T-Mobile Reports Fourth Quarter 2010 Results

T-Mobile reported their fourth quarter results this morning and they are decidedly mixed some good and some bad numbers. Getting right into the meat of it, in the fourth quarter of 2010, T-Mobile reported service revenues of $4.69 billion compared to $4.65 billion in the fourth quarter of 2009. T-Mobile saw the number of customers using 3G/4G smartphones increase by over 1 million customers in the fourth quarter of 2010 to over 8.2 million customers.

T-Mobile currently serves 33.73 million customers, down from 33.76 million from the end of third quarter 2010 and 33.79 million at the end of the fourth quarter in 2009. T-Mobile had net losses of 23,000 during the fourth quarter of 2010 compared to over 137,000 net additions in the third quarter of 2010 and 371,000 net additions in the fourth quarter of 2009. Contract net customer losses were 318,000 during the fourth quarter of 2010. T-Mobile says that the customer decreases during the fourth quarter of 2010 were driven “primarily by revised credit standards and competitive intensity.”

On the bright side, T-Mobile had 295,000 prepaid net customer additions during the fourth quarrier of 2010 compared to 197,000 in the third quarter of 2010 and 488,000 in the fourth quarter of 2009.

On the not so bright side is Blended Churn (prepaid and contract customers) with T-Mobile dealing with a 3.6% in the fourth quarter of 2010, up from 3.4% in the third quarter of 2010 and 3.3% in the fourth quarter of 2009. Contract churn was at 2.5% during the fourth quarter of 2010.

There are plenty of facts and figures below for the accounting types and it’s not all bad news, but the news we, as the T-Mobile faithful care is the customer additions or lack of. It’s comforting to know that T-Mobile has a long term plan for turning things around and that those efforts weren’t going to be an overnight affair.

Some choice quotes:

“Our service revenues increased year-on-year in the fourth quarter.  Data ARPU growth rates are outperforming our main competitors as we leverage our 4G network and provide rich and compelling smartphones and data plans.  However, high contract churn and significant contract customer losses in the fourth quarter of 2010 indicate that we still have a fair amount of work ahead of us and that any turnaround will take time.  With the ongoing implementation of our challenger strategy we are laying the foundation for improved performance going forward,” said Philipp Humm, President and CEO of T-Mobile USA.

“I am pleased with the increase in smartphone adoption and our ongoing improvement in data ARPU.  Data growth in the U.S. mobile market continues to accelerate and with the largest 4G network T-Mobile USA is well-positioned to differentiate itself and grow consumer usage.  We are not satisfied with contract churn, but we expect that the measures presented at the T-Mobile USA Investor Day in January will lead to improvements in 2011,” said René Obermann, CEO of Deutsche Telekom.

The full press release follows below!

T-MOBILE USA REPORTS FOURTH QUARTER 2010 RESULTS

  • Service revenues in the fourth quarter of 2010 at $4.69 billion, up 0.9% compared to the fourth quarter of 2009
  • Blended data ARPU of $12.80 in the fourth quarter of 2010, up 25.5% from the fourth quarter of 2009
  • 8.2 million customers using 3G/4G smartphones as of the fourth quarter, a net increase of 1 million customers in the fourth quarter of 2010
  • OIBDA of $1.34 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010 was comparable to $1.38 billion in the fourth quarter of 2009
  • America’s largest 4G network: T-Mobile USA’s national HSPA+ network now covers 200 million people delivering 4G speeds

BELLEVUE, Wash., February 25, 2011 — T-Mobile USA, Inc. (“T-Mobile USA”) today reported fourth quarter of 2010 results.  In the fourth quarter of 2010, T-Mobile USA reported service revenues of $4.69 billion compared to $4.65 billion in the fourth quarter of 2009, and OIBDA of $1.34 billion compared to $1.38 billion reported in the fourth quarter of 2009.  The number of customers using smartphones continued to increase significantly during the quarter, driving growth in blended data ARPU.  Blended data ARPU in the fourth quarter of 2010 was $12.80, up 25.5% from the fourth quarter of 2009.  Net customer losses were 23,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010 compared to 371,000 net customer additions in the fourth quarter of 2009.

“Our service revenues increased year-on-year in the fourth quarter.  Data ARPU growth rates are outperforming our main competitors as we leverage our 4G network and provide rich and compelling smartphones and data plans.  However, high contract churn and significant contract customer losses in the fourth quarter of 2010 indicate that we still have a fair amount of work ahead of us and that any turnaround will take time.  With the ongoing implementation of our challenger strategy we are laying the foundation for improved performance going forward,” said Philipp Humm, President and CEO of T-Mobile USA.

“I am pleased with the increase in smartphone adoption and our ongoing improvement in data ARPU.  Data growth in the U.S. mobile market continues to accelerate and with the largest 4G network T-Mobile USA is well-positioned to differentiate itself and grow consumer usage.  We are not satisfied with contract churn, but we expect that the measures presented at the T-Mobile USA Investor Day in January will lead to improvements in 2011,” said René Obermann, CEO of Deutsche Telekom.

Customers

  • T-Mobile USA served 33.73 million customers (as defined in Note 3 to the Selected Data, below) at the end of the fourth quarter of 2010, down from 33.76 million at the end of the third quarter of 2010 and 33.79 million at the end of the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • In the fourth quarter of 2010, net customer losses were 23,000, compared to net additions of 137,000 in the third quarter of 2010 and 371,000 in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Contract customers were the primary driver for the sequential and year-on-year change in net customers.
  • Contract net customer losses were 318,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010, compared to 60,000 net contract customer losses in the third quarter of 2010, and 117,000 net contract customer losses in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Sequentially and year-on-year, the decline in net contract customers was driven primarily by fewer contract gross customer additions.  Traditional postpay gross customer additions decreased in the fourth quarter of 2010 driven primarily by revised credit standards and competitive intensity.  FlexPaySM contract gross customer additions also decreased related to competitive intensity.
  • Connected device net customer additions, included within contract customers (as defined in Note 3 to the Selected Data, below), were lower in the fourth quarter of 2010 than in the third quarter of 2010 and now total 1.9 million at December 31, 2010.
  • Prepaid net customer additions, including MVNO customers (as defined in Note 3 to the Selected Data, below), were 295,000 in the fourth quarter of 2010, compared to 197,000 in the third quarter of 2010 and 488,000 in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • MVNO customer additions were the primary driver of prepaid net customer additions.  MVNO customers totaled 2.8 million at December 31, 2010.
  • Year-on-year, FlexPay No-Contract net customer losses were the primary reason for the decrease in prepaid net customer additions.

Churn

  • Blended churn (as defined in Note 2 to the Selected Data, below), including both contract and prepaid customers, was 3.6% in the fourth quarter of 2010, up from 3.4% in the third quarter of 2010 and 3.3% in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • The sequential and year-on-year increase was driven primarily by prepaid churn.
  • Contract churn was 2.5% in the fourth quarter of 2010, up from 2.4% in the third quarter of 2010 and consistent with the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • The sequential increase in contract churn was due primarily to higher churn of connected devices in the fourth quarter of 2010 and competitive intensity.
  • Prepaid churn increased in the fourth quarter of 2010 to 7.5% from 7.2% in the third quarter of 2010 and 6.8% in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • The sequential and year-on-year increase in prepaid churn was driven primarily by MVNO customers.

OIBDA and Net Income

  • T-Mobile USA reported OIBDA (as defined in Note 6 to the Selected Data, below) of $1.34 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with $1.32 billion in the third quarter of 2010 and $1.38 billion in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Compared to the fourth quarter of 2009, OIBDA decreased slightly due primarily to a higher equipment subsidy loss from more customers upgrading to smartphones (as defined in Note 11 to the Selected Data, below).
  • OIBDA margin (as defined in Note 7 to the Selected Data, below) was 29% in the fourth quarter of 2010, up from 28% in the third quarter of 2010 but down from 30% in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Net income in the fourth quarter of 2010 was $268 million, compared to $320 million in the third quarter of 2010 and $306 million in the fourth quarter of 2009.

Revenue

  • Service revenues (as defined in Note 1 to the Selected Data, below) were $4.69 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with $4.71 billion in the third quarter of 2010 and up slightly from $4.65 billion in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Service revenues in the fourth quarter of 2010 were positively impacted by data revenue growth, driven by the adoption of mobile broadband data plans, the revenue contribution from providing handset insurance services, and higher prepaid revenues from the growth of unlimited usage plans.  In the fourth quarter of 2010, T-Mobile USA began directly providing handset insurance services which had previously been provided by a third party.
  • Year-on-year, quarterly service revenues increased due primarily to data revenue growth and from directly providing handset insurance services which more than offset voice revenue declines.  The 0.9% increase in quarterly service revenues year-on-year in the fourth quarter of 2010 was an improvement from the 0.5% year-on-year decrease in the third quarter of 2010.
  • Total revenues, including service, equipment, and other revenues were $5.36 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with $5.35 billion in the third quarter of 2010 but down slightly from $5.41 billion in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Equipment revenues decreased year-on-year due primarily to lower sales volumes.

ARPU

  • Blended Average Revenue Per User (“ARPU” as defined in Note 1 to the Selected Data, below) was $46 in the fourth quarter of 2010, down slightly from $47 in the third quarter of 2010 but consistent with the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Contract ARPU was $52 in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with the third quarter of 2010 and up slightly from $51 in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Year-on-year contract ARPU increased as data revenue growth and handset insurance revenues more than offset lower voice revenue.
  • Prepaid ARPU was $19 in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with the third quarter of 2010 and up from $18 in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • The increase in prepaid ARPU compared to the fourth quarter of 2009 was due primarily to the growth of customers on unlimited usage plans.
  • Data service revenues (as defined in Note 1 to the Selected Data, below) were $1.29 billion in the fourth quarter of 2010, up 25% from the fourth quarter of 2009.  Data service revenues in the fourth quarter of 2010 represented 28% of blended ARPU, or $12.80 per customer, up from 27% of blended ARPU, or $12.40 per customer in the third quarter of 2010, and 22% of blended ARPU, or $10.20 per customer in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • 8.2 million customers were using smartphones enabled for the T-Mobile USA UMTS/HSPA/HSPA+ network (as defined in Note 11 to the Selected Data, below) such as the T-Mobile® myTouch® 4G, T-Mobile G2TM with GoogleTM and the Samsung VibrantTM at the end of the fourth quarter of 2010.  This was a net increase of 14% or 1 million customers using smartphones from the third quarter of 2010 and more than double the 3.9 million customers as of the fourth quarter of 2009.  3G/4G smartphone customers now account for 24% of total customers, up from 21% in the third quarter of 2010 and 12% in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • While messaging continues to be a significant component of blended data ARPU, the increase in the number of customers using smartphones and the continued upgrade of the network are driving Internet access revenue growth with the increasing adoption of mobile broadband data plans.

