Binge On criticisms continue with EFF report that says T-Mobile’s service is ‘just throttling’

BingeOnLogoLarge

Binge On has been the target of a lot of criticism lately, most notably from YouTube, which said that T-Mobile was “throttling all video services” on its network. Now another big report has come out that condemns T-Mo’s big Un-carrier move.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation today published a new report on Binge on that says that, despite T-Mobile’s claims to the contrary, Binge On is throttling. The EFF conducted several tests using a T-Mobile phone that had a strong 4G LTE connection and measured the throughput. The tests included streaming an HTML5 video on a web page, downloading a video to an SD card, downloading a video with a file name that didn’t indicate that it was a video, and downloading a large file that wasn’t a video. Each test was conducted twice: once with HTTP on so that T-Mo could see the file being accessed, and once over HTTPS so that T-Mo couldn’t see the content.

In its testing, the EFF found that T-Mobile throttled all video streams to a speed of approximately 1.5Mbps, regardless of the connection that the phone had and what video was being played. That includes both videos being streamed and videos being downloaded to the phone to be viewed later. The EFF says that T-Mobile’s Binge On doesn’t actually change the video being served to the user in any way. T-Mobile is just slowing the throughput to 1.5Mbps, and if the server doesn’t have a way of adapting and lowering the quality of the video, the user will see stuttering.

The EFF also found that T-Mo is slowing the connection of downloads that aren’t obviously video. When asked if T-Mobile is looking at files more deeply than HTTP headers, it said that it does have ways to detect attributes specific to videos that don’t involve looking at the content itself.

effbingeontesting

In response to the EFF’s report, T-Mobile confirmed that it does not optimize the video streams beyond reducing the bandwidth. The ball is then in the court of the video provider to respond and serve up a video that will work with the reduced bandwidth. And as I mentioned before, if the provider doesn’t adapt, the user sees stuttered video.

This EFF report is a pretty big knock against Binge On. On paper, the service sounds great because it’ll let you use your high-speed data on things other than streaming video. As I’ve said before, though, T-Mobile should not have automatically enabled Binge On for everyone. It does say on the Binge On product page that “Binge On is automatically enabled so your data will stretch 3 times further when you are streaming video” and that it optimizes “almost all other video streaming” outside of the 24 services with free Binge On streaming. However, I’ve seen a lot of people wondering why their YouTube videos are low quality. If T-Mobile made Binge On opt-in rather than opt-out, then only folks that are actively seeking the “optimizations” that Binge On offers would get them. Then perhaps there wouldn’t be as many people using Binge On, though, which would mean less data savings for T-Mo.

Given all of the brouhaha that’s surrounding Binge On, which includes YouTube’s complaint, today’s report, and an FCC inquiry, it’s starting to feel like T-Mobile is going to have to respond in a meaningful way. It’s certainly going to be interesting to see what happens in the coming weeks.

Source: EFF

Tags: , , , ,

  • J.J.

    Took me a while to figure out why 1440 YouTube videos were unwatchable. Once I figured it out I was a bit perturbed that they would include most video services not included in binge on plus automatically enable it on my unlimited plan. It is a great service for those who need it but to use it to throttle unknowing unlimited users is bad practice. Plus if some cant figure out the reason their videos buffer they may just assume the network Sucks and switch carriers

    • Agreed. Good service for some and a great option to have. Terrible to force on people. And they simply should NOT be throttling ANY video outside of those 24 services, unless they want to offer that as an additional option (defaulted to OFF).

      And this should have NEVER been enabled for unlimited customers. That’s just a cheap money-grab.

      • UKTK8

        I’m sure by opting everyone in from the get go, it improved the network since they throttled everyone.

        In essence, making their network seem better than it really is by using smoke and mirrors. Not because they are actually improving their coverage and network….

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’m sure by opting everyone in from the get go, it improved the network since they throttled everyone.

          In essence, making their network seem better than it really is by using smoke and mirrors. Not because they are actually improving their coverage and network….

          How does improving coverage actually affect congestion and data speed?

          Are you suggesting that T-Mobile is lying about their network coverage and instead used Binge On to somehow cover more POPs? Can you also explain how they have the fastest LTE network in the country? After all, “smoke and mirrors” cannot fool a third party (Ookla).

      • Fabian Cortez

        Terrible to force on people.

        Which “people?” The small percentage of those who notice the difference? Because these same people are very well capable of figuring out how to turn it off. Yes, it’s optional. Albeit enabled by default.

        And they simply should NOT be throttling ANY video outside of those 24 services, unless they want to offer that as an additional option (defaulted to OFF).

        It has been clear from the beginning that even if you do not benefit from the zero-data rating, that you could benefit by having your data go further with Binge On enabled.

        Again, it’s optional.

        • Forced on any person who doesn’t want it and wasn’t previously having their bandwidth throttled. Which means ANY YouTube user. That’s a whole hell of a lot of people. Don’t act like this only affects a few people – if you think that then you clearly don’t understand what’s going on or the magnitude of it.
          I’m a big T-Mobile fan but this was a mistake. And that’s okay as long as they admit it and correct things instead of pretending like this is not the case and covering it up.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Forced on any person who doesn’t want it and wasn’t previously having their bandwidth throttled. Which means ANY YouTube user. That’s a whole hell of a lot of people. Don’t act like this only affects a few people – if you think that then you clearly don’t understand what’s going on or the magnitude of it.

          It only affects the vocal few. If not, there’d be more outrage, just like all the stories that came out about Sprint and their 600 kbps indiscriminate video throttle that was not optional.

          I’m a big T-Mobile fan but this was a mistake. And that’s okay as long as they admit it and correct things instead of pretending like this is not the case and covering it up.

          I don’t care for throttling at all. Except when it’s used to avoid overages. But this is optional. If you don’t like it, turn it off.

  • D_Wall__

    TMobile was on such a good track. I hope this isnt true. While i enjoy Binge on, I enjoy my raw speed provided.

    • Fabian Cortez

      You. Can. Turn. It. Off.

      • TK – Indy

        It. Shouldn’t. Have. Been. On. In. The. First. Place.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It. Shouldn’t. Have. Been. On. In. The. First. Place.

          Right. Just like that wonderful 600 kbps video throttle that you could not turn off over at Sprint, right?

          Or the MMS and website compression that goes on today, right?

          If anyone wants to be up in arms about something, it should be that…

        • John Doe

          At least sprint’s CEO had the balls to remove that clause after his customers were pissed about it and John Legere made fun of him about it to but here we are.

        • John Doe

          Proof? Where is the proof? Defamation!!!

          Sprint’s CEO actually removed that clause for the 600kbps cap after people complained and even John Legere made fun of him but here we are now.

  • peharri

    Well, if that’s all there is to it, then that’s depressing. There’s not a whole lot video providers who do not use rate-adapting streaming protocols (RTxP, DASH, HLS, etc) can do to fit in with how T-Mo is doing things. Perhaps YouTube will be forced to switch to HTTPS for actual video delivery?

    Previous statements from T-Mobile have suggested, but not clearly stated, that they’re recompressing streamed content, not throttling. They’ve been very specific, even claiming that their system results in 480p videos (which throttling doesn’t, throttling just encourages a resolution downgrade.)

    As I wrote in the comments for the last article, I’d like T-Mobile to be up front and specific about what it is they’re doing. And I’ll add to that that it’s time they were also consistent with Binge-On – if the tradeoff is really quality vs price, then that trade off should be everywhere. If they’re going to throttle videos on my blog, or YouTube, or anyone else, they need to zero rate them just as they have Hulu, Netflix, et al.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Actually, T-Mobile’s statements have been that they’re not touching the stream of the Binge On participants.

      • TK – Indy

        No, just throttling them like crazy, no packet interference is necessary for that.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, just throttling them like crazy, no packet interference is necessary for that.

          Here, try comprehending what I stated above. I’ll quote myself for you:

          Actually, T-Mobile’s statements have been that they’re not touching the stream of the Binge On participants.

      • peharri

        Whether they at one point did or not is immaterial: they’ve said explicitly they’re not throttling YouTube or anyone else. http://www.tmonews.com/2015/12/t-mobile-says-youtubes-description-of-binge-on-as-throttling-is-misleading/

        • Fabian Cortez

          Correct.

          So is the Earth flat because we only perceive it that way?

          After all, they’re perceiving a throttle.

        • peharri

          I’m struggling to make sense of your comment. The EFF has proven, conclusively, that they are actually throttling. That the data is untouched and that it’s simply streamed at a lower speed. You’re arguing that they’re not because…. what?

          What is the legitimate reason to believe that T-Mobile are not throttling when the unimpeachable evidence shows they are?

          This isn’t saying the Earth is flat because it looks that way. It’s saying the Earth is Round because someone’s actually done the experiments, made numerous scientifically valid observations, and concluded that a spherical Earth easily fits the available data and a flat Earth doesn’t.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’m struggling to make sense of your comment. The EFF has proven, [u]conclusively[/u], that they are actually throttling. That the data is untouched and that it’s simply streamed at a lower speed. You’re arguing that they’re not because…. what?

          No they have not.

          Essentially, the EFF is putting their glasses on and saying “look, the Earth is flat” and then taking their glasses off and stating it’s not flat. Therefore, with these special glasses on, the world is flat. When the reality of the situation is that the Earth is never flat.

          The same thing applies here: we don’t know anything about T-Mobile’s optimization. Therefore, to say it’s throttling because that’s what it appears to be, with the option enabled, is shortsighted.

          What is the legitimate reason to believe that T-Mobile are not throttling when the unimpeachable evidence shows they are?

          Because you don’t know what type of optimization they’re using. Likewise, there are other services that are part of Binge On that T-Mobile doesn’t touch. And finally, because the EFF only tested their hand-selected video on using their own server.

          This isn’t saying the Earth is flat because it looks that way. It’s saying the Earth is Round because someone’s actually done the experiments, made numerous scientifically valid observations, and concluded that a spherical Earth easily fits the available data and a flat Earth doesn’t.

          Hardly.

          This is akin to running the speed test app and seeing slow speeds and claiming T-Mobile is throttling them. While possibly true, another end result could be that the user is experience deprioritization due to a congested cell site.

          The 1.5 Mbps “throttle” could just be the end result of T-Mobile’s optimization and not necessarily a direct and “evil” throttle as many want to claim.

          Oh, and you can turn it off.

  • kevev

    They are throttling everything for unlimited users with bingeon turned off here in San Antonio. Seems like Us unlimited users are getting double screwed. :(

    • Fabian Cortez

      They are throttling everything for unlimited users with bingeon turned off here in San Antonio. Seems like Us unlimited users are getting double screwed. :(

      Do you have any evidence of this or are you just experiencing congestion and improperly affixing a label?

      • John Doe

        That is not your Job unless you are a T-Mobile rep?

        • Fabian Cortez

          That is not your Job unless you are a T-Mobile rep?

          People tend to change the narrative when they lack facts.

        • John Doe

          Commenters who defend a company so enthusiastically and spread good PR for them tend to be paid by them or worse they are fanboys.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Commenters who defend a company so enthusiastically and spread good PR for them tend to be paid by them or worse they are fanboys.

          Sure, until then, come back with your facts here on TmoNews.

        • John Doe

          :-P

        • Or we just think it’s a good idea? Hell Sprint tried to do the same thing last Summer, but they forgot the all important opt-out option. Big difference.

        • John Doe

          People were not complaining about not having an opt-out option they were complaining about the fact it existed on an “unlimited plan” and Sprint’s CEO ended up removing it.

      • kevev

        Wow it got hot in here all the sudden. :p

        Fabian I have 10 T-Mobile lines with Unlimited everything. Some on different accounts in and around San Antonio. All lines noticed slowdowns on everything including streaming video, music,MMS, browsing web pages. This might be because of the spectrum swap between AT&T & T-Mobile. Not really sure though.

  • Irfan

    its happened to me , but tmo comments some one guide me and i am good to go , just turn off the binge on service from your online account , but too many firewalls make this service slower ….Tmo really made things difficult ……

  • jonathan3579

    This is pretty damning for T-Mobile’s argument of “just optimizing” and not throttling.

    • Fabian Cortez

      This is pretty damning for T-Mobile’s argument of “just optimizing” and not throttling.

      What was your understanding of “just optimizing” then? Surely you didn’t think T-Mobile was transcoding the video.

      • Requesting 480p content, much like a mobile website would load instead of a desktop one. At full LTE speeds, not slowed down.

        • jonathan3579

          You took the words right out of my mouth. :)

        • Fabian Cortez

          That sounds good but there are real-world things like congestion.

          Also, you’re forgetting that T-Mobile controls their network. Much like the tethering debacle, they know what traffic is being handled and transmitted. Hence the reason they were able to include Verizon’s Go90 without needing their participation.

          Simply changing headers in the HTTP traffic isn’t going to fool Binge On’s filters/trigger.

        • I’m not. I’m simply defining what “mobile optimization” entails, versus “throttling” or “network management” or other terms.

          Sure, T-Mobile controls its network, but it also has to follow rules.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’m not. I’m simply defining what “mobile optimization” entails, versus “throttling” or “network management” or other terms.

          Sure, T-Mobile controls its network, but it also has to follow rules.

          And these are the rules that you don’t understand. The rules for wireless are different than the rules for wired.

          What applies to Comcast et al. doesn’t necessarily apply to AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon.

        • John Doe

          Actually they are all classified as Title II common carriers and the FCC can regulate them all the same if it chooses to.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Actually the are all classified as Title II common carriers and the FCC can regulate them all the same if it chooses too.

          Sure. But in the real world, there’s something called “zero rating.”

