John Legere’s 2014 resolutions for T-Mobile to “transform the wireless industry”, hint at Uncarrier 4.0

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Of all the CEOs in the wireless industry, there are few that provide the level of entertainment offered up by our very own John Legere. If he’s not dressing as Santa and putting pieces of coal in the other carriers’ stockings, he’s teasing the upcoming announcements and having a dig at AT&T on Twitter.

Today, his image post hints at what’s up T-Mobile’s sleeve for 2014, and it seems that his thinking goes very much along with ours. He – perhaps – even confirms rumors we’ve already heard about Uncarrier 4.0 and what it could entail. Second in his list, behind removing “customer pain points” was the focus on LTE coverage. As you know from my post a couple of days back, I believe this is key to T-Mobile being seen as a genuine contender to AT&T and Verizon. And it’s vital to prove that 2013 was not a one-hit wonder.

But, it’s what’s behind it in the list that interests me. “Un-shackle the family from those other guys.”

We heard from our sources a little while ago that Uncarrier 4.0 was very much focussed on the family. Specifically, the idea is to offer customers from other carriers the ability to “escape” their existing contracts by paying off their early termination fees. This – according to those sources – is achieved partially by trading in old phones and having the rest covered by T-Mobile as a form of credit. With families of customers often choosing a single carrier, and potentially all having different end dates on their individual lines, it could be a great way for customers to save money and Tmo to gain long-term subscribers.

The announcement is taking place in just a few days time at CES in Las Vegas. So we only have a short while to wait and see exactly what Legere has up his sleeve this year.

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  • Noor Mahmoud

    I wonder if there is any meaning in that comment about ATT?

    • taron19119

      Yeah it is at every event he makes fun of at&t and is making a joke about not mention AT&T at all but we all know he will

    • philyew

      Well, if they do go after subscribers by helping out with ETFs, the policy will target all three of the larger carriers, not just AT&T. That would fit his words.

  • taron19119

    We can at least count on announcement about lte

  • philyew

    I hope you’re right that the focus on LTE means broader coverage, but I fear “go faster, go LOUD” can just as easily be interpreted as further actions to enhance the existing footprint.

    Acquiring additional spectrum, as they have started to do with the recent Verizon swap, will allow them to deploy 20+20 in more locations, thus taking care of the “go faster” component. Acquiring 700MHz* bandwidth, probably by buying from Verizon, will improve signal penetration into buildings, thus addressing “go LOUD”. Since the greatest issue with this is encountered in the cities, again the footprint isn’t necessarily extended.

    If he wanted to talk about coverage, then “go further” or something similar would have been more expressive.

    * Corrected thanks to Trevnerdio

    • Garblicks

      I agree with your last paragraph

    • Trevnerdio

      Oh goodness…700KHz would be a nightmare. Interfering with all that AM radio mess… ;)

      • philyew

        Well, it’s either that or wait until 2015 for the 600MHz auction to start working out the problems with poor signals in buildings.

        There is no other low frequency bandwidth available and TM’s problems in the city stem from only having spectrum in the higher frequency bands.

        • Trevnerdio

          Lol you misread – I’m just poking fun. 700MHz is what you were looking for, which is like broadcast television. 700KHz is low band AM radio with ridiculous crazy range, but 0 capacity :)

        • philyew

          Oops…sorry. That must have been auto correct at work. I promise I do know the difference as you’ll see in many other posts ;-)

        • Trevnerdio

          I don’t doubt you, man. Damn you, autocorrect!

  • Garblicks

    I’m wondering if tmobile will buy up more low band spectrum or buy out another smaller carrier to gain lower band spectrum. If coverage is the key to 2014 tmobile needs to start rolling out better coverage like they did lte last yr

    • philyew

      They have already raised $4 billion for the purpose, and Verizon are probably the likely source since they recently spent a ton of money buying out Vodafone’s share of the company. They can’t afford to sit around on spectrum that they have no plans to use, which applies to some of their 700MHz holding. Hence my earlier conclusion.

      • longtimeCustomer

        I read this morning that AT&T is in Europe thinking about buying Vodafone. Wouldn’t that be a mess.

        • philyew

          I’m not sure it would have any impact on the business here, as long as they don’t get over-stretched. The companies will operate as completely separate entities, in the same way that Deutsche Telekom operated the various TM entities when they owned them all exclusively.

          Maybe this indicates which way the wind is blowing in terms of profitability from the US wireless market…

        • Stone Cold

          Not much not that Verizon is free of them.

      • Garblicks

        So the 700 mhz bandwidth is gonna be enough for their whole network?

        • philyew

          Not that I am aware. According to what I have read, Verizon targeted urban areas in the 2008 auction where they acquired their 700MHz holding.

      • Stone Cold

        T-Mobile and Verizon have asked FCC permission for a high end spectrum swap. Hopefully we will hear more on this soon.

        • philyew

          Here’s the detail of that from Fierce Wireless:

          “According to the FCC, which must clear the swap, Verizon and T-Mobile would exchange 10 to 20 MHz of AWS-1 spectrum in 285 counties across 59 Cellular Market Areas. As part of the AWS swaps, Verizon would assign 10 MHz of AWS spectrum to T-Mobile in 16 counties across four CMAs, and after the deal T-Mobile would hold 30 to 40 MHz of AWS-1 spectrum. Additionally, T-Mobile would assign 10 to 20 MHz of AWS spectrum to Verizon in 26 counties across nine CMAs, and after the deal Verizon hold 20 to 40 MHz of AWS-1 spectrum.

          With regard to the PCS spectrum, the companies would exchange 5 to 20 MHz of PCS spectrum in 153 counties across 47 CMAs. In addition, in 11 counties across three CMAs in Texas, Verizon would assign 20 MHz of PCS spectrum to T-Mobile, and would receive 10 MHz of PCS spectrum in return. Finally, Verizon would assign 5 to 10 MHz of PCS spectrum to T-Mobile in an additional 34 counties across 13 CMAs.”

          Depending on the locations, that could help to boost existing coverage, or it could help to add 4G in locations that are currently too squeezed to provide any.

          Since the current 4G footprint spans over 250 CMAs, the numbers discussed here aren’t going to make widespread changes possible, so again expectations need to be moderated.

    • http://www.facebook.com/thomas.locurto Thomas LoCurto

      T- Mobile already said they plan to participate in the 600mhz auction, presumably going for a national license. That would be huge for them. The problem is that the auction has been moved to 2015, so they need to upgrade the huge swaths of their network that are EDGE now

  • milanyc

    4G LTE Go Faster-Go Loud doesn’t really mean expanding the “LTE Coverage”, more likely LTE enhancements and widening the channels within the existing footprint. Let’s not jump the gun please.