CPGA and CCPU

  • The average cost of acquiring a customer, Cost Per Gross Add (“CPGA” as defined in Note 5 to the Selected Data, below) was $290 in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with the third quarter of 2010 but down from $300 in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Year-on-year, CPGA decreased in the fourth quarter of 2010 due primarily to the shift in customer base towards MVNO customers and connected devices.
  • The average cash cost of serving customers, Cash Cost Per User (“CCPU” as defined in Note 4 to the Selected Data, below), was $24 per customer per month in the fourth quarter of 2010, consistent with the third quarter of 2010 and up from $22 in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Year-on-year, CCPU was higher due primarily to a higher equipment subsidy loss as more customers upgraded to smartphones and the cost of directly providing handset insurance services.

Capital Expenditures

  • Cash capital expenditures (as defined in Note 8 to the Selected Data, below) were $2.8 billion in 2010, compared to $3.7 billion in 2009.
  • The primary reason for lower cash capital expenditures relates to the 2009 build-out of the national UMTS/HSPA network.  In 2010 cash capital expenditures were driven by continued network investment including coverage expansion and the upgrade to HSPA+.
  • Cash capital expenditures were $828 million in the fourth quarter of 2010, compared to $643 million in the third quarter of 2010 and $697 million in the fourth quarter of 2009.
  • Sequentially, the increase in cash capital expenditures was due primarily to the build out of the network, including new cell sites and the HSPA+-enabled 4G network upgrade (as defined in Note 10 to the Selected Data, below).  With the latest expansion, T-Mobile USA’s 4G network is available in more than 100 major metropolitan areas, reaching 200 million people at the end of 2010.
  • Year-on-year, the increase in cash capital expenditures was due primarily to payment timing differences.

T-Mobile USA Recent Highlights

  • On January 20, 2011 T-Mobile USA and Samsung Telecommunications America (Samsung Mobile) revealed the Galaxy S™ 4G.  Powered by Android™ 2.2, the Galaxy S 4G is  T-Mobile USA’s first smartphone capable of delivering theoretical peak download speeds of up to 21 Mbps, delivering rich entertainment experiences on T-Mobile USA’s 4G network (previous 4G smartphones, such as the myTouch 4G and the G2, were enabled for 14.4 Mbps).  The Samsung Galaxy S 4G is exclusive to T-Mobile USA and went on sale on February 23.
  • On February 1, 2011 T-Mobile USA announced that it will introduce the T-Mobile Global for BusinessTM plan, a unique approach to international voice and data roaming that reinforces the company’s commitment to support multinational corporations, as well as government agencies and U.S. enterprises conducting business internationally.
  • On February 2, 2011 T-Mobile USA and LG Mobile Phones unveiled their Android™ 3.0 (Honeycomb)-powered tablet, the T-Mobile®G-Slate™ with Google™ by LG.  With a brilliant, high-definition (8.9-inch, 3D-capable multi-touch display, the T-Mobile G-Slate delivers a groundbreaking mobile entertainment experience, including the ability to record 3D and full HD video. The tablet is expected to be available this spring.  T-Mobile USA’s 4G network, America’s largest 4G network™, is currently available in more than 100 major metropolitan areas, reaching 200 million people nationwide.  With aggressive plans to expand and double the speed of its 4G network in 2011, T-Mobile USA expects that 140 million Americans in 25 major metropolitan areas will have access to increased 4G speeds (HSPA+ 42 Mbps) by mid-year 2011.
  • On February 3, 2011 T-Mobile USA was awarded the highest ranking for the second consecutive time (and the 11th time in the last 13 surveys) in J.D. Power and Associates’ 2011 Wireless Customer Care Performance StudySM — Volume 1.
  • On February 17, 2011 T-Mobile USA continued its streak of recognition for excellence in customer satisfaction with the fourth consecutive highest ranking in J.D. Power and Associates’ 2011 Wireless Retail Sales Satisfaction StudySM— Volume 1 results. T‑Mobile USA ranked not only highest overall, but the highest in each area for which the study measured customer satisfaction.

T-Mobile USA is the U.S. wireless operation of Deutsche Telekom AG (OTCQX: DTEGY).  In order to provide comparability with the results of other US wireless carriers, all financial amounts are in US dollars and are based on accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”).  T-Mobile USA results are included in the consolidated results of Deutsche Telekom, but differ from the information contained herein as Deutsche Telekom reports financial results in Euros and in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

This press release includes non-GAAP financial measures.  The non-GAAP financial measures should be considered in addition to, but not as a substitute for, the information provided in accordance with GAAP.  Reconciliations from the non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measures are provided below following Selected Data and the financial statements.

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  • Mahogany1

    They need better phone selection , add Iphone to selection and I believe they will beat AT&T. Its the little things.

  • Manusferrera

    wonder how many we lost to verizons iphone

    • Billibolas

      Not only the Iphone but when the other carriers step up there 4G coverage area

    • Billibolas

      Not only the Iphone but when the other carriers step up there 4G coverage area

  • BigMixxx

    I guess I read this differently.
    Total revenue:
    1st quarter — 5.28 billion,
    2nd quarter — 5.36 billion,
    3rd quarter — 5.35 billion,
    4th quarter — 5.36 billion,

    Easily a 20+ billion dollar year, with the network costing just under 5 billion to operate. Again, lowest cost to us as far as users.

    Also, I just wanna point out, when compared to ATT with 3 times the customers and a coverage map that’s comparable to T mobile’s (yes this profound and foolish, but it is what it is). The cost to run ATT’s network is 8 times as much as t mobile’s, so Verizon’s has to be higher and Sprint’s is high as hell.

    Once more, T mobile seems to be doing well, given the other companies have Wireline operations…so there is a natural convergence (well if I have a ATT phone line, may as well get an ATT wireless phone).

    So comparatively, it’s actually on par with the Big 2 (Sprint has a bunch of networks it operates) even with ‘shitty phones’ again, realistically…iPhone won’t hurt, yet it won’t help much either. Remember, T mobile’s European entity has the iPhone, so there is experience there, and it must be a reason why T mobile has not REALLY accepted Apple’s iPhone.

    the numbers are shitty, but read the others, they may be making money hand over foot, but the operating expense is really high…

  • my 2 cents

    I think all of the whiners on this site saying T-mobile’s devices and network suck need to give it up. I’ve speed tested my Vibrant against, AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon, and I’ve never been beaten.. Never. That’s Iphone 4, 3GS, 3G, HTC Incredible, EVO 4G, any Windows 7 Phone not on T-mobile etc.

    If you think AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint are better, run your own tests and see for yourself. I think it always comes down to this. People who whine like little babies, are just that, little babies. For every T-mobile whiner, there is an AT&T, Verizon, or Sprint whiner lining up right next them. Choose what works best for you and get on with it.

    I personally like T-mobile. They over me the fastest service for the lowest price, that for me has always been reliable. Maybe T-mobile has poor coverage in your area.. Maybe then it’s not the best choice for you… Maybe your deadset on an Iphone… then you either have to wait for your favorite network to get it or got to AT&T or Verizon.

    Just be glad you have choices… I live in an area where I can only get Comcast Cable. No line of site for Satellite, no Verizon FIOS. So Comcast charges whatever they want and raises the prices whenever they want. I’ll take competition in wireless any day.

    • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

      *bows* Amen!

    • Jay2real02

      All I want is to be able to test T-mobiles 3G/4G against the other 3 carriers like you have, but wait, the other 3 carriers HAVE 3G coverage where I am, BUT my carrier of choice (T-Mobile) sadly dos NOT. I really like T-Mobile, not bashing them because for the most part I have been content, but I get no high speed coverage from T-Mobile at all, while AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon all offer 3G in the 08641 area,

  • my 2 cents

    I think all of the whiners on this site saying T-mobile’s devices and network suck need to give it up. I’ve speed tested my Vibrant against, AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon, and I’ve never been beaten.. Never. That’s Iphone 4, 3GS, 3G, HTC Incredible, EVO 4G, any Windows 7 Phone not on T-mobile etc.

    If you think AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint are better, run your own tests and see for yourself. I think it always comes down to this. People who whine like little babies, are just that, little babies. For every T-mobile whiner, there is an AT&T, Verizon, or Sprint whiner lining up right next them. Choose what works best for you and get on with it.

    I personally like T-mobile. They over me the fastest service for the lowest price, that for me has always been reliable. Maybe T-mobile has poor coverage in your area.. Maybe then it’s not the best choice for you… Maybe your deadset on an Iphone… then you either have to wait for your favorite network to get it or got to AT&T or Verizon.

    Just be glad you have choices… I live in an area where I can only get Comcast Cable. No line of site for Satellite, no Verizon FIOS. So Comcast charges whatever they want and raises the prices whenever they want. I’ll take competition in wireless any day.

  • Joshua Mills

    Look lets be for real the iphone is not the key to making T-mobile great As a network at this point they stand alone they carry the best andriod phones out the and soon will be releasing a new phone i would like to call the iphone/evo killer look it up (htc pyramid) amazing!!!!!!!!! T-mobile as a whole will last for ever as long as they catch up to sprints plans I have been a customer for along time and cant wait to see what there is to come for the company…………..You better buy stock soon cause they are going to blow up!!!!!!!!!! lol

  • TMORocks

    TMO needs to offer sexy killer phones. Remove the crap ware and let Android shine on its own!

  • TMOprophet

    try getting a 4.3 in android..might help a bit

    • whosaidwhat

      It will help them a lot. They need something that will be exclusive to them (mytouch 4G doesn’t count).

      Verizon did it with the original Droid (we all know what that did for them)
      Sprint did it with the EVO
      ATT is doing it with the Atrix.

      All the above have the wow factor the MT 4G lacks. I played around with that phone after it came out and was just underwhelmed.

      If the rumored pyramid turns out to be true then they will gain some customers.

      Personally, I think they should grab the Galaxy S2 exclusively in the US or go after the LG Optimus 3G to compliment the G-Slate.

  • Jimbo

    COVERAGE TALK: I’m not going to say I know the complete story of how coverage works for all the carriers, but I don’t think you can just “build a tower” to expand your coverage. I believe it goes through bid wars for air space which is a very lengthy and costly process.