          Let us all know when you understand the case-by-case evaluation.

        • TK – Indy

          No, it’s called some are zero and some are not rating, and it is illegal, and will be stopped.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, it’s called some are zero and some are not rating, and it is illegal, and will be stopped.

          Okay. But only after your tantrum.

        • John Doe

          They are called complaints not tantrums. That is why the FCC has them so they can listen to people’s complaints.

        • John Doe

          Submit a FCC complaint so they get the message before the meeting with T-Mobile on the 15th. I am sure Tom wheeler read what Youtube and the EFF have said but also messages from customers helps.

        • John Doe

          In the real world zero rating services were not evaluated by the FCC because they did not have the power to do so but now they will be with the FCC already starting to question carriers about them on the 15th.

          Let us all know when you get with the news.

        • Fabian Cortez

          In the real world zero rating services were not evaluated by the FCC because they did not have the power to do but now they will be with the FCC already starting to question carriers about them on the 15th.

          Let us all know when you get with the news.

          Sure.

          In the meantime, still waiting on that proof of yours.

        • John Doe

          What proof is that exactly do you want? Who are you? I don’t owe you any proof Lmao

        • Fabian Cortez

          What proof is that exactly do you want? Who are you? I don’t owe you any proof Lmao

          And again…

        • John Doe

          and again…?

        • Actually… not WIRELESS carriers?

      • calvin35

        I actually thought it meant that video from non participating services would be optimized based on network congestion(480p during times of high congestion and higher during less congested times). Looks like i was wrong. Of course i did have to guess since T-Mobile went out of their way to make it as unclear as possible.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I actually thought it meant that video from non participating services would be optimized based on network congestion(480p during times of high congestion and higher during less congested times). Looks like i was wrong. Of course i did have to guess since T-Mobile went out of their way to make it as unclear as possible.

          And how would they do that if they did not have participation from content provider? You didn’t expect them to throw up services across the country that do nothing but transcode did you?

  • I couldn’t care less about the arguments on neutrality, as if it were a new canon against which everything was measured. However, T-Mobile does seem to have forced its hand with Binge On and ended up introducing a pain point on its customers and it’s not very uncarrier. The suggestions posed by EFF, to make it opt in or to throttle only those services that do not count against the data cap, seem more sensible.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Where are all of these people and their paint points?

      The only loud mouths going on about this all seems to be organizations, corporations, and the few jealous fourth place carrier subs.

      • John Doe

        Nope, I am a T-Mobile customer and I submitted a complaint to the FCC. Also this affects the content providers that are not part of Binge On first since they can’t show their content the way it is supposed to for T-Mobile customers with Binge On activated (which is all of them since it is opt-out).

        • Fabian Cortez

          Nope, I am a T-Mobile customer and I submitted a complaint to the FCC. Also this affects the content providers that are not part of Binge On first since they can’t show their content the way it is supposed to for T-Mobile customers with Binge On activated (which is all of them since it is opt-out).

          You also don’t know what you’re talking about.

          The world must be such a rough place for you. Oh the poor content providers. What about the consumers? Why don’t you take your fight and redirect it at the duopoly and their overages?

          Or better yet, aim your crosshairs at Sprint. After all, they’re cheating every single website as they “since they can’t show their content the way it is supposed to for Sprint customers with any service plan (which is all of them since there is no option to opt out of media compression).

        • John Doe

          Well, someone is hurt. You should get some ice for that. Until then I will calmly wait for the FCC’s response but thanks for your angrily input.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Well, someone is hurt. You should get some ice for that. Until then I will calmly wait for the FCC’s response but thanks for your angrily input.

          Yes, have a seat. I’m glad to see that your crusade for the content providers was a sham. If not, you’d be on your soap box about Sprint and the disservice they provide their subs. by degrading the image quality of every single website and MMS.

        • TK – Indy

          Article is not about Sprint, and those practices were stopped there when the net neutrality rules were implemented. Get current, Mr. Cortez.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Article is not about Sprint, and those practices were stopped there when the net neutrality rules were implemented. Get current, Mr. Cortez.

          Stay original kirt.

          Sprint most definitely continues to compress MMS and websites without their users’ ability to turn it off. Go cry to the FCC about that.

        • John Doe

          At least I don’t see the world through magenta colored shades. Have a nice day and thanks for your unbiased opinions /s

        • Fabian Cortez

          At least I don’t see the world through magenta colored shades. Have a nice day and thanks for your unbiased opinions /s

          Ah, the classic “at least I don’t…”

          Still no proof it seems.

        • John Doe

          :P

  • AS118

    Binge-on should’ve been made opt-in and the author is right. It’s a nice idea in principle, but only if it’s opt-in and doesn’t affect other kinds of downloads and streaming.

    Plus, users should be able to have more transparent and granular control over it. What does and doesn’t get throttled and why. Plus, T-mo should work with providers to make sure they have optimized content for binge-on, whether it’s 480p stuff or something else.

    • Fabian Cortez

      The only “people” with pitchforks in their hands about Binge On seem to be corporations and organizations. Yet the FCC chairman praised it.

      Things that make you go “hmm.”

      • It would be greatly innovative if it were just a network management solution as it was originally billed. It’s not good because they’re also specifically slowing down video traffic in addition, which is clearly not OK.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It is a network management solution. From the onset, all video would be subject to Binge On unless you opted out.

          It’s funny how YouTube and others never complained about carriers charging overages or limiting video before. No, what did YouTube do at AT&T’s and Apple’s “request?” Simply limit quality changes to Wi-Fi only and cap cellular quality to less then 480p (how embarrassing) on the iPhone.

        • Youtube is free to make whatever decisions they want to if they feel it would improve their users’ experience.

          Specifically treating one type of data differently (e.g. video) goes against net neutrality by definition, and therefore needs to be handled appropriately.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Youtube is free to make whatever decisions they want to if they feel it would improve their users’ experience.

          And now look like a bunch of hypocrites when it comes to waiving their arms in the air over Binge On.

          It sounds like they’re angry because they may want a cut that T-Mobile’s not giving to anyone. Which, by the way, would be a violation of net neutrality…

          Specifically treating one type of data differently (e.g. video) goes against net neutrality by definition, and therefore needs to be handled appropriately

          No. And that’s why you’re not getting this and why the FCC chairman praised this. There’s a difference between wired and wireless data.

        • It sounds like Youtube is angry because they’re being throttled, you mean… and then people might blame the stuttering video they’re getting on Youtube instead of on T-Mobile… which is kind of the whole point. How is that hypocritical?

          The FCC Chairman’s praise was for the strategy, not the implementation. T-Mobile didn’t say they were going to throttle, they said they were going to optimize. There’s a difference between throttling and optimizing.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It sounds like Youtube is angry because they’re being throttled, you mean… and then people might blame the stuttering video they’re getting on Youtube instead of on T-Mobile… which is kind of the whole point. How is that hypocritical?

          How can YouTube be angry when they’ve been throttling every single iPhone user since 2007 over the cellular network? It was only until recently that their app on iOS allowed a quality change over cellular.

          And again, the irony because Binge On is optional.

          The FCC Chairman’s praise was for the strategy, not the implementation. T-Mobile didn’t say they were going to throttle, they said they were going to optimize. There’s a difference between throttling and optimizing.

          Now you’re hairsplitting.

          T-Mobile made is very clear about “DVD quality”/”480p+.” There are no ifs, ands, or buts about that.

          You’re reaching.

        • TK – Indy

          No, not at all, you are being contrary to logic and the facts present. They are throttling all video by default, traffic can’t be differentiated because of content unless for network management, and T-mobile is simply trying to make room in its oversold spectrum portfolio for a few more $95/mo unlimited users. It is illegal, and will be stopped.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, not at all, you are being contrary to logic and the facts present. They are throttling all video by default, traffic can’t be differentiated because of content unless for network management, and T-mobile is simply trying to make room in its oversold spectrum portfolio for a few more $95/mo unlimited users. It is illegal, and will be stopped.

          Now you’re a broken record.

          Content is absolutely being differentiated. Play close attention to the direct download and the video without extension and header manipulation.

          That proves that T-Mobile knows exactly what’s video and what’s not.

          Oh and, you can turn it off.

          You, on the other hand, cannot turn off your MMS and website compression. Tell me, how to TmoNews look compressed on that 70 Mbps connection of yours?

        • Doing something doesn’t mean you’re not mad about it. Limiting high quality to WiFi is a strategy employed by many apps since they recognize the reality that most people do not have unlimited data. It’s not all at AT&T’s bidding, trust me. For many devs, it never even occurs to them that people would WANT to use more data. (see: enabling user streaming in many Twitter apps over LTE regardless of Android/iOS, watching high quality videos in many apps, etc)

          Again… it’s optional, but it’s opt-out. For someone who discovers this through slowed down video without being aware that Binge On is responsible for this, the damage is done. And furthermore, this should not be occurring in the first place.

          It’s not hairsplitting to say that there’s a difference between throttling and optimizing. There is. One has to do with quantity. The other has to do with rate. It makes a difference whether you can download a 200MB SD episode in 16 seconds or 16 minutes. It’s okay to give you the 200MB instead of the 700MB if you want it, and hey, added benefit: it’s free if it’s from one of those 24 providers! If not, then hey, you saved 500 MB from your monthly cap. What’s NOT OK is to have to wait much, much longer because T-Mobile decides to slow this data down (and going against net neutrality throttling rules, as already established with Verizon Wireless: https://www.techdirt.com/blog/wireless/articles/20150814/08521831943/verizon-quietly-backs-off-throttling-unlimited-wireless-customers-only-after-it-no-longer-matters.shtml).

  • Matt

    Others have noted that even with Binge On turned off, Netflix videos play at 480p. I’ve noticed this myself. This isn’t good news for the uncarrier movement.

    • Medion

      That’s likely on Netflix. They don’t certify every mobile device for HD. While some smartphones will do 1080p, others are limited to 720p or even 480p, even if they have a 1080p or greater display resolution.

      I’ll test after work if I remember to.

      • Matt

        My phone is 720p capable.

        • Medion

          Of course it is. I don’t doubt that. Mine is 1080p. But Netflix only plays at 480p except on specific devices, regardless of the phone’s capability.

        • Matt

          Okay, I wasn’t aware of that.

        • Medion

          Testing not warranted, got the info from the Netflix help site.

          https://help.netflix.com/en/node/23939

          “Resolution:

          Android phones and tablets currently support streaming in 480p.

          Netflix HD playback is available on select Android devices. See our “Netflix in HD” tab for more information.”

          And then you simply click the Netflix in HD tab to see if your device is supported. In fact, it;s a short list, to here it is:

          Netflix is available in HD on the Android tablets below.
          Note: Devices must run the latest firmware for HD playback to work properly.

          Dell Venue 8 7840 (Requires Android 5.0+)

          Google Nexus 7 2013

          Google Pixel C

          Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro (YT3-X90F, YT3-X90L)

          Nvidia Shield Portable

          Nvidia Shield Tablet

          Nvidia Shield Tablet K1

          Nvidia Tegra Note 7

          Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 (SM-T700, SM-T701, SM-T702, SM-T705, SM-T707)*

          Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 (SM-T800, SM-T801, SM-T802, SM-T805, SM-T807)*

          Samsung Galaxy View (SM-T670, SM-T677, SM-T677A, SM-T677V)

          Netflix is available in HD on the Android phones below.
          Note: Devices must run the latest firmware for HD playback to work properly.

          Google Nexus 6

          Google Nexus 5X

          Google Nexus 6P

          HTC One A9 (One A9U)

          LG G3 (D850, D851, D855, LS990, US990, VS985)

          Motorola DROID Turbo (XT1254)

          Motorola Moto X 2014 (XT1092, XT1093, XT1095, XT1096, XT1097)

          Samsung Galaxy Note 4 (SM-N910A, SM-N910P, SM-N910T, SM-N910V, SM-N910R4)

          Samsung Galaxy Note 5 (SM-N920C, SM-N9208, SM-N920I, SM-N920G, SM-N920A, SM-N920W8, SM-N920T, SM-N920V, SM-N920P, SM-N920R4, SM-N920R6, SM-N920R7)

          Samsung Galaxy S6 (SM-G920T, SM-G920T1, SM-G920P, SM-G920R6, SM-G920R7, SM-G920R4, SM-G920V, SM-G920I, SM-G920F, SM-G9208, SM-G920W8, SM-G920A, SM-G920AZ)

          Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge (SM-G925T, SM-G925P, SM-G925R6, SM-G925R7, SM-G925R4, SM-G925V, SM-G925I, SM-G925F, SM-G9250, SM-G925W8, SAMSUNG-SM-G925A)

          Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ (SM-G928F, SM-G928C, SM-G9287C, SM-G928I, SM-G928G, SM-G928A, SM-G928W8, SM-G928T, SM-G928V, SM-G928P, SM-G928R4)

        • Medion

          I had a reply here with the list of devices approved by Netflix for >480p, but apparently one of our moderators is up to their old tricks. There was nothing inappropriate or offensive in that one…

          Basically, go to the Netflix help site and check for Android 480p, then look for your device on the HD certified list.

        • Fabian Cortez

          She does have a life you know…

        • Medion

          She usually only moderates posts that reply to your inflammatory insults, while letting you entirely off the hook (I know I’ll be slapped for that, but worth it. Truth hurts).

        • Fabian Cortez

          That is a negative.

          There are plenty of conversations on here that get out of hand, without me, that she moderates.

          She has also moderated something I’ve said to someone before.

          There are no favorites here, but we all know who the trolls are.