    • Eric

      Go Loud could mean T-Mobile shocks the market by upgrading EDGE to LTE, as a T-Mobile employee implied would be complete and happening later in 2014.

      • milanyc

        Go Loud could also mean VoLTE, not necessary go “Further”.
        I’d sure be happy with more coverage, but let’s not jump the gun since that’s exactly what PR teams want us to do. Spread unverified, misinterpreted info, which creates a wave of second hand misinformation.

        • Noor Mahmoud

          Don’t they already have VoLTE? The Note 3 says VoLTE everytime a call is made with HD Voice and LTE.

        • milanyc

          That could be a bug in software. Next time that happens, fire up ServiceMode *#0011# and take a screenshot. If your ServiceMode doesn’t display LTE while the call is in progress, you’re using WCDMA, most likely with wideband AMR.
          Besides, Note 3 hasn’t been officially tested and approved for VoLTE operations by the FCC.

        • TylerCameron

          When I had a Note II, I noticed that when making calls, not only would I fall back to HSPA, but my speeds on HSPA wouldn’t even be HSPA+ speeds. Like, in an area that normally gets 14+mbps on HSPA+, I wouldn’t be able to exceed 5mbps on HSPA while in a call. I can on my HTC One though. Why is that?

        • milanyc

          I’ve seen something like that on AT&T. Not on T-Mobile.
          On T-Mobile while on call throughput is still over 10Mbps depending on the capacity, time of the day, etc…

        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          It doesn’t have to be, for now. VoLTE has been exempted until the FCC can figure out all the new rules for IP Voice.

        • milanyc

          Of course it doesn’t HAVE to be, but also “Go LOUD” doesn’t have to be the same as coverage expansion.
          It also doesn’t have to be next week at the CES, the 2014 resolution is for the next 12 month timeframe.

        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          I was referring to the fact that there’s no certification actually required for VoLTE by the FCC.

        • philyew

          They use CSFB right now I think. I certainly fall back from LTE to HSPA when making a call.

      • taron19119

        Not going to happen t-mobile EDGE is running on the pcs 1900mz band and t-mobile LTE is Running ON the aws 2100mz band and t-mobile one’s one band used for one thing not multiple things

        • Alex Zapata

          *AWS 1700/2100.

        • Eric

          T-Mobile has a nationwide license of AWS 1700/2100 and a pretty large PCS license, and with all of the rumored spectrum buyouts going on and coming in the future, T-Mobile is in a position to calm the “T-Mobile coverage sucks” party down and show AT&T and Verizon what the smallest major carrier in the USA will do.

        • taron19119

          True but u miss my point u said all EDGE Towards Well be upgraded to LTE and that can’t happen until voice over LTE happen first

        • Eric

          But you need LTE towers before VoLTE. :-O

        • taron19119

          They have LTE and u need to get every customer a LTE device before every EDGE Toward can run LTE and by going VoLTE now u can offset the lost of the EDGE Towards

        • Eric

          But it would be safe to say that upgrading every EDGE tower to LTE and killing EDGE would be great for everyone, especially people who travel a lot.

        • taron19119

          No cause u have To get every customer an LTE device

        • Eric

          Well anyway T-Mobile would want to put LTE onto each and every tower, since HSPA+ only wouldn’t future-proof the network.

        • taron19119

          True but t-mobile is working on urban areas first because that’s where the majority other customers are and then going to work their way down to the smaller areas theres a rumor that t-mobile well expand LTE to 350 market in 2014

        • Mark Reese

          Not when there are no custmers in rual america …lte only in the country becase 0 customers

        • http://www.facebook.com/thomas.locurto Thomas LoCurto

          HSPA+ can be deployed along with EDGE on 1900mhz and is in many areas. T-Mobile doesn’t have to undo EDGE anywhere to implement LTE – they will just add it on. HSPA+ is already replacing EDGE on their PCS spectrum, but theoretically they could run EDGE, HSPA+ and LTE together on PCS.

        • philyew

          That’s true, as long as there is sufficient spectrum to split between the three services. It would, however, be useless until there were phones to match.

      • Alex Zapata

        They probably wouldn’t get rid of EDGE, but rather augment it with LTE or HSPA+

      • fsured

        ATT and T-Mobile make money off the EDGE network from international travelers using the networks. Their phones usually don’t have the frequencies to work on the 3g and higher networks but do have the EDGE abilities. It has never been a plan to completely turn off 2g coverage.

        I also don’t remember a certain employee implying the coverage being upgraded in 2014. Their current roll out of LTE in their markets capable of it may be completed and just need to bet tweaked in 2014. I have not seen a plan regarding the 2g only areas.

        • philyew

          You’re right, you haven’t seen one, because there hasn’t been one announced. The nearest they have come is in October someone official told Fierce Wireless, in clarifying the 225 million target for LTE in 2014, that they would be extending beyond that, but they hadn’t announced anything formally yet.

  • D’orhk!

    – Don’t sell out to the man…and by man, I mean Masayoshi Son.

    • Adrayven

      Lets hear that again! Here’s hoping T-mobile makes it through 2014 w/o being bought out!..

    • maximus1901

      Then buy TMO yourself from DT. Or make a Kickstarter campaign for $20 bil.

      • D’orhk!

        I’m calling you out for your false dichotomy. DT could have additional stock offerings or create separate stock class and float them into the market, if they wanted to inject more money into TMUS. Or they could reorganize TMUS so that they could dilute the number of shares they have (to get out of TMUS), but still make money from doing so.

  • Jay J. Blanco

    hmmm 2014 maybe promising !!

  • TD

    In theory I like the idea of “unshackling” the family and crediting them with the ETF would be a prerequisite, but if that involves those new customers turning over their devices with pocket change (as everyone, including Tmobile, try to do) then it won’t be transformative. Tmobile has to make the trade-in value fair, not to where they can refurb and flip for a profit and leave new customers on the hook for new $600 devices.

    • UMA_Fan

      But if the whole ETF is covered as long as you trade in a phone than what does it matter what value they assign to the device? I would like to know how this is going to be profitable to Tmobile and how exactly this is going to work.

      • kalel33

        I’d love it if they unshackled me from my contract with them.

