Here’s how to disable Binge On using the T-Mobile app and website

tmobilebingeon

T-Mobile’s Binge On service has been a pretty hot topic lately. While it offers free video streaming from 24 services and video optimizations for others that aim to save you data, Binge On has been the target of net neutrality concerns, YouTube has accused T-Mo of throttling its videos, and the EFF recently said that it was straight-up throttling.

T-Mobile has responded to the complaints about Binge On by saying that it doesn’t throttle videos, it “optimizes” them. It’s added that any video service can be a part of Binge On if it’d like, and any customer can enable or disable Binge On whenever they want. The thing is that Binge On was automatically enabled for all customers when it launched in November, and the steps that you need to follow to turn it off may not be easy for some folks to find.

If you’d like to disable Binge On, you can do so using the My T-Mobile app (Android or iOS) or by signing into your account on your computer. First up, I’ll detail the steps that you’ll need to follow using the My T-Mobile app.

After launching My T-Mobile, you can click Account Info.

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Then select Plans & Services.

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And scroll down and select the Add/Change Services button.

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Finally, scroll down to the Other section and tap the + button to expand it. You can tap the “Enable Binge On” button to turn the feature on or off.

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If you’d prefer to turn off Binge On using your computer, you’ll first want to log in to My T-Mobile and click PROFILE in the upper right of your screen.

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On the left side, you’ll see a Media Settings button. Click it and you’ll find a Binge On entry, and next to it is a button that you can click to turn the feature on or off.

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So there you are. It’ll definitely be interesting to see how T-Mobile responds to all of the heat that Binge On has been catching lately, but for now, you can use this guide if you want to disable the feature if you decide that you don’t want videos on your phone to be optimized.

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  • besweeet

    “The thing is that Binge On was automatically enabled for all customers when it launched in November.” As a $20 unlimited high-speed data add-on user, it was never automatically enabled for me.

    • Garblicks

      Yes it was, better go check i have the same plan and they put it on my account without my permission

    • DILAW IDDAHLA

      I thought the same thing as you, but I just checked and it was turned on. I turned it off though

      • besweeet

        It literally was never enabled for me. I only ever saw the “Enable Binge On” option.

  • Garblicks

    Personally I have the unlimited 4g lte. T-Mobile put every customer on it bcuz I saw it on my account. Why would I want 480p video when I’m paying for unlimited. Watch almost all my videos in HD. Check your account bcuz every T-Mobile customer has been getting throttled without their knowledge or consent

    • “Why would I want 480p video when I’m paying for unlimited?”

      720p and higher video requires more than a simply higher resolution display to TRULY appreciate. Phone manufacturers are all guilty of deceiving the public into thinking that higher resolution video looks just as stunning on a little 4-6″ screen as it does on an 85″ one. Apple and Samsung are the biggest offenders here IMO. They need to keep selling new phones after all.

      So the question might really be why would you want to watch any more than 480p on a small screen regardless of the capabilities of the display?

      Even with great LTE signal, the site I visit might have problems streaming for whatever reason and 480p buffers less. For those (rare in my case) times where the signal is only 3G then 480p is a better option.

      For those that were paying attention, T-Mobile informed everyone at the outset that it would be an “opt-out” feature. Of course, that didn’t please everyone. If they had done the opposite, their would simply be a different class of complainers.

      Myself, I will leave it on most of the time knowing that it’s a simple toggle switch away in my T-Mobile app or the T-Mobile website under my account. Life is too short to stand on principle for such small / silly things.

      BingeON is such a “First World Problem”. LOL.

      • kgraham182

        Do you have an unlimited high speed data plan? Higher resolution video/photo looks better period even on a 1″ screen. Do you not remember mobile video in 2000 compared to 2005 then 2010? Are you trying to say .3MP(480) video/photo looks the same .9MP(720) or 2MP (1080)photo or video.

        • Yes, I do have unlimited while my wife does not. Perhaps it is a geographic issue or hardware issue? I have an unlocked,
          non carrier branded Nexus 5 running Android 6.01 without all the OEM Control software BS.

          No, I disagree even having lived through the late 70s. Though I will accept that a minority audience either believes it’s better because the technical specs say so / marketing messages have subliminally made it seem so.