  • Cam Fas

    Great so basically now since I’m on unlimited I should turn it off. Ughhhhh that’s why my stuff stutters. Being throttled before the 23 gig soft cap. I suppose now there is no reason to leave it on.

  • TK – Indy

    So this shows clearly that Legere lied to his customers.

    • Ordeith

      It wouldn’t be the first time…
      Or the last.

    • calvin35

      I completely agree, they’re throttling direct downloads as well, even non video files. Their network must be in more trouble than most people are aware of. As a T-Mobile unlimited customer the desperation of these actions had mea little concerned.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Where is your evidence that they’re throttling direct downloads?

        • John Doe

          Check the EFF report and if you can’t read look at the chart…beyond that i can’t help you.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Check the EFF report and if you can’t read look at the chart…beyond that i can’t help you.

          Yes, go look at the chart.

          But since you have a comprehension issue, I’ll approximate the difference between the two tests: ~1.1 Mbps.

          Nasty, nasty T-Mobile for that evil ~1.1 Mbps throttle.

          Come back when you understand the variances involved with wireless.

        • John Doe

          LoL you really can’t read?

        • Fabian Cortez

          LoL you really can’t read?

          I can read just fine.

          But can you comprehend what you read?

        • John Doe

          No you really can’t. Ask the 5th grader that is reading this to you to have a break I am sure they are tired.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No you really can’t ask the 5th grader that is reading this to you to have a break I am sure they are tired.

          Sounds good. But I still don’t see any facts from you.

          All I’m seeing are a bunch of red herrings.

        • John Doe

          :-)

        • Fabian Cortez

          :-)

          And there it is. Proof of intentional trolling.

          Thanks for that!

        • John Doe

          You’re welcome.

        • Sure, for a congested market like where EFF conducted the tests, it makes sense. I myself, however, receive upwards of 70+ Mbps regularly. That ~68.5 Mbps throttle would be quite significant to anyone that is opted in.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sure, for a congested market like where EFF conducted the tests, it makes sense. I myself, however, receive upwards of 70+ Mbps regularly. That ~68.5 Mbps throttle would be quite significant to anyone that is opted in.

          We’re not talking about the video, which was clearly mentioned from day one with respect to Binge On.

          We’re talking about the direct download that wasn’t video. That has a variation of ~1.1 Mbps. Which is negligible in a wireless speed test.

        • That is LITERALLY the most unproblematic part of this entire study. No one is saying T-Mobile is throttling normal traffic as part of Binge On. -_-

        • Fabian Cortez

          That is LITERALLY the most unproblematic part of this entire study. No one is saying T-Mobile is throttling normal traffic as part of Binge On. -_-

          Yes, people are…

        • …really?

        • Fabian Cortez

          …really?

          Read the comments. And yes, I get your issue.

          But like I’ve repeated: it can be turned off with ease.

        • If anyone is saying that’s the issue, then they’re missing the point. That doesn’t mean that you can use their comments as a straw man for the issue of Binge On violating net neutrality, though. The issue remains that T-Mobile is bundling the throttling with the optimization, instead of treating video data normally.

        • Fabian Cortez

          If anyone is saying that’s the issue, then they’re missing the point. That doesn’t mean that you can use their comments as a straw man for the issue of Binge On violating net neutrality, though. The issue remains that T-Mobile is bundling the throttling with the optimization, instead of treating video data normally.

          And that’s the difference. Just like deprioritization.

          Just because it appears to be throttling doesn’t mean it is.

          Maybe you should try setting up a server and see what happens.

        • If all video is being downloaded more slowly, what does that make it to you?

  • That pretty much squares away with my experience *before* BingeOn. Playing video would cause massive stuttering on 4G, but as soon as I quit, speeds were back to normal. Strangely enough, *since* BingeOn, I’ve actually had far fewer problems and haven’t really noticed too much change in quality.

    • Fabian Cortez

      It’d be interesting to know who’s scratching the EFF’s back as of late…

      • John Doe

        “It’d be interesting to know who’s scratching [Fabian Cortez’s] back as of late…”

        • Fabian Cortez

          “It’d be interesting to know who’s scratching the [Fabian Cortez’s] back as of late…”

          This is not about me.

          Please keep up.

        • John Doe

          It is about you. You are obviously biased and replying to almost every comment here that is against what T-Mobile has done so your intensions are as questionable as T-Mobile’s. At least you can grasp the meaning of that saying.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It is about you. You are obviously biased and replying to almost every comment here that is against what T-Mobile has done so your intensions are as questionable as T-Mobile. At least you can grasp the meaning of that saying.

          No, it’s not about it me. This article has nothing to do with me.

          The mistake you’re making is making it about me. Seek some help before it becomes an obsession.

        • John Doe

          You made the comment section about you by making sure you are the loudest on here and spreading your biased opinions.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You made the comment section about you by making sure you are the loudest on here and spreading your biased opinions.

          Yet you sought me out and continue to reply to me unsolicited. Funny how you’ve managed to make this and turn this into something about me.

          I’ll repeat: it’s not about me.

        • John Doe

          unsolicited? you replying to every comment disagreeing with your views on T-Mobile is unsolicited.

  • Mark

    I just don’t get the criticism. I am enjoying Netflix and Hulu on my subway ride home, viewing GBs of data for free. Like the free overseas data that lured me back to T-Mo, this has improved my quality of life by a lot, and it seems that all these people who I normally agree with, want to take it away. Why? If you succeed, I’ll have to pay just as much for these elusive Mom & Pop video operations as I would before, and I’ll have to pay for Netflix and Hulu too.

    So I won’t pay for any of them. Period. Why does this make your world better?

    • OK, that’s fine, and it’s great that you enjoy the benefits. It’s just that those videos download more slowly, which should not be happening. It’s nice as a perk, but it currently acts like a limitation, which is made especially more troublesome since it’s opt-out and the setting is buried on their website.

      • Phone Guy

        Then turn it off. Done. Don’t complain and let the rest of us have it. The opt out should not be the other way.

        • John Doe

          It exactly should be the other way it should be opt-in. Google was fined millions by the FTC for having a opt out feature that collected location data it is time for T-mobile to be fined as well. That reminds me, I will submit an FTC complaint as well along with my FCC complaint.

        • Okay. Also fine. You can still have it. Just that everyone should be able to have it without the throttling. No reason to wait for a video to buffer for minutes when seconds will do better. That’s just wasting your battery life and making you wait longer.

        • calvin35

          …. And saving T-Mobile buckets and buckets of data. I’m guessing that for larger files alot of people will start watching the movie and won’t finish it. Seems like by slowing down the download speed T-Mobile would be causing alot less stress on their network. If that makes sense.

        • Exactly so. It works out nicely for T-Mobile if you quit in the middle, but not so nicely for the user.

    • John Doe

      Why would they take it away? If this was opt-in from the first place there would not be any issue since you CHOOSE to go and sign up for it but enabling it for everyone is WRONG.

  • YABD

    I turned bingeon off the same day it came out, I like to see videos the way were intended.

    • Phone Guy

      If you like to see the way it was intended, watch it on a big screen. It was not intended in the first place to be viewed on a small screen over a mobile network. Funny. I like to see videos the way they were intended. I guess when you go to the movies and they have improved the quality of an old movie, you ask the projectionist to lower the quality back to the way it was intended. SMART.

      • John Doe

        Funny are you the producer or director of all of the videos out there? Because if the director decided to release a video to be watched at 4K on that new Sony Z5 then that it is how they were intended to be watched. This goes for 2K, 1080P, etc.

  • besweeet

    I don’t understand the criticism… It just sounds like Binge On at work. Want better quality video? Turn it off. It was said since day one that, for services not white listed, videos would be optimized or restricted to limit data usage.

    • TK – Indy

      This was a lie, there is no optimization, only a hard-capped throttle and all the negative experiences that produces. Legere lied.

      • besweeet

        Maybe limiting video bandwidth is all they’re doing for optimization? Makes sense.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I guess mobile-optimized websites and video are considered throttling as well.

          I agree with you: much ado about nothing when it’s optional.

        • Mobile-optimized means it’s smaller. Throttled means it downloads more slowly.

        • Fabian Cortez

          If you think the EFF and other subs. enrolled in Binge On are streaming 1440p (or any other stream above 480p) at 1.5 Mbps then you’re confused about what’s going on.

        • No, I’m saying that T-Mobile is within their rights to request optimized content from a provider (just like a mobile version of a site), but not to slow down that traffic. “Slowly” = rate, not time.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, I’m saying that T-Mobile is within their rights to request optimized content from a provider (just like a mobile version of a site), but not to slow down that traffic. “Slowly” = rate, not time.

          Again, this is an optional service that counts nothing toward the bandwidth you pay for.

          Complaining about something that is free and does not count against what you pay for seems like it won’t hold any water.

          Time will tell.

        • Yes, I understand that. But the main point here is the throttling. That’s the whole issue. Binge On itself is not the issue. 480p video is not the issue. Getting something for free is not the issue (legally). Getting something arbitrarily slowed down is the issue.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yes, I understand that. But the main point here is the throttling. That’s the whole issue. Binge On itself is not the issue. 480p video is not the issue. Getting something for free is not the issue (legally). Getting something arbitrarily slowed down is the issue.

          For the last time: It’s a free option.

          Now if the non video file was being throttled, that would be a problem. Contrary to how it looks (~1.1 Mbps difference), it’s not being throttled.

      • Fabian Cortez

        This was a lie, there is no optimization, only a hard-capped throttle and all the negative experiences that produces. Legere lied.

        Can you prove there was a lie? As besweeet clearly stated, this lower quality video, no matter what video source, was always part of Binge On. If you don’t like it, you can turn it off.

        Unlike that 600 kbps limit another carrier planned on imposing without being able to opt out.

        This sounds like nothing more but convenient trolling from you.

        • Medion

          Sprint only reneged on the 600kbps throttle when they realized that they couldn’t deliver sustained speeds that fast.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sprint only reneged on the 600kbps throttle when they realized that they couldn’t deliver sustained speeds that fast.

          That’s a good one!

        • TK – Indy

          I get 70mbps unlimited on Sprint, for much less than T-mobile charges, with far better coverage.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I get 70mbps unlimited on Sprint, for much less than T-mobile charges, with far better coverage.

          Sure, that’s what all the Sprint people say when they coalesce around the only Band 41 tower in their respective cities.

        • They made it sound like Binge On was just about serving 480p content rather than the highest resolution. There’s a difference in 480p being downloaded at 1.5Mbps or 480p being downloaded at LTE speeds. You would see that speed difference in buffering.

          Besides, a direct throttling approach would go against the net neutrality rules. An acceptable form of Binge On would involve serving the lower res content at full speeds with an opt-in from the user… not throttling all video traffic down with only a buried opt-out setting to look for.

          Granted, it could be worse, but at this point we all want and expect more from the UnCarrier.

        • Fabian Cortez

          They made it sound like Binge On was just about serving 480p content rather than the highest resolution.

          Do you have a source for this? I’d like to know how they “made it sound like Binge On was…” And what part of Binge On? I believe many of you are confused about what Binge On is.

          There’s a difference in 480p being downloaded at 1.5Mbps or 480p being downloaded at LTE speeds. You would see that speed difference in buffering.

          What exactly are “LTE speeds?” Is 1.5 Mbps not achievable via LTE?

          Besides, a direct throttling approach would go against the net neutrality rules

          Where? Prove this instead of throwing around those two words. Especially when the service is optional.

          An acceptable form of Binge On would involve serving the lower res content at full speeds with an opt-in from the user… not throttling all video traffic down with only a buried opt-out setting to look for.

          Acceptable to you, but you don’t run a business and T-Mobile is not your family or friend.

          Granted, it could be worse, but at this point we all want and expect more from the UnCarrier.

          Yes, so you have some options. You can file a complaint with the FCC, thus only making matters worse over something that can be opted out. You could turn it (Binge On) off. Or you could switch to one of the other four carriers out there.

        • The actual press announcement / event. In T-Mobile’s own words:

          “Powered by new technology built in to T-Mobile’s network, Binge On optimizes video for mobile screens, minimizing data consumption while still delivering DVD or better quality (e.g. 480p or better)”

          The implication is that T-Mobile was doing some kind of identification (OK) and then serving an optimized version (OK) to minimize data consumption (OK). However, what is actually happening is that T-Mobile is then discriminating against this data (not OK) and throttling it to 1.5Mbps (not OK).

          When I say that you should get unthrottled LTE speeds, I mean the maximum speed that is delivered to you by T-Mobile’s towers. If I get 100Mbps, I should be able to stream the video at 100Mbps even if it is 480p. That way, it will buffer in seconds instead of taking minutes, saving battery life and speeding up the network overall while not violating net neutrality.

          The concept of “zero rating” is questionable and debatable to many, but the concept of “throttling” is very clearly against net neutrality, and has generated the most public attention (e.g. fast lanes, paid prioritization, Verizon vs. FCC, etc.)

          Again, “acceptable” meaning “allowed under the current implementation of net neutrality ideals by the FCC”. (I contend that Binge On itself violates net neutrality in concept, as well as Music Freedom, but these are still legal because zero rating has not yet been explicitly marked by the FCC.)

          I did turn off Binge On, but that doesn’t prevent anyone else from being affected. The FCC is already looking into it (not that this would make matters worse as you claim), and I’m overall still happy with T-Mobile, just not with how they’re handling this specific matter.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The implication is that T-Mobile was doing some kind of identification (OK) and then serving an optimized version (OK) to minimize data consumption (OK). However, what is actually happening is that T-Mobile is then discriminating against this data (not OK) and throttling it to 1.5Mbps (not OK).

