T-Mobile Announces Fourth Quarter 2011 Financial Results, LTE Network Coming In 2013

Early this morning T-Mobile USA announced their first earnings report since the AT&T merger fell through and noted a loss of 802,000 customers in the fourth quarter. That’s the bad news and we know, it’s pretty bad. The good news is that thanks to the AWS spectrum T-Mobile received from termination of the AT&T deal, T-Mobile will launch their LTE service in 2013. Additionally, T-Mobile will spend $4billion rolling out HSPA+ on their 3G/4G services on the 1900 MHz band to allow for high-speed access for previously unsupported device…cough iPhone cough.

T-Mobile CEO lays the blame of subscriber losses on the iPhone when he says: “not carrying the iPhone led to a significant increase in contract deactivations in the fourth quarter of 2011.”

For now, T-Mobile is continuing to announce strength in their prepaid areas with an additional 276,000 customers signing up during the same timeframe. Here’s the critical quote from the press release regarding refarming the network and LTE:

T-Mobile USA announced it will invest $4 billion in total to strengthen its 4G network by installing new equipment at 37,000 cell sites and deploying HSPA+ in its PCS (1900) spectrum band. This spectrum re-farming effort, combined with the AWS spectrum T-Mobile USA will receive due to the termination of the AT&T transaction (subject to FCC approval), will allow the deployment of long-term evolution (LTE) service on AWS spectrum in 2013. This anticipated network transformation will significantly enhance coverage and performance for customers.

So yeah, this isn’t exactly good news, but it’s coupled with good news in the announcement that T-Mobile will definitively go LTE and in the meantime continue to strengthen their already competitive HSPA+ 42Mbps network. The refarming news regarding the 1900 MHz band is great news for iPhone customers who will want to take advantage of a network that doesn’t suffer the same kind of congestion AT&T does along with cheaper data plans. Yes, you’ll have to secure your own equipment, but in the long-run, are less expensive data plans and a better network worth it?

Check out the full financial breakdown in the press release below:

 

T-MOBILE USA REPORTS FOURTH QUARTER 2011 OPERATING RESULTS

Bellevue, Wash. — Feb. 22, 2012

2012-02-23 07:51:33

Strong adjusted OIBDA and prepaid performance; contract business negatively impacted in the fourth quarter of 2011 by iPhone 4S launches by three nationwide competitors

  • Adjusted OIBDA increased by 4.3% year-on-year to $1.4 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, adjusted OIBDA margin improved 2 percentage points year-on-year to 31% in the fourth quarter of 2011
  • Branded contract losses improved through the third quarter of 2011, however the launch of the iPhone 4S reversed this trend to a branded contract customer loss of 706,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011
  • Strong branded prepaid additions of 220,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011, primarily due to continued success of unlimited Monthly 4G prepaid plans
  • Service revenues down 2.7% year-on-year to $4.6 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, due to branded contract customer losses and revenue effects from the shift to unlimited Value plans
  • Branded contract ARPU increased $2 year-on-year to $58 in the fourth quarter of 2011, mainly driven by an increase in data ARPU
  • Branded Data ARPU increased $2.70 year-on-year to $16.50 in the fourth quarter of 2011
  • T-Mobile USA is reinvigorating its challenger strategy, which includes a major network modernization plan to launch LTE in 2013
  • On December 20, 2011 T-Mobile USA’s proposed sale to AT&T, Inc. was terminated; due to the termination of the sale near year-end, T-Mobile USA’s annual impairment assessment of indefinite-lived assets is still ongoing

T-Mobile USA, Inc. (“T-Mobile USA”) today reported fourth quarter 2011 results and provided an update on its annual assessment of indefinite-lived assets recorded in its financial statements. In the fourth quarter of 2011, T-Mobile USA reported service revenues of $4.57 billion, down from $4.69 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010, and adjusted OIBDA of $1.40 billion, up from $1.34 billion reported in the fourth quarter of 2010. Blended ARPU in the fourth quarter of 2011 was $46, consistent with the fourth quarter of 2010. Additionally, net customer losses were 526,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011, compared to 23,000 net customer losses in the fourth quarter of 2010.

“In 2011, T-Mobile USA showed solid financial performance with a remarkable adjusted OIBDA turn-around in the second half of the year, despite nine challenging months during the pending acquisition. We further increased our 4G data speed to 42 Mbps, expanded our sales channels, launched 25 new 4G handsets and significantly improved our operational efficiency. As a result, adjusted OIBDA rose again year-on-year in the fourth quarter of 2011 and branded data ARPU grew 20 percent year-on-year as smartphone adoption accelerated,” said Philipp Humm CEO and President of T-Mobile USA. “However, not carrying the iPhone led to a significant increase in contract deactivations in the fourth quarter of 2011. In 2012 and 2013, T-Mobile USA will invest to get the business back to growth, including an incremental $1.4 billion investment in its network modernization initiative, which will total a $4 billion investment over time.”

“Though we are not satisfied with the contract customer losses and the decreased total revenues, the quarterly margin improvement year-on-year was impressive. The spectrum gained through the break-up fee empowers T-Mobile USA to start LTE-based services in key US markets and strengthens its competitiveness,” said René Obermann, CEO of Deutsche Telekom.

Total Customers

  • T-Mobile USA served 33.2 million customers (as defined in Note 1 to the Selected Data, below) at the end of fourth quarter 2011, compared to 33.7 million customers at both the end of third quarter 2011 and the end of fourth quarter 2010.
  • Fourth quarter 2011 net customer losses of 526,000, compared to net customer additions of 126,000 in the third quarter of 2011, and net customer losses of 23,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • The sequential and year-on-year increase in customer losses is a result of intense competitive pressure from the launch of the iPhone 4S by three nationwide competitors in the fourth quarter of 2011. In addition, higher connected device deactivations contributed significantly to the net customer loss in the fourth quarter of 2011, including a nearly 265,000 deactivation related to one customer with a yearly service revenue impact of less than $1 million.

Contract Customers

  • Contract net customer losses, including connected devices (as defined in Note 1 to the Selected Data, below), were 802,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011, compared to 186,000 net contract customer losses in the third quarter of 2011 and 251,000 net contract customer losses in the fourth quarter of 2010.
  • Branded contract net customer losses, excluding connected devices, were 706,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011, a decline of 317,000 net branded contract customer losses from 389,000 in the third quarter of 2011. Net branded contract customer losses were 364,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Sequentially, the decline in branded net contract customers was driven primarily by higher branded contract deactivations as a result of the launch of the iPhone 4S by three nationwide competitors in mid-October.
    • The year-over-year change in branded contract gross customer additions resulted in part from competitive pressures and the implementation of strengthened credit standards as part of T-Mobile USA’s focus on improving the overall quality of its contract customer base.
  • Connected device net customer losses were 95,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011 compared to net customer additions of 204,000 in the third quarter of 2011 and net customer additions of 113,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • The sequential and year-over-year change was driven by higher connected device customer deactivations during the fourth quarter of 2011. Connected device customers, which have significantly lower ARPUs (averaging less than $2) than other contract customers, totaled 2.4 million at December 31, 2011.