          The larger the resolution, the larger the physical size of the display needs to be and further the distance you should sit to view it properly. Hopefully, VR or Holographic projection technology improves drastically over the next decade and making physical display size more a thing of the past.

        • Rorison Meadows

          Exactly. People are relying on their psychological perceptions rather

          than physical, done to them by marketing schemes. Evidence of this is all over the internet.

        • Rorison Meadows

          Exactly. People are relying on their psychological perceptions rather
          than physical, done to them by marketing schemes. Evidence of this is all over the internet.

          All people need to do is look at “resolution worth it” charts.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          I have 2.5 GB data and I usually use around 1 – 1.3 GB a month. I watch most of my youtube videos at home (on WIFI). When I am outside, I am either at work, driving, with friends, etc. so I hardly watch videos outside. However, yesterday I received a text from a friend with a link for a youtube vid. I opened it and I was looking at the video thinking to myself “Why does the video look bad and the sound is not loud/crisp.” I checked the resolution and it was on 480. I am using a Note 4. Maybe lots of people can’t tell the difference between 480i, 720p and 1080p on their small smartphones, but I can. Although I don’t have unlimited internet, I was unhappy to find out T-Mobile turned Binge On automatically without notifying me. I turned it off, because I know even with it turned off I won’t come close to even 2.0 GB when I have 2.5 GB. I am not angry with T-Mobile for turning Binge On for me, but it would have been ethical for them to notifying me first or ask me to turn it off or on on my own. All I am saying is NOTIFY YOUR CUSTOMERS IF YOU ENROLL THEM IN ANY FEATURE EVE IF IT’S FREE

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          You know the more I think about this feature Binge On, the more I am upset with T-Mobile for turning it on for me automatically. The biggest deal with Binge On is that streaming video (on some apps) doesn’t count towards data limit or unlimited. But in my case every MB I use counts even on those apps so why turning it on for me T-Mobile??? Ohhhh, throttle me so you can add more customers or have more capacity on your network?

        • Rorison Meadows

          So leave. That’s the beauty of no contract!

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          I just turned it off. I said I am not angry to the point that I would leave, but didn’t appreciate what T-Mobile did/does without letting their customers know

        • Rorison Meadows

          Keep crying like an uber nerd. Most people don’t care about this.

        • DILAW IDDAHLA

          Some care

        • Rorison Meadows
        • kgraham182

          What that chart shows is the closer you are to the screen the higher the resolution needs to be, thanks.

        • Daniel Marchand

          Exactly, but it starts at 20″ on up… How close do you hold your phone to watch videos? If you like to hold it right in front of your face resolution differences will be noticeable, if you hold it 12″+ away probably not do much. I have a 5.5″ screen and I’m good with 480p. http://www.phonearena.com/news/Quad-HD-vs-1080p-display-resolution-can-people-actually-see-the-difference_id69856

        • Rorison Meadows

          What it’s saying is a little backwards, but I get what you’re saying. You have to be really close to tell the difference between any of them. Continue the lines to the bottom left and note how they converge.

    • Rorison Meadows

      “Why would I want 480p video when I’m paying for unlimited.”

      Maximizing quality of video for the sake of saying that it’s maximized (hardly a difference noticed) is fine, but beware if you cross the threshold of 42GB/month, you risk being throttled as a heavy user anyway. I have BingeOn enabled, don’t watch Netflix, some YouTube, but mostly Google Maps (satellite imagery) for directions and SiriusXM (included in BingeOn), I crossed the 42GB plain. Be careful for what you wish for. Never throttled though, because the 42GB was via my phone, not actual consumption considering the SiriusXM inclusion. If I had it turned off, I would have been throttled as a heavy user.

    • calvin35

      You wouldn’t, the throttling of unlimited customers is done strictly for the benefit of T-Mobile. I only hope that they are at least working as hard at building new towers and expanding their network as they are at throttling and restricting data usage of their current and future customers.

  • kgraham182

    Off my not be truly off. I still see my downlink being limited to 1.5Mbps while playing videos

    • patt

      did you reboot your phone or waited minimum of 2 hours? when I disabled it like 2 weeks ago it took like 2 hours to take effect.