          I see. So then the 24 content providers must be in on it and okay with T-Mobile throttling them at 1.5 Mbps?

          Oh and not to mention that it’s an optional serivce that costs $0.

          When I say that you should get unthrottled LTE speeds, I mean the maximum speed that is delivered to you by T-Mobile’s towers. If I get 100Mbps, I should be able to stream the video at 100Mbps even if it is 480p. That way, it will buffer in seconds instead of taking minutes, saving battery life and speeding up the network overall while not violating net neutrality.

          Correct. But what about congestion? Should you also receive 100 Mbps when the tower is congested even though you think it’s not? Or will you blame that on throttling without understanding the concept?

          The concept of “zero rating” is questionable and debatable to many, but the concept of “throttling” is very clearly against net neutrality, and has generated the most public attention (e.g. fast lanes, paid prioritization, Verizon vs. FCC, etc.)

          You keep throwing the FCC out. Funny, because the FCC said it will review “zero rating” on a case-by-case basis for wireless. Let us also not forget the chairman’s praise for Binge On.

          So what’s next? You want to ignore the FCC’s view on “zero rating” in the “spirit” of net neutrality?

          I did turn off Binge On, but that doesn’t prevent anyone else from being affected. The FCC is already looking into it (not that this would make matters worse as you claim), and I’m overall still happy with T-Mobile, just not with how they’re handling this specific matter.

          It’s a free option.

          There is zero evidence that they’re handling this in an negative way. Until there is and until the end user cannot turn it off or is charged extra for it, this is much ado about nothing.

        • 24 content providers are fine with getting their services zero-rated because it encourages more consumption. They’ve got their own subscription fees to be pushing. And again, the option is not the issue, *it’s the throttling.*

          Again… T-Mobile is throttling video traffic even when there is no congestion. You should receive whatever the tower determines you are capable of receiving, with no discrimination between types of data or their sources.

          Yes, the FCC will review wireless on a case-by-case basis… like they will be doing already. This is not the issue we are debating.

          Once more, the fact that it is free is irrelevant (though it helps T-Mobile’s case in front of the FCC). The evidence of harm is in specifically the first two sets of bars in the original chart by the EFF.

        • Fabian Cortez

          24 content providers are fine with getting their services zero-rated because it encourages more consumption. They’ve got their own subscription fees to be pushing. And again, the option is not the issue, *it’s the throttling.*

          I am now sensing a disconnect.

          There is no throttling going on with respect to the Binge On partners. Please educated yourself on this.

          Again… T-Mobile is throttling video traffic even when there is no congestion. You should receive whatever the tower determines you are capable of receiving, with no discrimination between types of data or their sources.

          That’s with Binge On enabled. Again, a zero rated service. If you don’t like it, guess what? You can turn it off. It costs nothing. Zip. Zilch. Nada. The benefit being that it doesn’t use your data with those services. And other video content benefits because it uses less data, throttled or not. That’s the whole point.

          Again: YOU CAN TURN IT OFF

          As far as other data is concerned: it is untouched. As evidenced by the unrelated direct download.

          Yes, the FCC will review wireless on a case-by-case basis… like they will be doing already. This is not the issue we are debating.

          Once more, the fact that it is free is irrelevant (though it helps T-Mobile’s case in front of the FCC). The evidence of harm is in specifically the first two sets of bars in the original chart by the EFF.

          YOU CAN TURN IT OFF

          It doesn’t get any simpler…

        • There is no throttling of the partners. There is throttling of the consumers. I’m getting of tired of saying this, but the fact that it is free and can be turned off is NOT THE ISSUE. The issue is that T-Mobile is throttling video traffic instead of simply optimizing it.

        • Fabian Cortez

          And you had it right but got it wrong at the end.

          There is no throttling of the partners.

          Yes.

          There is throttling of the consumers.

          No.

          The content providers are sending T-Mobile the optimized stream. All other video traffic that’s not yet part of the Binge On appear to be throttled at. But that’s only based upon the EFF’s single file that they uploaded to their server.

          but the fact that it is free and can be turned off is NOT THE ISSUE. The issue is that T-Mobile is throttling video traffic instead of simply optimizing it.

          Being free and being able to be turned off is absolutely part of the issue. It absolves the issue since it can be turned off

          And you assume it’s throttling because of the EFF’s single test on their own servers. What makes you think T-Mobile isn’t optimizing Go90 even though they’re not a direct partner of BingeOn? They managed to put Go90 on the list because they can analyze the traffic. Maybe the optimization isn’t so real-time.

          The fact remains that we’ve got a singe test from the EFF and an opportune time on a service which is free and optional.

        • Let me put it this way: you should be able to opt in and out of optimization without having your video traffic throttled.

          If you’ve got a problem with the EFF’s methodology, feel free to repeat it with something like Youtube. Measure the time it takes to buffer a video in 480p with Binge On enabled. Clear your cache. Measure the time it takes to buffer the same video in 480p with Binge On disabled. You should see a clear difference between the two, given sufficient throughput and a lack of congestion in your area. For best results, try it with a long video and in an area with the fastest sustained speeds.

        • SirStephenH

          The previous statements by T-Mobile, although they didn’t go into specifics (not very uncarrier), suggested that there was some kind of re-encoding going on and they refused to admit that they were simply throttling. They even spoke out against You Tube when they said T-Mobile was throttling their video despite not being part of the program. So yes, T-Mobile LIED.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The previous statements by T-Mobile, although they didn’t go into specifics (not very uncarrier), suggested that there was some kind of re-encoding going on and they refused to admit that they were simply throttling

          And that’s where you misunderstood. Not once did T-Mobile ever say they re-encoded or even transcoded the stream.

          They even spoke out against You Tube when they said T-Mobile was throttling their video despite not being part of the program. So yes, T-Mobile LIED.

          Again, that’s something you may have understood but that is not the truth. Google it, because you won’t find any information about T-Mobile re-encoding and/or transcoding.

        • TK – Indy

          Can’t you read? Even 480p video, which is crap anyway, was buffering with BingeOn enabled, it did not buffer with it disabled. This is because it is throttled, not optimized.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Can’t you read? Even 480p video, which is crap anyway, was buffering with BingeOn enabled, it did not buffer with it disabled. This is because it is throttled, not optimized.

          Right.

          So does this happen on all video streaming services with Binge On enabled?

      • Phone Guy

        funny. NOT

    • Matt

      Turning off Data Maximizer/Binge On does not seem to improve video quality on Netflix.

      • besweeet

        If you’re having problems, even with Binge On disabled, then it seems like something else is wrong.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Correct.

          Congestion could be at play.

        • John Doe

          Am I missing something or you a T-Mobile tech support rep? You seem to be providing people with “unsolicited” tech support.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Am I missing something or you a T-Mobile tech support rep? You seem to be providing people with “unsolicited” tech support.

          Troll someone else.

        • John Doe

          You really need to lookup the term trolling because if I am a troll then your are as well lol

        • Fabian Cortez

          You really need to lookup the term trolling because if I am a troll then your are as well lol

          Again, troll someone else.

        • Juan Carlos Tejada

          No, welcome to the new era thanks to tmUS, “throttle, Cap,Prioritizing” = Congestion

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, welcome to the new era thanks to tmUS, “throttle, Cap,Prioritizing” = Congestion

          So because the Earth appears flat due to your limited vision must mean the world is flat, right?

          Likewise, because the Sun, Moon, other planets, and stars appear to revolve around the Earth must mean we’re at the center of it all, right?

      • Willie D

        Netflix itself also has something called Mobile Data Saver that may be turned on, as well as in your Netflix account your video playback settings may be set to LOW rather than HD or Auto.

      • Medion

        As stated in another response, the MAJORITY of smartphones only do 480p on Netflix. Go to their help site to look up their list of phones/tablets that do more than 480p.

  • seattle tech

    I use to be the biggest proponent of T-Mobile. After their failed sale they are turning as bad as the others. John had a positive image all because of t-mobiles pricing. I think his true colors are showing. TROJAN MOBILE

    • Willie D

      What failed sale? The only sale that failed was the actual bid, acceptance and procesasing sale to AT&T in 2011 long before Legere walked in. Any other possible sale was just rumor and not announced thus not a sale. So which sale do you refer?

      • SirStephenH

        He could also be discussing the failed merger with Sprint…

      • seattle tech

        Sorry merger

    • Phone Guy

      Please go to Verizon or at&t. Enough said. Talk about fraud.

      • seattle tech

        How is that fraud. Your comments are all useless. Just because youre a fool that cant see how this violates net neutrality. Here take this free crack cocaine. Once you are hooked i’ll charge you for it later down the line

  • Jason Caprio

    Apparently this is T-Mobile devious method in dealing with the ever-increasing issue of Network congestion, to automatically enable throttling of all video streams. Most people aren’t very technical and would just deal with this. I had to dig into my profile settings on my account to disable Binge-On. I am grandfathered on a $70/month Unlimited plan so I have no need for Binge-On.

    The fact that this option was turned on by default for UNLIMITED customers really makes one think of their intentions.

    • Medion

      Most uncarrier changes are advertised as advantageous to consumers, but clearly hold an advantage for T-Mobile.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Correct.

        They’re a corporation. And I have no problem with a company that takes care of themselves and their customer base.

        • Adam

          Except, this is fraud. The evidence contradicts the official email T-Mobile sent Karl Bode.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Except, this is fraud. The evidence contradicts the official email T-Mobile sent Karl Bode.

          Prove the fraud.

        • John Doe

          The FCC will.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The FCC will.

          Good. But until then, you need proof to back your claims.

        • John Doe

          The FCC is the one that gathers proof not the customers and they will sue T-Mobile if they have to and if it not them then there is the FTC and the DOJ. And if not them then you have state Attorney Generals like in NYC that is currently investigating T-Mobile.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The FCC is the one that gathers proof not the customers and they will sue T-Mobile if they have to and if it not them then there is the FTC and the DOJ. And if not them then you have state Attorney Generals like in NYC that is currently investigating T-Mobile.

          Sure.

          So then what you’re engaging in is defamation since you have zero evidence to back your claim.

        • John Doe

          It is not defamation if it is true. T-Mobile can come out deny the report and sue the EFF for defamation if it wants but they won’t because it is true :)

          Last time I checked you don’t need to have evidence to write comments on the internet (the evidence is already clear and more and more people are noticing it). But if this hurts your feelings so much then sue me.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It is not defamation it is true. T-Mobile can come out deny the report and sue the EFF for defamation if it wants but they won’t because it is true :)

          It is defamation because you’re making the claim of “fraud” by T-Mobile.

          So until you can prove said “fraud,” you are doing nothing but making baseless claims.

          Have a good evening.

        • John Doe

          You obviously do not know the laws surrounding defamation so please go look that up and stop pretending like you are smart unless you are a lawyer then I feel bad for your clients.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You obviously do not know the laws surrounding defamation so please go look that up and stop pretending like you are smart unless you are a lawyer then I feel bad for your clients.

          Still waiting on those facts, sir.

        • John Doe

          I am not giving any facts because you are not T-Mobile nor are you a regulatory agency. I owe you nothing.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I am not giving any facts because you are not T-Mobile nor are you a regulatory agency. I owe you nothing.

          No facts? Check.

          Admitted troll? Check.

          Good to know.

        • John Doe

          smh Lmao

        • What’s important now, is for people to learn how to opt out. If the FCC weighs in it’ll be a year or more, and we’ll deal with that when it happens. Until then… Binge On!

        • resource

          Can you moderate out this astroturfing please? It’s embarrassing.

      • Phone Guy

        and the customer.

      • I think it’s a win/win, and you can always opt out.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Apparently this is T-Mobile devious method in dealing with the ever-increasing issue of Network congestion, to automatically enable throttling of all video streams. Most people aren’t very technical and would just deal with this. I had to dig into my profile settings on my account to disable Binge-On. I am grandfathered on a $70/month Unlimited plan so I have no need for Binge-On.

      Devious? This helps and improves your network experience when the 7 year old down the block does nothing but unnecessarily stream 1440p content on his 6″ phone.

      The fact that this option was turned on by default for UNLIMITED customers really makes one think of their intentions.

      What intentions? That they would not have you pay $15/GB in overages while you stream to your heart’s content?

      That the data that you pay for can now be used for other things now that both music and video doesn’t count against it? Or their short-term congestion tackling due to the ~2 million new subs. that join their network per quarter when densification takes longer than the amount of subs. they pull in.

      So please enlighten us about T-Mobile’s intentions.

    • Phone Guy

      You have “no need for binge on” as you suck the bandwidth dry in an area to watch an HD video on a tiny screen. Makes no sense. Or having a kid watch cartoon at ultra HD. The kid doesn’t care but it sure drags down everyone else’s performance. But then again you have “no need for binge on”

      • Jason Caprio

        I have no “need” for Binge-On because I pay EXTRA for UNLIMITED DATA. I use about 4 – 10GB a month which is hardly sucking bandwidth dry. When I’m home, I’m on my Comcast internet Wifi. When I am out and about, and I feel like watching the occasional video, I feel like I deserve to stream in 1080P HD quality which T-Mobile’s “Data Strong” and “Fastest LTE Network” support.

        The point I am trying to make in my original post was, that T-Mobile should be more focused on increasing their network capacity, rather than find hidden ways to throttle people. For those with the $50 plan, Binge-On is great, for those who pay a premium price for unlimited data, Binge-On is nothing more than a hidden network optimization to sneakily unburden their network.

        • Phone Guy

          Have you missed all the news posts? They have doubled their LTE network in the past year. Its amazing. They have bought as much 700MHZ as they can. They are getting ready to go big in 600MHZ auction. They are doing exactly what you want. They are expanding as much as possibly for a small carrier of their size and strength.

