expect you to pay the full MSRP immediately. That includes the element of their profit which they take on the difference between their wholesale price plus supply chain costs and the MSRP.

          TM say that the remaining ETFs which still apply to legacy contracts are intended to cover device subsidies, yet they have to waive them when customers are canceling for cause. The EIP bubble payment also relates to the cost of the device, but cannot be modified in any way.

          I’m not saying what’s outstanding on the EIP shouldn’t be paid, I’m saying that TM shouldn’t be hypocritical in condemning their competition for using ETFs as an anchor to retain customers, while using the EIP bubble payment in exactly the same way. Allowing the payment over the original schedule gives TM their money, while not using the payment in a way that they loudly condemn when done by their competition.

        • bob90210

          I think the long term plan for T-Mobile to eliminate contracts, including EIP. T-Mobile does not want to be in the business of financing phones since subsidies and financing allows the device manufactures to artificially inflate prices. T-Mobile does not want to pay for that! They offer financing because they have to. Customers are used to paying $0 to $200 for phones and will balk at paying full price. If T-Mobile can eliminate subsidies from the industry, then device manufacturers will lower prices and offer more mid-range and low end phones. And then T-Mobile will not need to provide any financing.

        • mikey

          some manufacturers are actually hitting that price point. The alcatel fierce is a great phone, with excellent battery life at 130, and the new L90 from lg is great too at $179 has some sweet features i wish my note 3 had.

        • Rdaex

          Im with you except for the Fierce.. that phone is a huge pile.

        • philyew

          You’re forgetting that the US carrier subsidy model is not typical of the global market and the US market doesn’t represent a significant share (said to be 13% of a market which surpassed 1 billion shipped units for the first time in 2013).

          The idea that ending subsidies will lead to reduced wholesale prices is a bit of a stretch, I fear.

          EIPs are going to be with us for the foreseeable future, I think.

    • mikey

      It’s called buy what you can afford. Plus nobody says you have to pay it all at once, just like with etfs. Alot of people leave carriers without paying the etf, and when it shows up on their credit they are given options to pay it all or to make installments til the balance is covered to have it removed from their credit report. Same thing with phone installments.

      I think tmobile should offer the purchase plan they currently have for phones to customers who wish to leave as well. That way if you still owe a balance, them purchasing the phone back would cover a portion of that so it would not be as much left to pay.

      • philyew

        Buy-back would help, but read my other response. I object to the current scheme because the EIP bubble is not only potentially much greater than the ETF, but it also must be paid in circumstances where the ETF would have been waived under the terms of the old contract.

        All I’m suggesting is that TM offer the original installment plan without having to go through the negative credit trap and then get an installment repayment. Who does that help except those who feed off the bad credit industry?

        • mikey

          helps tmobile recover their lost cost, Consumer loses out most if they get a new phones and break the contract. So new customers who get a line and hate the service and leave quickly will be left with a larger bill than normal if they exceed the grace period.

        • philyew

          I understand what you are saying, but that simply means that their Uncarrier posture is BS.

          If that’s the case, I’m not going to keep drinking the Kool-aid without drawing attention to the fact.

          They have an opportunity to address these inconsistencies at relatively little cost and its possible they could choose to do so, in which case we all come out happy.

        • mikey

          Check my other reponse below. I think they could remedy it simple, same way they allow people to jumponce a phone is halfway paid off now, allow people to turn in their device and not owe anymore as well once its paid half off.

        • philyew

          That was an option I had considered, but it’s hard to express that alternative in a 140 character tweet ;-)

      • erikdrakon

        That would be a loss for t-mobile keeping the eip with installment payments after you leave, the phone is blocked to not use on another carrier till it’s paid off in full, because a majority of eip customers given the option would not pay off the phone, just like when people left with etf it would go to their credit because paying 2 cell phone bills was out of their limit.

        • philyew

          So you’re saying that the majority of people didn’t pay the ETF that was due on their account? Do you have any evidence that this is true?

    • ChitChatCat

      Finance the phone elsewhere where you plan to keep a relationship no matter what cell phone carrier you use. Then your payments aren’t tied to your service.

      • philyew

        That’s an option, but it really doesn’t address the point of my suggestion, which is to correct the hypocrisy of claiming a pro-consumer, Uncarrier strategy with no contracts, while operating an EIP scheme which is actually more onerous than the old contract-based ETF system.

        • ChitChatCat

          It provides a transparent cost that is explained up front each time a purchase is made in a truth-in-lending disclosure. The full cost of the device is provided up front with the opportunity to pay for it in full. I think the transparency is pretty consumer friendly. If it ain’t your cup of tea, don’t finance a device. All the options are pretty well explained on the website every time I’ve looked.

        • philyew

          You’re missing my point. Under the old, “bad” contracts, TM had to allow customers to leave without penalty if changes to their services and/or contractual conditions resulted in a financial disadvantage to customers. It constrained their behavior because they couldn’t do things that resulted in mass cancellations.

          Now it doesn’t matter. You can’t leave under any circumstances without paying a bubble payment for the full MSRP of any device obtained under the EIP program.

