Qualcomm wants to run LTE-U tests with T-Mobile’s help

qualcommcesbooth

Qualcomm has submitted an application with the FCC for Special Temporary Authority so that it can conduct tests of pre-commercial LTE-U equipment. The testing will help it learn more about the equipment in its development of commercial devices, helping it to see how the products perform outside of a lab environment. There will also be testing to see how LTE-U and Wi-Fi co-exist in the real world.

So where does T-Mobile come in? T-Mo has been collaborating with Qualcomm, the Wi-Fi Alliance, and other companies on the co-existence of LTE-U and Wi-Fi. T-Mobile will also open up its facilities for the LTE-U/Wi-Fi coexistence testing. Here’s what the application says about this testing:

“In addition to the product development testing described above, Qualcomm, T-Mobile, and their partner companies intend to conduct separate and independent LTE-U/Wi-Fi coexistence testing in a real-world environment at a T-Mobile facilities using a coexistence test plan being developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance. This test plan is a product of extensive technical collaboration between the Wi-Fi Alliance, T-Mobile, Qualcomm, and their partner companies and would be modified as appropriate based on the specific environment to be used for the testing.”

And here’s what a T-Mobile spokesperson told FierceWireless about the LTE-U testing:

“We are working with various chipset, radio infrastructure and device partners on production trials, who have submitted applications with the FCC for field testing to determine LTE-U/Wi-Fi coexistence based on the Wi-Fi Alliance test plan.”

LTE-U would enable carriers to use the unlicensed 5GHz band to boost their service, but some folks are concerned that it could have an impact on Wi-Fi. Qualcomm, T-Mobile, and others are working to show that that’s not the case, and that’s one reason why they’re planning these tests. If the FCC grants this STA to Qualcomm, the testing will take place from April 20 through October 20. If you’re interested in checking out the full application for yourself, you can find it at the FCC link below.

Via: FierceWireless
Source: FCC

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  • _7sk#iH

    I don’t use Wi-Fi on phone, save battery, for security, for privacy, no tracking, no mapping, no microwaves, et al. Lol

    • Wezi427

      I just wear my tinfoil hat, problem solved.

      • _7sk#iH

        Hope that protects you from malwares and hackings too… NOT!

        • Wezi427

          Try it out for yourself, it’s the only way to truly know.

        • _7sk#iH

          Lol. A tinfoil firewall and tunnel. Very funny.

          Do you update your Android phone?

        • Wezi427

          Update, of course, that’s part of the reason I buy Nexus phones. I have a Nexus 5 and Nexus 6…….updates are important.

        • _7sk#iH

          Yep. But I think most Android user don’t care about anything.

        • Wezi427

          The average user doesn’t care. They just want their phones to work.

        • Android_God

          I care about MANY THINGS and I’m an Android user! #AndroidUsersLivesMatter

        • Android_God

          Why do people want to hack you so badly?

        • _7sk#iH

          No, not me personally. I just don’t trust Wi-Fi.

    • steveb944

      I don’t think avoiding WiFi would save you battery in ALL occasions. And with the mobile network they can just track you 24/7, instead of one location at a time.

      • _7sk#iH

        Businesses can track and identify you by your device when you use their Wi-Fi and other phone related services like phone payments. And yes carriers can come up with your location history if the authorities ask them to provide or if they want to sell it to a third party which I don’t think is the case with the major carriers. But the big thing to worry about is login in to a fake Starbucks Wi-Fi or a not so secure Starbucks Wi-Fi; Starbucks Wi-Fi is just an example.

        • steveb944

          Same thing with the mobile network, all the time. Simply being in the vicinity it logs the user and I would say major carriers would be the prime example. Customer data aggregation is big money for all these tech companies.
          I don’t worry about anything as I use secure networks only for sensitive items.

  • Allen Alberto Enriquez

    I wonder if any chance will some of us truly bare witnesses the full performance this year!

    • VN

      Even if they finished testing next month and then decide to bring it to the public as soon as possible as it is, they would still need the approvals and we the devices. Maybe in a couple of years.

      If 700Mhz has good reach and building penetration, what these 2500Mhz+ have for mobile telecommunications? Will it be like WiMAX? Maybe someone has the answers.

      Anyway, all I want to know is about Carrier Aggregation.

  • Android_God

    I love the old lady peeling her facial skin off!!