          However, money and the other networks willing to sell their bandwidth is not unlimited. Even the government blocked T-Mobile getting more bandwidth. So they have to do things like Binge On and Music Freedom (at the same time) to cut down on the bandwidth. Its as if they aren’t doing enough to increase their bandwidth and network footprint for you? (remember at&t and Verizon are waiting for you and Verizon will even pay your phone off now).

          Binge on is not sneaky. Not one bit. Secondly, the amount of unlimited users is less and less. I am one of them but my other 8 lines are not. So for the greater good of all, its an awesome thing. And why is it a hidden network optimization. They have been screaming about it from every rooftop including how to turn it off if you don’t want it. Its on every news story, emails, etc. I get you would have liked it turned off by default but then it would have never worked. 90% of the customer would have never turned it on for fear of degradation. However, now thats its on for most and since most don’t even notice the slower speed except for a few audiophiles and videophiles, it was a win win.

          And T-Mobile is sooo sneaky that they gave all customers who use it free data for the next three months. That’s really sneaky. Shame on them. If you just turn it off, you can go back to the way it was and be done with it.

          T-Mobile simply doesn’t need to be more focused on increasing network capacity. They are already doing that while finding other optimization techniques to go hand in hand with the growth you say isn’t happening or being focused on. Turn it off and go back to your unlimited data. Simple. done.

        • Jason Caprio

          I have to agree with you completely. I guess if Binge-On did not give people the option of disabling it, there would be a lot of heat on T-Mobile.

          I’m just getting a bit irritated that over the past 2 years I’ve been with T-Mobile, I’ve been ever increasingly encountering situations where my data speeds, despite a full LTE signal, are very slow and unusable. This happens especially in my work area of Trenton, NJ in the downtown area. I get speeds of 0.1 – 0.6Mbps regularly. Just hoping they fix these issues!

  • Eric Blackman

    Anyone who actually watched the press conference where BingeOn was announced should not be surprised by any of this. Legere very clearly stated that you would be able to stream as much as three times the normal amount of video with the same amount of data, even on services that were not a part of BingeOn, because of the “optimization” they were using. If you’re surprised it’s because the tech writers don’t know how to do anything but unbox a phone for YouTube and copy each other’s articles.

    • calvin35

      As I’ve said all along Binge On is nothing more than a throttling service. Did you not read the article? Not only are they throttling streaming video, but they are also throttling direct downloads that don’t have video file extensions as well as direct downloads that have nothing to do with video.

      • Fabian Cortez

        The direct download of non video is negligible. The difference is ~2 Mbps which equates to normal network conditions/fluctuations. Especially when one considers the time it may take for Binge On to be deprovisioned from the account. Hardly unlike the capped 1.5 Mbps for video, which is what Binge On was meant to do.

        This is a nonissue.

        • calvin35

          I’m curious, just how much would T-Mobile have to throttle your data without telling you before you actually cared? I only ask because you clearly don’t mind them throttling you without your knowledge. So give me a number.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Let’s stay on topic.

          Can you prove this is nothing more than a throttle? Are you suggesting that 24 well-known services are in on this little “throttling service” of theirs?

  • Eric Blackman

    From T-mo’s Binge On FAQ:

    What is Binge On?

    Binge On lets you get optimized video streaming on your smartphone or tablet at no extra charge, making high-speed data last up to 3 times longer. Binge On is already enabled and ready to go on your smartphone or tablet.

    Disabling Binge On

    If you decide to turn it off, your video streaming will no longer be optimized, resulting in 4G LTE data being consumed faster. Video streams at DVD quality (480p+) with Binge On. You may disable Binge On at any time, but you’ll lose the Binge On benefits. To disable Binge On, you can do so through My T-Mobile or through the My Account app. Read how to disable Binge On.

    • Adam

      DVD video peaks at 9.8 Mb/s, which is much better than the 1.5 T-Mobile is providing. So, I would say Binge users are not getting anywhere close to DVD quality. DVD is h262, while YouTube is h264, but at higher bit rates the difference in algorithms is not noticeable. This is why a DVDs at 480p look better than YouTube at 480p.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Very nice, but are you conveniently ignoring screen size?

        • Adam

          Screen size doesn’t matter. It is the the angle of view that makes different bit rates noticeable.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Screen size doesn’t matter. It is the the angle of view that makes different bit rates noticeable.

          You don’t know what you’re talking about.

  • DStudio

    I haven’t decided whether what T-Mobile’s done here is wrong or not. But I’m very glad others are bringing the truth out and holding them accountable by exposing or explaining what’s really going on.

    • Fabian Cortez

      T-Mobile has said from the beginning that even services that did not participate in the Binge On program, that users could still take advantage of the optimization due to the lower bandwidth usage.

      EDIT: The word “optimization” might be loosely and generically used for more things behind the scenes.

      • DStudio

        Which is why I’m glad the reality of the situation is being exposed by others – because T-Mobile’s being more vague and veiled than usual here. In this case T-Mobile’s made it necessary for them to do so.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Which is why I’m glad the reality of the situation is being exposed by others – because T-Mobile’s being more vague and veiled than usual here. In this case T-Mobile’s made it necessary for them to do so.

          Just like people thought they were being throttled when in reality, they were being deprioritized.

          The end result does not necessitate throttling.

  • Hiro

    I think it actually makes sense for most customers to have it automatically enabled. Why?

    Customers most likely to be more frustrated and expect the very best quality video are the same people, typically, who would know exactly how to go and disable it. People like myself and friends.

    Then you have people like my parents, who would be totally fine with a little lower video quality in exchange for the saved data. But if this wasn’t automatically enabled, they wouldn’t have a clue how to enable it without having someone do it for them. Many of those group would be in the same boat.

    • Drewski

      I agree

    • Alex P.

      Good point, but T-Mo should still provide more information about this feature to all kind of people instead of forcing them to search about it on Google/Reddit. I’ve seen several people complaining about YouTube “throttling” on their smartphones because they simply didn’t know that this feature was automatically enabled on their plan and that it automatically throttles all kind of streaming video services.

  • Throlling…

    I agree…throlling by any other name is still throlling..

    • Fabian Cortez

      Yes, 600 Kbps throlling is throlling.

      • John Doe

        Where is your proof? this is defamation.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Where is your proof? this is defamation.

          Your obsession with me is unhealthy.

        • John Doe

          I am imitating you but thank you for realizing that it is unhealthy lol

  • Ordeith

    John Legere, the carnival barker of yet another T-Mobile sideshow, giving the suckers something to believe in.

    • Fabian Cortez

      John Legere, the carnival barker of yet another T-Mobile sideshow, giving the suckers something to believe in.

      This article is not about John Legere.

      But why do you keep paying T-Mobile again, sucker?

      • Ordeith

        I don’t think you have an objective cell in your brain when it comes to T-Mobile.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I don’t think you have an objective cell in your brain when it comes to T-Mobile.

          Says the individual whose first post in this article consists of an ad hominem attack on John Legere.

          But if you trolled me well, you’d know that I’m not a fan of phone leases and their copying of Sprint in that regard. Even though they took Sprint’s baby and made it better (18 months vs. 21/22 months and 3 yearly upgrades vs. 1 upgrade per year).

          Again, why are you still paying T-Mobile?

        • Ordeith

          I know you’re a fanboy and a fool.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I know you’re a fanboy and a fool.

          That didn’t take you too long to show your rearend once again.

          Just as expected when you continue to lack facts.

          Now please go and wash your mouth out with soap.

        • Ordeith

          I’m guessing the fool came before the fanboy, though.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’m guessing the fool came before the fanboy, though.

          Still no facts to stand on, so we resort to baseless personal attacks.

          Hey, no one claimed you were some trailblazer.

        • Ordeith

          far from baseless, you provide ample evidence to support my suppositions.

        • Fabian Cortez

          far from baseless, you provide ample evidence to support my suppositions.

          This isn’t about me nor John Legere. So until you can prove your statements, you’re doing nothing but trolling while still paying T-Mobile monthly for service.

          That must be quite the sour taste.

        • Phone Guy

          Copying Sprint? Cars are leased. Housed are leased, office equipment is leased. They didn’t take Sprints idea.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Copying Sprint? Cars are leased. Housed are leased, office equipment is leased. They didn’t take Sprints idea.

          I think we need to be honest with ourselves here: In this industry, Sprint pioneered the leasing model.

          A model that I was not a fan of then and am still not a fan of now, regardless of who offers it.

  • Rey Charger

    Who cares if it goes down to 480? It’s free and doesn’t go against your data. What other company is offering to let you watch Netflix, Hulu etc for free? T-mobile can say eff it and just not offer this option. Just saying.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Exactly, it’s optional!

      • Rey Charger

        It’s a nice option too. Don’t know why people are complaining about it.

        • Acdc1a

          The only ones complaining are on unlimited plans and upset they had to click a button. They are going to be the same ones complaining when T-Mobile takes unlimited away.

        • Rey Charger

          For reals. Lol how lazy have we become? Takes no more than 5 mikes to log on and either enable or disable.

        • patt

          I am not upset actually and not hating T-Mobile for doing it. But they should do something by not enabling for those people who pay some extra for unlimited (I only pay 40$) but others may pay 95 and tax.

        • John Doe

          Exactly but they are not listening so the only thing to do is submit an FCC compliant. This should not be turned on for unlimited plan users.

        • Unlimited is going away this year, for all carriers as part of thier New agreements on net neutrality. Unlimited in its very definition is against what the carriers and Government have defined as net neutrality acceptable.
          There is a reason Verizon is offering 24 GB a month for $100, same with the 30GB at AT&T. Its to get in line with the CTIA/FCC plans.

      • RosynaKeller

        It’s not optional. It’s enabled by default and there’s no way to disable it for Netflix.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’s not optional. It’s enabled by default and there’s no way to disable it for Netflix.

          Understand the word “optional.”

          You have the option to turn it off. /class

        • RosynaKeller

          This is incorrect for Netflix. Due to a bug or something, it always thinks Binge On is enabled. Watch the “Test pattern” stream on Netflix, season 1, episode 1. It’s designed to test.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This is incorrect for Netflix. Due to a bug or something, it always thinks Binge On is enabled. Watch the “Test pattern” stream on Netflix, season 1, episode 1. It’s designed to test.

          So now we’re going to change subjects and refer to bugs? I hope that’s not your argument. Again, that does not change the optionality of the service.

          You are not forced to watch Netflix.

        • RosynaKeller

          The bug only exists because of Binge On. It’s unclear whether the bug is on Netflix’s side or T-Mobile’s. They’re both blaming each other when contacted. Since Netflix charges extra for HD, I want what I paid for.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The bug only exists because of Binge On. It’s unclear whether the bug is on Netflix’s side or T-Mobile’s. They’re both blaming each other when contacted. Since Netflix charges extra for HD, I want what I paid for.

          I understand. But that has nothing to do with this being optional.

          Turning Binge On off solves your problem…

        • RosynaKeller

          No, that’s what I’ve been saying. Disabling Binge On does not give you HD video on Netflix. There may be other services that are part of the Binge On promo that have the same issue. However, I only subscribe to Netflix and Hulu (and Hulu behaved correctly)

          That is, it is impossible to disable Binge On for Netflix.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, that’s what I’ve been saying. Disabling Binge On does not give you HD video on Netflix. There may be other services that are part of the Binge On promo that have the same issue. However, I only subscribe to Netflix and Hulu (and Hulu behaved correctly)

          That is, it is impossible to disable Binge On for Netflix.

          Okay I understand now.

          I find it very hard to believe that that bug is widespread. Because then there’d be a serious issue.

        • RosynaKeller

          Due to the nature of HD Netflix, it seems people aren’t noticing as quickly since Binge On started on November 19th. I only noticed it about 10 days ago when I was watching an animated feature and the high contrast areas were noticeably low resolution.

          It’s not as noticeable with live action features as there aren’t as many high contrast areas.

          If you have an Android device, HD is only available on a very small number of phones and tablets. Netflix has a list https://help.netflix.com/en/node/23939

          People speculate it’s limited to due to DRM requirements.

          I’m not sure which iOS devices support HD video. I know they added support for 720p on iPhone/iPod touch and 1080p for iPads running iOS 7 in Oct, 2013. When the iPhone 6 Plus was released, it got 1080p support in Netflix.

        • Prode

          I have this problems as well. I was talking with RosynaKeller about it the other day ago. I pay for unlimited data but am not able to watch anything on my phone with netflix over 384p. If I use the hotspot to my laptop I am able to go over 384p. So it is a problem that T-Mobile needs to fix. I do not think it is netflix but more t-mobile slowing down all traffic. I really think Binge on is nice for some ppl but not all. I really wish you had to call Care or go into a store and tell them you want it on for it to work, or its jsut disabled other wise.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Unfortunately I can’t help you on that since I don’t use Netflix.

        • Not for me. Works fine in HD.

        • RosynaKeller

          No, it does not. Not for a single person that I’ve seen try Netflix on T-mobile when starting a video on mobile (starting on Wifi and then disabling Wifi will work around it, assuming you have Wifi available)

        • Perhaps it’s your area or device, but I disabled Binge On, and I am able to watch HD streams without issues on iPhone 6S Plus.

        • RosynaKeller

          I don’t believe you. Every single device I’m tried it on and every single device others I have asked have tried it on (in multiple locations) *all* confirm Nstflix video reminds capped when starting playback on T-Mobile when Binge On is enabled.

        • Try calling support, maybe it’s not actually off on your account? Seems most people here have also said they turned it off without issues?