        • ChitChatCat

          No, I get your point. Mine is that this “trap” is crazily well explained and there is a radio button under the disclaimer that allows you to opt out of it by paying full price. It’s a risk you take when you accept the financing…the consequences of which is spelled out pretty fully and clearly.

          Also, let’s be honest. Over the course of years, how many times do you really remember mass exoduses of customers from a wireless provider under ETF waivers?

        • philyew

          They didn’t happen because the waiver acted as a constraint on carrier behaviors.

          I don’t consider the arrangement as a “trap”, so much as that it just doesn’t look like the kind of arrangement that should be described as Uncarrier.

          I was ok with it until I realized that TM could increase monthly charges or reduce services and everyone on the EIP program could only move on (as espoused by John Legere), if they paid a bubble payment which could amount to over $2,000 in some cases, including the profit that TM take from device sales.

        • UMA_Fan

          How is it a scheme exactly? The cost of the phone and the service plans are two different things now. The interest free financing is optional but you can only do it if you are paying T-Mobile for a service plan. You’re free to finance your phone elsewhere and not worry about paying off what you owe in one lump sum. If you don’t like the service anymore you’re free to cancel without any sort of fees.

        • philyew

          You are paying the full MSRP, which exceeds TM’s cost for the device and associated supply chain costs, even if you are leaving in circumstances under which TM would previously have been disqualified from charging an ETF.

        • UMA_Fan

          But it’s totally up to you whether you buy devices greater than what the ETF used to be or not. This is something that is completely your fault if the device you ‘happen’ to want is $600+. T-Mobile has full priced smartphones from $50 and some mid range ones from $150-$280. A Nexus 5 or a LG G2 is only like $350 right now! Whether you are paying more than what the ETFs were or not is really all dependent on the phone you pick out/ how much you’ve paid on it so far/ and so on.

        • philyew

          The point about the relative cost is only that it is now possible for the amount at stake to be even greater than the ETF.

          The main issue is that now TM can increase prices or worsen services and you still have to pay the full MSRP to leave, whereas before you had your subsidized device and they still had to forego the ETF.

          If you don’t see that as being inconsistent with a pro-consumer, Uncarrier marketing strategy, then I don’t know what to say.

        • Rdaex

          They arent changing prices on your plan… where are you pulling this scenario?!

          It isnt inconsistent.. you just chose a phone you couldnt afford. If you want to look at cost vs. etf, then fine, choose a cheaper phone, or buy a phone online for cheap.

          I cant believe the level of no self accountability youre talking about here.

        • philyew

          You are not grasping the point at all.

          A couple of personal points, seeing as you have seen fit to judge me here:

          a) My argument nowhere suggested that a person shouldn’t pay the due amount, all I said was that they should be able to pay off the EIP over the originally agreed schedule, rather than as a bubble payment. Heck I’d even accept that an additional installment could be charged to cover the issue of “lost interest”.

          b) I don’t have any problem paying off whatever I owe – to anybody.

          This is actually about the perception of a company that promotes itself as “the Uncarrier” – the pro-consumer choice.

          John Legere talks loudly about how bad contracts are and how they, and ETFs, are used to trap the customers of their competitors when they should be free to move to get the best service at the best possible price. They are so bad that TM will pay their ETFs to free them from this bondage (talk about washing away people’s self accountability).

          Their alternative to “bad” contracts, however, is to create a situation where the bubble payment on an device obtained through an EIP arrangement can be substantially more than the ETF used to be, and the full amount of money is due regardless of what TM might do to contribute to the breakdown of the vendor-customer relationship. Previously the terms of the “bad” contract waived the ETF in circumstances where the customer was terminating the contract for cause.

          I know that TM isn’t currently increasing prices, or reducing service levels – just as it wasn’t when the company addressed such possibilities in the contract entered into with every customer. But the difference now is that there is no contractual constraint on TM to stop them from doing that in future, and theoretically they could double the prices and customers would still have to pay every last cent of the MSRP on a device in order to leave to avoid being gouged.

          How does that not in effect act like the very behavior that they roundly condemn in their competitors?

          I’m not looking to avoid any payment, I’m looking for TM to genuinely act like the Uncarrier they pretend to be. How hard is it for people to grasp the point?

        • philyew

          By the way, I’m using the word “scheme” in the neutral sense of “the way that something is arranged or organized”, not as a “dishonest plan”.

    • UMA_Fan

      Actually if you’ve met the minimum requirements to Jump and you happen to owe $300+ on your high end smartphone that you’ve been paying in installments there is nothing preventing you from trading that phone back into T-Mobile, they will then pay off what you owe (meaning that whole $300+) and you’re free to upgrade to ANY phone in the store even if it happens to be the cheapest device they are selling at the time which could be some $50 basic phone and then there you go you don’t owe several hundred dollars to cancel T-Mobile services if you really wanted to. So it truly is NOT like a service contract at all.

      • philyew

        But you have to buy into the Jump program and then meet the minimum requirement to jump first, so it’s only not like a service contract under certain conditions.

        The fact remains that, whereas previously TM operated under some contractual constraints regarding services, pricing changes and terms, because they could lose their right to levy ETFs, no such checks exist with the EIP program. However badly your service might deteriorate, you are contractually obliged to repay the full MSRP of any device you acquire through EIP. The amounts might be prohibitive.