    • TMOrep1

      Finally someone that has a clue. If it were entirely up to T-Mobile we would have every inch of the country covered but it isn’t nearly that easy. When you have to work through all the red tape of zoning laws and government regulations and spectrum and all the different cities, counties, states and crap, it can take several months to even get clearance to put up one tower. I have seen previous applications take up to a year to get approved. Once approved we have a tower up and running in a matter of a couple weeks or so. For all the people that always say get better coverage take a minute to search online and learn what is required before a carrier can “Just put up a tower”. We are committed to expanding coverage as quickly as we are permitted to. With out new CEO I promise you will see a whole new T-Mobile in the years to come. Thanks for supporting us as we reorganize and begin to take America by storm.

      • Jay2real02

        Sure red tape and the like affect coverage, but without coverage, you lose customers. Its hard when you want a 3G/4G phone and have to pay for the required data for that phone, but quickly learn that the only available data is EDGE. Sad, but T-Mobile has new HSDPA+ phones coming, but if I can not get anything beyond EDGE, its almost useless. Anyone tried loading web pages or downloading an email attachment on EDGE lately? Horrible…..

        • Anonymous

          If you’re getting EDGE and not 3G the solution is not more towers.

  • The Interface

    Folks – the carrier is the channel/path. The interface is what really matters to folks now that the channels are substantially similar. I’d been fighting the iPhone for a long time. I finally decided to compare it to the mytouch4g. The iPhone won out. I took the family plan over to AT&T and have to say I love the iPhone more than I ever thought I would. I can’t believe I tried to fight it so long just because I didn’t want to leave Tmo.

  • Anonymous

    iPhone 4 will still look years ahead next to a dual-core HTC android phone. Read below why.

    IPad>>>>> motorola xoom or G-slate. Based on apps alone.

    Nor the xoom or G-slate can compete with ipad’s applications. Both in numbers and quality.

    iPad 1 doesn’t have any cameras or dual cores CPUs… YET, it’s native applications outperform anything android tablets have to offer.

    Same for iPhone vs android phones. You can have a dual core 2.0ghz HTC android phone, but iPhone 4 will still look better next to it. Tens of thousands Apple applications look and feel light years ahead of androids.

    It’s going to take awhile before I take androids market seriously. (i bought a bronze G1 on launch)

    If t-mobile doesn’t get the iPhone, it would be like traveling in a boat through a lake without a paddle. Your not going anywhere far.

    Hate the iPhone or not, it’s still one of the best phones out there. And it’s not because of icon status or popularity. This is 2011 people. Not 2007.

    Using an iphone4 just blows me away how smooth and polished it is.

    The apps again, are amazing.

    My G2 has barely 10 quality apps. I searched the android market up and down and do so daily. Apples app store blows it away easily.

    That’s what draws girls/guys/moms and the general public in. The smoothness. User friendliness. The applications. The hardware quality. It’s a joy to use an iPad.

    I converted a few “iPad haters” once they used my iPad, they were glue to it and in love with it. Especially the apps….. So fluid and high quality and creative. The whole experience feels polished.

    Android IS catching up. But matching apples app store is still far away. Not in the next year or 2 anyway.

    • steve

      Damn dude how many apps do you have? I have about 25 or so half of which I don’t use. Apple will look better because because were the first good smart phone, I don’t what the first smart phone was but the iphone was the first successful one and became well known around the world quickly because everybody was familiar with the ipod, another thing if you use a mac at home, your more likely to get an iphone.

      Yes the G1 wasn’t very good because it was slow and had a not so great camera, but these new android are really good they loose to the iphone when they compare specs numbers and stuff you can’t even see with the naked eye

      • Anonymous

        It’s funny. I was a die hard android supporter day 1. Who hated the iPhone. I loved my G1, even though the iPhone 3G was A LOT smoother, had better apps, had a bigger screen etc at the time.

        Now owning the G2 and an iPad (since launch both of them) I like both android and iOS.

        I like androids wide selection in hardware. Larger Super amoled screens etc etc etc.

        But iPhone 4 still has a pretty mean battery life. Top notch camera/video capabilities. Looks and feels high quality. Awesome retina display.

        But forget hardware. Software wise they both have their +/-’s

        I like androids customization a lot. Love the live wallpapers (even though some are nasty resource hogs) Absolutely love the pull down notification bar, with the weather bug app showing the temperature constantly, up top left corner and as you pull down.

        But iOS is built so well, I don’t think about these missing features or lack of customization. The design and smoothness is what impresses me. And the apps.

        All it takes is one app to change your mind. And a few to draw you in. There’s apps on the ios that I use daily. On android not much.

  • Really, no 4G

    TMo wants better numbers, treat your legacy customers to the same, if not better, deals new contracts garner. The upgrade price for a 4g and a G2 is now 249 on the website. And quit pushing Samsung devices. Samsung and Sprint pulled the froyo update for the EPIC after three days due to glitches. This, after they delayed the updated for almost 7 months after the EVO, and HTC device!

  • Anonymous

    Just in on the news, for those of you “iPhone will save T-Mobile” fans:

    “Consumer Union, publisher of Consumers Reports magazine, is not recommending the iPhone citing the same problems it had with AT&T’s iPhone. Remember that was the big debate, what would happen when Verizon got the phone, dropped calls, low signal strength, same issues apparently.

    Consumer Reports claims when the phone is held a certain way it could cause dropped calls or prevent users from making phone calls.

    Verizon is not making comment yet in response to the review.”
    ____________________

    So sales of the Verizon iPhone did not meet expectations and now Consumers Reports (an extremely trusted source for potential customers) does not recommend the phone.

    http://www.google.com/search?q=iphone+verizon+does+not+meet+expectations&rls=com.microsoft:en-us&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&startIndex=&startPage=1

    http://blogs.forbes.com/briancaulfield/2011/02/25/consumer-reports-wont-recommend-verizon-iphone-either/

    So as intelligent people have been saying since TMoNews came online, quit with the “T-Mobile needs to get the iPhone” comments. You want the iPhone now you have two choices, AT&T or Verizon. Move on over to one of them and snap yourself up an iPhone.

    • Ldominguez1986

      Yeah that was because it was a half a year old phone being released again. Let’s see how you feel when they release the iPhone 5 and then say it is a huge fail. Let’s be serious, the iPhone on tmobile would do good. Look what it did for att.

      • Anonymous

        There’s many reasons the iPhone did not meet sales expectations at Verizon, that it was a six-month-old phone is not one of them (albeit some people may have chosen to wait on getting an iPhone since Apple brings out a new iPhone every June. But those are few unless you are saying 90% of phone shoppers won’t look at a phone that’s been on the market for six months because they see it as outdated and like playing mystery games each June).

        I’m not saying that the iPhone would not be good for T-Mobile to get, but it’s NOT the answer to T-Mobile’s problems nor as some say in here will it “save the company” (not that T-Mobile needs saving). And IMHO a carrier getting an iPhone will not dramatically increase customer count, as Verizon sales have indicated.

        The iPhone has reached its saturation point meaning that those who are inclined to get an iPhone already did so. There’s only so many iPhone purchasers to go around.

        http://www.dailyfinance.com/story/verizon-iphone-4-fails-to-generate-expected-wave-of-atandt-defecto/19840944/

        Well, I won’t repeat all that’s been said in the past about the iPhone and T-Mobile. Fact is, Apple fanboy predictions have been incorrect for the most part.

        For example, here is what someone said on a tech site’s comment section, in May 2010, before anyone knew who might even get the iPhone:

        “There will be people breaking contracts to switch to Verizon iPhones. And the number one source of switchers will be AT&T. Whoever gets the iPhone after AT&T’s exclusivity period ends will be the top carrier in net adds for the next four quarters, at least.”

  • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

    I think T-Mobile problem is A) Marketing. Even if you’re not gonna get a iPhone. Market the h*ll out of the device’s you are getting, so it will be like Clash of the Titans type marketing. Most people do not know about these phone’s & stuff like we do. Everyone is not as smart as us, or tech savvy. You have to make it simplified & obvious to the average consumer. Like the T-Mobile G2, it was not marketed except by HTC a few times, & the rest really by word of mouth or online. I’ve only really seen the MyTouch 4G get the most major coverage. The only reason people really knew the Droid was because of Verizon’s EXTENSIVE marketing campaign. Half of the people using it, don’t even know how the h to use it. They just see “Ooooh… cool that’s the phone on the commercial, it can do this, this, & that” *purchases* B) Top off the high-end consumer base, they are really getting annoying w/ the sub-par high-end phones. C) expand your coverage in non major populated area’s as well (clearly people are aggravated with that). D) Work efficiently on your technology on your phone’s so in 3G/4G area’s it can stay on those signals without run back between that & edge or not even getting to 3G/4G at all. E) most people don’t think it, but lower or bundle your plans. We now have options like Metro PCS with FAST 4G LTE, Boost Unlimited, Virgin Mobile (some people really do not care about customer service, etc. etc..) it’s a recession, they have android, unlimited minutes, unlimited data, that’s all people need to see. Do not keep adding additional fee’s to everything. I do not think we should have to pay $10 extra for T-Mobile TV. for $30 the data plan it’d be nice if we had T-Mobile TV bundled in there & something like either T-Mobile Hotspots or, Mobile WiFi Hotspots (instead of the $15 charge). People can say “Oh, but that’ll cost them money”, but it will also bring them in customers, & the customers who are potential to being T-Mobile customers do not care.

    • Brians Android

      Also why do Mobile WiFi Hotspots go against you anytime minutes? That blows! Also why make such a big deal out of being on top when it comes to 4G when I am lucky to get edge? And yes where the the hell are the double and quad core cpu’s and gpu,s along with a top notch screen? I signed up with T-Mobile over two years ago because I saw a company with huge potential and doing it right, but now I am very concerned they are moving in a direction. And they were the first to introduce the android but they have allowed there competition to take the very best of that away as well. With some fast and smart decisions T-Mobile could wipe up the competition and give great customer service at the same time. The ball is in there court lets see if they do the right thing? I am rooting for them all the way but they have to PRE REACT to the competition, and quickly. BTW great post DA :)

      • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

        I agree. I love them, & I’m not gonna throw them under the bus, but they need to get it together. Enough is enough.