      • kgraham182

        Yes I have, but that’s not required. John and co. said it’s instant. https://youtu.be/xac9tGkUtTA?t=1h24m35s

        • Android_God

          Are you like 5 years old? This how your argument appears. Maybe he misspoke? I’m sorry if he hurt you

        • kgraham182

          Maybe he misspoke when he said video services not included in BingeOn would not be throttled also.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Maybe he misspoke when he said video services not included in BingeOn would not be throttled also.

          Well that would mean that you “misheard” because that was never stated, ever.

        • calvin35

          He’s wrong. I enabled it yesterday just to see if it was as bad as i remember (it was) and i had to reboot my phone to get it to kick in. When i went to disable it i also had to reboot my phone to get it to disable.

        • patt

          it wasn’t instant for me I guess it depends :D

        • Fabian Cortez

          Exactly. The website clearly says it can take up to 2 hours (attached to the article).

  • Ontwowheels

    I am on the older 4 for $100 Simple Choice, 2.5GB each line. I didn’t think I was eligible for Binge On…but there it is, I see it both the app and when I access my account over the web. Should I leave it on or off? Don’t really watch that many videos…

    • Rorison Meadows

      I’d leave it on, TBH. Even though you don’t watch that many videos, might as well keep the data low if you do. It’s also comforting to know that you could, at any point, take advantage of the service!

    • patt

      if you are on the 2.5GB it would actually benefit you I think. You should try out any of the apps and watch some short video so you will know for sure.

      If you have hulu tosh.o has I think 20-25 min episodes to test it out.

  • Mike

    Just another example of cramming. Doesn’t matter that I’m not paying for it it was added to my account without my knowledge or permission. WithOut knowledge or permission meets the definition of cramming. TMO says if you don’t want it turn it off – how about TMO turn it off and let me decide if I want to enable it. I see a very hard road ahead for TMO unless they put control back in the hands of the customer by turning binge off at the system level and let customers voluntarily (if they want it) to turn it back on. That’s true choice…

    • Rorison Meadows

      You still have the choice, but if they didn’t enable it from the beginning, you’d just have a different set of complainers.

      • Joe

        If they turn it on automatically then they should send a message asking you if you want it not just doing it without asking.

      • John Doe

        who would those complainers be exactly and what would be their complaints?

        • Rorison Meadows

          The people that would want it on by default and expect it to work out of the package.

    • calvin35

      I agree with you but if they did that it would defeat the whole purpose of Binge On which is to throttle as many people as possible, all other aspects of Binge On are window dressing meant to distract.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Makes sense. So international roaming et al. (Music Freedom, etc.) shouldn’t have been added either?

      • John Doe

        International roaming is allowed and you have to either call or turn on the “Block international roaming”. (At least for me that is how it was) it is opt-in. You have to opt-in to block international roaming and that is how Binge On should have been, you have to Opt-in to have your videos throttled not opt out.

        • Fabian Cortez

          International roaming is allowed and you have to either call or turn on the “Block international roaming”. (At least for me that is how it was) it is opt-in. You have to opt-in to block international roaming and that is how Binge On should have been, you have to Opt-in to have your videos throttled not opt out.

          Right. So if they advertise international roaming, music freedom, etc. and people travel and can’t use them because they didn’t opt in, how many more people will complain? That’s a rhetorical question…

        • John Doe

          Can’t you read what I wrote? It is literally the first sentence.

          “International roaming is allowed…”

          You have to optin to BLOCK international roaming.

    • Jerry Rich

      What are you a twelve year old child? Quit your hissy fit and either turn the function on or off. Try to “cram” that concept into your tiny brain. I’m sure you have bigger issues to deal with.

      • John Doe

        This is coming from the person who is using insults to shutdown the argument. Good on you for being an “adult”.

        • Rorison Meadows

          Nothing wrong with that if you are acting like you have a tiny brain.

    • Android_God

      It’s not cramming but nice try. Just because you don’t like it doesn’t mean it rises to the same level as cramming.

    • Mahmoud S.