        That, to me, it’s the very antithesis of Uncarrier and, as a matter of principle, I believe it should be fixed.

        • UMA_Fan

          You’re not ‘contractually’ obligated into anything. The phone costs what it costs. Splitting it into payments interest free is completely optional and how costly a phone you get is optional as well. Customers paying for service with T-Mobile get free financing on devices. If you don’t pay T-Mobile for service you’re not a T-Mobile customer so there’s no reason for them to offer the financing.

          There are more positives than negatives that exist from separating the cost of devices from service. You brought up your service deteriorating and wanting to cancel but what does that have to do with what YOU still owe in equipment? Your equipment has nothing to do with the service anymore and you’re better off for it.

        • philyew

          The EIP agreement does contain a contractual clause requiring you to pay the outstanding balance in full, if you cancel service. You used to be able to cancel service for cause under the old full contract without having to pay the ETF.

          With the EIP, you are now required to pay the full MSRP which exceeds TM’s actual costs, so they are still making a profit on the device, even if you are leaving under circumstances where previously they wouldn’t be able to recover their subsidy (which is what they claim to be the purpose of those ETFs that remain in place).

        • Disestablish

          T-Mobile has not allowed customers to cancel for service issues since the implementation of Wi-Fi Calling. The vast majority of Americans have high speed internet access at home. Signal Boosters are available as an alternative for the small percentage of people who do not have home internet access. You don’t get to stop making payments on your TV you bought with your Best Buy credit card 9 months ago because you moved somewhere where you “can’t get TV service.” It’s not unreasonable to require you to pay for the phone. The phone you buy can be unlocked and used on another network and has many other uses not contingent on cellular service.

        • philyew

          First of all, my original proposal was a compromise requiring that the customer paid the full MSRP over the original repayment schedule, not as a bubble payment, so no one is getting anything for nothing.

          Second, there were very specific terms in the old service contracts setting out the conditions under which customers could leave without paying ETFs. No such terms exist for the EIP in relation to the requirement to pay the MSRP in full regardless of the circumstances under which the customer is closing their service plan.

          All I’m saying is that it’s a reasonable compromise for the customer to pay back the full amount over the original schedule.

  • Felipe Bigio

    Coverage,coverage, and more coverage. Ohh,and cancel once in for all the ETFs reimbursements that harms the company so much. That’s what big magenta needs to surpass the other guys……..

    • JBrowne1012

      Coverage has always been improving

      • Felipe Bigio

        In the northeast yes, but here in the south it sucks bad need to improve coverage near my job in central fl and near my home too.

  • SEBA

    Let me guess. John is opening boutique with T-mobile t-shirts?

    • $15454173

      Huge LOL!!

    • ChitChatCat

      Best.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    Note Pro 12.2, other LTE enabled tablets, more LTE markets, 2G to LTE expansion and low frequency launch for bigger markets

  • $15454173

    Ask for back payment from those who had any company (AAA ect.) related discounts but not charge interest over the course of the repayments?

  • $15454173

    How does this sound: If anyone is using JUMP and you want to leave Tmobile then at the 6 month JUMP point trade your $600 plus phone or phones for the cheapest phone and exit Tmobile. Would this work? You would get a new in box cheap phone which you could sell.

    • mikey

      not if you have the new jump, with this one you have to have paid half the price of the device before you can upgrade, so if you make minimum payments on phone it will take about a year to reach this point.

      • JBrowne1012

        The thing I hate about Jump is the trading in the phones it seems like from what I hear is that when you trade it in you are cutting complete losses with the trade in phone clearing out the eip and not getting anything in return to put towards the new phone. As if you are just giving them a free phone to resell as refurbished because while you won’t pay taxes on your trade in you are starting over from the beginning instead of the middle where you left ff I’m not sure if that accurate or not thats how I’m understanding it

        • xmiro

          It’s like leasing a car sans interest

        • mikey

          It basically cuts out the middle man, alot of consumers like me were buying phones yearly or earlier and selling old phones on ebay and Craigslist. Now since I can get half the price from tmobile I don’t have to do auctions etc and possible get less than half the price for it, especially if the phone ended up being a flop.

  • JBrowne1012

    remove atrocious tiered insurance plans? umm give better discounts? something needs be done for loyal customers by now because nobody has to stay with a company year over year when we don’t have contracts now? How about cutting costs on the full price of cell phones to match with amazon prices? Offer BLU products and GPe devices in store.

    • mikey

      if you been with tmobile for years, then you probably have the original jump, which is a great perk in itself. I have it, so twice a year at any point can upgrade to a new phone without having to pay a certain portion of it first. And you could have gotten the truly unlimited for $10 less than customers pay now, plus you get to keep any corporate discounts while new customers cannot add any.

      I save 15% with my corporate discount, been with tmobile 7 years. Also have the cheaper data plans from when uncarrier first started on two lines so thats another $20 i save a month, and if when the g3 comes out in july I want to upgrade I can after having my current phone only 6 months which means i would have paid 180 for my note 3 instead of the 720 or costs or the 360 new customers have to pay before trading theirs in. Then if I want to turn around 3 months later and get the note 4 after only making 3 payments on the g3 I can. Because Ive been with tmobile long enough to have acquired those plans when they were available for the limited time they were.