Prepaid Customers

  • Prepaid net customer additions, including MVNO customers (as defined in Note 1 to the Selected Data, below), were 276,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011, down from 312,000 net prepaid customer additions in the third quarter of 2011, and up from 229,000 net prepaid customer additions in the fourth quarter of 2010.
  • Branded prepaid net customer additions, excluding MVNO customers, were 220,000 in the fourth quarter of 2011, down 34,000 from third quarter 2011 branded prepaid net customer additions of 254,000, and improved by 365,000 from 145,000 net branded prepaid customer losses in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Sequentially, branded prepaid net customers declined due to churn from prepaid customers as a result of competitive offers introduced by T-Mobile USA’s competitors during the quarter.
    • The year-on-year growth in branded prepaid net customer additions was due primarily to growth in customer adoption of T-Mobile USA’s unlimited Monthly 4G prepaid plans.
  • MVNO customers increased slightly in the fourth quarter of 2011, totaling 3.6 million as of December 31, 2011. Compared to the fourth quarter of 2010, MVNO net customer additions decreased due to fewer MVNO gross customer additions.

Churn

  • Blended churn (as defined in Note 3 to the Selected Data, below), reflecting both contract and prepaid customers, increased to 4.0% in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from 3.5% in the third quarter of 2011 and 3.6% in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • The sequential and year-on-year increase in blended churn was primarily driven by higher churn from branded contract and connected device customers.
  • Churn from branded customers was 3.6% in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from 3.2% in the third quarter of 2011, and 3.4% in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • The sequential and year-on-year increase was primarily due to higher churn of branded contract customers as a result of competitive market conditions and all of T-Mobile’s primary nationwide competitors offering the iPhone 4S in the fourth quarter of 2011. The year-on-year increase was partially offset by an improvement in prepaid branded churn as a result of unlimited Monthly 4G prepaid plans introduced in 2011.
  • Contract churn, including connected devices, was 3.1% in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from 2.4% in the third quarter of 2011 and 2.5% in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Sequentially and year-on-year contract churn was negatively impacted by competitors’ launches of the iPhone 4S, which is not offered by T-Mobile USA.
    • To address contract churn, T-Mobile USA continued to focus on loyalty efforts during the quarter, including a strong focus on re-contracting its most loyal customers.
  • Prepaid churn, including MVNO, decreased to 6.8% in the fourth quarter of 2011, from 7.2% in the third quarter of 2011 and 7.5% in the fourth quarter of 2010.
  • The sequential decrease in prepaid churn was driven primarily by fewer MVNO deactivations.
  • The year-on-year decrease in prepaid churn was driven primarily by the success of unlimited Monthly 4G prepaid plans introduced in 2011.

Adjusted OIBDA

  • T-Mobile USA reported Adjusted OIBDA (as defined in Note 8 to the Selected Data, below) of $1.40 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, compared to $1.45 billion in the third quarter of 2011 and $1.34 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010.
  • Adjusted OIBDA margin (as defined in Note 9 to the Selected Data, below) was 31% in the fourth quarter of 2011, consistent with the third quarter of 2011 and up from 29% in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Year-on-year OIBDA margin improved primarily due to the reductions in equipment subsidies in connection with the new unlimited Value plans.
  • T-Mobile USA is currently performing its annual assessment of the indefinite-lived assets recorded in its financial statements. T-Mobile USA anticipates that it will record a material non-cash impairment charge related to its indefinite-lived assets for the fourth quarter of 2011. Any such charge would have no affect on either the Company’s current cash balance or future cash flows. T-Mobile USA expects to include full financial statement results for the fourth quarter of 2011 in the earnings release for the first quarter of 2012 as a comparative period.
  • Adjusted OIBDA in the fourth quarter of 2011 and the third quarter of 2011 excludes AT&T transaction-related costs of $123 million and $51 million, respectively, primarily consisting of employee-related retention benefit expenses.
  • Sequentially, adjusted OIBDA decreased as a result of lower service revenues driven by branded customer losses and higher customer acquisition expenses. This was offset by lower network operating expenses. Third quarter of 2011 adjusted OIBDA had also benefitted by $29 million in connection with the discontinued retail partnership with RadioShack.
  • Year-on-year, adjusted OIBDA increased as a result of reduced losses from equipment subsidies due to the launch of the unlimited Value plans and continued cost management programs. Fourth quarter 2011 operating expenses, excluding the cost of equipment sales, remained consistent sequentially and year-on-year as cost savings programs in 2011 helped control expense growth.

Revenue

  • Service revenues (as defined in Note 4 to the Selected Data, below) were $4.57 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, down from $4.67 billion in the third quarter of 2011 and $4.69 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Sequentially and year-on-year, quarterly service revenues decreased primarily due to contract customer losses, which were partially offset by the increased adoption of data plans in the contract and prepaid customer base. Additionally, year-on-year service revenues were positively impacted by growth in revenues from providing handset insurance services to customers, which were insourced in the fourth quarter of 2010 and reconnection fees, which were introduced in the third quarter of 2011.
  • Service and Sales revenues (as defined in Note 13 to the Selected Data, below) were $5.1 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, down from $5.2 billion in the third quarter of 2011 and $5.3 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Service and Sales revenues decreased slightly from the third quarter of 2011 primarily due to contract customer losses as described above, partially offset by increased 3G/4G smartphone sales volumes. The number of 3G/4G smartphones sold in the fourth quarter of 2011 increased to 2.6 million from 1.8 million in the third quarter of 2011 and 2.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2010. 3G/4G smartphones also accounted for a record 92% of equipment sales in the fourth quarter of 2011 compared to 77% in both the third quarter of 2011 and the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Compared to the fourth quarter of 2010, Service and Sales revenues decreased by 3.6% as fewer branded contract gross additions were partially offset by handset sales in connection with the introduction of T-Mobile USA’s new unlimited Value plans.
  • Total revenues, including service, equipment sales, and other revenues were $5.2 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, consistent with the third quarter of 2011 and down from $5.4 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Compared to the fourth quarter of 2010, total revenues changed due primarily to contract customer losses as described above.