      T-Mobile is going to have to fix this themselves or they will be fined and forced to do it by the FCC.

  • Mike

    Here’s a question for the experts . I have poor signal in my area and am using a TMO personal cell spot to enhance my signal. Is this personal cell spot “optimizing” (throttling) my data when watching vids on wifi on my phone?

    • Rorison Meadows

      Is it one of those Wifi hotspots, meaning you’re just connecting to your Wifi or is it a cellular one that’s pulling internet signal from the towers instead of your own internet service. If first, no. If second, probably.

      • Adrayven

        The new Cellular LTE one uses your own home internet pugged into your router and provides LTE to anyone around you. Works well, I put one at my grandparents. And no, that one doesn’t pull from your data pool.

        Only if the signal ultimately comes from a T-Mo cell tower would it count.

        • Rorison Meadows

          I was trying to dumb it down, but yes. Wifi Cellspot = home internet, no T-Mobile; Standalone Cell Booster = T-Mobile optimization

  • Simply Solution, Disable….

    Thanks Alex, a easy and simple solution, for customers like me…

    • John Doe

      If there was no problem in the first place, we wouldn’t need a “solution”. The fact that an article had to be written about this shows everything wrong with how Binge On was implemented.

      • Again, Disable…

        Again, thanks Alex, a easy and simple solution, for Customers like me….

  • calvin35

    T-Mobile made sure to bury that deep. Thanks, i had it of already but still didn’t know how to do it myself.

    • Fabian Cortez

      T-Mobile made sure to bury that deep. Thanks, i had it of already but still didn’t know how to do it myself.

      You mean with all the other settings, right?

    • Android_God

      I don’t know that they buried it but I didn’t realize it was that easy to find. I tried to find it previously but gave up. Now I feel like a dumbass that it’s that easy to find and I didn’t find it initially.

  • Philip

    Did anyone do a test with this thing OFF and see that it is really in high speed mode and not throttle?

    • JMccovery

      On both the unlimited plan, and the 20GB family account line I have neither throttles video or downloads with BingeOn disabled.

      • patt

        20GB?

        • JMccovery

          The 4-lines, 10GB/line plan with 20GB/line upgrade.

        • patt

          Ah right I remember now +10$ for x2 data.

    • patt

      With ON: it would limit download speed to around 195 KB/s – 200 KB/s

  • ewilts

    I have the minimum 2GB per month plan. Binge On was enabled even though it does not offer unlimited video streaming – the 2GB plans are excluded. T-Mobile chose to throttle my video without my permission for no gain (other than to reduce data usage). I turned it off.

    • Android_God

      Oh jesus some of you seriously need to get over yourselves.

      • thrhea

        Seriously, tmo said it would be enabled by default and stated people could opt out even before it started. Don’t know what people are whining so much about, smh.

        • John Doe

          Because not all 63 million T-mobile customers keep up with their announcements and T-Mobile did not contact them to let them know of the changes happening to their plans so more and more people will realize what is going on and it will only get worse unless T-Mobile fixes this implementation and communication problem with Binge On.

        • Ignorance has never been an acceptable excuse (to be exempt from something even in a private sense) but that hasn’t stopped people from trying to change the reality of the situation. Take some responsibility instead of blaming private companies for your own ignorance. T-Mobile did inform the public. However, they didn’t bombard the populace with this information. Plenty didn’t even know / care until Google brought the matter to their attention.

          Not all people keep up with all the new legislation that gets passed either in any given year but that doesn’t mean people don’t have to comply with those new laws. If a government makes a reasonable attempt to inform the public there will always be people that claim they didn’t know. As much as people might wish, unlike with BingeON there’s no simple off switch for such laws. Lol.

        • John Doe

          “Plenty didn’t even know / care until Google brought the matter to their attention.”

          The fact that plenty did not know is the problem here. If you signup for a credit card and the late fee was $25 but they changed it to $50 without letting you know and you got charged a $50 late fee on a $30 balance…I am sure you would be angry. Also they would be fined for not notifying you of the change because there are consumer protection laws in place..

          The burden is not on the customer to check every change a company makes, it is on the company to inform them of any changes and for regulatory agencies to keep them in check.