    • Jay2real02

      T-Mo can have all the marketing in the world, like their “largest 4G” network, but if there isn’t 4G or 3G where you need it, they are going to lose customers to the other carriers that have the service coverage

      • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

        Not tryna be funny, but did you actually read what I wrote? I made more than 1 comment, beside’s marketing. Including coverage. I already addressed that, so your comment was kind of irrelevant. T-Mobile still needs advertising in addition to what you said. & I didn’t say marketing about their “4G” network, I said their phones/devices.

    • jarjon76

      I agree with your point about them needing to do a better job of marketing their phones. You’re spot on on the G2–a great phone that T-Mobile’s marketing dept ignores. And they should do a better job of showing off what phones like the G2 and MT4G can do. In their commercials they are too busy knocking the iphone, rather than giving the benefits of THEIR phones. That’s Selling 101–rather than bash your competitor let the consumer know the benefits of YOUR products and services.

      And your point D is another major issue. As a long time customer, I too get frustrated with the slow/no coverage, especially in my home. I live in Dallas, so it’s not like I live in a small town or a place where coverage is expected to be spotty. If I have a 4G phone, I shouldn’t drop into Edge as often as I do. That’s an easily fixable problem. Sometimes you have to spend money to make money.

      Excellent post, Dthe Artist.

      • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

        OMG, Yess! Exactly, completely agree. *gives standing ovation*

    • http://twitter.com/theanalyst81 Sarah

      I agree. I think people are getting tired of the cutesy Carly commercials. After a while, it just looks pathetic that T-Mobile is so into badgering the other companies. T-Mobile needs to focus on getting better phones and not their plans for low-end smartphones. How many smartphone users actually want cheap devices? I don’t see tons of people flocking to get the cheap smartphones. Right now, T-Mobile has a few high-end phones (Vibrant, G2, Nexus S), which they need to promote more.

      • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

        They really do. I’m kinda happy at them in a sense because all the other carriers were throwing T-Mobile under the bus with their ads, so I was happy T-Mobile was speaking up for themselves. But… if they could market more RELEVANT thing, it’d be nice. Talking about the other carrier’s & can’t do this & that is taking up 95% of their new commercials rather than their product, plans, & services.

  • Anonymous

    If T-Mobile re-released the myTouch4G with a bigger screen, kickstand and a slightly better camera people would be pissed off. THIS FONE SUXX WHER IZ THE DUAL CORES!!!

    • Anonymous

      Exactly, every site has what I call “serial complainers” who are like leeches on a site, no matter what T-Mobile does or brings out, these suʍolɔssɐ will find something to complain about. T-Mobile could give them free $500 phones, free two-day shipping. They will complain that shipping was not overnight.

      • Anonymous

        lol

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          There are plenty of both on this site! I have seen people post for the first time a complaint and the next thing you know they get beat up by the TMO Fan boys and girls! And that pisses me off more than anything. Someone post a legit complaint and the next thing you know it’s like a feeding frenzy. I’m sure they are very comfy picking on people from the comfort of their computers. If someone was to treat me like that in person they would be swallowing their computer!
          People do have legit complaints whether you like it or not, not everyone gets great customer service from TMO, not everyone has good coverage.

          I have been with them for about 15 years…since the voicestream days… and even I am getting tired of the lower end phones or Tmo high end phones that come out at the same time EVERYONE else gets faster better phone, coverage not being what it should be.
          Sure would be nice to see people chill!

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          Also, to be honest, every time I have had a problem with T-Mobile the customer service has been pretty bad and taken way too long to get fixed and has never been fixed in one try. I really have always wondered why people seem to think their customer service is a gift from the gods. I haven’t had problems often (usually only when I change phones) but it always takes many phone calls and sometimes a call to cancel service to get things fixed…and that just ain’t right folks!

        • frigadroid

          Ha ha you and I are probably the oldest farts here. I started with a powertell prepaid back in the 90s. I have stuck with them all these years. Man it was expensive before they got unlimited with the overage and roaming. I would love to know what I have payed over the years. Probably enough to buy a house.

          Its not that tmobile customer service is so great its that the other carriers are so pitiful they win by default. The one time I had a serious row with them I just payed my regular bill and told them if they want to charge me a bogus charge then lets go to mediation. Eventually they took off the charge.

          People please don’t think I hate on tmobile my “chronic gripping” is only blowing off steam and my construed way of offering constructive criticism, because I want to see tmobile do well.

      • Jonathan

        Michael, I think that most of us are not “serial complainers” we are just growing tired of T-Mobile’s apparent attitude of continually doing business as usual. For me personally and I’m sure most of us “serial complainers” will concur that if they expand their 3G footprint, expand the HSPA+ service and get top notch phones that are just as good as what Verizon & AT&T are offering (or better) we’ll shut up and be happy. T-Mobile is dragging their feet. I feel like T-Mobile USA’s parent company, Deutsche Telekom is not willing to invest the money to make T-Mobile USA profitable. The view to me is: they keep tring to duct-tape the “holes” in the USA division and not really do the things to make T-Mobile USA competitive with the “Big 2″ (Verizon & AT&T.)

        • Anonymous

          Nah, I’ve got to agree with Michael here, This sites users bash tmobile more than any other tech forum. It’s crazy. You’ve got idiots trying to say the Nexus S isn’t a tmobile phone but then talk about Verizons Thunderbolt. People complaining about coverage in their areas, why would you join with a company that doesn’t cover your home? It seems pretty basic. The phone selection is better than any other carrier I’d say except for Verizon, who I will add only recently (since the Droid) have offered competitive handsets. This site is Tech news, not a b*tch session. I live in NY routinely gets speeds over 8Mbps on my Galaxy S 4G, GPS works great, not a fan of touchwiz but nothing a Rom can’t fix. I’m satisfied with my service. They put wifi calling on all of their phones and people still complain. I’ve been dropping iPhone calls non-stop in my apartment to the point where I am planning on canceling it for maybe Verizon (I like having two carriers) when I called you know what they told me? “we can’t guarantee in building coverage”. The grass is always greener people, even people that come in here saying oh i just got an Atrix or an EVO praising their network are just newlyweds in love. They havent been with the network long enough to experience the downside. Good luck with those 4G speeds btw I’ll keep enjoying my data speeds that’ll only get faster while you guys can continue to talk about your MotoBlur powered Atrix getting 2Mbps.

          I just don’t get all the negativity on a tmobile site. It’s ridiculous…

        • http://cosmicbreeze.tumblr.com/ DtheArtist

          I agree with you & Michael. But, there are some other carrier fanboys that use post like this to lash out their hate & dislike of all things T-Mobile to make it seem like they really care about T-Mobile, when they really just wanna talk trash. Btw, we need to see people like you all on the TmoNews forums, I haven’t been on there in so long. You all seem really smart & interesting. & I do agree T-Mobile is really trying. They did Myfaves, UMA, WiFi calling, offering options from low end to high end, faster more efficient “4G” speeds, broadest “4G” coverage & most offered “4G” phones. T-Mobile are really working hard, we need to support our carrier. I will not complain; however, I will offer suggestions.

      • frigadroid

        “serial complainer” lol. My uncle told me we came from a long line of “chronic gripers” Serial complainers are like the junior varsity compared to us chronic gripers. :-P

    • Jay2real02

      Yup, T-Mo needs to get their 3G/4G coverage up. I work in an area where the best i can get is EDGE. Bought the Mytouch 4G, only to realize that for me it is MYtouch Edge. I like T-mo, but with the other 3 big carriers all having 3G in my area (08641) i am kind being pushed away. Especially if I want to use a tablet or Data card

    • Jay2real02

      Yup, T-Mo needs to get their 3G/4G coverage up. I work in an area where the best i can get is EDGE. Bought the Mytouch 4G, only to realize that for me it is MYtouch Edge. I like T-mo, but with the other 3 big carriers all having 3G in my area (08641) i am kind being pushed away. Especially if I want to use a tablet or Data card

    • Jason

      yes your couldn’t be more right, people on here are on a whole different level than I am when it comes to rating a phone, BUT what bothers me the most is lag, slow computers and phones get on nerves so bad that I look for the processor power. I think so far the nexus s is the only phone that has no lag. So I have to get on here to see what’s going on and listen to people wine about specs and video quality ect…

  • MSalam11

    Why are there so much adds now at the bottom of the page? This wasn’t there before.

    • Jonathan

      I was wondering that too. I’ve had issues since those ads (Best Buy Buy Back Program Ads) started showing up. The stupid page won’t load and freezes.

    • frigadroid

      David has bad nights at the track and casino too, so you can’t blame him for wanting to make some cash.

  • Anonymous

    Money loss is never a good sign! I hope Tmobile recovers with their new devices coming soon!

    • Lubbalots

      What new devices? Haven’t seen or heard of one anywhere yet in the tech world.

      • Anonymous

        The Optimus 2x, Optimus Black and possibly the Optimus 3D. Also the HTC Pyramid is said to be rumored for tmobile. Samsung Galaxy S 2 is bound for tmobile also. Tmobile said at CES they have 25 new devices launching in all of 2011 so I am sure some more are to be announced.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          OK..Go buy one. What ?? you can’t?? That’s because they don’t have any…yet. I am looking forward to their new devices, I just hope they get them out on time to be considered High End.

  • Anonymous

    Well here’s what the real issues are, some details straight from the big shots’ mouths.

    This story got nationwide publication today, the day these dismal results got posted, including in the WSJ and investor dailies.

    Note where Obermann mentions the iPhone. (As I said last year, getting the iPhone would not “save” T-Mobile, as some in here like to say, but it would have generated significant publicity, prevented some customer defections and “put T-Mobile on the map” for a lot of people.)

    ______________________

    T-Mobile USA Inc., the nation’s fourth largest wireless carrier, is coming under growing pressure to bolster its network through a partnership or acquisition, as its latest earnings report detailed further declines in profit and customers.

    The U.S. unit of Germany’s Deutsche Telekom AG said on Friday that its fourth-quarter profit fell 12.4% to $268 million, while its service revenue rose less than 1% to $4.7 billion. Over the quarter, 318,000 contract customers left the carrier, it said, only partly offset by 295,000 less lucrative, prepaid customers.

    Deutsche Telekom Chief Executive René Obermann said a T-Mobile’s lingering reputation for poor coverage, due to the late market arrival of its 3G network, and lack of an iPhone partnership had contributed to the customer losses.

    But analysts say a potentially bigger problem looms for the mobile carrier: T-Mobile is running out of spectrum, which gives carriers capacity to send video and other content to smartphones just as rapidly increasing smartphone sales are causing mobile data growth in the U.S. to surge. The lack of spectrum may soon force the company to seek a partnership or acquisition, as it seeks to turnaround the erosion of its customer base, they say.