    • D Nice

      I can agree with this some. If you are a person eager to get out of contract it can make sense, especially if you have sprint. Being that the service is bad this may be a good incentive to get out while you can. In my area not even the sprint employees recommend the service. (yes awhile ago I looked into sprint). Also I have quite a few friends in my area that has sprint, they say if this proves true with TMO paying ETF they will be the first person in line come the 15th. I came from Verizon it just made sense for me to switch (I was still under contract) because I was just paying too much for my four lines of service I could no longer justify it especially since they started charging early upgrade fees of $35. I realize each person situation is different, in saying this I think this will make a lot of sense to many people. Looking at the world we live in the cost of business is not cheap or free. If it could benefit me I would trade in my device in a heart beat( even if they were flipping them for a profit) if it was for a lower market rate selling it to TMO vs selling it privately, they have to make money somewhere. I guess we as consumers have to reasonable to a point, after all you can never have your cake and eat it too.

    • AndroidProfit

      Are they going to REQUIRE you to trade in a device..”sorry but I lost my phone”?

      • TD

        I have to imagine that TMobile won’t eat the customer’s ETF without having some pre-owned devices with resale value to offset that cost. We’re talking several hundred dollars here. NO WAY TMobile can afford that given their rate plans and no commitment.

  • T mobile proud employee

    The 4G LTE hint he gave is exactly what he means! you guys will be super surprised by what he will unveil in just a couple of days!! and not only our customers but our competitors!! and for the other treats you will be even more shocked and FYI the ideas you are giving are great!

    • AndroidProfit

      This is great news potentially! Thanks for sharing your excitement.

    • HadALLTheCarriers

      In all honesty T-Mobile needs to fix there fatal flaw COVERAGE!!! 2G is NOT cool go anywhere out of a major area BOOM! ZERO COVERAGE SLOW DATA SPEEDS Come on now the 4G Revolution is here And Need I not say Mr.Legere is a formal AT&T Corprate Exec. So Have SEVERAL Seats

      • Dakota

        Well they can play the role of a niche urban area network.. You have to choose a carrier based on coverage in the areas you’re in. If you travel or live in non urban areas,T-Mobile is not for you. I’ve got friends who travel for work & they’d never even consider T-Mobile

  • http://davidron.com davidron

    The fact that the 2013 list contains items that are specifically measurable as done and the 2014 list contains vague immeasurable elements, I doubt this image is nothing more than a marketing ploy to inspire unfounded speculation.

  • Melissa Cardenas

    pfft whatever tmobile should fix there network today at the famous rose parade in pasadena tmobile and sprint were the ONLY ones that TOTALLY crapped out i know since i have tmobile i went with my whole family my cuzin on sprint was also on the same boat as me . My sister with at&t and her man on verizon were able to use 4G lte and make calls and send texts without a problem i was thinking for sure att network is gonna get overloaded since i heard it has happend before but tru out the whole parade it worked much better than tmobile and im sure thousands of people were on att network ,tmobile was just sad couldnt call got “network busy” not even texts were going tru even tho my S4 displayed full bars 4G nothing was coming tru. I had to borrow my sisters att iphone 5S to update my FB n twittr n send Texts and call my mom when she got lost in the crowd all from my sisters att phone because tmobile was useless.

    • AndroidProfit

      Despite Atlanta supposedly being blanketed in 4g I am CONSTANTLY getting NO SERVICE on T-Mobile when traversing ATL.

      • Dakota

        Depends what part of the area you’re in, but why don’t you switch if you’re not happy.

        • kalel33

          He might be in contract.

      • Anthony

        what part of the ATL are you in…cause I never had the problem of NO SERVICE..although I do admit 2G seems to be frequent in ATL. with TMO….but to be fair…I had problems with my ATT iphone 5 in ATL too…so it could be an issue with the area

    • Dakota

      Sometimes you get what you pay for. You can try AT&T LTE on straight talk if you have an

    • Anthony

      wow…time for you to be out then…ATT or Verizon might be calling you…I went to the NYC ball drop for New Years eve…never had a problem with TMO service…could text, surf the internet and talk while there up too and including after 12 am…

    • scarfacemario

      Can i give you a suggestion …. next time that happens switch your phone to 2G and i guarantee you it will work

  • TmoJohnstownCustomer

    Anyone else notice “go LOUD” appeared to be capitalized. Could it be some sort of acronym?

    • taron19119

      Im stuck on go further I’m hoping a rumor that I been hearin is true t-mobile to expand LTE in 2014 to 350 markets

      • philyew

        There was a comment at beginning of October from TM clarifying a Neville Ray statement about plans to reach 225 million POPs with LTE in 2014. Fierce Wireless had the following quote: “We will expand LTE over time, and as we have clearly demonstrated already, we will execute quickly,” she said. “We simply haven’t yet announced LTE expansion plans beyond 225 million POPs.”

        I’m still betting that the focus will, for some time, continue to be on the potential subscribers to be had in their 4G-enabled markets. There are 180 million potential customers within the 4G footprint, compared with only half that number in the rest of the country.

        It makes sense to add spectrum to create a killer-fast LTE network in the major markets, augmented with additional low-frequency spectrum to improve in-building reception. Together with the other Uncarrier elements and an aggressive pursuit of other carriers’ customers through subsidizing ETFs, arguably you have the best recipe for substantial growth, regardless of issues outside those areas.

        Filling out the suburban coverage round the growing urban centers and boosting coverage on major routes will also satisfy a lot of complaints, so I do expect some expansion in the footprint in that context.

        • maximus1901

          On their 3Q2013 conference call slides, they have the 225mil figure. Why? Well they currently cover 229mil with HSPA+ so . . . probably because those are the sites where they have fast backhaul.

          In other words, no they were NOT PLANNING to expand. They are PLANNING to sell. The BS statement of “We simply haven’t yet announced LTE expansion plans beyond 225 million POPs” is something only fools believe. It’s not a coincidence 225 is just under 229.

          Those slides are targeted to investors, to whom they can’t lie.
          Customers on the other hand . . . .

        • philyew

          When they announced their LTE strategy, the target was to bring the service to the 37,000 towers that currently delivered 3G/HSPA+ service. It was always stated that the program would run on into 2014 and at the time the HSPA+ footprint covered markets with 225 million POPs. There is no inconsistency with the numbers shared in Q3 2013.

          Since the HSPA+ footprint extended from 225m to 229m over the last year, I don’t know what you would call that, other than expansion.

          It certainly isn’t an aggressive program, and I’ve repeatedly cautioned that it is probably too much to expect such aggression right now, but it is expansion, which is likely to continue at least at the pace I have suggested i.e. filling in suburbs and main highways.