      • JBrowne1012

        Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get the original jump plan as when it was introduced in the first place my fam and I were still under contract from tmobile through the classic plan it was till earlier this year I’ve decided to take a hit of the migration fees to save $$ in to the long run because data is the main thing that my fam and I uses and that $20 data was gonna go up to $30 as I got the news here it did cut the bill effectively by at least $40 a month I actually hated the new plan because for a family its more expensive if everyone gets a new device with only paying taxes. Its at least $60 more expensive a month but then I realized that I primarily pay for my phone in full and my mother’s as some sort of gift so it wouldn’t be much different but now we have to really think about the phones we want in terms of $$$ because a high end phone can cost up to $30 a month multiply that by 3 $90 a month for phones over 2 years add that to a bill of 3 unlimited lines thats $60 in data plans plus $30 for 3 insurance lines because of jump. $90 for the 3 line accts. So $90 Plus $60 plus $90 is $240 before tax then its like $270 per month for a regular person that is imo hella expensive for me considering I don’t need unlimited minutes. a 200 minute plan would be more than enough with unlimited data I mean luckily with discounts it cut bill about $70 would be nice to upgrade and have the family not worry about if they could pay the phones every month. I don’t even care so much to not having a contract, t-mo has been a great company and very affordable if discounts in place

        • mikey

          Alot of people don’t use minutes like they use to which is why all the plans are unlimited now, minutes are the smallest part of revenue now, data is the most.

          For me was cheaper. The same I make in two years of $30 monthly payments is the same I was spending every other year on a new device between upgrades. Then you still have to add in the amount of the actual upgrade which was about a $300 dollar down payment for the best phone but now it’s free to upgrade. So that was coding me over a thousand extra to have 2 new phones in a two year period. Now I spend 720 over monthly payments and get 4 new phones with no hassle and a free accessory thrown in at the tmobile store. In addition to the $15 per month per line I saved by switching to the uncarrier plan

    • truthtalk

      Shut up about loyalty already. I have been with T-Mobile for 8 years now and I have seen them grow and get better. That is enough for me. I pay for a service and it’s provided, after all it is a business. I have been drinking coke for a very long time and I don’t expect coke to kick me a case or Two because I choose them over Pepsi. If you want sh*t for free go to Verizon or Att and pay $150 a month for your line and get your free flip phone. Gtfo

      • JBrowne1012

        I have seen them grow and get better as a company but the should just do a lil bit more for the ones that stuck by them for so long. Its not wrong to want that. Maybe thats good enough for you but I like to feel as if a loyal customer has privilege because if it was not for the loyal customers T-mobile would be gone. Your analogy is a poor one because its not the same situation but if you want to say it is then there is reward programs for both coke and pepsi which is much like a loyalty program in that you get a reward if you choose to use the points, heck for doritos if you buy enough you can participate in their lil auction to get a free Game console. You GTFO with your poor comparison. AT&T Verizon and Sprint all offer some sort of program for loyal customers. An improvement in regards to loyalty program isn’t too much to ask for.

        • Rdaex

          Sprint CERTAINLY doesnt offer anything for “Loyal” customers. They charge everyone an upgrade fee ($36), took away the sprint premier discounts that they used to have.

      • Bilesha Welton

        I agree with everything you say except…. Coke over Pepsi???

        I wanna cry! :'( lol

    • xmiro

      You clearly have no idea why Amazon phones are so cheap do you?

  • Jay J. Blanco

    Purchase Cellular one network in Montana and to expand more into the state.
    Purchase General Communications in Alaska and offer tmobile to the population there.
    Join Rural Independent Network Alliance to offer service to rural America
    Network agreement with SRT Communications to offer coverage to Dakotas.

  • francob911 .

    Add up to 7 lines for $10 more per line $130 for 7 lines all taxes and fees included ..all phones unlocked and to have all the compatible bands for Latin America

    • mikey

      Bands are already compatible, just depends on which companies own them in which countries. Which is why most phones are gsm now, in order to make it easier to be used in multiple countries by just changing sim cards.

    • msohail

      Nice .. so you can easily rip tmobile and ship the phones to Latin America :)

      • francob911 .

        How can you easily rip T-Mobile? I see that they can benefit from this if they inform the customers

    • xmiro

      No

      You can add 10 lines on T-Mobile business at $20 a line for lines 5-10

      Doubt it would be different for consumers of they do do it

  • bourgeois

    Since the last uncarrier rollout I have had unlimited SMS to Europe. For uncarrier 5.0, I would love to see unlimited calling to any European fixed and mobile number as part of the base plan. It would save me the $15/month international add-on per line.

    • mikey

      If not this time, they will soon, especially with the voice over data they are starting to do.

  • Hank Hill

    They are going to raise the throttling speeds for customers not on the true unlimited plan.

    • UMA_Fan

      Then why would anyone pay for faster speeds? Also, how fair is it to people paying the premium for truly unlimited high speed data that people choosing to pay less than them get just as fast speeds?

      • Tyler Kirchman

        They can double them and make the connection more usable for web browsing but you still couldn’t load video on it.

        • Hank Hill

          3G speeds most likely.