    Phillip Redman, an analyst with market researcher Gartner Inc., called T-Mobile’s need “fairly urgent,” because outfitting new spectrum for use takes time. “Without spectrum, T-Mobile is always 18 to 24 months behind its rivals,” Mr. Redman said.

    At a T-Mobile investor event in January, Mr. Obermann said that the German telecommunications company isn’t seeking a big acquisition right now but that T-Mobile is exploring its options for acquiring or expanding its U.S. spectrum. Analysts say the planned sale of T-Mobile’s 7,000 U.S. towers could help finance such an endeavor, netting the company as much as $2 billion for deals.

    Though Mr. Obermann said he believed the company’s 54 megahertz of spectrum in the U.S. is enough to satisfy demand in the medium term, “longer-term the question exists and we have to get prepared.”

    On Friday in Bonn, Germany, Mr. Obermann said the company is open to a partnership in the U.S., but that the U.S. market is more complex than smaller countries in Europe. That’s in part because the industry is more concentrated and there are fewer potential partners, he added.

    “We’re investigating what potential partnerships there are in America,” he said. “We are working on the solution, and will hopefully have something more concrete in the coming months.”

    Deutsche Telekom said Friday the company’s loss for the quarter ended Dec. 31 increased to €582 million ($800.1 million) from a €3 million loss a year ago. Total sales in the quarter fell 4.5% to €15.48 billion. A contributing factor was T-Mobile USA, whose performance has suffered in recent years from being squeezed between lower-end competitors and larger rivals.

    Chief Financial Officer Timotheus Höettges said the sale of the cellular towers would begin in the second quarter. He also reiterated that the company ruled out an outright sale of the U.S. operations.

    T-Mobile has a number of options for gaining more spectrum, including buying capacity from Clearwire Corp., a wireless broadband provider 54% owned by Sprint, which is seeking additional funding through a spectrum sale.

    The move more often raised by analysts and investors is a potential acquisition deal or partnership between T-Mobile and Sprint. If achieved, a tie-up would create a carrier with the scale almost rival to that of AT&T and Verizon Wireless, a joint venture of Verizon Communications and Vodafone Group PLC. But the potential for a deal is limited by the fact that it would require integrating three incompatible networks.

    Last month, Philipp Humm, T-Mobile’s chief executive since November, outlined a strategy to return the Deutsche Telekom unit to growth by pushing cheaper smartphones and data plans. As part of the plan, the company’s is touting the speed of its 4G network, which uses a technology called HSPA+, over that of its rivals. “Ironically, the more successful they are with their strategy, the more customers they will get and the more strain it will put on their network,” says Craig Moffett, analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. “So it will bring the strategic questions to a head all the earlier.”

    • frigadroid

      Some of what I read from that Gartner Inc. research sounds pretty dismal for the industry as a whole. I wouldn’t recommend investing in any of the carriers for the long term.

  • Ravercwb

    T-Mobile will keep losing customers igf they don’t give a chance for old customers to upgrade teir phones for free. I’m really willing to move to AT&T if they don’t come up with a good duo-core phone like tge Atrix 4G.
    In my opinion the main problem is the lack of good devices offered.
    We always get second hand devices. I use a Mytouch 3G 1st generation and it was released with almost 100mb RAm rhan the HTC Magic. They always find a way to screw their customers.
    We also don’t get 3g worldwide band, only. The AWS BAND IV.
    So, there are many rrasons for customers to leave Magenta for any other company

  • The Shadow

    I left t-mobile because of their revised credit standards, I had an even more plus plan and they took away my 22 month payment option. It’s funny how Sprint had no trouble activating my 5 lines. Wonders never cease!!! Anyways I come here because the site is very tech oriented.

    • Anonymous

      I am on Even More Plus and paying for my Vibrant on a 22 month plan. (Usually I pay off that “loan” so I can get a newer phone and “finance it” too. Paid off the HD2 balance to get the Vibrant, etc.)

      What do you mean that they took away your 22 month payment option? Were you paying for a phone and they removed it, called the loan due, so to speak.

      Or do you mean on a phone purchase they would not offer you the 22 month option?

      I’m curious what happened and if they might pull that on me.

  • janesmithh

    well i have at&t now i have a motorola atrix 4g. I had t-mobile a mytouch 4g. So far im liking at&t more my only complaint is that internet is not unlimited. But i live in los angeles zip code 90022 and so far im luvin at&t service more than t-mobile i get way better signal inside buildings .i know have 2-3 bars inside places like the clinic the dentist and im able to talk something that was impossible with t-mobile! Also my phone has the 850 3g mhz band which comes in handy when u go to mexico because u get 3g when roaming in mexico. Another complain i had with t-mobile is that since it uses the aws band which only works here in the us when u go to mexico u only get edge which sucked and at&t gets 3g in mexico. I go to mexico alot so this comes in handy for me. Well i admit at&t network may not be that fast but t least i have service inside buildings and get 3g in mexico. The only reason i left t-mobile was cuz of those things i mentioned above cuz i didnt get signal in alot of buildings and cuz i didnt get 3g when i was roaming in mexico. Som people might get mad at me and argue with me but i dont care

  • adriana

    i agree with jane why couldnt the phones from t-mobile use the 850 mhz band for 3g ? Even if they dont use it here in da states. It wud be coo for them to support it. Because for us people that travel to latin america and south america it wud be nice to have 3g over seas. All of latin america and south america use the 850 mhz band for 3g like att here in da states. I travel alot and i have a samsung vibrant and my husband a sony ericcson w518a from at&t its a really crappy phone. But when we went to guatemala and nicaragua and panama we were both roaming and my vibrant only got an edge signal . And his crappy sony ericsson from att had and H next to the signal which means he had an hsdpa 3g signal. He had the H signal in those 3 places we went . His phone only dropped down to edge once in a while nd it wud show an E icon then it wud automatically pick up the H icon again. Which sucked for me cuz i had edge all the time. T-mobile may get 3g in europe from what i heard but in south america and latin america ur screwed ur stuck with edge only while att gets 3g.

  • Lubbalots

    Its coverage, coverage, folks and devices that can compete with other carriers. How can I not get coverage in a basement of a hospital in a big city while my coworkers are chatting away on Verizon and AT n T network. And plus they get corporate discount too! How can this be? As everyone may know all over the tech news there rumors and even pictures of new devices coming yet there’s nothing that relates to tmo. How can the this be? Then there is claim by tmo of fastest 3G/4G network. They don’t mean jack if there is poor coverage. Is there an incentive to stay with tmo?

  • Alex

    The ONLY reason I’ve stayed with T-Mobile for so many years WAS because of their outstanding customer service. Well let me tell you, that has GONE down the drain. Not only is tech support lacking education these days, but customer service reps are rude lately.

    With that GONE, I have no reason to stay with T-Mobile, and come this summer I’ll be shopping different carriers for my options.

    And like Lubbalots below me said, coverage coverage coverage. It really ticks me off, that I live in a major metropolitan city, yet inside buildings I get no coverage, while all my verizon friends have signals.

    • Anonymous

      110% agree with your comment about the degradation of T-Mobile’s customer service.

      Interestingly, over the past one year+ that I have been echoing sentiments similar to yours, there’s a lot of T-Mobile employees in here who posted: 1) I’m full of it; 2) I’m the problem, not T-Mobile; and 3) that if I don’t like it I can just leave.

      Most bizarrely, some CSR employees posted that the reason I get bad service when I call T-Mobile is because I have been put on T-Mobile’s “black list” of problem customers. They said when I call that’s why:

      – It takes a long time for them to pick up the phone (they know it’s me on the line, when I call every six months or so);

      – I am put on hold for 15 to 20 minutes;

      – Because I am on “the list” it’s OK for the CSRs to be rude;

      – It’s OK to hang up on me.

      Also see this:

      http://forums.t-mobile.com/t5/T-Mobile-General/T-Mobile-Puts-Frequent-Callers-On-A-Blacklist-With-Excessive/m-p/695281

      Even if a list or “problem customer codes” do not exist, that “the Net” thinks there are such things is a serious problem for T-Mobile , IMHO. For sure, being on a list at T-Mobile and knowing that CSRs make notes to my file or put code on the screen that pops up and says “this guy is a problem customer” are additional reasons why I too will be looking at options other than staying at T-Mobile (as much as I like the upcoming S2 and I assume T-Mobile will be getting it).

      Despite being with T-Mobile over seven years and paying them about $28,000 (they have that info on the computer screen when you call) I’m OK with going back to a BlackBerry Curve (Boost Mobile) and getting a really nice “standalone” 10.1″ tablet, to use for multi-media. After all, I don’t need a 4.3″ superphone, tablet, two netbooks and notebook computers. I really should have only one or the other, a nice superphone or a super tablet, having both is kinda redundant.

      Sidenote: I have called T-Mobile on average about three times a year, one of the calls always being to order a phone, for which I pay full retail since I am on Even More Plus.

      The other calls are to question $80 and $60 overcharges, for which I got credits since they were in fact overcharges.

      My call last month was to tech support, to ask about Android I had put on my HD2 (I wanted to know if I needed to switch on T-Mobile’s end from a Windows data connection to an Android/Google connection. I figured out on my own that I did not).

      After a one-minute conversation the tech support guy put me on hold (he exclaimed surprise that I had put 2.2 on my HD2 and from his tone indicated that was a real no no. He also exclaimed shocked that one could put 2.2 on an HD2) . After 15 minutes on hold the phone mysteriously and coincidentally disconnected. He did not call back (which he could have done since he had my number and he could call me, but I could not call and get him back on the phone).

      • frigadroid

        Not to knock any tmobile employes, I like my local company store they are nice but are not phone junkies like us and usually they either don’t know what I’m talking about or have been told to act like they don’t know what I’m talking about.

        With tech support those guys are following a flow chart and same thing either they don’t know or have been told to say they don’t know. In their defense it would be hard to know all the phones inside out and many good component level tech savvy troubleshooters probably wouldn’t want to work the phones at tmobile. That’s why they usually direct you to the manufacture service or send a refurb.

      • Tom

        I was a T-Mo customer for a year and the first time I called, I was on hold for 20 minutes. I can’t be on a list unless they’re psychic and knew I was calling to cancel my webConnect service. I didn’t even understand the guy through his accent.