ARPU

  • Blended Average Revenue Per User (“ARPU” as defined in Note 4 to the Selected Data, below) was $46 in the fourth quarter of 2011, consistent with both the third quarter of 2011 and the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Both blended and contract ARPU benefitted from growing handset insurance revenues and from the introduction of reconnection fees.
  • Contract ARPU, including connected devices, was $53 in the fourth quarter of 2011, consistent with the third quarter of 2011 and up from $52 in the fourth quarter of 2010. Branded contract ARPU, excluding connected devices, was $58 in the fourth quarter of 2011, down from $59 in the third quarter of 2011 and up from $56 in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • oYear-on-year, branded contract ARPU increased as data revenue growth more than offset lower voice revenue, which included effects from the shift to unlimited Value plans.
  • Prepaid ARPU, including MVNO, was $19 in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from $18 in the third quarter of 2011 and consistent with the fourth quarter of 2010. Branded prepaid ARPU, excluding MVNO customers, was $25 in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from $24 in the third quarter of 2011 and consistent with the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • oQuarter-on-quarter, branded prepaid ARPU increased primarily due to the continued growth in unlimited Monthly 4G prepaid products.
  • Data service revenues (as defined in Note 4 to the Selected Data, below) were $1.4 billion in the fourth quarter of 2011, up 9.9% from the fourth quarter of 2010.
  • Data service revenues in the fourth quarter of 2011 represented 31% of blended ARPU, or $14.20 per customer, compared to 30% of blended ARPU, or $14.00 per customer in the third quarter of 2011, and 28% of blended ARPU, or $12.80 per customer in the fourth quarter of 2010. Branded data ARPU in the fourth quarter of 2011 amounted to $16.50 per branded customer, compared to $16.00 per branded customer in the third quarter of 2011 and $13.80 per branded customer in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • In the fourth quarter of 2011, the increase in the number of customers using smartphones, along with T-Mobile USA’s continued upgrade of its 3G and 4G networks helped drive Internet access revenue growth through the increased customer adoption of mobile broadband data plans.
    • 11.0 million customers were using smartphones enabled for the T-Mobile USA 3G/4G network (as defined in Note 12 to the Selected Data, below) such as the Samsung Galaxy S®II, the HTC Sensation™ 4G and the T-Mobile® myTouch™ 4G Slide. This represents a net increase of over 34% or 2.8 million customers using smartphones from the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • 3G/4G smartphone customers now account for 40% of total branded customers, up from 36% in the third quarter of 2011 and 28% in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Messaging revenue (as described in Note 5 to the Selected Data, below) continued to be an important component of data service revenues. Messaging accounted for approximately 31% of total data revenues in the fourth quarter of 2011, a decrease compared to 32% in the third quarter of 2011 and 36% in the fourth quarter of 2010 related to a shift in the data revenue mix towards mobile broadband data plans.

CPGA and CCPU

  • The average cost of acquiring a customer, Cost Per Gross Add (“CPGA” as defined in Note 7 to the Selected Data, below) was $270 in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from $260 in the third quarter of 2011, but down from $290 in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Sequentially, CPGA increased in the fourth quarter of 2011 due primarily to a change in the customer mix towards branded customer additions and higher advertising costs.
    • Year-on-year, CPGA decreased in the fourth quarter of 2011 due primarily to lower handset subsidies as a result of T-Mobile USA’s new unlimited Value plans, which do not bundle subsidized handsets as in traditional wireless service contracts.
  • The average cash cost of serving customers, Cash Cost Per User (“CCPU” as defined in Note 6 to the Selected Data, below), was $23 per customer per month in the fourth quarter of 2011, consistent with the third quarter of 2011 and down from $24 in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Year-on-year, CCPU decreased in the fourth quarter of 2011 due primarily to lower handset upgrade subsidies as a result of T-Mobile USA’s new unlimited Value plans.

Capital Expenditures

  • Cash capital expenditures (as defined in Note 10 to the Selected Data, below) were $2.7 billion in 2011, fairly consistent with $2.8 billion in 2010.
    • In 2011, cash capital expenditures were driven by the continued build-out of the HSPA+ 21 and HSPA+ 42 networks (as defined in Note 11 to the Selected Data, below).
  • Cash capital expenditures were $551 million in the fourth quarter of 2011, compared to $741 million in the third quarter of 2011 and $828 million in the fourth quarter of 2010.
    • Sequentially and year-on-year, the decrease in cash capital expenditures was a result of lower expenditures related to the buildout of the HSPA+ 42 network.
    • To further improve the value provided to customers through its 4G mobile broadband network, T-Mobile USA has continued to invest in its HSPA+ 42 network, which reached over 184 million people as of the end of the fourth quarter of 2011, doubling the theoretical speed of its 4G network to 42 Mbps.

T-Mobile USA Recent Highlights

  • On March 20, 2011, Deutsche Telekom AG and AT&T Inc. entered into a definitive agreement under which AT&T proposed to acquire T-Mobile USA from Deutsche Telekom in a cash and stock transaction valued at approximately $39 billion, subject to adjustment in accordance with the agreement. In the third quarter of 2011, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a complaint in the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia to block the acquisition. On November 24, 2011, AT&T and Deutsche Telekom withdrew their pending applications at the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) for the transfer of T-Mobile USA spectrum licenses to AT&T as part of AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile USA. On December 20, 2011, AT&T and Deutsche Telekom jointly announced the termination of the agreement on the sale of T-Mobile USA. As a result, AT&T made a $3.0 billion cash payment to Deutsche Telekom in December 2011. The break-up consideration due to Deutsche Telekom under the terminated Stock Purchase Agreement also included significant Advanced Wireless Services (“AWS”) spectrum and a long term agreement on Universal Mobile Telecommunications Systems (“UMTS”) roaming within the USA. T-Mobile USA incurred transaction-related costs in 2011 that primarily reflect incremental personnel costs as a result of the formerly proposed deal.
  • T-Mobile USA and AT&T Inc. have jointly filed a request with the FCC for approval of the AWS spectrum transfer noted above, which resulted from the termination of the agreement on the sale of T-Mobile USA. This spectrum will increase T-Mobile USA’s average spectrum holdings in the Top 100 markets from approximately 54 to approximately 60 MHz.
  • T-Mobile USA continues to unveil cutting edge devices including 42 Mbps-capable smartphones such as the T-Mobile® myTouch® Q, the HTC® Amaze™ 4G and the Samsung Galaxy S® II and new 4G tablets such as the T-Mobile® SpringBoard™ with Google™ and the Samsung Galaxy Tab™ 10.1 and the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S® Blaze™ 4G.
  • T-Mobile USA announced it will invest $4 billion in total to strengthen its 4G network by installing new equipment at 37,000 cell sites and deploying HSPA+ in its PCS (1900) spectrum band. This spectrum re-farming effort, combined with the AWS spectrum T-Mobile USA will receive due to the termination of the AT&T transaction (subject to FCC approval), will allow the deployment of long-term evolution (LTE) service on AWS spectrum in 2013. This anticipated network transformation will significantly enhance coverage and performance for customers.

T-Mobile USA is the U.S. wireless operation of Deutsche Telekom AG (OTCQX: DTEGY). In order to provide comparability with the results of other US wireless carriers, all financial amounts are in US dollars and are based on accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). T-Mobile USA results are included in the consolidated results of Deutsche Telekom, but differ from the information contained herein as, among other things, Deutsche Telekom reports financial results in Euros and in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

This press release includes non-GAAP financial measures. The non-GAAP financial measures should be considered in addition to, but not as a substitute for, the information provided in accordance with GAAP. Reconciliations from the non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measures are provided below following Selected Data and the financial statements.