      • philyew

        I don’t think the OP is suggesting that throttled speeds should remotely match the premium performance. They could, however, improve the throttled speeds to 3G and still give a more usable product, which would match what they currently offer for free overseas.

  • steveb944

    Hmm, maybe totally free international calling to landlines instead of the $15 they charge now. Other than that they already covered all my pain points. I know it’s not realistic to get hardware discounts so why ask.

    Oh and I need more tablet selection as I’m in the market for one. I’d get a Nexus 7 but I’m waiting/hoping for a sequel announcement, and T-Mobile stopped selling it themselves.

    • monkeybutts

      They stopped selling nexus 7 anyways

  • Abe_The_Babe

    Since “Safe and Sound” is a song by Capital Cities, Uncarrier 5.0 will be T-Mobile’s switch from cellular network to music production.

  • Christopher J Sacra

    Maybe you mean subsidy and not “subside” smartphones.

  • Seemore_Justice

    Like Steve Jobs did when he brought out CEO Paul Otellini at an Apple WWDC event to tell the Apple faithful that Apple was switching to Intel chips, John Legere of T-Mobile will bring out Sprint CEO and announce approval of a Sprint buyout.

    • Serge

      John Legere will bring out Elon Musk and announce Mars LTE coverage by 2020. No contract and you get unlimited 2G roaming when visiting Earth.

      • gpt2010

        That was awesome Serge!

    • KingCobra

      That would be an excellent way to kill all of the momentum T-Mobile has right now.

  • Can I just get coverage at my house? K thanks.

  • spartanjet

    My sticking point is the lack of high end Windows phones.

    • James Kozak

      Android is alot better

      • xmiro

        I say this lovingly as 100f android user… It’s not, and don’t care I need a second phone and would love a Nokia 930.

        My Apple fanboy friend went gaga over it, it’s a great phone

      • BlackJu

        Except when I don’t agree

      • itguy08

        There is some truth to that. Microsoft should just give up already.

      • monkeybutts

        Not necessarily better just better supported by developers

      • spartanjet

        Not at all.

      • Bilesha Welton

        I’ve owned every Galaxy device up to the S4. And it’s not. Windows Phone performance is very high compared to Android. The only thing (after Windows Phone 8.1) that Android has over Windows Phone is better developer support, but even that is changing, albeit sometimes too slowly depending on the developer.

  • czaplin

    Uncarrier 5.0: EDGE becomes LTE.

    • philyew

      Already announced last round. It will be completed by mid-2015.

  • Moises Lugo

    It would be nice if they add more wifi hot spots for customers

  • rafaelfsp89

    How about giving those of us that have bad credit but have good standings with t-mobile the option to upgrade our phones at the “well qualified” price (typically zero down)

    • ChitChatCat

      That does happen eventually. It takes a couple of years.

      • Rdaex

        Only on certain credit classes… and VERY few of those.

    • TMO EMP

      On your 3 year anniversary, Your account becomes “well-qualified”

      • luvmytmo

        It does not happen if there was a deposit when you signed up. As it stands, if you had a $50 or higher deposit, you will always pay the higher down payment. It doesn’t change. Only on certain credit classes. However, they should do away with deposits and lower credit pay higher down payments until you are “loyal” after 2 years (and you have a good payment history…not perfect but good) and then all credit classes move to well qualified. After 2 years of good payment history, you have proven your credit worthiness! Just an employee with an opinion!

    • Allen Enriquez

      It takes 24 months here in California!

    • Rdaex

      GOD I hope so… Asking a customer upgrading to 5S to spend $350 out the door is INSANE. Sprints policy is either 0 down, or the contract price.. Why TMO cant adopt that.. its a much better policy.

  • tmobile

    How about no bloatware and phones come unlocked

  • Chad D

    Aren’t they testing VoLTE? Could be the sound part?

  • David Q

    Free phones and tablets for just being a t-mobile customer but once you leave t-mobile you are required to return the device just as you would if you rented a DVR from your cable provider.

    • Chad Dalton

      and how do they make money that way?

  • mobileguy

    LTE over their entire edge footprint and loyalty discounts on phones for consistent customers.

    • philyew

      They’ve already announced that they have started the program to deliver LTE to their entire 2G footprint. It’s to be completed by mid-2015. That’s a pretty impressive schedule.

  • Tony

    Definitely has to do something with Sprint. The location of Los Angeles was peculiar as well. (Los Angeles is closer to Tokyo than New York.)

    • ChitChatCat

      It’s also closer to Bellevue/Seattle.

  • James Kozak

    i hope they flip the switch with the 700 spectrum they bought from Verizon. if that happen i get 4G LTE

    • monkeybutts

      You would need to buy a new phone first none of the phones t-mobile carry allow access to band 12

      • substance

        Sony Z1S does, as well as a couple others in Tmo’s current lineup support it.

        • monkeybutts

          Z1S only supports LTE bands 4 and 17. The new spectrum needs band 12. There are 0 phones currently available with band 12. yes there are phones that support 700 MHz but they typically only do B and C block and not the A block that was acquired from Verizon.

        • substance
        • Josh

          Actually that article states that those phones are compatible with the 20+20 AWS network, not the Band 12 one. No current T-Mobile devices and I don’t believe really any other devices out there support Band 12 at the moment. I asked recently.