    • Anonymous

      Again people, the fact that people are telling the kinds of stories that are even on T-Mobile’s own forums indicates T-Mobile has serious customer service problems. T-Mobile can bury its head in JD Powers’ lap, so to speak, or they can fix the problem.

      http://forums.t-mobile.com/t5/T-Mobile-General/T-Mobile-Puts-Frequent-Callers-On-A-Blacklist-With-Excessive/m-p/695281

      • Sayin

        Well, if you are a whiner and are always calling to complain, then I can understand why no one wants to deal with someone like you. And the fact that these complaints are actually on TMo’s forums shows that the company is confident in their service. Someone will always be upset with Tmo for whatever reason. The fact that you think you are so important that your experiences reflect reality is pathetic. Go back to writing long responses and not actually saying much in them.

      • Anonymous

        You gave the link and you probably didn’t even read the whole thing.. I give you an F for that. Take a look at this (it’s on the same thread u gave me): http://forums.t-mobile.com/t5/T-Mobile-General/T-Mobile-Puts-Frequent-Callers-On-A-Blacklist-With-Excessive/m-p/695281/highlight/true#M21459

  • Lubbalots

    From word of tmo’s new CEO, his strategy for the company is cheap phones and fastest 4G network . How are cheap capable of 3G or 4G? How do you even get the fastest 4G when you can’t even get 3G in a building in a metropolitan area? And where are the list of new phones and devices to to backup this fastest 4G network? False advertising and wrong direction from new CEO. Claims should base first on largest coverage area, fastest 4G, and best new phones and devices. If this is not the order of strategy, tmo will not service.

  • Lubbalots

    …and the hot magenta will not help tmo in any way.

  • Lubbalots

    …and the hot magenta will not help tmo in any way.

  • Lubbalots

    Oops! Magenta girl…

    • Anonymous

      lummox

  • Lubbalots

    Oops! Magenta girl…

  • frigadroid

    Since they like to rip off commercials how about that frosted mini wheat boxing skit? You get michael buffer “let’s get ready to rumble”. Then two animated phones go at it. Hey I just equaled tmobile’s marketing campaign with 0 budget lol.

  • Metalimatt

    iPhone iPhone iPhone iPhone

  • Bobblehead

    BoyGeniusReport headline sums is up nicely:
    T-Mobile takes a beating in Q4 2010; sheds 318,000 contract customers, post-paid churn at 3.6%

  • Anonymous

    vipshopper.us

  • Garryeb

    they are losing one more customer in a few months when my contract is up.

    • Stayin

      Oh No. Somebody call TMo quick and tell them about Garry leaving. How can they let him leave??? This is a disaster!!!

    • Jedry

      Multiply by a 1000 or more. That’s what going to happen.

      • TechManiac

        More like multiply by hundreds of thousands. The only good thing I see is that there will be less people hogging resources. Now I can go back to hunting that mythical 21 Mbps downloads. So far I found 3 Mbps.

  • Schippma

    Geez people! For a fansite of T-Mobile, you guys are being way too critical. T-Mobile is making strides in their coverage and phones. The G2 and MT4G are not kiddy phones, they are both great phones that compete with any phone that AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon have out today.

    I am not saying these are the only great phones that T-Mobile has today, however, looking back just a few years ago when T-Mobile did not focus on the data customer at all and only focused on cheap plans and data services, their phones also reflected that, cheap phones. However, over the past year, I see T-Mobile making a shift from just cheap phones to smartphones. They have a hell of a lot more smartphones than they had previously.

    The point is that T-Mobile is not going to change overnight. They are moving in the right direction. Am I mad that I do not get good signal at my house, yes. Am I mad cause when I do travel to the outskirts of town that I may or may not get a signal, yes. However, I also understand that it is not just T-Mobile who dictates how and when a cell tower goes up and there are forces outside their immediate control. Yes T-Mobile needs more aliances with other companies to get their network up to par with the other 3 carriers and they are working on it but it does take time. T-Mobile is a young company and it will grow.

    I am just glad I am part of a company who treats me right and doesn’t charge a $10 fee to use a smartphone on an Everything Data Plan on their network, doesn’t try to force me off of my grandfathered rate plan to get a subsidized phone or when I want to add a line, and lets me use any phone on their network that is compatible with their frequency. The other carriers cannot say the same.

    Sorry for the long post but someone has to defend the carrier I love, and yes, I have been with the other three companies and will never go back!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

      Where does it say FAN SITE FOR T-MOBILE on the page?? Please show me. It called T-Mobile NEWS…NEWS…. I’ll say it again…NEWS!! Go to the T-Mobile forums if you want a fan site.

      • Schippma

        I think you missed the point of my post. You are obviously here because you have T-Mobile service. If you hate their service so much, why stay? And I am not trying to say this is a fansite per se, however, most of these posts are negative on a site that reports news about T-Mobile.

        And if you read the forums at T-Mobile, you would know that most posters are not fans at all, most have complaints of some kind.

        • TMo Customer, Not Fan

          Why can’t we want better service? No one should be a fan of any company.

        • Schippma

          I agree with better service. We all want better service. However, looking back over the past few years, T-Mobile is stepping in the right direction. Are they perfect, no, but what company or person is perfect? I can say that T-Mobile is the least evil of the cell phone companies I have delt with over the years. And why not be a fan of a company? If you like sports and have a favorite team or are a fan of a team, guess what, that is a company too.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          “Geez people! For a fansite of T-Mobile, you guys are being way too critical.”

          Like I said in an earlier post, fan boy gets upset if anyone says anything bad about T-Mobile. Well screw you, 90 percent of the complaints I see on this website are valid complaints, if you don’t like it go to the T-Mobile forums where you can celebrate the joys of T-Mo with the other fan boys.

        • Schippma

          Not to go back and forth with you on this issue but what is your deal with T-Mo? Have they done you wrong so bad that you are this bitter toward them? Hey, I have had HORRIBLE experiences with other companies and I guess T-Mobile has done right by me so far. I am not trying to sound like a fanboy, I am mearly trying to find SOME positive out of this report as many others have failed to mention thus far. T-Mo has improved over the past few years. Yes, they are by no means perfect. They don’t have 3G coverage in many, many places and GPRS speeds are prevalent in too many areas that are heavily populated. Yes, their coverage needs improvement BIG TIME but it is slowily expanding. Rome wasn’t built overnight, right? Now you can tell me some more fallacies about my thinking and opinions but this is how I see it, you don’t have to agree.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          And to answer Your useless post…where did I say I have a problem with T-mobile. FOR THE LAST DAMN TIME…I have been with them for at least 15 years, they are not perfect. What I am COMPLAINING about is the jerks that jump all over anyone that has a complaint about T-Mobile. And hopefully for the last time…THIS IS NOT A FAN SITE, it’s called T-Mobile News. All the news you want about T-Mobile you can find here. I have this site up all day as well as some others. WHY? To read the news, to hear about problems others have with their phone and or T-mobile and to read how others have had that problem or one similar and what the did to resolve it. Not to read how someone has had a problem and then see everyone tell him to switch companies if he doesn’t like T-Mobile.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          Also, I would like to apologize to everyone for taking up so much space. I’ve had a bad day and enough was enough! Let me just say, if you don’t like someones t-mobile complaint and you can’t post some way to help…..maybe…just don’t post. At least don’t put them down for posting their complaint.

        • Schippma

          Again, I am sorry you missed my point. This is my last comment to you. And why put me down because of your opinions? I did not say anything bad to you but you blew up at me. Let’s just leave well enough alone, shall we?

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          And I am sorry you seemed to miss mine!
          Agreed, I will not post to you. I’ll even like that last post! : )

        • Schippma

          Again, I am sorry you missed my point. This is my last comment to you. And why put me down because of your opinions? I did not say anything bad to you but you blew up at me. Let’s just leave well enough alone, shall we?

        • Sayin

          Woah, calm down there champ. Why are you telling him to screw off? Just relax and let him have his opinion. He didn’t post targeting you but you got your panties all twisted. You don’t have to agree with him but keep your panties on.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          I am sick and tired of fan boys ganging up on anyone who has a complaint, a legitimate complaint. And I’ll tell anyone I want to screw off. Why are you so fixated with my panties anyway. I’m telling him to screw off for telling me to leave T-Mo. If I had a big enough complaint, I would!
          My complaint here is someone calling this a fan site (which a fan boy would) when it is not. That is what the t-mobile forums are for.

        • Ldominguez1986

          I think your a fan boy of the word fan boy

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DNR3MMYBLZEKZ6TB6TBPVECNZU JamesM

          Even I had to “like” that one!! LOL

        • AlexS

          Your sports team comparison to a corporate business doesn’t exactly fit. Plus, a lot of sports fans are very, very, VERY critical of the teams they’re supposedly fans of.

        • Schippma

          True, my comparison isn’t perfect. I am only trying to see SOME positive out of this report and giving my feedback as to the changes T-Mobile has made over the past year. They have come far but it is naive to think they will change over night. Change takes time and I do see them moving in a forward direction. And yes, I do get angry at my sports teams too.

        • frigadroid

          Speaking of sports that’s another gripe I have the other carriers have some deals to watch live games and racing while I get to look at a game tracker that only gives the score and stats.
          Don’t get me wrong I’m not going to dump tmob just to watch some rednecks drive around in a circle every sunday but it would be nice with the ncaa tournament to be able to use my phone on the road to watch my home teams.

  • Anonymous

    OK, here’s a discussion I posted on the Net about Verizon. It establishes that Verizon has HUGE problems too, IMHO far more problems than this T-Mobile quarterly report.

    Out-of-context: If nothing else, look at Verizon’s soon-to-debut HTC Thunderbolt. IMHO for a phone announced over a year after T-Mobile’s HD2. And if you compare it, the Thunderbolt is not dramatically different than T-Mobile’s “old” HD2.

    http://www.phonearena.com/phones/compare/HTC-ThunderBolt,HTC-HD2-US/phones/4985,4345

    (And arguably the HD2 that has been constantly pilloried is now the most phenomenal-valued handset on the planet, not only because it remains a powerful, large-display handset; but additionally because it is beautifully and efficiently running Gingerbread AND WP7.)

    People on “Verizon fan sites” could dis the Thunderbolt all day long with comments like “Sheesh the Thunderbolt not that much different than T-Mobile’s old HD2, what an outdated phone. Come on Verizon, we want better 4G phones, and more 4G phones than just one.”

    And what if one of T-Mobile’s phones got a “DO NOT RECOMMEND” rating from Consumer Reports and that fact was covered coast to coast on the national news. Man… people in here would be predicting that’s the end of T-Mobile, it’s going bankrupt any day now.