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  • Mark

    Owww…. 800,000 lost?  Let’s hope the “reduce churn” efforts pay off.  Nice to see them actually mention LTE, though.

  • BiGMERF

    That’s what i call a silver lining. Over all good news indeed

  • jon

    Hear that? The crickets are chirping…Where are all the BOZOS that said dt wouldnt only invest enough to “keep the lights on” until another buyer is found. T-Mobile is on a hiring spree, is fighting against verizon for that aws spectrum, and today has commited 4 BILLION dollars to upgrade its network and begin a LTE rollout…some crow eating needs to begin around here..

    • Chad

      I’m with you, but I can’t lie I’m surprised (a lot of other people probably are too) that DT wanted to invest anything in TMO-USA it was only 1-2 months ago they were so apt to sell us away, it’s like a jekyl and hyde turn around, I’m still leary of DT and talk is cheap. What if someone approachs them with the right price? We will be right back where we started and all of this “good news” goes back into limbo..but i digress. I’m happy to see their trying to come back strong.. 800,00+ customers loss was a big hit but I like the idea of supporting 3G for the unlocked iPhone without actually carrying the iPhone in their line up..very smart idea. I think that’ll work in their favor if they bundle some nice data plans for unlocked users. LTE is the big thing it’s good to finally hear it come out of the horses mouth that was a big factor for me in deciding later this year whether to renew my contract. I didn’t want to be stuck with a carrier who wasn’t building to prep for the future but it sounds like they will be..as I said before, talk is cheap, this all sounds good but when Nov 2012 and 2013 rolls around let’s see what really gets done or is in process of getting done. It’s time for action if they want to win back the loyal customers.

      • http://twitter.com/PaulHarrisonPro Paul Harrison

        DT doesn’t benefit from holding on to a declining business, even if they intend to get rid of it, so it does make perfect sense they’d invest in T-Mobile, at least until they do divest of it one way or another.

        I suspect though that the aftermath of the AT&T deal has also forced DT to look at keeping T-Mobile for the time being. Remember:

        - While the merger attempt did a huge amount of damage to T-Mobile, most of it is recoverable, and the breakup “fee” will help repair the situation.
        - T-Mobile got a lot of spectrum out of the deal, which will help in an eventual migration to LTE
        - With the offer from Sprint being far below AT&T’s, and the heightened risk of it being rejected too (albeit considerably lower risk than AT&T’s was), and the lack of technological and cultural simularities between the two operators, DT’s options are smaller.
        - The losses this year mean that spinning it off (floating it) is out of the question, despite the fact pretty much every TMonews reader would run out and get a brokerage account the day of the announcement ;-)

        If DT wants to sell it, they have to make it valuable. If DT doesn’t want to sell it, they have to make it work. Either way, DT has to invest in the business now.

        • Chad

          That’s some good points Paul. I guess I didn’t think of it in that way

    • http://twitter.com/PaulHarrisonPro Paul Harrison

      They weren’t bozos, they were saying exactly what they were paid to say, no matter how absurd!

      • jon

        Lol. Maybe some of them were paid trolls. But there were plenty of regular posters repeating some of the same garbage. It was nauseating to listen to idiots profess to “know” dt would drive tmob usa off of a cliff or would strip it for parts if the merger didnt go through. As a family that has depended on tmob since the days of voicestream to support our family, I just take great satisfaction in news like this. DT may work out a deal to sell tmob tomorrow, but the idea that dt would abandon tmob or strip it for parts was absurd.

    • TMoFan

      I won’t call anybody out, but I can name a few people who posted here that are now nowhere to be see or heard from. I laugh thinking of all the money at&t wasted trying to convince everybody what a good deal this was.

  • Anonymous

    I guess it makes sense for them to fight for the AWS of verizon, because they will need more AWS if they want a nationwide LTE network. Refarming their 1900mhz to HSPA+ will def help them with rogue iphone users.

    I thought they should have partnered up with Tmobile and used 1900mhz for LTE, but who cares, they are at least saying Competitive. GO TMO GO!

  • Anonymous

    They took a pretty big hit in customers though everything else isn’t as bad as i thought it would be.  Sadly i still see this as treading water.  Maybe now they’ll finally be able to actually refocus.  

  • Anonymous

    maybe now i can get 3g at my house

  • Crazypatriotsfanatic

    Losing almost a million customers in 3 months?  Yeah, that’s bad news.  Keep sucking T-Mobile

    • BigMixxx

      really, losing almost 1 million customers and still making 1.4 billion, despite not having an iPhone on the network, a potential buyout looming….plus T mobile recognized the competition from iPhone.

      Take a look at sprints numbers.  Net customer gain does not equal real profit. 

      • Bratty

        Big – gotta look at numbers from a long term perspective. If Sprint gained 1M customers (for ex) this quarter, then they pay the phone subsidies in this quarter. But revenues flow over 2 years and thus Net Income. You want this.
        As for TMo, read carefully about OIBDA and then this sentence “Year-on-year OIBDA margin improved primarily due to the reductions in
        equipment subsidies in connection with the new unlimited Value plans.”
        Think about this from a long term financial perspective again. We want this turned around for TMo to survive.

        • BigMixxx

          I am….

          Look at it this way, they will never be able to fully recover with all of the change going on in the sprint network over the next 2 years and see a significant profit. Sprint desperately needs to partner with someone to help with their vision.  With Lightsquared dying ever so slowly, that vision of a ubiquitous network that they can lean on another provider to help with was totally shot in the foot.  Funding the vision now lies solely in sprints hands..   They must see quarter over quarter gains that are similar to these (1.4 million), in order to reduce a lot of the debt they hold, keep up with the investments and keep free cash flow maximized.  The inevitable will happen.  T mobile will get an iphone, this shared subsidy cost (read instant rebates) model seems to work very well, minimizing the eat that T mobile will have for devices…that will bite into sprints profit margin, sending it down the hole a bit faster….

        • Anonymous

          so… that’s why they’ve been pushing Value plans so hard then?

      • Cashman

        Wireless companies really don’t start making a profit off of customer until they are 4-6 months into their contract. T-Mobile will continue to turn a profit as long as all they have 20 million exisiting customers. Net gain does equal a real profit, wait until sprint releases their 1st quarter #’s

        • BigMixxx

          I’ll wait.  

          There will be another net gain, but sprint has to spend on infrastructure costs, to meet the needs of the vision that Hesse laid out. This will, again, eat into the profit.  Sprint will have to see 3+ million new customers to post a significant profit.

          All in all, 1.4 billion in profit, staying within that 5.4 to 5.7 billion dollars per quarter range, is NOT bad, given that T mobile has no wireline operations slowly eating at costs of wireless operations.

        • JQuest

          Also, Sprint jumped on the iPhone bandwagon, Which was part of their customer gain. So I’m sure that will eat into their profits as well. Correct me if I’m wrong….