          Once you sign that terms of service agreement you never go back to it unless the company asks you to agree to it again if it changed like how you have to when using Google or iTunes they always ask you to agree to it again if they make changes.

          If you don’t know the difference between the government and private companies then I really can’t help you any further.

          Google a few years back had a program called Buzz that was opt out and it would collect user location data. Many were not informed of this and the FTC fined them millions for that.

          Do you blame the “ignorant” Google users or Google for not notifying them? (Your answer to this question does not matter because the FTC answered it already)

        • Yes, the US government does indeed love to protect the lazy, stupid and the ignorant (three distinctly separate classes of people with some overlap, of course) from themselves whether they want it or not. Too much if you ask me. Lol.

          To be fair though, I am also ignorant of so much (not limited to just technology). There’s simply too much out there not to be ignorant of something. Those who believe differently are eithet lying to the world or themselves. I take personal responsibility for what I don’t know and try to freely admit my ignorance where applicable.

        • Blake

          Thats never the case. The newsroom on tmobile.com website is there for everyone to read up on. If every Tmobile person is that eager enough to know the true story about Tmobile, then why can’t they all do the extra work towards getting to a computer at home or perhaps get to a library somehow just to check to see what is going on? I call it being lazy. If people wouldnt be so lazy to where they shouldn’t expect everything to be handed to them, then people would realize that everything is simply put right infront of them to read up on. Call Tmobile and ask questions or check the newsroom feed or again just simply keep calling back for more answers its that simple. No more excuses.

        • Rorison Meadows

          It’s the same people that just go to three car stores without knowing anything but their commercials and buying the third car. American consumerism at its best. Lazy.

        • Blake

          Thats never the case. The newsroom on tmobiles website is there for everyone to read up on. If every Tmobile person is that eager enough to know the true story about Tmobile, then why can’t they all do the extra work towards getting to a computer either at home or perhaps get to a library somehow just to check to see what is going on? I call it being lazy. If people wouldnt be so lazy to where they shouldn’t expect everything to be handed to them, then people would realize that everything is simply put right infront of them to read up on. Call Tmobile and ask questions or check the newsroom feed or again just simply keep calling back for more answers its that simple. No more excuses.

        • John Doe

          Do you hear yourself?

          T-Mobile changed their ToS agreement and did not notify every customer of the changes not only is that illegal but wrong especially coming from a company that prides it self for listening to its customers.

          You know who is lazy? The people that just stay silent and let companies make decisions for them and allow themselves to be pushed around like a bunch of bags filled with money.

          The burden is not on the customer to check every change a company makes, it is on the company to inform them of any changes and for regulatory agencies to keep them in check.

        • Thorhand

          What are you talking about? T-Mobile did inform everyone that this feature would be enabled and customers can opt-out at any time. There is really no problem here. All this hype is manufactured for absolutely no reason. Are people’s lives so perfect these days that the biggest problem they want to whine about is that they are getting free throttled data? That T-Mobile did not personally call them to explain to them how this works? All of the information was available on the T-Mobile website. I agree with others that said that anyone who wanted to be an informed customer could have taken the responsibility to do so. But no….. This is America…. Where we wait for a headline that reads “Is T-Mobile violating the law and throttling your videos and screwing you over?” to go viral… And then people start to believe that there’s an issue or a cause to tweet about and a freedom that needs to be defended. When in fact, the issue is very simple… It takes less time to disable BingeOn then to complain about it.

  • Android_God

    Reading the comments below prompts me to want to buy stock in one of the leading tissue makers as well as the worlds tiniest violin manufacturers.

    • Dustin Maki

      I like you! Also I feel the same way.

    • Charlie Kim

      you’re awesome

    • Mahmoud S.

      Too late T-Mobile bought them all for when the FCC drops the hammer :)

  • Sushimane

    Seems like this doesnt apply to legacy plan holders like myself. I got the select choice plan.

  • Nate

    I thought about disabling Binge On and then remembered we were getting Sling TV discounted and a $4 per month credit to Vudu for having it enabled. I can then enjoy this media on our large screen TV in full HD as an alternative to watching it on my tiny phone.