    Despite my complaints (expressed herein) it’s not like T-Mobile is sitting on the sidelines “like a potted plant.”

    Sidenote: I don’t see myself sticking around T-Mobile because of the customer service issue (I will always boycott companies or services that provide lousy service or whose employees are rude, condescending or consistently incompetent). But on the technology side I have no problem with what T-Mobile is doing.

    Now on to my Verizon post (Yes, I know it’s long, you can simply not read it):
    ____________________

    It’s interesting to follow Verizon’s price-cutting actions in light of recent developments (that seem to be occurring almost weekly). IMHO Verizon is in panic mode. It’s “freaking out,” especially on the heels of Consumer Reports rejecting Verizon’s iPhone. That’s devastating news so close to major product debuts including the Xoom and Thunderbolt.

    Consider the following, any one of which would turn a company’s excitement and jubilation into concern and working on weekends to rethink strategy and come up with fixes.

    1. The Xoom “Buy it now, send it in later for a 4G upgrade,” has met with wide scale criticism, despite Verizon giving free shipping and assuring there will be a short turnaround time for the upgrade. (Frankly, with all the ways consumers have been burned I don’t think people trust anything that manufacturers and carriers say nowadays about capability, functionality, rebates, updates, and upgrades.)

    2. The Xoom does not come with the ability to play flash on the Net. Release a high-end device without Flash capability, that alone is insanity since flash is one of the most common ways that people play multimedia on portable devices (streamed movies; TV episodes on Hulu, for example).

    3. Word around the Net is that Android Honeycomb has “rough edges” and is not ready for debut.

    4. More bad news, at launch time there are not many apps for the Xoom, that is, Honeycomb-specific applications. Some Android smartphone apps may work, but cell phone small-scale graphics don’t play well on a 10″ display, starting with the fact that some graphics are the size of a postage stamp.

    5. Purchasers will be first adopters on both the Xoom and the Honeycomb OS. IMHO that severely limits the number of people willing to fork over what is considered by most to be a “ton of money,” for what I think is a “glorified picture frame” or “crippled/limited/scaled down netbook” (take your pick).

    6. The U.S. economy was already in the sewers of Paris. Now major Middle East instability is shooting U.S. fuel prices into US the $4 per gallon range with predictions it will get to $5 by summer. Nothing else “slows down faster” the US economy (and risks a depression) than another round of $4 to $5 per gallon fuel prices.

    What this means to the wireless industry in general and to prospective Xoom and Thunderbolt customers is that instead of buying high-end products people will batten down the hatches until things get better.

    People were already holding back spending on “unnecessary” electronics. (IMHO that’s why wireless sales are down, and I suspect a LOT of people are moving to prepaid.) Now, what little discretionary income people have (it is not much) is going to pay for the daily work commute.

    7. Verizon is still licking its wounds on the dismal iPhone launch. (That’s right, I said “dismal.” Despite Verizon’s attempts to sugarcoat the iPhone launch as a success, even national news media is talking about how Verizon’s iPhone launch did not meet expectations. E.g. #1: I watched the news. Every broadcaster showed empty Verizon stores, the only people inside were the 10 Verizon employees staffed to handle the crowds, that never showed. E.g. # 2: Contrary to predictions, a very small percentage of users switched from AT&T to get the iPhone on Verizon.

    8. Despite heavy advertising and attempts to generate excitement, interest in the HTC Thunderbolt is not what Verizon had hoped. Compounding the situation, there’s talk all over the Net that Verizon’s 4G system has software problems, this makes people wonder what else Verizon’s 4G network has wrong with it.

    9. Verizon is getting the reputation that is debuts products that are not ready for market. This appears accurate to me. Look at the Xoom: it is debuting 1) Without 4G; 2) Few applications; and 3) the inability to play Adobe Flash files.

    10. The timing could not be worse, on top of all of the above, Consumer Reports, just gave the Verizon iPhone a “Do Not Recommend” buy rating. All the free advertising Verizon got on the iPhone launch was countered by the national media coverage (national and local news included) about Consumer Report’s devastating rating. (That kind of “free advertising” a company does not need.)

    11. It doesn’t help that Verizon’s 4G services are so limited. It has few cities where 4G is offered. I’d be curious how many people pass on a 4G device because the service is not yet available, and Verizon refuses to provide solid information on projected service debut dates.

    12. IMHO pricing for the Xoom and Thunderbolt alone will assure lackluster sales. The economy is sinking. That’s the time you lower prices not raise them. Maybe this is Verizon’s way of controlling usage, so that the data pipeline does not have breakdowns like AT&T. For sure, if you have limited pipe you don’t overload it all at once with 4G devices that will overload the system.

    The above events and actions are way beyond a “perfect storm” that negatively affects product launches. Any one event would normally doom a product launch. It will be interesting to see what happens with the Xoom (and Thunderbolt) in light of recent events. For example, if it’s plastered all over the news that Consumer Reports says “don’t buy a Verizon iPhone” you don’t bring out follow that up with a product launch.

    Sidenote for TMoNews: For Herr Humm this quarterly report is like having to sleep with a chunk of bar soap on the inside of his cheek. But the Consumer Reports rating of Verizon’s iPhone has to have helped him sleep a little better, if not with a smile on his face. ;)

    OK, I’m done. Thanks for your time.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Luis-Dominguez/100000411307848 Luis Dominguez

      I think the iphone could fix this

  • Anonymous

    Here’s some news- TMO needs to market to professionals MORE, and not just teens and moms. Until TMO figures out that we don’t need cutting edge processor designs wrapped in ridiculous, purposeless trendy designed shells (or with stupid hinges), I’ll enjoy my Nexus One with GINGERBREAD.

    and the HD2 was a professional design….BUT….in typical TMO fashion, they put an outdated OS on it. Are you kidding me? If it had been Android, I’d have one.

  • Anonymous

    What they should try to do is become THE tablet carrier. If it really is going to be the next big ticket item pushing forward in that area would be a good option. (And I want one from TMo, so I have my fingers crossed for good deals)

    • Anonymous

      I agree with you.

      Here is what I posted in here just before T-Mobile’s strategy meeting. Since this article deals with numbers, strategy and outlook, it’s probably more relevant than when I posted it back then. Of course I continue to think it great advice. :)
      __________________

      Since search engines pick up these comments, consider this an open letter to T-Mobile’s executive office.

      Since there’s only so many customers to go around, IMHO carriers have depleted the market for selling current wireless technologies (handsets, phone service and data)

      It’s like running against the wind, as carriers compete against each other for the SAME customers,with the SAME bag of wares (technologies). T-Mobile can’t break free of that vicious cycle unless it comes out with something new, stuff that the other carriers don’t have.

      T-Mobile would be wise to announce getting into new technologies for wireless customers (software, hardware and infrastructure, crowned with revolutionary pricing).

      These moves would not only set T-Mobile apart from the competition, but TMOUS would become “the carrier” to sign up and stay with to enjoy such things. (Much like the public perceives Apple is the company who produces innovative products even though Apple rarely has: e.g., in 2007 the iPhone was not new, as early as 2002 touchscreen only PDA phones were on the market; the iPad is not revolutionary, more powerful tablets were on the market in 2004).

      Becoming a revolutionary wireless company would require T-Mobile to form partnerships with established hardware and software companies, and maybe even acquiring emerging and innovative technologies.
      Yeah, that would cost some coin and for sure investors would chop off executive heads if the investment did not pay off with increased profits in two to three years.

      So where to go and what technologies and am I talking about?

      - Become the “broadband only” network, known as the only carrier providing exclusively 4G services. Do something similar to what Nissan did with its luxury “Infinity” brand, or Toyota with “Lexus.” T-Mobile would be the premium brand, with only high-end service and high-end handsets.

      – Spin off or separate the “budget division” that would be for budget smartphones, feature phones and slower service. Spin off 3G and Edge to a different entity, to differentiate those “20th century speeds” from 21st century broadband.

      – Develop a full line of tablets. By that I mean “echoing” what’s been done with handsets (for the budget minded T-Mobile has free feature phones, for the geeks, T-Mobile has $500 premium handsets).

      Do the same with tablets, have a $100 model that’s simply a WiFi-only e-reader, a $250 unit with average features, and max price $500 tablets that are powerful computers without the keyboard (but have a keyboard dock and USB port that can accept any USB keyboard).

      – Allow all tablets to access the Net and interact online. The $100 model has a smaller display, WiFi, but connects at EDGE if one chooses to dial 611 and order that service. The $500 model is 4G.

      – The key is to become THE carrier to go to shop for the full range of tablets, maybe seven to ten models filling the spectrum. (This is far better than each carrier having one or two tablets.)

      - Partner with software companies (Microsoft, Adobe) to offer popular office application on T-Mobile handsets and tablets, via cloud computing. E.g., make MS Office available across platforms, “in the clouds,” that would not be dependent on the handset or tablet OS. That may not be doable if, for example, Microsoft has its own plans.

      – Have a full range of “professional devices” meaning that a salesman, for example, or a lawyer, can use T-Mobile handsets or tablets to perform any and all office tasks that are currently done on netbooks, notebooks and desktops. Cloud computing makes that possible.

      – In line with the above develop full cloud computing capability on handsets and tablets. “Cloud computing” for those who don’t know, is simply doing on the Internet anything you would do on your computer.

      For example, you would no longer install MS Word on your computer. You would pay MS a license fee for access to MS Word online. Online you would create, edit and even save documents.

      Sidenote: In a sense, a “cloud computing” handset or tablet will have morphed into what in the old days was called a “dumb” terminal, similar to what many office networks use.

      – The iPhone: IMHO a really bad thing that happened to T-Mobile was it not getting the iPhone, and it instead going to Verizon. Of course, maybe T-Mobile tried to get it for the U.S. market, but Apple instead wanted it to go to Verizon because of its huge customer base.

      However, if it was a matter of money, T-Mobile should have paid whatever it would take to get the iPhone. That move would have paid off handsomely simply in the free media coverage that T-Mobile would have received on the event (attention that instead Verizon got).

      - Things that show T-Mobile is on the right track:

      4G, not HSPA+ – One of the smartest moves T-Mobile made was “abandoning” the HSPA+ label and instead boldly calling it “4G.” That took guts and brains to pull off.

      And you know T-Mobile’s 4G ad campaign was a slick move; T-Mobile needs to keep that kind of momentum going.

      “Attack ads” – Taking off the gloves is a good thing for T-Mobile. T-Mobile needs to become aggressive instead of what could be characterized as standing around with its feet flat on the ground.