        • Vim

          What profit?  You mean add to Sprint’s debt…

        • JQuest

          Good point…

        • Anonymous

           Sprint themselves doesn’t expect to make a profit until 2017…no reason you should.

  • 30014

    I can’t wait until they bring lte to atlanta.

  • http://profiles.google.com/mimi1923 Mimi Rivera

    i have been a loyal TMO customer for years. After having several issues with TWO SGS4g phones, a customer service rep actually suggested that I cancel my contract with TMO! I was shocked and later found out that many LAZY reps are telling customers to leave TMO. TMO you are a disgrace.

    • BuhBye Humm

      Same experience with several reps…instead of trying to resolve issues,they tell customers to leave & we’re finally starting to listen

      • Realcool2000

        Yeah, im talking to a service rep over here and they told me to tell you to leave this site so we dont have to hear you bitch any more.

        Go to any other carrier and have fun talking to all their great service reps, I bet u wont have any problems with them.

        • Anonymous

          Lol, yea, let all the bitchy customers leave

    • Jehernandez4688

       Did you read what you just posted?Lazy reps that where probably sure they where loosing their jobs, wanted to take it out on the company and you feel for it? I was with you until the last sentence. Why would you blame a company for what some LAZY reps tell you? Blame the reps, T-Mobile was getting screwed by their parent company and AT&T. Now that this is over and past, they are working really hard to better themselves.

  • hater on the rocks

    this is gonna be interesting. i wouldnt think that tmobile would go lte but stick with hspa+ and upgrade to the multi flow think that qualcomm invented but i guess this can be a good think i guess. 

  • Lani

    Tmobile needs to start the LTE rollout like yesterday. Along with ensuring they sell more top of the line mobiles since they dont sell the popular mobile that the other carriers sell.

    • ogopogo

       Slow down. It is good that T-Mobile took this long before moving forward with LTE. If you haven’t noticed, Verizon is going through some serious growing pains with their deployment.

      T-Mobile has done the correct thing. Wait for others to work out the bugs, and then invest in gear that will be solid, and not to mention cheaper than the early adopters.

  • Anonymous

    so their margins and profits grew? Am I reading this right?

    • ReallyReallyAgain

      All that means is that their sucking the life force out the customer that they do have

      • Jehernandez4688

         Really? Then Verizon and AT&T are rapping and flat out murdering their customers. You know, since T-Mobile usually has the more affordable plans……

        • Dave Macias

          that comment made my day hahahaha

        • Anonymous

          I was going to say… we get 1000 shared minutes for $59.98/$49.98 on value plan! The other carriers charge 10-20 more a month for just that.

          Not to mention how many times the lack of overages on Tmobile have saved me when Comcast was busted and I had to tether to get work done. If we were on Verizon or AT&T I would’ve had a couple hundred dollars bill for just data

  • Anonymous

    so does this mean the note will work on tmo 3g?

    • http://tmonews.com David

      Conceivably, yes it would.

      • Anonymous

        Nice. And you would get 3G on your iPhone as well. This is a win win situation for all!!!

  • Cashman

    Time out, did they really just blame their horrible 4th quarter on the iphone? Forget about the fact that their network is dropping MORE calls than ever. Forget about the fact that their overall customer service has been awful. Forget about the fact that they have 2 rate plans that confuse customers. For them to blame the iphone is dissappointing instead of them looking in the mirror to see what the real issues are. And from what I understand, it seems like they want the iphone, but don’t want to spend the same amount of money that sprint did to get it.

    • Anonymous

      well a lot of people have been fleeing for the iPhone and because of the then impending buyout by AT&T. I know we considered it.  People I know who work at Apple stores were telling me how many iPhone activations they were having and were beating their goals and exceeding them in a big way

      Also, it’s not up to Tmobile to decide if they’ll get the iPhone. Apple has to put an AWS radio in, if Apple doesn’t then no iPhone for T-Mobile USA. Tmobile in Europe carries and subsidizes the iPhone, you can get it for free in Germany with certain level of calling/data plan

      • Jehernandez4688

         Thank you. That is a good explanation.

      • Cashman

        Money talks, if t-mobile wants to spend the money apple will create the iphone for them. It’s as easy as that. T-Mobile and sit back and continue their word play, but at the end of the day, if they really wanted it and felt that it would bring them back to life, there would have been an announcement about it.

        • Anonymous

          right except execs have said it’s up to Apple to decide if the phone is coming to Tmobile USA, and that they would like to have it. Which indicates Apple chose not to include an AWS radio in the phone, same as how Verizon turned on LTE and Apple chose to ignore that and not release an iPhone that support it. Apple will do what Apple wants to do, the only way for Tmobile to counter the lack of iPhone is with premium Android (and maybe Windows Phone) devices, pricing, and get 3G on 1900Mhz so AT&T escapees can take advantage of faster speeds, as that is pretty much the only complain people with iPhones have about using on Tmo

      • Wolfwood

        I fled the iPhone and ATT for Tmobile this month and I couldn’t be happier.  To each their own…

    • BuhBye Humm

      Agree. As lifelong Tmo customer Im shocked at how incompetent – and in some cases rude- their custserv has gotten. After asking for help with a non-working device that their own tech support told me had known issues they could do nothing about, their ECR told me to find a new carrier. Im happy to oblige. I no longer bleed magenta. Another rep told me he was going to hang up cuz he had already been on the line five min. Its not all the iphone..mngt in denial

    • Jehernandez4688

       T-Mobile has wanted the iphone for a while. The problem seems to be that Apple does not want to invest in creating an iphone that works on T-Mobile bands. Especially when it looked like AT&T would have taken them over. There is a big number of people that did in fact leave T-Mobile for Sprint when they got the iphone. T-Mobile has recognized that they can and need to do better in order to improve. They just stated that they are making those changes as we type these comments. Did you not read about they upcoming network improvements? Did you not read about the work/changes coming to the front line employees on other press releases? They know they need to do better, and they are already working on it. The fact that the iphone played a role on the customer losses is a very real one. They are not blaming the iphone alone for this issues. 

      • Cashman

        I did read the entire article and what stood out to me the most was the fact that they mentiioned the iphone 7 times. They’re focusing too much energy on a phone they do not carry. It’s almost like they’re saying that they lost 500k-700k customers to the iphone which is far from the truth. In order for T-Mobile to survive, they need to give themseleves a reality check and understand why so many people are leaving. And on top of that they need to figure out why people are NOT signing up for their services because it is not just because of the iphone

        • Jehernandez4688

           I see your point here. They do need to work on fixing the customer losses. That would help a lot.

        • Respawn

          Look at the numbers. They don’t lie. I don’t like the iPhone, but watch….

          Net contract custoemer losses – Third quarter (before iPhone) 186,000
          Net contract customer losses – Fourth quarter (after iPhone launch) 802,000

          That is a very significant difference for “customer service” and “network” problems that we all know plagued T-Mobile all year, and therefore should have been similar all year.