          There’s also the need to replace older equipment which is failing. They will replace GSM equipment with the new equipment that is being used to deliver HSPA+/LTE on an ad hoc basis, whether they expand backhaul to support 4G or not.

          As long as there is an AWS license covering the location, they will be able to offer 3G until such time as the backhaul can support 4G throughput.

        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          Those same slides that they gave investors also pointed to T-Mobile having a budget of at least $4 billion in 2014 and $3 billion 2015 for upgrades and expansions.

          T-Mobile has been very cautious not to over-promise. They are under-promising and over-delivering. Given the kind of crap Sprint got for over-promising and under-delivering, I think T-Mobile is taking the right stance here.

          T-Mobile, like any wireless company, is tackling its network in stages. The first stage is to standardize the network platform for the UMTS HSPA+ network area. The second stage would likely be fill-in around the HSPA+ network area to seal up any coverage holes. The third stage is certainly going to be tackling those 2G-only areas that have equipment that is at least 10 years old and no longer supported by its suppliers. T-Mobile completed the first, is finishing up the second, and is on its way to the third. Give the company some time.

        • maximus1901
        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          Well, at some point it’ll have to be done. Right now, it’s being done on an ad hoc basis as cell sites break down, which led to a decrease in 2G-only coverage by 10 million POPs over the course of 2013.

          I expect that if T-Mobile were to gain more subscribers (approaching or surpassing the number of subscribers that Sprint has), we’ll see further accelerations of T-Mobile’s modernization program.

          For now, my expectation is that sometime in the next few months, T-Mobile will provide a more concrete timeline for the next stage of its modernization initiative.

        • maximus1901

          I just looked over the “3q13 investor slides” and I don’t see where they hint what their 2014 capex is.
          All they say, slide 16/17, is that outlook for 2013 capex is 4.2-4.4bil.
          Nothing about 2014

    • Magenta Man

      Ahhhh haaa…. Maybe…Lte On Your Device (LOUD) s the acronym!!!

      • Spanky

        That’d be LOYD.

        • Magenta Man

          Lte On Users Devices (LOUD)

  • Sectime

    Just hope that large bucket of cold water called Sprint or Dish misses Tmobile.

  • wcjeep

    I used to have T mobile. It was very frustrating cell service. At the time the customer service was great at apologizing. No real help or plan to improve the signal to the device. I live in the vicinity of T-Mobile head quarters. I’ll continue to pay more for the competition. The competition works in the metro and the mountains. I do like the T mobile pressure applied to the industry.

    • AndroidProfit

      2 down votes on a VERY REASONABLE perspective on tmobile?

      • samsavoy

        You should know by now the comment section is fanboy-haven.

        • AndroidProfit

          YUP!

        • Dakota

          Probably cuz without a contract, you’d think most customers complaining of poor coverage would switch & probably not visiting a site about a network they’re not on.. But people also have to be able to take criticism and realize service is going to vary depending on location..

        • kalel33

          You’d think that a person posting on a T-mobile site would know that anyone that became a customer in February ’13 or earlier is in a contract and cannot leave without the hefty early termination fee.

        • philyew

          Not really a true statement. More accurately, if you entered your contract between March 2011 and February 2013, you still have an ETF obligation, which tapers away the longer it has been active.

        • kalel33

          My ETF is still $200 and hasn’t tapered at all. In a couple of months that will change to $100 but my previous statement is still correct.

        • philyew

          Think about it, Kalel, before you reply again.

          If I “became a customer” any time before February 2012 and HAVEN’T ENTERED A NEW CONTRACT SINCE THEN, I have no ETF obligation to worry about.

          Your statement that “anyone that became a customer in February ’13 or earlier is in a contract” is NOT correct.

          By the way, my own post was incorrect as well, it should have read “if you entered your contract between February 2012 and February 2013…”.

        • Anthony

          You would have to be in the know in varying locations to be able to say that TMO service is poor mostly…and fortunately you are not…you can only speak for yourself. If that is your experience with Tmobile, and you are on Tmobile you should leave now. I travel extensively and have noticed that in rural areas TMO service is not the best….It could be the worst who knows?? but it works even if down to 2G…In Metro Areas Tmobile is much much better… It is sometimes subjective to your circumstances but all in all TMO has pretty decent service. I don’t think anyone on the TMO site has a problem with people complaining about service…especially if you are one of the people who are affected by service that may not be the best…but to make blanket statements for which you cannot possibly prove without some real data collection over a period of time, then to day TMO’s service is on a whole mostly poor is absurd and incorrect and gives people incorrect information especially since you can prove none of what you are saying.

    • Trevnerdio

      The one thing that I’ll ever agree with @androidprofit:disqus on…your view is very reasonable.

  • quez91

    I like all the improvements T-Mobile has done. I just really hope they do not get bought by sprint, that would be an absolute nightmare.

    • bucdenny

      It is not Sprint that is buying T-Mobile. It is Softbank, which has the cash to do so.

      • quez91

        Ahh true indeed, well basically I wouldn’t want things to change. I just like T-Mobiles current progress

      • Sectime

        Ahh they don’t have the cash, all borrowed money.

      • Sasori

        Well, if Softbank changes TM, you can expect absolutely lame service at their outlets and welfare-like lines for ‘main’ stores that can actually get things done, like transfer your service to another phone. Oh, and when you’re angry with your customer service ‘rep’ over the phone, expect to be simply told, ‘thank you for your call’ – click.
        That’s how they do it in Japan, where, you’re only a respected customer until you’ve bought something.

      • KP

        Wont happen.. Dish yes, Softbank, NO.

    • Stone Cold

      SoftBank not Sprint

  • AndroidProfit

    Can’t WAIT until these potential new customers FEEL THE PAIN that is the LOUSY T-Mobile network.

    • Stone Cold

      We know the network needs to be improved but it isn’t lousy everywhere.

  • kev2684

    my little T-Mobile fanboy heart breaks every time I see these kind of posts knowing they could be swallowed any minute by either dish or sprint. dammit DT.

    • maximus1901

      Buy TMO from DT.

      • Stone Cold

        That would be awesome if that could happen in my opinion.

    • KP

      Dish wouldn’t be a bad thing…

      • kev2684

        dish has slow internet and is expensive. they even have this ridiculous 15GB cap on their internet+tv plans. how many HD movies/tv on netflix/hulu is that? i will not be surprised if they get T-Mobile, they will start offering T-Mo’s 4G LTE as an alternative to their satellite service. that will just give them reason to raise prices of both T-Mo and Dish overall.