        • Guest

          You obviously didn’t read the article…
          “During the keynote they made a point of comparing this with Verizon’s new AWS airwave offerings, which amazingly, aren’t compatible with many of its phones. Of course, the three new devices (Sony Xperia Z1S, LG G Flex and Galaxy Tab 3) are all compatible.”
          I am a proud owner of a Z1S, and anyone who has one, knows that it clearly states it on the product box as well.

        • T-Pain

          You need to read the article, momo. They’re comparing 20+20, NOT the new 700 band 12. No current phones support it unfortunately.

  • Brian F

    I think 5.0 will have to do with start up cost for customers who don’t fall under the well-qualified bracket. If not this time around, then one of these Uncarrier moves will touch on it.

    Several years back they didn’t even have deposits. Instead, they had Flexpay. Granted, it wasn’t the best plan to be on, but it brought customers in the door because regardless of their credit history they wouldn’t have a deposit. They were losing a lot of customers, though, because coverage was the worst. A few years later they started doing the Even More & Value Plans. All customers paid the same down payment to finance the phone, but some had a deposit. When the original Uncarrier movement launched they changed the down payments to where low credit customers had to pay their deposit, the regular down payment for their device, AND a new variable down payment in addition to it all. This obviously results in HUGE start up costs for low credit customers. Which, let’s be honest, even though Magenta has lower credit standards you still have to have pretty decent credit to get those advertised $0 down prices. I worked there for years, and so I’ve seen it first hand. A lot of rumors circulated internally in regards to the security deposits, and variable down payments. Basically that one or the other would go away as part of one of the Uncarrier announcements.

    It’ll be interesting to see if they still try and make that happen since investors are complaining about profits.

    • Allen Enriquez

      Wow! I remember still Flex Pay, I had Flex Pay Post-Paid Account! It was something right before Evermore plans! Except it was a rare account to go under, because I didn’t have great credit it was given to me as a credit worthy long time customer at least 8 months + long! It was the best setup except again it was limited of what it can buy under financing! Like HTC G1 Nexus it was not possible even supervisor was trying to overwrite systems but he was not able due to second party purchase from Google’s site ! Well back to the idea of why it’s the best this particular account was able to finance taxes, activation fee, SIM card, and accessories! My payment was a whopping Bk $47.89 for four months, but not after paying $356.99,addition to this I didn’t have to pay for 3 months! then it gets lower to $29.89 for the remainder time. Incase anyone cares to hear what was the cost a stunning lightning bolt of $1,321.93! I had terrible credit to! I bought accessories too! Within the $356.99 payment comes the first billing cycle at that time I had unlimited text Talk, data for $89.99 + Tax + Account Control Fee $4.99 + Tax a month, + SIM card $19.99 + Tax + activation fee $49.99 + Tax + California E-Waste $10.99 + Tax! (There was a choice to add to financing or pay activation, SIM card, California E-Waste fees but I choose to pay some of it) incase again someone was curious of price break down and I did pay some of the smartphone off at purchase so it’s not so much of payments.

  • CJ

    Speeds don’t drop from lte to Edge, lte drop to hspa+

    • philyew

      The plan for the next phase of LTE roll out is different though. In some areas they will be re-using the existing 2G antennae and repurposing a significant part of their PCS spectrum to support LTE. In those areas, there will be no HSPA+ or 3G to fall back on. It will be LTE or 2G.

      • Chad Dalton

        well hopefully, with the update to LTE in those areas, fallback to 2G, should be less. What would cause the connection to fall back?

        • philyew

          Same reasons that you sometimes get HSPA+, 3G or EDGE now in areas that are LTE enabled.

    • mikey

      Edge is being updated to 4g, so the throttling in those areas could be raised to 3g speeds easily.

  • Hopefully they will have a list of cities/areas that have EDGE to LTE coverage. I remember coming to this site hourly to see updates on the initial LTE rollout. Those were some exciting times.

  • maximus1901

    Google “Deutsche Telekom accepts Softbank’s offer to buy T-Mobile – Kyodo

    • Paul

      An interesting development.
      The DoJ and FCC have to approve before they move forward. We shall see what they say on the move, and we still need to see what the agreement was.

      • maximus1901

        Doj doesn’t get a veto. They can challenge it but they could also lose. See doj v oracle.

        • philyew

          The challenge was enough to stop the AT&T takeover attempt, but I take your point and I suspect that, given the history, Son won’t fold in the face of a challenge and will probably take it all the way.

          My first reaction to the news was that the Uncarrier 5.0 announcement would be insipid as a result, but on reflection and considering Braxton Carter’s recent comments about the need for the merged company to promote competition, I think it’s even more important now for TM to show that the takeover will not undermine the Uncarrier movement.

        • maximus1901

          It was challenged by fcc also and fcc can veto for no reason at all.

        • philyew

          But it was the DoJ lawsuit that caused AT&T to abandon it’s attempt.

          The FCC could seek to block the transfer of the relevant spectrum licenses, but if the takeover had previously been approved under the antitrust legislation supervised by the FTC and DoJ, then the attempt would almost certainly be ruled invalid in any legal action brought by Softbank against the FCC.