    • Daniel Holmstock

      I actually have to agree with this 100 percent, I now drive in areas that drop calls where service use to be PERFECT… so again spot on. 

    • Vim

      Yep, T-Mobile’s current management has screwed up badly, but they don’t want to take the blame.  It’s much more convenient to blame lack of the iPhone for all their problems retaining customers.  The iPhone is just a convenient scapegoat.

    • http://twitter.com/Cat_Isidor Cat Isidor

      Not to mention there was a good chunk of time where it looked like Tmo was going to become ATT and people figured they were gonna get out before the change over or the end of Tmo which seemed likely as well when the deal fell through. 

  • Littlesis1774

    Now they launch LTE oh but wait that won’t happen until next year. The question is why didn’t they launch LTE before merger happened? Did they waited too late to launch it?  WOW lost over 802,000 customers that is not good

    • 30014

      Because they didn’t have the spectrum. Can’t you read?

      • Respawn

         Judging from her other posts, no.

  • Aaron

    If the AWS spectrum is repurposed for LTE, doesn’t that mean that current T-Mobile 3G AWS phones won’t be able to get 3G anymore?

    • http://twitter.com/shipman jon shipman

      Or a software update to use LTE? Maybe not the full LTE speeds, but an update to keep the data.

      • http://twitter.com/PaulHarrisonPro Paul Harrison

        That’s impractical unfortunately. The way LTE uses spectrum is entirely unlike how UMTS (W-CDMA) uses it, which means the physical hardware is optimized differently.

        That said, I’d be surprised  if T-Mobile removes UMTS from AWS completely. It has enough spectrum in most markets to be able to run both simultaneously, it’s just not very efficient to do so. My guess would be for at least the next half decade you’ll see UMTS in all markets they currently support and more, with LTE deployed anywhere they have more than 5MHz (in each direction). The spectrum deal with AT&T means that’ll mean those conditions are satisfied in most major markets.

  • Anonymous

    Lost customers and gained profit. Sprint gained customers and lost profit. Why again would T-Mobile want the iPhone?

    • jon

      It is still important to carry it. And they will carry this year. The important thing here is tmob has negotiating leverage with apple. The iphone will be fully functional whether tmob officially carriers it or not. So apple can either make some money or tmob will just unofficially support it and apple can kick rocks…

      • Anonymous

        That’s not leverage. If someone brings an unlocked iPhone to tmo, apple has already gained their profit from that sale and the entity not making money on the handset is now tmobile. So maybe I misunderstood, and by leverage you meant something different, but that seems like a bad position for tmo, not apple.
        In a related note, they readily admit the churn losses due to the iPhone 4s but never once do they mention talking with apple. The fact is that the iPhone is a huge investment, and I’m willing to bet its not something in the budget this year.

        • jon

          There is leverage there to negotiate a lower order min. Sure it would be in apples and tmobs mutual interest to work out a deal and just carry the thing, but tmob has to get apples demands to something more reasonable. Apple does have more motivation to sell tmob on a more reasonable min rather than selling unlocked phones that end up on tmobs network…apple doesnt care as long as the iphone is stuck on 2g but the second that thing works on tmobs 3g/4g, they (apple) are going to want to be in on this.

        • Dabearsfan

          Actually Tmo probably could care less one way or another about the iphone. Right now anyone can go to apple and pick up a unlocked version and put a tmo sim card in and your good to go. Tmo customers get there iphone Tmo has no out of pocket subsidies (15 billion for Sprint) and gets your money each month. Its not perfect, but really from there standpoint it works. 

      • Vim

        While nice for T-Mobile Value plan customers with iPhones, I don’t see how this gives T-Mobile leverage with Apple.  Apple makes pretty much the same money either way. 

    • Hi_Ry

      Investors buy into growth and profitability is just an after thought

      • Vim

        Not in the current market.

  • http://twitter.com/jamesdax James Matthews

    They’ll be losing another customer if they don’t get a highend Windows Phone in soon.

    • jon

      Give them time. Lets not forget they werent able to do much while under at&ts thumb. I am sure that included negotiating with phone manufacturers for “high end” devices. I am willing to bet by summer you will see a much better device lineup.

    • Anonymous

      What do you mean High-End? Aren’t windows phones basically all the same? You mean you want a bigger screen or something? I don’t understand.

      • Anonymous

        haha good one

    • Anonymous

      This is silly.  Nobody has a high end windows phone right now. Verizon has no windows phones at all, and Sprint’s selection is worse than T-Mobile’s.  AT&T is about to get the Nokia 900 in 3 weeks as an exclusive, the first high end Windows Phone in the US, and even the 900 isn’t quite caught up to the hardware available for Android and iOS.  If three or four months from now T-Mobile still has nothing competitive with the 900 then your whining will be more understandable, but as it stands you sound like a shill for Microsoft. 

    • Respawn

       High-end as in Titan? So … a bigger screen? Honestly, that’s the major difference between high end and low end Windows Phone. They all work pretty much the same (which is not a bad thing in their case).

    • http://twitter.com/PaulHarrisonPro Paul Harrison

      That could be why they’re not bothering. I mean, compared to the three quarters of a million they supposedly lost due to not having the iPhone, losing one customer over not having a Windows phone is pretty tiny…

  • Anonymous

    So basically we’re gonna become AT&T-like spectrum wise? This will open up many phone options for those who import or want the iPhone if T-Mobile still doesn’t manage to officially acquire it. When will the 1900 MHz plan come into effect and will it be nationwide and not just little pockets? I’m serious when I say that T-Mobile is about to lose a few families that I know because of the lack of iPhone. If this happens quickly (before Dec. of this year) then maybe I can convince them to stay.

    • http://pharaohtechblog.blogspot.com/ Conan Kudo (ニール・ゴンパ)

      Nationwide. Pretty much all PCS markets with 20-30MHz or more will get 3G on PCS. This began late last year and will finish in Q3 2012. Q3 2012 onward will be lighting up LTE, afaik.

      • Anonymous

        Thanks for the response. You’ve been a great and informative asset to the site. I hope Houston is able to get lit up sooner than later because that’s where I am and know that if something doesn’t happen quick, they’ll be a few lost customers. Will this mean that we’ll have LTE compatibility with the likes of Telus up North? (I like the fact that they typically don’t brand their phones.)

  • Anonymous

    So basically we’re gonna become AT&T-like spectrum wise? This will open up many phone options for those who import or want the iPhone if T-Mobile still doesn’t manage to officially acquire it. When will the 1900 MHz plan come into effect and will it be nationwide and not just little pockets? I’m serious when I say that T-Mobile is about to lose a few families that I know because of the lack of iPhone. If this happens quickly (before Dec. of this year) then maybe I can convince them to stay.

  • TMoFan

    So much for DT allowing T-Mobile to wither and die, then selling off the parts.

    This is the year for T-Mobile to rebuild and reinvigorate the business. Very excited that T-Mobile is going to be investing in LTE. It’s been repeated, but T-Mobile needs the iPhone. People flocked to Spring for the iPhone despite their terrible data speeds. Come on T-Mobile / Apple. Work out a deal and offer it already.