        • KP

          Dish actually is the cheaper of the satellite companies. The reason why they are a better fit is because of frequencies they have as well as the cash for M&A and buildout… With Softbank, you have two incompatible platforms. DOJ would approve a Dish vs. Softbank…

        • Trevnerdio

          Not to mention seriously burden the T-Mobile network!

  • czydiamond

    Really liked their recent ad where one of the advantages of T-mobile is “no more at&t”.

  • Gary Hernandez

    Hmm, he wore the same sweater to write the reolutions for New Years 2013 and 2014.

    • Matt Macaluso

      No, he wore the same sweater to check off the boxes for 2013 in 2014…

  • T-Mobile wannabe

    I love T-Mobile’s plans and un-carrier approach BUT their network coverage is not just bad, it’s TERRIBLE! I paid earlier termination fees to escape AT&T in order to take advantage of T-Mobile’s great rates but couldn’t make or receive calls unless I was standing outside.

    Neither my iPhone 5 nor my wife’s iPhone 5s could get more than 1 bar/dot in any building in San Francisco and most of the time I’d have “No Service”. This despite T-Mobile technicians’ and customer service reps’ claims to have more LTE towers in San Francisco than any other carrier. I even had to use Skype just to cancel my T-Mobile service. How bad is that?

    • Sasori

      I did the same with ATT, because their coverage was worst; never had coverage issue with t-mobile.

    • aspblom

      but it’s one of the few carriers that have good service where I live in the hills of Hollywood

    • Edgar

      I was in San Francisco last year in summer and did not had that problem and they where upgrading so it was suppose to be unstable. So I don’t know what you are saying

    • dullgeek

      Ok. That may be true. But for me, I’m in one city 345 out of 365 days of the year. And that city has great TMO 4G LTE coverage. And the times when I’m not in that city, I tend to travel to other cities with strong TMO coverage. The reality is that I’m only outside of good TMO coverage about 2-3% of the time. And amount I’d have to pay extra to go to Verizon is just too high for that little advantage. I suspect there’s an incredibly large number of non-TMO customers who are in that same situation.

      Of course, that’s no help to those people who are in bad TMO coverage areas and want to be come TMO customers. But building coverage is expensive. You need spectrum licenses and capital buildout. And all of that takes time. If the cost of providing coverage were zero, or near zero, I’m sure that TMO would already have done it. In the mean time, they have to focus on building a customer base from the large number of people who are in my shoes.

    • KP

      Great coverage in Dallas… But to make it really appeal to my company is making it great in every metro we go to.

    • wezra

      I go into the Bay Area several times a year… specifically San Francisco and San Jose. I have never had an issue with coverage in either city inside buildings or outside. I was just there and had LTE or 4G in both locations all of the time… no exception.
      Not sure what your specific issue is, but from my experience, T-Mobile has not been an issue what so ever in San Francisco.

    • Anthony

      I dont know if i a believe that…I was in San Fran a few weeks ago and had no problems with my TMO service in and outside buildings ….coverage was fine for Data and phone reception was normal…I didnt have 4 bars but a strong 3 bars of service and at no time did i loose data connection speeds…so not sure i believe you … I wasnt alone on my trip and the two other people that were with me didnt have problems either…one was with AT&T but the other was with TMOBILE and we never had an issue with data or phone coverage so…..

    • Ford_Thundercougarfalconbird

      I always get excellent reception on TMo in San Francisco. Of course I don’t have an iPhone.

    • Parker

      That’s really strange. As someone who lives in San Francisco, I have excellent coverage. At least as good as AT&T or Verizon in the city.

    • Chris

      Seems like you’re alone here buddy.

      Lots of people have confirmed great receptions in San Francisco area. Is your house made out of thick metals used in gasoline refineries? lol

    • wunderhund

      If you brought an unlocked phone over from AT&T, you have access to T-Mobile’s signals, BUT you won’t have the 1700/2100 band, available only on T-Mobile branded phones, that gives you access to more towers. I brought an unlocked GSM phone to T-Mobile, had good coverage on my commute, office, outside — but at home, I had dropped calls, weak signal. Bought the $70 Lumia 525 and now have a stronger signal in the house because it has access to the extra band, whose tower must be closer to my home. I’d rather be using my previous phone everyday, but with the money I’m saving on the T-Mobile plan, I’ll be able to purchase one of T-Mobile’s better phones soon and still spend less annually compared to ATT&T.

      • philyew

        Good point. However, the PCS (1900) and AWS (1700/2100) signals are on the same towers, it’s just that the signal strengths may vary.

        The LTE service is only delivered via AWS, so unless you have a device that can handle LTE on AWS, the best you can get is HSPA+.

    • http://snuxoll.com Stefan Nuxoll

      Sounds like a device issue to me, I was just down in SF the other week and was absolutely stunned by the service I had with T-Mobile compared to what I get at home in Boise. LTE was everywhere, in fact the only place I did not have constant service was in the metro tunnel under Market St when I was on the light rail or BART.

  • freshstart222

    If he wants to transform the wireless industry, he should consider reducing the rates for various services and stop imposing caps on minutes, data etc. which are designed to trick consumers into paying more.

    • Shep

      That’s what happened last year. The plans are unlimited with the exception of data which throttles back at a certain point.

      • philyew

        You can even buy unlimited 4G, with the only restriction being on the amount you can consume through a tethered device. Sprint has a similar plan with an extra 2.5GB tethered limit…but you pay a massive $40/month more for that privilege.

        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          In my experience, adding the tethering package removes the unlimited data completely on Sprint. You only have the amount of data total. Then: overages. :(

        • philyew

          I went through the Sprint online process earlier today to see what their comparable price is for unlimited everything. It said $110/month with a cap of 5GB for a tethered connection. The TM equivalent is $70/month with a tethered cap of 2.5GB.

        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          Yeah. Sprint is substantially more expensive on a price per feature basis.

    • 21stNow

      I take it that you forgot the “/sarcasm” at the end of your post.

    • yankeesusa

      Can you be more specific on the services he should reduce the rates on? What cap on minutes are you talking about? Are you sure your on T-Mobile?

  • Sasori

    perhaps he should start charging for calls that we ‘don’t’ get.