        • Paul

          Son and Sprint don’t have the money to screw up a possible buyout or to go to court over the deal.

        • philyew

          So that would mean, if true, that Son already knows that the DoJ and FCC are going to set acceptable conditions for the deal to be approved.

        • Paul

          Yes and that’s why I mentioned the FCC.

          Of course, we don’t know the details of the agreement.

    • TechHog

      This article is moot, then. Uncarrier is dead. I’m switching to AT&T this fall.

      • philyew

        Hang on a minute…think about this. A few days ago Braxton Carter said that the success of this proposed consolidation depended on it promoting competition.

        How would it look if TM immediately folded up the Uncarrier tent once this was announced? It would be a huge signal that the merged company would be behaving like AT&T and Verizon, which is anything but competitive.

        If anything, it’s even more important to TM that their next Uncarrier move has real teeth.

        • TechHog

          Sprint will kill T-Mobile and Uncarrier in favor of their own plans.

        • Fraydog

          And why would they do that if that would lead to the merger being DOA. This is being driven by Sprint’s new corporate parent, SoftBank. So why would SoftBank commit to a move that would ensure anything they would do would be DOA with the Feds.

        • philyew

          That may well happen eventually, but in the short term they can’t afford for the takeover to be seen to be anti-competitive, or it will fall the challenge that TM management have recognized.

          Softbank/ Sprint won’t have control for at least a year and until the deal is finally approved, it’s essential they don’t start looking like the other competition.

        • TechHog

          Sprint will talk up Network Vision and their other plans for the future, and will talk about how Uncarrier is still resulting in huge losses.

        • Josh

          Actually, if you pay attention to the reports you’ll see that T-Mobile will likely be the surviving brand and John Legere will likely be the surviving CEO. If that is the case, IMO Legere would never let the thing he worked so hard to create just disappear, ESPECIALLY if he’s still CEO. Also, T-Mobile did post a loss last quarter, but is still profiting millions of dollars, whereas Sprint is still LOOSING about $1m a quarter average. So the UnCarrier won’t die, and also switching to AT&T would be worse than sticking with the combined company even if it did.

        • Josh

          Oooh actually, relooking it, T-Mobile gained 30 Million in net, and Sprint didn’t just loose $1M, they lost $1 BILLION!! With a B! So to further my point, there it is.

        • Jarobusa

          Why? Because Sprints plans are working so well? Come on.

  • I got it. Part of 5.0 will be FREE LG G3’s for the 1st week for those coming in the door to take advantage of whatever the 5.0 event will be.

  • Jeffrey Wang

    Maybe rollover high-speed data allotments?

  • Ralph

    Could “sound” be a pun to refer to HD voice or Voice over LTE? When I worked for MetroPCS pre-merger they made a huge deal about Voice over LTE.

    • Justin Johnson

      Think they will announce more Voice over LTE for the rest of the year, and I hope they have something else. Hope its not a music deal, like free Beats streaming or a free concert.

  • oms

    Want to alleviate a major pain point? Allow more data roaming. 10mb is not enough for anything! I think that the inability to truly roam across the country is the biggest drawback to switching to T-Mobile.

    • mikey

      Roaming is done on other companies’ networks. So it’s lucky we get any free at all, because of course the other company is going to charge tmobile even if it is for 10 mb. Nothing is free.

      • oms

        I understand that there is a cost but T-mobile is large enough to absorb the cost of occasional roaming. US Cellular, a much smaller regional carrier offers up to 200mb of 3G roaming and then throttles. Because they have smaller coverage they probably have more roaming than T-mobile and pay more on average for T-mobile per user. So, if Us Cellular could do it, I’m sure T-mobile could as well.

        This would still not be appropriate for constant roamers, who live and work outside of T-mobile’s network but this would help the occasional road traveler. No one wants to take a road trip through a rural area (where T-mobile may not have native coverage) and get lost because their GPS has used up more than than the alloted 10mb. It’s a major safety issue these to have reliable coverage. And so until people could trust that their phone would work well in most places, they would rather go with a larger carrier even if there is a higher cost.

        My other point is that T-mobile is already spending too much in other gimmicks to have people switch over, such as paying the early termination fees and international roaming. If they want to be truly effective they need to focus on expanding domestic coverage, even if in the meantime they have to losen up some change to allow more domestic roaming.

        Maybe even could control roaming cost and retain customer loyalty by allowing people to rollover unused monthly roaming allowances from month to month. That way if you are a one year T-mobile customer, you can have 120mb available to roam on an annual road trip.

        • mikey

          Rollover Roaming would be a good addition to the uncarrier. But increasing roaming would just increase their costs more when they are focusing more improving network speed and reliability. They are using gimmicks such as paying etfs to gain new customers, but remember you have to trade in your current phones to do it, which means they are not eating the entire cost of the etf, most likely they are refurbishing and reselling those collected phones for $$$ plus they are charging more for leaving tmobile which is whatever you owe on whichever phone you received, instead of the standard 200 to 350 etf other places charge. So they actually are more likely to make more money than they loose.

    • guidomus_maximus

      If you are roaming a lot you should switch to the carrier you roam on.

    • izick

      @oms I agree wholeheartedly. T-Mobile offers unlimited data roaming outside the US, but only 10mb inside the US? Huh? I understand the economics of it, but from a customer point of view, it doesn’t make sense.