        • RosynaKeller

          Uhm, who here has said disabling Binge On makes Netflix correctly playback HD? Hell, most mobile devices in the world won’t even do Netflix in HD due to DRM issues. (Netflix restricts it to iOS devices and a small number of Android devices).

          What bitrate and resolution does Netflix’s test pattern stream display when started on T-Mobile for you?

          Of course, Netflix streams will display correctly if started on Wifi or when connected to a VPN.

        • Scrolling down the thread it seems people who opt out are having no issues, but if you are try calling T-Mobile support or Netflix? Remember they’re an official participant, so maybe it’s at their end?

        • RosynaKeller

          As I’ve previously said, I called both already. Netflix confirms I have an HD-capable and the correct high bandwidth settings and blames T-Mobile. T-Mobile confirms I have Binge On disabled on all my accounts and blames Netflix.

          But as I asked, what bitrate and resolution does that Netflix video show you?

        • Could be a congested area or something? Good luck with it, most likely a transient issue.

        • RosynaKeller

          No, because *as I just said*, it correctly displays HD when on VPN or when starting on Wifi then disabling Wifi. That should immediately make it painfully obvious it has absolutely nothing to do with the area or the state of the tower.

          And no, it’s not transient because I noticed the problem over two weeks ago and then found many others reporting the same problem that only seems to happen with Netflix.

          Are you avoid the resolution/bitrate question?

        • Netflix works fine in HD. Also, what kind of weird plan do you have that charges extra for HD? It sounds like you’ve got some issues.

        • RosynaKeller

          Uhm, are you unfamiliar with Netflix’s pricing plans? The basic streaming plan is $8/mo and only has SD video. To get HD, it’s $10/mo. 4K (UHD) is $12/mo.

        • Phone Guy

          Turn it off. Do you need me to hold your hand and show you how? Or maybe you can put your big boy pants on and read the article on how to do it yourself. https://support.t-mobile.com/docs/DOC-24294

      • It’s like voice mail, it’s on for everyone too and you can’t opt out! I wonder if anyone complains about that?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yeah really.

          Why are these people not up in arms about overages (not optional) and/or Sprint’s MMS and website compression (not optional)?

          Again, it’s only a select few and organizations and corporations.

    • Ordeith

      Who cares?
      The EFF, the FTC, the FCC, Google and other video providers that have their customers’ experience compromised by this policy, customers that want honesty and transparency from their carrier.
      For starters.

      • Rey Charger

        Honesty? Who the hell is honest these days? Either use the option or don’t. Just pretend t-mobile didn’t offer anybody this option.

        • Ordeith

          T-Mobile didn’t just offer the option, they forced it on everyone. The extra work is in rejecting the “offer”, not in the accepting of it.

        • Drewski

          No, no ones forced Bro. Read the fine print. Either make use of the free services being offered, otherwise Turn it off, its that simple.

        • Rey Charger

          They didn’t force it on everyone. I went into my options and enabled it.

        • Ordeith

          You are mistaken.

        • Rey Charger

          How am I mistaken? I just went online 2 days ago and enabled it.

        • patt

          Actually I signed up almost a month ago and never knew I had it enabled by itself. Yes he is right it was on for me as a new customer with unlimited data.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Actually I signed up almost a month ago and never knew I had it enabled by itself. Yes he is right it was on for me as a new customer with unlimited data.

          And as an informed consumer you can now, and have always been able to, turn it off.

        • patt

          Yup and I did :D and am happy ever since. I never complained was just surprised at first .

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yup and I did :D and am happy ever since. I never complained was just surprised at first .

          And that’s why choice is good!

        • John Doe

          That is not a good kind of choice. what would be better is if they asked before turning it on now that would better so part would have been surprised in the first place.

        • patt

          Exactly :D

        • John Doe

          You shouldn’t have been surprised in the first place. They should have asked. like any company that prides it self for listening to its customers like T-Mobile.

        • John Doe

          informed after the fact.

        • Please cite any relevant regulation where it says you must be informed before the fact?

        • John Doe

          There wasn’t any regulation that said Google couldn’t have an opt-out feature but the FTC thought it was against consumer interest and fined them millions.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Please cite any relevant regulation where it says you must be informed before the fact?

          He can’t and won’t.

          He has yet to provide any proof for his irrational claims.

        • John Doe

          File an FCC complaint they would love to hear why a new customer who is paying $45 for UNLIMITED data was not notified of binge On being activated by default.

        • Fabian Cortez

          File an FCC complaint they would love to hear why a new customer who is paying $45 for UNLIMITED data was not notified of binge On being activated by default.

          That’s funny. Because LouIE above mentioned that when he signed up for T-Mobile, there was “a disclaimer that BingeOn is enabled and I could of sworn I got an SMS saying Binge on is enabled and a short link on more info.”

          So who do we believe?

        • John Doe

          The FCC will sort out who is lying and who it not. Thankfully that is NOT your job :)

          I as well was not contacted about Binge On being enabled or how to turn it off.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The FCC will sort out who is lying and who it not. Thankfully that is NOT your job :)

          I as well was not contacted about Binge On being enabled or how to turn it off.

          Then you’re an ill-informed consumer.

          Not to mention it clearly being listed on T-Mobile’s website upon checkout.

          Includes Binge On™, free unlimited video streaming on popular services like Netflix, HBO NOW, Hulu and more without using your high-speed data.

          Video streams at DVD quality (480p+) with Binge On.You may disable Binge On at any time, but will lose Binge On benefits.

          It seems like patt didn’t read what he signed, which is not unusual.

        • John Doe

          It does not matter what it says it is against Net Neutrality and should be stopped. Hopefully the EFF files a formal complaint with the FCC and sue T-Mobile if they have to.

        • patt

          Why? Do you see me crying ? I turned it off and happy ever since.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Why? Do you see me crying ? I turned it off and happy ever since.

          Exactly.

          Now if there was no option to turn it off then there’d be a big problem.

        • John Doe

          so this isn’t unsolicited? LoL

        • John Doe

          “In the meantime, if T-Mobile doesn’t change its behavior then it’s up to the FCC to follow up. After all, the net neutrality rules aren’t just words on a piece of paper—they’re regulations meant to protect Internet users from precisely this sort of abuse of power by ISPs. We believe the FCC should regulate lightly, but our research suggests this is a significant consumer harm that runs afoul of well-established open internet principles. The FCC can and should step in and hold T-Mobile accountable.”

          -EFF

        • calvin35

          Damn, you’re just full of good posts today. The problem is that some of the people posting here haven’t yet bothered to read the EFF article.

        • The number of complaints is so small it’s a non issue, a huge success by any measure.

        • John Doe

          Then don’t file an FCC complaint. It is not about crying, it is about doing the right thing. What the EFF has said is clearly the right thing and the FCC should investigate. If you are happy being cheated by your carrier then that is your choice but not for me. I offered you advice if you don’t want to take then don’t but T-Mobile will be forced to reverse its decision because more and more people are noticing what is going on and that it what is important.

          When you went to sign up for an unlimited plan were you told that you would have Binge On activated? were you told how to turn it off? I wasn’t and that is why I filed a complaint because by having Binge On activated for a new customer on an unlimited plan automatically voids T-Mobile’s claims and advertisements that they are selling you an unlimited plan because it is NOT unlimited with Binge On and Since it is opt out meaning that you have to shut it down it makes all of their unlimited plans void. The NYC attorney general is looking into these false advertisements by T-Mobile and I will file a complaint with him as well to include this in his investigation.

          But don’t take my advice if you like carriers making decisions for you on the data you pay for without your consent first.

          I will encourage others to file complaints. Thank you for your time and enjoy your service.

        • calvin35

          Well said.

        • There is no $45 unlimited data plan at T-Mobile.

        • Fabian Cortez

          T-Mobile didn’t just offer the option, they forced it on everyone. The extra work is in rejecting the “offer”, not in the accepting of it.

          “Force it on everyone.” Please, you act like it cannot be removed or is akin to the Affordable Care Act.

          Stop being so dramatic in an effort to stir up trouble.

        • John Doe

          Google got fined by the FTC for having an opt-out feature that collects user location data. Opt-out is bad, opt-in is good!

          It is time for T-Mobile to get fined millions as well.

        • Phone Guy

          Yawn. Force? Just turn it off. Done. They were very clear. Free unlimited data for all, or turn it off. Stop complaining.

        • “Extra work”? Luckily they have a policy to deal with people who think like you… they’ll happily give you a bill credit! #score

      • Fabian Cortez

        Who cares?
        The EFF, the FTC, customers that want honesty and transparency from their carrier. For starters.

        There was an entire un-carrier event dedicated to this. Not to mention the toggle located in each customer’s My-T-Mobile.

        Maybe you don’t understand the meaning of “honesty” and “transparency.”

        • TK – Indy

          There was only dishonesty to be found in this one, Legere is a liar.

        • Fabian Cortez

          There was only dishonesty to be found in this one, Legere is a liar.

          You’re just using words without providing any substantial evidence.

          Where’s the lie? What specifically did John Legere state that isn’t true?

        • Juan Carlos Tejada

          Not only a liar, it’s all a Fraud….!

        • Fabian Cortez

          Not only a liar, it’s all a Fraud….!

          Good. You made the claim, now prove it.

        • Phone Guy

          Please switch to at&t and be done with all of this. Thanks.

        • You might be thinking of the other guy with weird here that’s running for president?

      • Exactly who cares. OPT OUT. It’s like going to the doctor and saying hey Dr. it hurts when I do this. Thenl don’t do that! Lol

    • calvin35

      Actually i don’t care at all about that. However i do care about the non transparency of it all and the fact that they’re also throttling direct downloads without telling anyone.

      • Fabian Cortez

        However i do care about the non transparency of it all and the fact that they’re also throttling direct downloads without telling anyone.

        You have no evidence that they’re throttling direct downloads.

        • Ordeith

          He does, the EFF source clearly shows it.
          You have no evidence they’re not.

        • calvin35

          Thank you! Good grief.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Thank you! Good grief.

          Still no evidence? Good to know.

        • TK – Indy

          Mr. Cortez has a reading comprehension difficulty, if he finds it disadvantageous to comprehend, he chooses not to.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Mr. Cortez has a reading comprehension difficulty, if he finds it disadvantageous to comprehend, he chooses not to.

          Why don’t you try reading the article and not the catchy headline. And then take the leap to comprehend.

          A difference of 1.1 Mbps is considered a throttle now over wireless? Hmm, then Sprint’s been throttling people since day one.

        • John Doe

          Where is the evidence that sprint is throttling people? Where? this is defamation smh *In the words of Fabian Cortez*

        • Haha like what you did there.

        • Fabian Cortez

          He does, the EFF source clearly shows it.You have no evidence they’re not.

          Cite specifically where it states that T-Mobile is throttling non video traffic.

          The difference between the two was negligible. Not to mention the fact that the EFF did not disclose the time of day, etc.

          At most, there’s a difference of ~1.1 Mbps. Yes, such a nasty throttle! Yeah, more like standard network variance.

      • Rey Charger

        I don’t know what type of downloads you guys do, but I download a lot especially from the pirate Bay and I haven’t had an issue. My question is for the people that are complaining is, what would they be doing if t-mobile didn’t offer this option? It may not be the best option but it is an option. No one offers this. I’m just saying

        • patt

          who downloads from pirate bay on mobile connection.. dam…

        • Rey Charger

          I do. When I’m on leave and want to watch a movie on the projector.

        • calvin35

          Yes, i don’t really have a problem with Binge On if you’re a limited subscriber as being able to stream at 480p without it counting against your cap is better than nothing. My main problem with Binge On is with its main goal and its implementation. Mainly throttling, that is what Binge On is all about.

        • But then just opt out and quit complaining. It’s like, if you don’t like the steak, order the chicken. You don’t need to tell everyone why you didn’t order the steak, we don’t really care that you’re a vegan or had a pet cow as a kid or whatever. Life’s short, move on and watch more free video!

        • calvin35

          Hey do you know how to block people on DISQUS? I’d really like to know that. You like to pretend you have half a brain in your head. Figure it out and then please get back to me, quickly, um, make that very quickly. Thanks man.

        • I dunno why ask me? Look on their website?

    • RosynaKeller

      Considering that Netflix charges more for HD…

      Also, it’s 384p on Netflix (560kbps)

  • (J²)

    As a T-Mobile customer and supporter, I hate to say that T-Mobile has a history of making it up as they go. At least incidents like this are not intended to screw customers.

    Nearly every promotion, feature and etc. has been released with unanswered questions – some of which go unanswered for months. Its because T-Mobile isn’t thinking things through. When you are a company that “puts customers first” you can afford to make these types of mistakes because in the end the company is obligated to make things right. In comparison, the other carriers who do something similar, shrug it off and move on with or without its customers.

    I believe T-Mobile needs to do the obvious and explain everything about Binge On and allow customers to opt in rather than opting them in by default. I think T-Mobile also needs to stop throttling providers that are not affiliated with Binge On.

    I do not think T-Mobile had bad intentions, I think Binge On was a big risk for T-Mobile that offered little gain and now T-Mobile has to accept the negative publicity.

    • calvin35

      I agree with making Binge On opt in instead of opt out but that would defeat the whole purpose of having Binge On in the first place as far as T-Mobile is concerned. Their whole objective with Binge On is to reduce data usage by as much as they possible can so they can free it up to sell to their new customers as new data plans. T-Mobile is trying to increase subscribers without increasing data usage.

      • (J²)

        I think they were trying to add more subscribers without congesting their networks, pretty much like you said.