  • Eldric

    for everyone talking crap about T Mobile and how crappy they services is let me tell you t Mobile is the best service in the area I live in. every chance I get I go against Verizon, AT&T, Sprint in speed test T Mobile has beat Verizon LTE, AT&T LTE on 4G speeds T Mobile may not be the fastest and download or upload speed but if T Mobile don’t win they’re close T Mobile is by far the best phone service out there the price you can’t beat CHARM OTTER NC

  • maximus1901

    Since there’s sometimes a TMO employee here, pretending TMO cares about improving its network, let’s help TMO by compiling a list of places where:
    1) TMO has LTE (according to their obfuscated map)
    2) TMO has NO SERVICE inside houses, buildings, etc.

    Please respond with:
    {zip code} – {cross streets}

    • philyew

      Or, to take your own advice, you could buy DT’s shares, and fix it yourself ;-)

      • maximus1901

        I don’t have TMO. I have Verizon unlimited, switching to Sprint unlimited when the iPhone 6 comes out. I couldn’t care less what TMO’s coverage is. All I care is that TMO remain independent so Sprint is forced to have unlimited data forever.

        • Chris

          Then why are you here? lol…
          And why would you want to get someone’s zip and cross street.

        • fentonr

          That’s what I don’t get, why are there so many people here that don’t have T-Mobile and often don’t even like them. I get that some people would like to have T-Mobile but can’t due to coverage or some other reason, but there are a bunch of people who seem not to care about T-Mobile at all…why are they here?

        • philyew

          I can understand why non-TM people may want to contribute to some of the discussions, such as a possible Softbank takeover, or other policies which have a potential impact on the industry overall, but all too often the other stuff is nothing more than trollery.

        • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

          Why can’t everyone be constructive?

    • KP

      No complaints in Dallas…. I did the stats last week. Oh and it worked in my house and my office building as well.

      Trust me, we have ATT as a family (unlimited data) as well as the office but we have been pleasantly surprised at our testing in dallas as a first look at moving to TMO.

    • Stone Cold

      This is true in Denver I walk in my moms house bars drop to one unless I enable wifi calling.

    • yankeesusa

      Tmobile may not work for you but as far as my signal I get perfect signal indoors and out. In fact with my brother in laws verizon phone the speeds of tmobile are like comparing 6mbps DSL to 25mbps Cable. My sprint phone wouldn’t even get 3g inside target or walmart. Now I get 4g LTE on my tmobile phone indoors and can actually use data indoors. Yes, their coverage may be lacking but I myself have seen improvements and not just little ones.

  • maximus1901

    Notice that in the resolutions, improve coverage is not an item.
    It is a pain point, though I’m not sure it’s one Johnny will spend money fixing.

    • Spanky

      Johnny would rather spend time talking smack about AT&T than dealing with his own company’s shortcomings.

      • philyew

        So nothing about the company has improved since AT&T withdrew their attempt to buy TM? The substantial changes that have been made in the last year haven’t addressed any of the company’s previous shortcomings?

        OK, they may not have hit your pain points yet, but they’ve certainly addressed a lot of issues for other people.

        • Spanky

          Of course substantial changes happened, simply because they had to. As you’ve mentioned in another comment, the failed AT&T buyout heralded a rather dark period in T-Mobile’s existence. In order to bounce back, the company had no choice but to reinvent itself.

        • philyew

          So Legere (and his management team) did “deal with his company’s shortcomings”…

          Whether the changes were voluntary or driven by business imperatives, they were changes that dealt with TM’s shortcomings which have occurred on Legere’s watch.

          I’m not deluded into thinking that what they are doing is altruism. It’s all about finding a business model that optimizes revenue and profit. Nevertheless, right now it works in favor of the consumer as well as the company, and long may that prosper.

        • Spanky

          The 800 pound gorilla in T-Mobile’s room is coverage. T-Mobile is certainly aware that it’s a major point of contention, which is why they have to implement other means of attracting customers. Unfortunately, these other means are only a Band-Aid. One way or the next, they’re spurring competition and forcing other carriers to make changes of their own, which ultimately benefits the consumer.

        • philyew

          So far they have converted billions of dollars worth of new spectrum acquired through the AT&T breakup, MetroPCS merger and other spectrum transactions into improved network service. They have spent over $1 billion on the network modernization program which has upgraded over 70% of their network, and billions more have been raised to acquire and deploy new spectrum.

          These aren’t “other means of attracting customers”, they are a direct response to coverage issues posed by their own previous limitations and the direction the industry as a whole is taking. You forget that, if they hadn’t carried out all this work, coverage would be an issue throughout 100% of their network in comparison with the other main carriers.

        • yankeesusa

          And that’s bad because???? Yes they are using the money from the failed merger but they have also surpassed Sprint in LTE coverage and not to mention speeds. In fact in my area tmobile was almost unusable in the last year and a half or 2. Now they are better than verizon in speed and att. At least in my area of course.

      • KP

        I disagree… I like the discourse and everyone has to be real in the fact that TMO has taken a lot of customers from ATT with their moves in the marketplace.

        ATT can stop all of this by doing one thing… Bring back unlimited data and that would be checkmate.

      • fentonr

        Its easier to point out AT&T ducks than it is to make billions of dollars appear and tons of spectrum.

        • philyew

          …and yet in recent months they have raised $4 billion for the precise purpose of making more spectrum appear. Go figure.

        • fentonr

          I didn’t say they can’t do that or that they aren’t, I just said it was harder.

        • philyew

          Sorry, I wasn’t contradicting your comment, just extending it as a response to the PP.

        • fentonr

          Ahh, I misunderstood.

      • UMA_Fan

        Which has resulted in at&t changing the way they operate as well

        • Spanky

          Indeed it has, particularly with the implementation of unsubsidized, contract-free plans. Unfortunately, their (as well as Verizon’s and Sprint’s) early upgrade plans leave a lot to be desired.

        • yankeesusa

          How is the upgrade program for tmobile the same as verizon and sprint. It’s actually one of the best, especially since it includes insurance coverage, something that the others charge extra for. And sprint just announced that even if you have insurance coverage after 2 times of your phone coming in for repair any other times after the 2nd you will get charged a $25 fee.

        • Spanky

          Reread my comment. I clearly stated that the other carriers’ (“their”) early upgrade programs leave a lot to be desired, which implies that they are not the same.

        • yankeesusa

          Got it

      • ccnet005

        and it looks like at&t is about to smack back at CES.

    • Chris

      Because it’s been announced since last year that they will improve their coverage by starting to convert their 2G to HSPA+. This is not an overnight event and certainly not magic where Legere can just wave a magic wand and ta-da, coverage improved. Lots of things has to happen, budget, man power, etc. In my area, and certainly inside my office, I’ve noticed the changes they announced and I actually get 4G reception. So their building penetration improved in my opinion.