      @guidomus_maximus:disqus, the only problem with low data roaming allotment is people generally roam when they need their data the most (away from wifi hotspots, traveling/on-the-road, on a vacation/business trip, etc.). The problem is, this doesn’t happen all that often. So, it’s a balancing act that turns into a pain point. We do want to choose T-Mobile for our service provider, but occasionally need more than 10MB of domestic roaming data, even if it is *just* 2G.

      • Austin

        I travel for a living. And the one place I needed roaming (Iowa) actually had unlimited roaming.

        Other than that, I never roam, (except for at my church, once a week *shrugs*)

    • Chad Dalton

      i have the$70 unlimited plan, with up to 50mb of data roaming/AT&T

  • MVSGeek

    How about a competitive rate for cruise ship roaming? TMO charges $5.99/min for voice and $15/mb for data roaming on cruise ships. VZW charges $2.49/min for voice and $25 for 100Mb data roaming. I’m not asking for free roaming on ships, just compete with Verizon!

    • Miami South

      your wrong its 50cents per minute

      • MVSGeek

        I checked again. TMO definitely charges $5.99/min for voice, $15/Mb data and 50cents per outgoing text. I checked Carnival, Celebrity, Princess and Tui. That is way too much compared to Verizon with their $2.49/min for voice, $25 for 100Mb data and 50cents per outgoing text.

        • Lindsay

          That’s extra. There are some cruise lines that have joined the free international roaming list so you don’t need to worry about overages or extras.

        • MVSGeek

          I have been unable to find any cruise lines that have joined the program. As far as I know, it is done at the carrier level and the cruise lines have only a few different carriers. Most cruise lines either use either MCP (Maritime Communications Partner) or MTN (Maritime Telecommunications Network) or OnWaves. The cruise lines do not control what the carriers bill. I have looked on the TMO website and have not been able to find any cruise lines that TMO does not charge $5.99/min for voice, $15/Mb data and 50cents per outgoing text.

        • S. Ali

          WiFi calling is free, use it or buy a phone that supports it. Cruise ships have WiFi.

        • MVSGeek

          Wifi calling is rarely an option on ships. There is not enough bandwidth. Ship wifi starts at 75cents/minute. The fact remains that Verizon has a data plan on ships that is hundreds of times less expensive than TMO. TMO needs to compete.

        • S. Ali

          The company that provides cell service on Cruise ships is owned by AT&T (WMS), their own package is $120/month. Its only 2G/1X speed anyway. Paying $0.75/min for WiFi is a good deal. You’re on vacation, enjoy it.

    • tech916

      How about you leave the phone at home and enjoy your trip. Jeezus people what did you do before cellphones.

      • MVSGeek

        I tend to travel alone. Since it’s my vacation and I play by my rules I like to bring my phone so I can keep in touch with people that I care about as well as use it as a camera. I enjoy my trips greatly even while playing with my phone.

  • Bilesha Welton

    Uncarrier 5.0: Not selling out to the competition like carriers do.

  • Marcus

    T-Mobile Cloud Storage in the U.S. = Safe (backup) and Sound (music).

    • xmiro

      that’s not what the uncarrier events are about, other carriers have cloud storage. T-Mobile already offers a security app.

  • Marcus

    Launched last year in the Netherlands and what do you know, it’s 5.0 GB.

  • Nick

    last pain point… coverage and building penetration

    • Aaron Davis

      You can blame Verizon for that one, for buying up all the low frequency (long distance) spectrum and leaving none for t-mobile.

      Now that the FCC has forced Verizon to sell the 700mhz Block A spectrum to T-mobile, you should see drastic improvements in range and building penetration as soon as they turn on the new spectrum in the old towers (probably before the end of the year)

  • dman

    I would love separate payments but keeping the discounts for additional lines like sprints framily plans

  • Reddog

    No more deductibles on broken phones if you have Jump? Maybe one free one a year? HUGE pain point for customers, and many leave rather than paying it. Many other carrier’s customers come to T-mobile because of the deductible at their old carrier. SAFE and sound. Sound….maybe offering EIP on accessories? $0 down on accessories would mean HUGE sales…..

  • YABD

    If you can’t pay high cruise calling fees or data? Stay where Tmobile have coverage. SIMPLE.

  • CondescendingTruth

    No enrollment in JUMP required to upgrade after half the device is paid off. No other carrier requires an extra monthly fee beyond the installment handset payment to upgrade.

    • ac

      You’re getting insurance as well as jump all in the same package….for $10….you could take off jump though…..you’d be saving $2 ;)

  • Luke Gray

    get rid of deposits or bring them down some a major pain for me don’t separate everyone between perfect credit and building credit

  • Alex Pilaia

    Would love to have a “Thank You” credit to Tmo customers of like 2+ years. like a $10 Bill Credit per month for being a loyal customer for 2 years…. is that too much to ask??

    • Ruskastud

      How much should I get for 15 years……..?

      • Alex Pilaia

        Should be up to a max of like 20% off your total Bill.. :)

  • Jared

    It sure would be nice if we could get the opportunity to have a reasonable amount of off-network roaming in Traverse City, MI!