    If T-Mobile makes the improvements that they need to make I believe that T-Mobile will be back with a vengeance.

  • TMoFan

    So much for DT allowing T-Mobile to wither and die, then selling off the parts.

    This is the year for T-Mobile to rebuild and reinvigorate the business. Very excited that T-Mobile is going to be investing in LTE. It’s been repeated, but T-Mobile needs the iPhone. People flocked to Spring for the iPhone despite their terrible data speeds. Come on T-Mobile / Apple. Work out a deal and offer it already.

    If T-Mobile makes the improvements that they need to make I believe that T-Mobile will be back with a vengeance.

    • http://www.unscripted360.com Deacon

      lol one can dream

      • Vim

        No, the cost matters.  It’s dumb to agree to a price that puts the company out of business. 

  • drmd

    Dont know about others. I get 14-16mbps on galaxy S2. Easily 10 times that of people getting on ATT or sprint in my area.

    • http://twitter.com/robsleezy Rob Sleezy

       Lol… Maybe in your area, my GS2 Skyrocket gives me 44mbps down. If I could attach a picture I would, but since I’m posting with my twitter, I believe I posted a pic there…

      • Nerdy Desi

        44mbps is nice but what’s the point given overages or being throttled to 2G if you’re an unlimited customer after only 2gb?

      • Dirk Diggler

        You lie. The networks theoretical max is 42 mbps.

      • hater on the rocks

        rob why u be lying. sense u used the word skyrocket u must be on att there’s no way in hell u get 44mbps. the only way u would get that high if ur on wifi never on att network ha

    • Anonymous

      dude sprint is a fucking joke. they get like what 200kb on 3g and zero to none on jokemaxx 4g

  • Anonymous

    So which markets will get the 1900MHz spectrum? Will T-MO disclose this (or have they)?

  • Anonymous

    So does this mean no HSPA+ 84???

    • Elk

      No reason with LYE, 42 haps should work just fine between now and then

  • Anonymous

    Bad day for T-Mobile when it comes to customer loss. That is a TON of customers.

    Im curious, though. When is the 3G refarming on the 1900 band supposed to be completed and in what markets?

  • Rlburr

    My original Vibrant was a high end phone, and the won’t even update the operating system. If I don’t get Gingerbread my next phone is from another carrier and I will add to their loser stats.

    • Jehernandez4688

       You do know that the “Manufacturer” of the Vibrant is responsible for the software upgrades and not T-Mobile. Right? why could you blame the carrier for something the Manufacturer did not do?

    • Vim

      Blame Samsung, not T-Mobile for this.  It’s the manufacturer’s responsibility to produce the OS upgrade it promised, and Samsung has really been seriously dragging its feet on this one. 

  • Anonymous

    Just saw on CNN that the At&t CEO was docked $2 million from his pay for the failure of the Tmobile acquisition. Ouch!!!!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EVZR6774PL27ROXUJQSQQEP4X4 Mauni M

      2 mill? lol He still made 20 million. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_AWWIKW6MNPUHOC4OVSHWUDWAHM Fabio

     They’re on the right track, all of this is pointing to a T-Mobile iPhone coming out this year or next year, whenever Apple is ready to release an LTE version, (if the next iPhone is even LTE at all). With T-Mobile re-farming their 1900 MHZ to 3G/4G UMTS, that means older iPhones WILL be fully compatible with T-Mobile.

  • Respawn

    iPhone isn’t worth what Sprint paid for it. Apple needs to pull their head out of their greedy bum and actually realize their customers are people, not actually walking sheep with cash for wool.

    • http://twitter.com/4i2 OSN tv

      THANK YOU! Apple’s not gettin my money only the grocery store gets it!

  • 123

    Haha, that’s what you get Tmo for trying to get ATT to buy you out. Serves you right. 

    • Elk

      What’s your issue?

    • Anonymous

      tmobile gained from the failure. who are you

    • 123

      I have an issue with tmo for deliberately engaging in anti-competitive practices in the name of money and excessive greed. True, tmo did get money from ATT as a “consolation prize,” but that came at a great expense. The tmo brand has been damaged and sullied, which is evinced by the mass efflux of customers and is why tmo is currently refocusing using, as David would put it, a new “2012 Reinvigorated Challenger Strategy” in order to rebuild their reputation and brand. Serves them right, and I am glad the market reacted accordingly. 

      • Jehernandez4688

         Oh, my GOD. T-Mobile did not do anything. DT, the parent company did. They wanted to sell to AT&T, they where willing to let it go down the sewers as long as they got paid. When will people learn to differentiate. T-Mobile and their employees did not want the merger. Please check your facts before you post. 

        • 123

          LOL! This post cracked me up. Where do you think Philip Humm is from? Deutschland. 
          He was the CEO of Tmobile Germany. He is now the CEO of TMO USA. He was an integral part of Tmo Germany and is Tmobile insider no matter how you cut it. Don’t pretend like TMO USA is a victim here. They clearly know what they are doing…it just didn’t work i.e. they bet on the wrong horse/strategy. They should have made a safer bet then rolling the dice with ATT.

          And many people here suggest that he was brought to TMO USA for the sole purpose of selling off TMO USA. You would be a fool to think otherwise. I think you should perhaps check your facts before you tell others to check theirs because you clearly don’t know what you are talking about. Please, stop embarrassing yourself. I still stand by my original statement that it serves tmo right that they lost so many customers. 

          You know I am right.

  • Elk

    At some point people realize that the iPhone is just a social fad and will stop buying it because everyone else has one. If every other house on your street is blue, wouldn’t you want something different? It has flaws like every other piece of technology. Kudos to Tmobile for not selling there soul to acquire it.

  • Anonymous

    YEAHHHHHH TMOBILE FTW! 

    i wish i wanted an iphone id be so pumped right now

  • http://twitter.com/4i2 OSN tv

    Exactly!

  • Minioninnc

    WOW! Maybe 4G will finally come here. Doubtful, but hoping so. I can finally get that E off my phone!

  • Kife0301

    So basically by 2013 we may not have the iPhone but will be able to use the iPhone (without sacrifice like edge speeds) on tmobile like any other carrier?

  • Smith

    And I am guessing still no High-End Windows Phone devices.

    No wonder they lost so many customers this quarter.

    I am leaving T-Mobile after 11 years in March 18 (will switch to AT&T) to Nokia Lumia 900 Windows Phone 4G LTE.

    Wish they offered this phone so I don’t have to go to AT&T.

    GOD knows I hate AT&T but enough is enough. I can’t wait anymore for T-Mobile so maybe they offer some high-end Windows Phone.

    • 123

      sweet! the faster people leave, the faster tmo will get the message. More power to you brotha. 

    • Anonymous

      Lol nobody is leaving t-mo fora windows phone. As a matter of fact they are diminishing as the last report stated.