      Seriously man, they KNOW about their coverage issues and they are working on it (getting more frequencies from Verizon, etc.). So just chill!

      • yankeesusa

        Exactly! Why don’t you switch to sprint then, their LTE is all rolled out already…. oh wait…

    • yankeesusa

      I think the LTE section is pointing to expanding coverage. Right now companies are focused on lte expansion and that is something I hope tmobile will announce which will mean more coverage overall.

    • CerealFTW

      I actually just started getting lte at my house yesterday. Though it’s only 1 or 2 bars, it’s a start

      • maximus1901

        We’re you getting only 2g previously?

        • CerealFTW

          Hspa+ but I would get around 2-5 mbps down

  • AngusMightHaveABeef

    I’m in Louisville, KY which just got 4G LTE in 2013. My speed falls between 5MB to 8.5MB down and 1.5 to 2.9MB up for LTE. The one time I noticed I was on HSPA+ I got right in the same speed ranges. This does not seem normal to me. Do others see the same speed for LTE and HSPA+? What about your speed in general?

    • samsavoy

      Same in Scranton, PA. Getting 4.5mbps down/8mbps up on LTE. HSPA gives me 10-15mbps. Kinda sucks, and it’s been that way since August.

      • j0mama

        Maybe it’s still 5+5 market. LA market was the same but after they updated to 10+10, speeds doubled.

        • philyew

          They have four licenses for Lackawanna County with a total of 30MHz between them. For comparison, they have six licenses totaling 40MHz in Los Angeles County.

        • samsavoy

          I am able to max out towers at 36mbps in Lackawanna county on another device but I believe my plan is screwed up because my speeds are poor. I still think they’re throttling some customers.

        • philyew

          Have them reset the line and make sure your APN and signal preferences are correct on your device.

  • tech916

    Maybe he can start by removing the ETF from his OWN Customers TMOBILE accounts

    • Rand0m3

      We have ETFs? We don’t even have contracts! Only thing I know they do now is force you to pay off the remaining balance for your phone if you leave and are financing the phone, but that’s not an ETF. If you managed to renew before the switch last year I guess it would be a different story, but I personally tried to just after (like the day after) and they wouldn’t let me, and I’m glad they didn’t. My bill is lower with a third line than it was with just two. I am not stuck paying off a phone when I want another phone (I like using the model I use for everything else aside from my home of just buying what I want and not being forced into a contract.

      • thepanttherlady

        Yes, some of us are still under contract. I don’t think mine ends until October of this year.

        • Rand0m3

          Maybe they’ll do something but this seems like its more of a function to get people to move. They wouldn’t “pay” your ETF they’d reimburse you with an equal amount in services from them from the sound of it. That being the case I don’t know how that would work for existing customers.

          From the article “This – according to those sources – is achieved partially by trading in old phones and having the rest covered by T-Mobile as a form of credit”. It’d be nice if they just let people pay off whatever was left on the phone they purchased with the contract rather than the pro-rated etf, it seems like that normally happens a few months earlier (I assume that’s why you never had to wait 2 full years to do another upgrade). Or maybe trade in the old device and use that credit (like in the quote) as part of the credit applied to the balance, then whatever credit is left over they applied to the account for buying a new model. That would at least save people money and if they planned on staying they could switch to a lower cost plan at that point if they wanted.

        • philyew

          I think the point is that people want something in Uncarrier 4.0 for existing customers to complement the suggested plans to help others become TM customers.

          If they were to do it, it would surely only have to be an announcement that TM no longer intended to enforce ETFs.

        • yankeesusa

          That would be nice to let current customers out of their etf. But in the end you got a discounted phone for signing those contracts. Maybe if you return your phone they can cancel the contract and you can buy new phones at full price and have no contract.

        • philyew

          That is perfectly understood, but in most cases, people have been paying the subsidy back for at least a year now. Based on the difference between Classic and Value pricing, that means most people will have paid back at least $240 towards the subsidy, significantly reducing TM’s exposure.

          We will have to see what the deal will be for new customers, but a substantial amount of subsidy to pay ETFs for customers of other carriers, when not recovered via contract or ETF, may turn out to be an equally generous gesture.

          As I’ve said repeatedly, I plan to go nowhere, so canceling the ETF would not benefit me at all. From my point of view, it would be an emphatic statement underlining the Uncarrier philosophy and a commitment to the program of improvements that is already in place.

        • tech916

          I as well until March 2014

        • Daniel

          You have 2 months… Big deal. Just wait. Stop Complaining.

      • philyew

        If you upgraded or became a postpaid customer between February 2012 and February 2013 there will be an outstanding ETF.

        What I’m not clear about is whether people who paid a migration fee to move from Classic to Simple Choice wiped out their ETF. I know that even though I recently migrated without a migration fee, I still have an ETF covering until August.

      • http://joinowr.com Matt Wilkins

        It’s all about your situation. I was a Classic customer since May 2011 and did the $0 cost bridge to Value program once i hit 18 months tenure in November 2012. Although I am under contract until November 2014, I was able to switch to the Simple Choice plan since it was the same monthly cost as my existing Value Plan. I wasn’t charged a migration fee but am under the same stipulations of my old Value Plan if I were to terminate my service early.

        • philyew

          So the Bridge to Value move actually extended the contract…? I didn’t know that happened.

        • http://joinowr.com Matt Wilkins

          yes.

      • fsured

        There could be some customers that would leave the carrier if they did this. It’s a gamble for them to offer this for current customers. My contract doesn’t end until Nov. 2014. I have 3 lines and my mother moved to an area that does not have Tmo coverage. They even checked their own coverage maps and said yep, she will have no service there and may have a partner companies signal to pick up, but we can send a signal booster! Like a signal booster is going to do anything when there is no signal to pick up and it won’t work to pick up another companies signal.

        The line service is essentially useless when she is home and may have signal depending on where her errands take her. Being that she does not live with me anymore and my billing address has full coverage, they would not let me cancel that line without paying EFT like they used to. If I could cancel it and not pay EFT I would. No point in keeping the service if it can’t be used to make calls.

        • philyew

          I had absolutely no problem getting my daughter’s line removed from my account without ETF when she moved to a roaming area, but it may have helped that there were a few months with zero usage on the account to prove it wasn’t a whine. I think it really depends on who you get from customer support. I use the chat support, where you can control the discussion better, or TForce, to get important changes made.

          I have no plans to move anywhere, so an ETF waiver would be worthless to me personally. Nevertheless, I think it would be an excellent gesture by the company to show they have faith in their product and are committed to the idea of having people stay because of the value and service, rather than because of any other reason.