      For example, people can relate to Carly Foulkes bad mouthing the iPhone’s WiFi-only video phone call feature and saying how T-Mobile’s video chat is better.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with you.

      Here is what I posted in here just before T-Mobile’s strategy meeting. Since this article deals with numbers, strategy and outlook, it’s probably more relevant than when I posted it back then. Of course I continue to think it great advice. :)
      __________________

      Since search engines pick up these comments, consider this an open letter to T-Mobile’s executive office.

      Since there’s only so many customers to go around, IMHO carriers have depleted the market for selling current wireless technologies (handsets, phone service and data)

      It’s like running against the wind, as carriers compete against each other for the SAME customers,with the SAME bag of wares (technologies). T-Mobile can’t break free of that vicious cycle unless it comes out with something new, stuff that the other carriers don’t have.

      T-Mobile would be wise to announce getting into new technologies for wireless customers (software, hardware and infrastructure, crowned with revolutionary pricing).

      These moves would not only set T-Mobile apart from the competition, but TMOUS would become “the carrier” to sign up and stay with to enjoy such things. (Much like the public perceives Apple is the company who produces innovative products even though Apple rarely has: e.g., in 2007 the iPhone was not new, as early as 2002 touchscreen only PDA phones were on the market; the iPad is not revolutionary, more powerful tablets were on the market in 2004).

      Becoming a revolutionary wireless company would require T-Mobile to form partnerships with established hardware and software companies, and maybe even acquiring emerging and innovative technologies.
      Yeah, that would cost some coin and for sure investors would chop off executive heads if the investment did not pay off with increased profits in two to three years.

      So where to go and what technologies and am I talking about?

      - Become the “broadband only” network, known as the only carrier providing exclusively 4G services. Do something similar to what Nissan did with its luxury “Infinity” brand, or Toyota with “Lexus.” T-Mobile would be the premium brand, with only high-end service and high-end handsets.

      – Spin off or separate the “budget division” that would be for budget smartphones, feature phones and slower service. Spin off 3G and Edge to a different entity, to differentiate those “20th century speeds” from 21st century broadband.

      – Develop a full line of tablets. By that I mean “echoing” what’s been done with handsets (for the budget minded T-Mobile has free feature phones, for the geeks, T-Mobile has $500 premium handsets).

      Do the same with tablets, have a $100 model that’s simply a WiFi-only e-reader, a $250 unit with average features, and max price $500 tablets that are powerful computers without the keyboard (but have a keyboard dock and USB port that can accept any USB keyboard).

      – Allow all tablets to access the Net and interact online. The $100 model has a smaller display, WiFi, but connects at EDGE if one chooses to dial 611 and order that service. The $500 model is 4G.

      – The key is to become THE carrier to go to shop for the full range of tablets, maybe seven to ten models filling the spectrum. (This is far better than each carrier having one or two tablets.)

      - Partner with software companies (Microsoft, Adobe) to offer popular office application on T-Mobile handsets and tablets, via cloud computing. E.g., make MS Office available across platforms, “in the clouds,” that would not be dependent on the handset or tablet OS. That may not be doable if, for example, Microsoft has its own plans.

      – Have a full range of “professional devices” meaning that a salesman, for example, or a lawyer, can use T-Mobile handsets or tablets to perform any and all office tasks that are currently done on netbooks, notebooks and desktops. Cloud computing makes that possible.

      – In line with the above develop full cloud computing capability on handsets and tablets. “Cloud computing” for those who don’t know, is simply doing on the Internet anything you would do on your computer.

      For example, you would no longer install MS Word on your computer. You would pay MS a license fee for access to MS Word online. Online you would create, edit and even save documents.

      Sidenote: In a sense, a “cloud computing” handset or tablet will have morphed into what in the old days was called a “dumb” terminal, similar to what many office networks use.

      – The iPhone: IMHO a really bad thing that happened to T-Mobile was it not getting the iPhone, and it instead going to Verizon. Of course, maybe T-Mobile tried to get it for the U.S. market, but Apple instead wanted it to go to Verizon because of its huge customer base.

      However, if it was a matter of money, T-Mobile should have paid whatever it would take to get the iPhone. That move would have paid off handsomely simply in the free media coverage that T-Mobile would have received on the event (attention that instead Verizon got).

      - Things that show T-Mobile is on the right track:

      4G, not HSPA+ – One of the smartest moves T-Mobile made was “abandoning” the HSPA+ label and instead boldly calling it “4G.” That took guts and brains to pull off.

      And you know T-Mobile’s 4G ad campaign was a slick move; T-Mobile needs to keep that kind of momentum going.

      “Attack ads” – Taking off the gloves is a good thing for T-Mobile. T-Mobile needs to become aggressive instead of what could be characterized as standing around with its feet flat on the ground.

      For example, people can relate to Carly Foulkes bad mouthing the iPhone’s WiFi-only video phone call feature and saying how T-Mobile’s video chat is better.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Luis-Dominguez/100000411307848 Luis Dominguez

        I think the iphone could fix this

        • Guest

          shut up mario

  • http://urgentessays.co.uk/buy_dissertation buy dissertation

    [...] T-Mobile currently serves 33.73 million customers[...]
    despite all the losses i think it is a great achievement!!!

  • doncorleone

    Let’s step back and look at the forest vs the trees in Q-4 2010. I have follwed TMO in the news on fiercewireless/broadband, rcr and the WSJ for 2 years. This is what has happened: It’s always management, it’s always coverage and it’s always the device. These are the big 3 that drive the success if the brand. 1. They had a mid year CEO change, 2. they have re-organized the management drilled to the local level and 3. they only in 2010 phased out the Limited “joe’s wireless dba TMO” dealerships to create brand consistency. I cannot stress enough how important brand consistency is when the customer shops around, travels around and gets a different experience each time. When it tastes funny, they get disaffected. Go to 20 Lowe’s stores and see how consistent it is, same with Apple. TMO emulates Apple and is making a major overhaul in that consistency dept. It will pay off in spades. And to boot, they’re clearly tied to Wal-Mart now in the MVNO game (since Radio Shack is being a little baby and blaming the carrier while it failed to spend much iof any dollars on marketing or advertising, but well done with promoting ATT 99.9%), which is honestly where the pre-pay is coming from. However, those pre-pay/MVNO folks have to go to a store or online to get issues resolved. And that’s an oppty not be blundered by TMO.
    2010 was a lot of re-direction, stop, assess the situation, observe, report. change. And sales did suffer. But like any traditional German company, the leadership takes a long look at the brand beyond a year or two and focuses upon core metrics that are effective. Cut ineffectiveness, promote effectiveness. Tower portfolio: they’re selling the portfolio to raise cash; they’re leasing spectrum from competitors (everyone needs the capex right now), coverage is bound to be increasingly better. In fact, in major markets where they see the ROI, that is exactly where spectrum is being increased. Sorry if you’re rural, if you are, the brand is going to fail you. If you live in a major metro, the coverage gets better. But honestly, if you’re inside at work or home, switch it to UMA and get 5 bars. If out and about and you drop, no excuse and TMO is seeing that and responding. Again, takes time, dollar in for a dollar out. Finally, as for devices, take a long look at the next 2-3 years. We’re entering “The Tablet Wars”. Android is poised to overtake Apple in less than 2 years as the OS of choice. TMO is a clear frontrunner in promoting RIM and undoubtedly the Playbook is going to make hay for TMO. Verizon solidified their tie to Apple with the iPhone launch, ATT pioneered. Sprint, Metro, Leap, they all will get on board with RIM. This is EXACTLY where the business strategy comes into play, but you’ll see 2 devices being sold to the business, phone and Tablet. Businesses try, then “citizens” buy. TMO’s trick coverage wise is to launch the JV with RIM in markets where they have the coverage, not just the capacity on spectrum. They are already doing this by talking with LightSquared for an immediate launch of coverage. Again, it’s a long look with short term cuts and hoarding of dollars to stay ahead of the curve. This more management’s to wreck the brand than anything. All of that said, Q-4 shaped up much nicer for other brands, Sprint got 1.1 milliuon customers, insane : http://www.fiercewireless.com/special-reports/wireless-fourth-quarter-2010

    • Anonymous

      Be my friend… Godfather.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Luis-Dominguez/100000411307848 Luis Dominguez

        I think the iphone could fix this

    • Anonymous

      Be my friend… Godfather.

    • Anonymous

      Inspired comments, by the way. But would it have killed you to hit the “new thought” key (return key) once in awhile. Compelling reading but I had to use my cursor to follow along.

      What… were you typing this one-handed, while in a cab, on the way to the airport, heading to a meeting with Herr Obermann? That’s the only excuse. ;)

      Thought Bubble: I wonder if “Don Corleone” is really P. Humm.

      • frigadroid

        If it is Mr. Humm fire obermann and sell the network it worked for GE lol :-)

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Luis-Dominguez/100000411307848 Luis Dominguez

        I think the iphone could fix this

  • Anonymous

    zZz… (3 weeks to CTIA) zZz… (3 weeks to CTIA) zZz… (3 weeks to CTIA).

  • Anonymous

    zZz… (3 weeks to CTIA) zZz… (3 weeks to CTIA) zZz… (3 weeks to CTIA).

  • Anonymous

    What happened to David and crew? No action on TMoNews since posting this story.

    What… did they all hop into a convertible and drive into the Grand Canyon?

    Turn that jalopy around boys, 2011 will be a great year for T-Mobile. With the tanked economy and fuel prices going to $5-$6 people will be joining T-Mobile… for value.

    Besides, the few of us in here can only hold the fort so long.

    • Anonymous

      $5 gas is definitely a possibility. I guess you can’t post anything if T-Mobile isn’t being creative right now. Like teasing us about WTF IS COMING NEXT!

    • http://tmonews.com David

      Well I was on vacation, but I’m back now and there wasn’t really much going on since Friday when I left. Andrew and Kick would have handled anything major but nothing really major after the quarterly numbers!

    • http://tmonews.com David

      Well I was on vacation, but I’m back now and there wasn’t really much going on since Friday when I left. Andrew and Kick would have handled anything major but nothing really major after the quarterly numbers!

  • Anonymous

    vipstores.net

  • Anonymous

    vipstores.net

  • Anonymous

    Wow if TMO takes a bump and goes away in the near future, I would have been with TMO from start to end. Have been with them since they where know as VoiceStream.

    • Punkfloyd_138

      as was i, back in 98

      • Anonymous

        seems like yesterday, kind of.