        As I mentioned in a post from months ago, it is a strategy that was never going to work. There’s too many people who don’t give a f*** about Binge On.

        I think they are going to have to take Binge On back to the drawing board and tell us all about Binge On 2 in a future Uncarrier announcement.

        The FCC is not going to be happy with T-Mobile and the agency tends to favor the smaller carriers.

    • (J²)

      Just to reiterate, I do not believe T-Mobile did this intentionally. Based on the other comments, the results seems to vary from one customer to the next. Seems like the culprit is inadequate QA testing. Either way, it’s still unacceptable and I’m curious to see how the FCC responds when it finishes its review.

  • Mike

    Sounds like Cringe On is bound for more than a nice tea party discussion with the FCC. Wtf is T-Mobile doing saying they “optimize” video when the are actually are throttling us. Even if I watch a you tube vid which is not aligned with Cringe On you mean T-Mobile is throttling me! Who do they think they are? Bunch of bastards at T-MOBILE are nothing more than whores and fuc*ing liers. John/Nevil just be honest with us. Truth is easier to take than getting smoke blown up our ass.

    • lol

      haha cringe on
      oh u s4gru folk have showed up already

  • Justin Feld

    As a simple choice unlimited customer. This is exactly why i opted out. Having unlimited data… All this did for me was slow my video speeds down to a point hd was not a option. I opted out the first week after binge on release. After opting out all my hd video played without issue. I only realized it because when watching youtube 1080p would keep buffering. Tmobile… Binge on is a great idea especially for those without unlimited data. But the transparency wasnt there and its useless for unlimited suscribers. I agree it should be opt in only. Like i said its a great idea it just wasn’t properly deployed. If i gained something out of binge on maybe i would have left it but all i gaines was irritation from the buffering of hd

  • Juan Carlos Tejada
  • LouIE

    I’m on the 2/$100 unlimited plan and have Binge On Enabled. I travel for work and take my ChromeCast with me and use my mobile phone as a hotspot. Over 5 days I used 4.5GB out 7GB of Mobile Hotspot – I watched 9 hours of Showtime over that 5 days. I was lucky to ever even get 3 episodes prior to the launch of BingeOn. The best part was it didnt buffer! I was still surfing the web on my phone and connected to VPN on my laptop with no issues or lag. I even did speed tests (while watching Showtime) and was still getting 21MPBS

    As for transparency, when you sign into MyT-Mobile, you get a disclaimer that BingeOn is enabled and I could of sworn I got an SMS saying Binge on is enabled and a short link on more info. My brother was experiencing a lag on video, all he did was disable BingeOn and he was good to go. It took him no more than 5 minutes to troubleshoot and get it resolved. As a customer, I’m very thankful for it.

    Also, I think it comes back down to, T-Mobile is not an ISP; They are a mobile carrier. No Mobile network can handle that much streaming data at once without a lag or trip somewhere. They are offering new and exciting ways of breaking the norm. I have all of North America as part of my home coverage, to me that’s insane! What other carrier does that at no additional charge? Umm.. None! What about MusciFreedom? or Simple Global? NONE!

    • John Doe

      I did not get notified by T-Mobile and probably and I am on an Unlimited plan so that would have been nice of them.

      T-Mobile is an INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER LOL even the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) calls them an ISP so you information is wrong.

      Point is Binge On should not be on by default and it should not be throttling videos like the EFF and Youtube have stated.

      I want to control my data usage not let T-Mobile do it for me and if they can’t handle it then get rid of unlimited data and increase prices but DO NOT under any circumstances interfere with my data.

      • Just opt out!

        • John Doe

          Opting in is the right way to do it.

        • calvin35

          You’re wasting your time.

        • I agree. I mean for the people who don’t want it, they should opt out.

        • He’s a paid a schill with a fake name.

        • Who knows his name might really be “John Doe”, but I agree, he’s a little over the top for a customer. Doesn’t matter though, he can say his peace, and hopefully find a carrier he likes better.

        • John Doe

          Yeah okay I have been visiting Tmonews for several years now and have been a T-mobile customer for almost 15 years but thanks for your false accusations.

        • Fabian Cortez

          He’s a paid a schill with a fake name.

          And has now resorted to trolling and obsessing versus dealing with facts.

    • Great post!

  • Fabian Cortez

    A majority of the whiners in here are acting just like when T-Mobile decided to get rid of corporate/employer discounts on service. Of course T-Mobile caved due to people being vocal enough.

    The difference between then and now is that you have the option to turn. it. off. Which is what a majority of these whiners have done.

    Mountain out of a mole hill by corporations, organizations, and their paid shills.

    • Medion

      Sometimes we agree, sometimes we disagree. Here is where we disagree.

      “The difference between then and now is that you have the option to turn. it. off.”

      Grandma doesn’t know how to turn it off. Her preferred video website stutters now, so she simply uses less video. Win-win for T-Mobile – less bandwidth used by those who use optimized (participating) streaming providers, and less bandwidth used by those who give up due to non-participating providers stuttering.

      T-Mobile should have made it opt-in. There is no justifiable reason for not doing this, ESPECIALLY for those already on unlimited data. The only reason that TMO could possibly come up with is, “it’s too hard/complicated/cumbersome (it’s not, for most of us) for someone to opt-in.” And that is precisely why it shouldn’t have been opt-out.

      Had it been opt-in, there would have been zero legitimate complaints about this service. It would have been a good compromise that would benefit both the customer (opt-in data exemption) and the carrier (reduced bandwidth). Instead, but making it opt-out, TMO succeeded in reduing bandwidth usage by a ton, and pissing off a lot of people.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Grandma doesn’t know how to turn it off. Her preferred video website stutters now, so she simply uses less video. Win-win for T-Mobile – less bandwidth used by those who use optimized (participating) streaming providers, and less bandwidth used by those who give up due to non-participating providers stuttering.

        No, grandma complains like any other person who pays monthly for service. In fact, grandma and her generation are much more likely to complain than someone significantly younger. Customer service exists for a reason…

        T-Mobile should have made it opt-in. There is no justifiable reason for not doing this, ESPECIALLY for those already on unlimited data. The only reason that TMO could possibly come up with is, “it’s too hard/complicated/cumbersome (it’s not, for most of us) for someone to opt-in.” And that is precisely why it shouldn’t have been opt-out.

        It’s quite clear that they automatically opted people in for various reasons: instant-on Binge On feature. Just like the other features: international data roaming, Music Freedom, etc. It’s the “it just works” simplicity that makes companies like Apple so successful.

        Another reason is due to the obvious bandwidth savings.

        Had it been opt-in, there would have been zero legitimate complaints about this service. It would have been a good compromise that would benefit both the customer (opt-in data exemption) and the carrier (reduced bandwidth). Instead, but making it opt-out, TMO succeeded in reduing bandwidth usage by a ton, and pissing off a lot of people.

        No. It would have been a nightmare. Multiple calls to customer service and visits to stores to add a feature that can simply be added to every single T-Mobile sub. from the central office. Not to mention that it’s part of their marketing game; it’s something that sets them apart from the competition. A perk.

        • Steven

          Fabian, (AKA potentially Ledger)…. I am a big T-Mobile advocate, but I disagree that Binge On is a feature that should have been opt-out. I saw immediately, as well, the writing on the wall. This was a way to guarantee MILLIONS of subscribers (who probably would never notice a difference) to immediately use 1/4 of the data they used to for heavy video. I, for one, would be someone who knows the difference and would have Opted In. But everyone who knows about Binge On knows T-Mobile had it turned on by default so those, unaware, unfamiliar, or just to lazy to opt-out wouldn’t do it. In many ways its a brilliant idea to give something unlimited AND lower overhead costs!!!! But it needs to be an Opt-in not Opt-out. And you cant compare this Un-carrier move to the others, because this one directly effects everyday quality for many. While I disagree many of them can even tell, they do have a legitimate gripe.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Fabian, (AKA potentially Ledger)….

          I am not John Legere. John Legere has his own Disqus account and has used it to post on here before.

          This was a way to guarantee MILLIONS of subscribers (who probably would never notice a difference) to immediately use 1/4 of the data they used to for heavy video.

          This is true and was never hidden. Binge On was a clear win-win for both the consumer and T-Mobile.

          But everyone who knows about Binge On knows T-Mobile had it turned on by default so those, unaware, unfamiliar, or just to lazy to opt-out wouldn’t do it. In many ways its a brilliant idea to give something unlimited AND lower overhead costs!!!! But it needs to be an Opt-in not Opt-out. And you cant compare this Un-carrier move to the others, because this one directly effects everyday quality for many. While I disagree many of them can even tell, they do have a legitimate gripe.

          It can absolutely be compared to other un-carrier initiatives as they too were directly applied, for the most part.

      • Correction, by making it opt out they reduced bandwidth by a ton, and pissed off a FEW people (that were probably pissed off anyway). From a cost benefit analysis they hit it out of the park with this.

        • Medion

          “Correction, by making it opt out they reduced bandwidth by a ton”

          Agreed. I said the same, verbatim.

          “and pissed off a FEW people (that were probably pissed off anyway).”

          Partially agree/disagree

          It pissed me off. I wasn’t pissed off before. EFF got rattled, but they already were. Other news outlets that had previously defended TMO (DSLReports) hammered them on this. They’ve gotten a fair amount of negative press from this, and not all from people that were already against them.

          ” From a cost benefit analysis they hit it out of the park with this.”

          Absolutely. The only hit right now is in PR, but I’m sure they’l recover on that front.

        • The more PR this gets the more people that sign up for Binge On. This was and continues to be a huge success and the haters are just making it more successful.

        • John Doe

          The “haters” are bringing attention to it including this article on Tmonews as for advertisements T-Mobile has commercials for Binge On on every commercial break so they don’t need the haters to spread the word they are already spending millions to do so.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The more PR this gets the more people that sign up for Binge On. This was and continues to be a huge success and the haters are just making it more successful.

          Exactly.

          When someone is doing something right, there are always the vocal few out there trying to bring it down without justification.

          But good luck with the obsessive troll; I’m done with him and gracefully hand him off to you.

  • ucmee

    I don’t see anyone posting that they can watch unlimited videos on verizon or AT&T and pay $600 a month for data and happy to watch 1080p videos on their phone… a family member of mine was told by a verizon employee that she could use as much data on her phone (didn’t mention the overages) and got that fat bill.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Excellent point.

      Unfortunately, the majority are entitled whiners. Let’s not forget a couple of (literally two) opportune trolls too.

      That’s all. Nothing more, nothing less.

    • John Doe

      Why would people on a Tmonews website post about Verizon or AT&T? and besides this isn’t about them this is about T-Mobile but other carriers are also introducing programs like Binge On and hopefully the FCC will regulate it after their meeting.

  • Max

    um did no one realized they using the web browser..Binge On only work with certain apps, not threw a web browser….. EFF is not using the any of the apps that are listed on Binge On. Where does it say anywhere on t-mobile.com that Binge On works on a browser??
    Crackle

    DirecTV

    Encore
    ESPN

    Fox Sports

    Fox Sports GO

    Go90

    HBO GO

    HBO NOW

    Hulu

    Major League Baseball

    Movieplex
    NBC Sports

    Netflix

    Showtime

    Sling Box

    Sling TV

    Starz

    T-Mobile TV
    Univision Deportes

    Ustream
    Vessel

    Vevo

    VUDU

    • kgraham182

      I just tether my laptop to my phone, and watch several videos from youtube, Netflix, and some random porn site. My downlink was throttled to 1.5Mbps. I have BingeOn disable and still getting throttle. What for I’m a unlimited subscriber that averages around 8GB per month, John should love me.

  • Mike Thaler

    I think BingeOn is only available for those who have more than the basic 2G of data on their plan (it was 1G up to a month ago. ) We have our phones on the basic plan. I wouldn’t know if movies are throttled, since I never have watched a movie on a phone screen.

  • Guest

    T-Mobile needs to end Binge On ASAP, for one BIG reason: bad press.

    Whether you like Binge On or not, doesn’t matter anymore.

    • How much are you getting paid, “Guest”?

    • MisterSuperGod

      Nah, they’ll do just fine.
      Any press is good press.

      • Guest

        Maybe in the entertainment business, not elsewhere. Ask Blue Bell, Chipotle or John Kerry.

        This story is on the first link of eff dot org, I also heard it on TV and even on the radio.

  • MisterSuperGod

    i don’t see the big deal.
    There is an option to turn it off. Problem solved.

    • Prode

      This does not work for Netflix. No matter what option you pick it still forces binge on with netflix. You can test this on your phone by viewing the Netflix Test Pattern. You will see that you are not able to go over 384p with it disabled.

      • John B

        Yes it does. I watched moving art oceans which is a 4k video on netflix and it didn’t play in 480p. You can tell the difference.

        • NexusPhan

          Liar! Netflix is limited to 480P on every US carrier when on mobile data. You can only get above 480P when connected to WiFi. That’s been the case for years and nobody noticed.

    • There is no big deal. It’s optional, Sprint is just mad because hey tried it and failed.

      • Fabian Cortez

        There is no big deal. It’s optional, Sprint is just mad because hey tried it and failed.

        And even worse, MMS and website compression that their users cannot turn off.

    • Totally agree. This is just FUD spread with money from other carriers (Sprint, Verizon) USING the EFF for thier propaganda.

  • Smo

    Seems like people are complaining about:
    1. Binge On being opt-out.
    2. It throttles videos outside the ones from the non-data counting services.
    3. Even when the filename and HTTP headers are changed, video stream/downloads are throttled.
    4. Even downloading a non-video file, the connection is throttled but not as much.