          Yes, it’s a gamble, but it may also be a good indicator of where the network most urgently needs to improve.

        • yankeesusa

          If you live in an area that has “literally” no coverage, they will let you out of the contract. So far coming over from Sprint, tmobile reps have been nothing but helpful. In fact I got $200 credit for each of my lines to compensate my etf with sprint.
          Some of you may be on old contracts but you did sign those contracts didn’t you? Unless someone did it for you then you should just wait till the contract ends. I’m sure your discounted phone helped with those contract signups.

      • Stone Cold

        Some people are still on 2 year contracts some of my family is locked in until either later this year or 2015

    • fentonr

      Why? You agreed to those terms and when you renew you won’t have to agree to a contract again. Why would you assume that because someone else agreed to a different deal you should be able to invalidate your current deal and get the same thing? If the tables were turn and TMO did that to you, you’d pitch a fit.

      • philyew

        This is about the changes that TM plan to/could make in Uncarrier 4.0 and beyond.

        What’s wrong with expressing a desire that, if TM is going to drop money on people who are not customers, they should extend the same to current customers?

        No one is arguing the morality of contract obligations, but either party is free to waive their rights under the contract, if they choose to.

        There was also a dark period in TM’s history where they extended some contracts without telling customers or going through electronic verification procedures, justified only by changes in the services.

        • fentonr

          I suppose I’m just a bit jaded from my time spent as a rep. I’ve had crazy customers demand all sorts of absurdities regarding contracts they agreed to. I was threatened to be shot, beat up, sued, stalked and all sorts of other things by customers who were clearly told the terms of their agreement and decided that they didn’t like it any more. I’m not saying that is how all customers are or that reps don’t make mistakes, but I also firmly believe that the customer is not always right and telling them they’re always right degrades the situation for everyone involved…since then I can happily say I have graduated college, started a career and I am now just a T-Mobile customer…while I’ve also talked to idiots in stores or through customer care, I also know I am not always right.

        • Stone Cold

          Yes people are idiots at times.

        • philyew

          I believe every word of what you say. While I never worked in that type of role, and have never been other than a TM personal and corporate customer, I spent a very active couple of years providing peer support in the TM forums and it was clear from the experience that people would say just about anything to get their own way.

          Even so, there were sufficient indicators that things were going badly wrong with customer support in the period immediately before, during, and after the AT&T episode. Much of it seemed to stem from a deliberate policy to lock in customers by any means possible, in the face of an enormous exodus brought about by the situation. Offshoring didn’t help and I suspect that some of the processes, like online contract verification after a service change, weren’t always available to the agents.

          The good thing about the TMoNews forum is that people can exchange ideas without there being so many issues on the line. All the best with the career…I’m at the opposite end of mine ;-)

      • D Nice

        Unfortunately this is the mentality of most people today.

      • samsavoy

        I will say that they’ve effectively backed old customers into a corner. I have a value plan with an ETF attached. One person on the plan upgraded to an iPhone and their only option was a 4GB $30 data plan as part of Simple Choice. They removed the $10 2GB option. It took literally 4 calls to customer service to get the appropriate value plan data applied. Each rep would apply it, then it would disappear the next day and go back to a T-Mobile splash page. It’s very frustrating when you have a contract but they go and remove all of the options you used to be able to choose from. I was about to move to Simple Choice but our bill would have gone from $110/month to $140/month with no perks (that we’d use).

        • fentonr

          Very true. That is something I can sympathize with, my parents are in the same position. That said, T-Mobile (or any carrier for that matter) can’t simply offer everything forever. I saw customers on $20 for 25 minute voice plans. I’ve known people who have worked for T-Mobile for almost a decade and they don’t remember those plans. At some point, they do have to say, you can keep it, but if you get something new, you might not have the same choices.

        • samsavoy

          Yeah, the plan is technically not even 1 year out of date. They should at least not touch them until the contract expires.

        • fentonr

          I agree, but you did renew it. You could have stuck with what you had and they would have let you do that for the duration of your contract, they just won’t let you change what you had to a different discontinued plan. Upgrading is the same thing, you changed things rather than leaving them how they were. All of that said, I do think that T-Mobile needs to find a way to people off of value plans, they served their purpose and now they just cause issues. I don’t know what the answer is but the fact is that the simple choice plans are some of the best plans to ever be offered, you get a lot of bang for your buck and they’re way better than what you’ll find at AT&T and Verizon. T-Mobile needs to get everyone onto the simple choice plans so that they have consistency. For a while it looked like T-Mobile was going to work on lowering the requirements to switch but it kind of looks like they have backed away from it.

        • thepanttherlady

          The only difference with my Value plan and the new Simple Choice plans is that my 3rd line has been free for the last year and as of this month will be $5 instead of $10. Also, my 3rd line has absolutely no data not even the “included” amount, just the way I want it.

        • yankeesusa

          What does your current plan give you and how many lines do your have?
          For 2 lines with unlimited voice and text, 1 line has unlimited data the other 2.5gb I pay $110 before tax.
          What choices did they take away?

        • samsavoy

          4 lines, 1000 mins, unlimited text. 1 line has no data, the others are 2GB. The bill is $110 after taxes. Simple Choice comes to $130 before taxes. That does include an extra 500MB per line but…I don’t know…the one line isn’t even used much so it’s kind of a waste. There are cheaper AT&T MVNO’s that meet our needs. The coverage issues are annoying so there’s no sense in us paying more money for the same network.

    • yankeesusa

      Back when you signed those contracts was a different time. After you finish the contract that you happily signed off then you can switch to no contract. Like someone said, you agreed to those terms and probably got a subsidized pricing on your phone.

      • philyew

        Don’t forget there was a period when contracts were being extended for service changes, without any new device subsidy. There was also substantial evidence to conclude that some contracts were extended without the customer being properly notified and without going through the contract verification process.

        Your point is understood, but it would be an emphatic statement about Uncarrier to do it.

        • yankeesusa

          I did not know that. Thanks for bringing that up. I’m new to tmobile. Been with sprint for about 13 years and worked for Verizon.

        • philyew

          TM went through some dark days immediately before, during, and after the AT&T takeover episode. While most of the contracts initiated over that period will have expired by now, there is still a nasty taste associated with ETFs for many who were customers in that time.

  • Pitahson

    anyone have a clue if T-Mobile MVNO’s are finally getting LTE? lol

    • maximus1901

      What about Straight talk? Even ATT offers LTE on ST