      • David

        Nice try fanboy but you failed big time.

        He didn’t mean all these 800k people that left it’s because of Windows Phone devices. And the truth is this is also one of many reasons people are leaving T-Mobile.

        And I hate to break it to you but at least 3 of my friend left T-Mobile for same reason Smith is going to leave T-Mobile.

        An I know other peoples that they did leave T-Mobile for AT&T because of better and more high-end Windows Phone devices on AT&T network.

        • Vim

          It’s kind of funny.  I don’t know anyone in real life who wants a windows phone, let alone anyone who is impatient enough to leave their carrier for AT&T to get the latest WP handset on the first day its available. It’s only on the internet that I ever see such die-hard WP fans.  On the other hand I know plenty of real people who want iOS or Android, and who have switched carriers to get the latest iPhone or the latest Nexus. 

          Perhaps if you and your friends multiplied yourselves by 10,000 you’d make enough of a dent to get T-Mobile’s attention the way iPhone fans have.   Maybe once Apollo gets released and WP finally becomes more feature-competitive with iOS and Android the other carriers will take it more seriously.  Or maybe Microsoft will, out of its own very deep pockets, subsidize the new high end WP phones so heavily to gain market share that even Apple will blush.  I do believe that the last two are very likely and that eventually WP will ascend to become the 3rd big mobile OS, but only because Microsoft has deep enough pockets to keep throwing insane amounts of money at it from all directions until eventually it catches on.

          I wish you and your friends luck with AT&T.  You’re going to need it.

        • Drivethruboy168

          Dude workin at a store, people want Windows Phone. People but the Nokia Lumia 710 and enjoy their experience! People want larger screens, better camera, speaker design. I’m an Android fan and appreciate iOs, but windows phone is pretty solid in performance and software is is easy to use and the apps are gettin there. Windows will be a competitor. I don’t know about BlackBerry though, they need to release a BB10 phone and they need to do it fast!

        • Vim

          Nokia and Microsoft were extremely eager to move product and gave T-Mobile an extremely good deal on the 710, which is a competent little smartphone.  It’s being sold as a budget phone where it competes extremely well against the likes of LG’s horrid budget MyTouches.  The overwhelming majority of people in that price category don’t do a whole lot of OS research.  They walk into the phone wanting a free or close to free phone and buy the phone that stands out the most in that price category as they look around the store. 

          Blackberry doesn’t have Microsoft’s mountain of cash to throw into engineering, marketing, developer seed money, and subsidizing their own phones to encourage adoption.  They’re circling the drain just as Palm did. Unless someone with much deeper pockets buys them, they’re toast.  It’s just a question of when they finally slip down the drain.

        • Duff

          Sorry, I’m not stocking you lol. But TMobile has cheap service so yes the 710 is doing well, but I’d look into the sales on the 800 in Europe and the preorders selling out in many countries. Thats not exactly a cheap phone.

        • John

          Just because you don’t know anybody that doesn’t mean those peopke are not exist.

          Me and 2 of my other friends have Windows Phone HD7 and we love it. And yes I do hav efriends that have iOS or Android as well.

          And me and my other 2 friends are thinking same about moving to AT&T for Nokia Lumia 900.

          So no he is not alone in this. Many people want and like Windows Phone too and yes they do leave T-Mobile for get high-end Windows Phones somewhere else.

          And Windows Phone already cover all the features other platforms has and not behind. with Apollo they will add few things that maybe missing or add new features that others don’t have.

        • Vim

          Even the latest, greatest Windows Phone, the soon to be released Nokia Lumia 900 will be running on an outdated, energy inefficient single core Qualcomm S2 processor with a slow, obsolete GPU that will limit its gaming abilities.  It also has only half the RAM of its android competition, but I suppose it doesn’t need as much since its multi-tasking is crippled. 

          The resolution is still only WVGA.  No qHD, 720p, or “retina display”.  No 1080p video either.   Its wifi (no 5GHz) and bluetooth (no 3.0) support are also a bit behind the competition.  The lack of a removable SD card is a bit of a downer (although some of the competition has the same issue), and in this day of thinner, lighter smartphones the 900 is a fat brick. 

          So no, I don’t think it’s feature competitive with the iPhone 4S, Galaxy S2, the Galaxy Nexus or the other high end android phones about to be released.  This is the reason why most of the carriers are avoiding “high-end” WP for now.  That said, I agree that WP has much potential, but  IMHO it needs more time baking in Microsoft’s oven before it can go toe to toe with high end android and iOS.  Bring on Apollo…

          Btw, I’ve heard that AT&T’s exclusivity period for the 900 is only 45 days.    And next to AT&T, T-Mobile has the closest relationship with both Microsoft and Nokia.  So if you’re right about the demand for this phone among T-Mobile customers being significant (about which I’m very skeptical), then It’s highly possible that T-Mobile will be picking it up in May once AT&T’s exclusivity period expires.

        • David

          WOW!

          I stopped reading when I saw “energy inefficient single core” at the beginning of your post because that shows how much you know and not even worth reading the rest of your post.

          Android fanboy need more core because of their laggy Android devices. Other platforms work very fine with singlecore and actually much smoother and faster than your dual or quad core Android phones.

        • Duff

          What in the name of …. are you talking about? Yes WP doesn’t have 8 cores and 5 gigs of ram (obviously exaggeration), but have you ever played with a windows phone? The games area may be lacking a bit stil]g ahead with it and the GPU may not be SUPER RIDICULOUS, but as far as performance goes, its way better than android. Even with multicore, android is laggy. The main advantage to WP, IMO, is the amazing ecosystem. I’ve had back and forth with people on countless occasions, and no one ever convinces anyone, but what matters is WP people are happy with their phones, and I would dream of going back to iOS or Android. Enjoy yours, I enjoy mine =D

  • http://twitter.com/cielomoreno127 Solo lo traga

    802,000 contracted customers left in the 4th quarter!!!!!!!!! This wasn’t surprising at all to me. All the fanboys who respond to what they call negative comments, when dissatisfied consumers post comments about T-Mobile. They say boo hoo and bye.  People are doing just that leaving and taking their business elsewhere. Here’s the proof.

  • Anonymous

    Smart move by t-mo, not getting the iPhone but supporting its frequencies. Its far more cost efficient this way t-mobile doesn’t have to lose out over unsold iPhones. People could just buy one unlocked and use it.

  • J-Hop2o6

     IDK why u want a Sony phone but more power to u, but yes, once Tmo uses 1900 PCS for HSPA+, that’ll make ALOT of phones able to hop on Tmo’s HSPA+ including that Sony phone. If the phone is carrier locked, u will have to find the unlock code.

    And if AT&T starts pushing for LTE phones using 1700 AWS (along with 700) that will make their phones compatible with Tmo’s LTE once Tmo launches their LTE over AWS.

    • Anonymous

      Thanks for the response!

      um.. I like the feel of Sony products and haven’t had a bad experience with them. The design also appeals to my style more than say HTC products.