    Seems like 3 and 4 are pretty bad. This would involve some sort of deep packet inspection. That is, T-Mobile is looking at your data to recognize patterns, which I can see people not liking due to privacy concerns. When there’s a match, they throttle your connection. Also, their data inspection algorithms seem to be broken.

    I guess T-Mobile could:
    – Make Binge On opt-in.
    – Have 2 levels of opt-in: 1. Throttle only non-data counting videos. 2. Throttle all videos.
    – Fix or get rid of their broken data monitoring algorithms.

    Sounds simple for people who read tech blogs but I can see it getting complicated for others and resulting in many support calls. Then again, T-Mobile constantly changing things up seem to be confusing people already so implementing the above changes isn’t going to make things that much worse.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Seems like 3 and 4 are pretty bad. This would involve some sort of deep packet inspection. That is, T-Mobile is looking at your data to recognize patterns, which I can see people not liking due to privacy concerns. When there’s a match, they throttle your connection. Also, their data inspection algorithms seem to be broken.

      3. can be taken care of by turning Binge On off. If not, that would be circumventing T-Mobile’s policies that are put in place for Binge On. That would be very similar to bypassing the tethering check.

      4. would be very bad but is not happening as far as we can tell. ~1.1 Mbps difference is negligible and not even worth throttling.

      • Smo

        About 4, I hope you’re right and that the EFF taking speed samples over 5 minutes in the same physical location and at roughly the same time of day still resulted such a difference due to varying network conditions.

        However, I can still see people being concerned about privacy for 3. Specifically, T-Mobile is looking at their data at a low level. People who want Binge On but don’t want T-Mobile looking at their data don’t have that option currently. To me, it’s at most creepy feeling but to others it’s a privacy violation.

        Also, needing to manually turn Binge On off and on every time you want to fix 3 isn’t a very good user experience even for readers of this site. I feel that T-Mobile can still work to improve the user experience of Binge On. The current implementation shouldn’t be fixed forever.

        • Smo

          Also, the changes people are asking seem reasonable, albeit with the use of words that wouldn’t necessarily encourage cooperation.

        • Fabian Cortez

          However, I can still see people being concerned about privacy for 3. Specifically, T-Mobile is looking at their data at a low level. People who want Binge On but don’t want T-Mobile looking at their data don’t have that option currently. To me, it’s at most creepy feeling but to others it’s a privacy violation.

          Fun fact, all ISPs look at your data. Also T-Mobile already does this with respect to tethering.

        • kgraham182

          True statement, that’s why I use a paid VPN service with no logging.

        • Fabian Cortez

          True statement, that’s why I use a paid VPN service with no logging.

          And you are well within your rights and their TOS to use VPN.

  • Probablynot

    I have an unlimited plan (in before it was $$$$). I have this turned on, and I’m glad it’s an opt-out because it lowers congestion. Before this, my internet literally died once I hit downtown, now it’s ‘okay’ and actually usable the whole horrible bus ride to work.

    • That is EXACTLY the idea. You got it. Opt-in would be completely pointless, for it to work it has to work at scale. Net Neutrality rules are to prevent abuses like ISP’s extorting companies NOT to prevent creative new solutions to network congestion. The FCC isn’t going to have a problem with this at all. Can you imagine reading the complaint from the guy who was mad he had to click opt-out? They get all kinds of crazies, they’re used to it. The rules will evolve as innovative companies like T-Mobile come up with cool new solutions. That’s why they said they’d look at things on a case-by-case basis… no one will be able to prove they were harmed and it’s clearly VERY popular with consumers.

  • Timothy Poplaski

    It’s really a shame they can’t provide some way to “de-prioritize” voluntarily so that an activity wouldn’t count against billable data.

    For example say that “Anything using ports 50,000-55,000 will be de-prioritized and not counted against your monthly high speed allotment.”

    That’d address a lot of the current abuse (torrenting, large file transfers, even video downloads) while still helping the network. Sure, it’s a more network savvy thing having to press a “de-prioritize” button in an app to have whatever it’s doing not count against your bandwidth use… but I’m pretty sure the majority of people could manage it. And being voluntary, per app, it’d be hard to argue against it.

  • kev2684

    I knew this was the case from the start. It was a way for T-Mobile to cut down bandwidth on everyone without eliminating unlimited plans which is clearly taking a toll on network quality for everyone. I turned off Binge-On the day it was released on all my family’s plans as getting less than 1080p on mobile is unacceptable. Not when we’re all unlimited data users anyway. Binge-On should’ve been an opt-in feature, not forced on all with an opt-out option. Not everyone is tech savvy enough to have an actual T-Mobile account and turn off the feature. Most customers rely on the younger people in their plans to know how to do these, even then, the amount of people aware of these kind of features are less than 10% of their customer base.

  • Timothy Poplaski

    Thee free Vudu rental movie codes are now available for Unlimited data users in the form of a $3.99 credit. Enough to cover a STANDARD DEF rental that’s not super popular.

    Screw em, I’m disabling BingOn for the entire account. None of us watch a lot of mobile video, they won’t even notice.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Isn’t it nice when you can disable something?

      • Timothy Poplaski

        Definitely. But I’m a technically savvy person that (usually :) ) pays attention. The majority of people aren’t. You also have to dig into your account settings to find the place to disable it. Per line, too.

        While the idea of BingeOn is solid (when do you really need 1080p on a 5.7″ screen?) the implementation seems underhanded. Whether it’s pretending to be “optimizing” video by throttling it to 1.5Mb (talk about intentionally misleading bulls—.) or burying the settings to turn it off and on.

        Shame they couldn’t have just specified a de-prioritized port range, and let app developers include a “doesn’t count against your data but will be slower” button in their apps, and/or had their own app that would let a person choose to throttle their entire connection at will in exchange for usage not counting against the high speed cap. Turn it on, hand the phone to the kids to watch a movie, turn it back off afterwards. That sort of thing.

        Take it further, leave people control, and make it app/service agnostic, and I don’t think anyone would take complaints seriously. As things are now, especially with the misrepresentation of the program, they’re going to tarnish the whole Uncarrier thing and seem as dishonest as AT&T and Verizon to regular people who hear about it third hand.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Definitely. But I’m a technically savvy person that (usually :) ) pays attention. The majority of people aren’t. You also have to dig into your account settings to find the place to disable it. Per line, too.

          It’s in the settings area with all the other settings. Likewise, why would you not want it per line?

          What if I want my tablet to be afforded Binge On but not my phone? An account-wide-only setting would negate this. A per line (per device) setting was definitely the way to go.

          As things are now, especially with the misrepresentation of the program, they’re going to tarnish the whole Uncarrier thing and seem as dishonest as AT&T and Verizon to regular people who hear about it third hand.

          A statement will most likely be released and it is very doubtful that this will tarnish them. Again, this only stems from the vocal [and irrational] few who enjoy throwing out the misunderstood “Net Neutrality” slogan.

        • Timothy Poplaski

          It’s not in with all the other “settings”. At least not the ones used to manage the phone. It is under the small “Profile” option in the top right corner, then Media. I’d never had any reason to look in that section until I wanted to disable BingeOn. I never would have found it on my own, I had to google it.

          It also takes considerably longer to switch between phones in that section, making it that much more of a pain to turn it off/on, encouraging people to leave it as is.

          So, yes, you can find it. But it’s buried, deliberately, to discourage people from doing so. People being people, it effectively makes the option to disable it invisible, locking most people in. That sort of underhanded “lawyering” of the interface, the “optimizing”, and so on. All technically true, but all as obscured as they could safely manage it, it ruins customer trust.

          It ALREADY has tarnished them. It’s only a question of degree at this point.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The Binge On settings are in the same place with all of the other account settings. I don’t think deliberately buried.

  • I’m all for the FCC giving an opinion on this. They’ve already been very clear they like things that benefit the consumer and encourage competition. T-Mobile is targeting congestion with both network expansion *and* with great ideas like Binge On. In any case we’re looking at a long process… the FCC doesn’t move quickly… maybe a year or so before we get their position. Until then, if you have problem with it, opt out, find a carrier you like better, or just be mad and post a lot. ;)

    • Fabian Cortez

      A lot of angry and irrational people in here clamoring over something that is optional.

      • John Doe

        angry and irrational…took the words right out of my mouth.

        • Fabian Cortez

          angry and irrational…took the words right out of my mouth.

          Another unsolicited and trolling comment from you.

          Keep proving my point. Meanwhile, I’m still waiting for your proof.

        • John Doe

          “Where is the proof? this is defamation! OMG”

        • Fabian Cortez

          “Where is the proof? this is defamation! OMG”

          You’ve become quite the obsessive troll. It’s not a good look if you wish to be taken seriously.

          Troll someone else please.

        • John Doe

          You are making false claims without proof I am just imitating what a well paid T-Mobile employee would do LoL

        • Fabian Cortez

          You are making false claims without proof I am just imitating what a well paid T-Mobile employee would do LoL

          Troll and obsess over someone else please.

    • John Doe

      Tom wheeler also said he didn’t want to reclassify cellular carriers as Title II common carriers but he ended up doing it. Just because he says one thing does not mean it is set in stone.

      • That’s true, but they’ve made the litmus test for what’s acceptable and what’s not pretty clear. Consumers being able to use the internet more while spending less is EXACTLY the kind of competitive policies they want to encourage, not restrict.

  • SpaceGho5t

    T-Mobile should have sent out emails and texts to every single customer with a link to the binge on toggle letting you decide if you want it on or off! Update the damn T-Mobile app and make the binge on toggle clear as day. Make sure people are informed about what exactly it does, Include a widget that you can simply toggle on or toggle off like you do with your Bluetooth or airplane mode. I love the idea of binge on! I’m an unlimited customer on the original $70 plan (thank god) and benefit with it on when I use my hotspot for my son’s tablet to stream Netflix for him on long car rides. Its a pain digging through profile settings on an outdated app to try and find the toggle to turn it off. I had to turn it off for my father who pays for unlimited and had no idea what the hell i was talking about. It’s How they released it that was definitely kind of shady. Average Joe who pays for unlimited has no idea that he is getting shorted from this. Just make it easier T-Mobile and you have an awesome perk.

    • Juan Carlos Tejada

      Just navigating thru T-Mobile app, to problematic, can’t hire someone to create a better one?, but still have the option to turn or disable Binge.
      All is a Fraud…..just lies and lies, people get tire in supporting corporations like tmUS.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Just navigating thru T-Mobile app, to problematic, can’t hire someone to create a better one?, but still have the option to turn or disable Binge.All is a Fraud…..just lies and lies, people get tire in supporting corporations like tmUS.

        I see. So because you find navigating T-Mobile’s app problematic makes everything “a Fraud…..just lies and lies?”

        Who are these people “get[ting] tire[sic] in supporting corporations like tmUS?” Because their quarterly metrics say otherwise.

  • el_perezo

    You know I’ve never gotten a straight answer from any Tmobile reps whether in store or on the phone. How do I know i have binge on? I got 6 lines, and 1 tablet line. None have more than 2.5 gbs. Some reps say “yes you have binge on because you pay for data on tablet”. Some say “yes you have binge on but only on your tablet”. Some say ” no you don’t have binge on because none of your lines have the required 3 gb or higher”. When I go to my Tmobile page I see the option to turn off and on for every line. I live in south Texas where Tmobile probably don’t care about having a good signal so I can never tell whether I’m being throttled or just a shitty signal. Pleeeeeeease someone clarify this. At least the Binge on portion.

    • Greg

      You have binge on automatically enabled. This means you have the video optimization enabled. You do not however benefit from the unlimited streaming from the 24 providers on your cell phones. Your tablet will have unlimited streaming if it is 6GB or higher otherwise it will be the same as your phones.

    • Retail reps are always kinda dumb… we all know that. It’s like asking someone at McDonalds how many calories are in a shake. ;)

  • Joe

    480p on a 6″ screen is like 1080p on a 50″ screen. Your eyes can’t tell the difference. It’s funny seeing these comments from people saying they must have 1080p on their phone or they don’t watch movies. One thing with Binge On is that if you turn it off, you lose the double data. Tiers were 1 gig, 3, gig, 5 gig. With Binge On you get 2 gig, 6 gig, 10 gig for the same price.

    • John

      It’s not the same price at all. 1Gb and 2 Gb yes, 6GB is $65, 3 was $60, 10 is $80 and 5 was $70.

  • Antonio JcRM

    I’m glad someone stepped in. That was my whole issue with Binge On. Even when you have it disable multimedia video is still slow to a crawl. I’m here giving T-Mobile their props when they go and do this. You are being throotled. There is no way they can compressed your video to a certain quality. The apps does that by its self when it knows their is a slower connection then it’ll either buffer or downgrade your quality to match your connection. All this because T-Mobile can not handle their network. I understand what they were trying to do but at the sametime my point is when you disable it, their shouldn’t be any interruptions. Now i’m on Simple Mobile, hoping Binge On does not get to them because then i’ll just have to leave the entire T-Mobile Network all together.

    • Fabian Cortez

      That was my whole issue with Binge On. Even when you have it disable multimedia video is still slow to a crawl.

      That’s not true.

      What you’re experiencing is something called “congestion.”

      • Juan Carlos Tejada

        so you’re selling what you don’t have or afford?

        • Fabian Cortez

          so you’re selling that you don’t have or afford?

          All carriers’ networks undergo congestion. Ever been to a large venue?

        • Medion

          Or used Sprint?

      • Antonio JcRM

        “Congestion”.. R u serious.. I’ve never ever had any congestion problems no matter what time it was. Stop making excuses, it is wat it is..

        • Fabian Cortez

          “Congestion”.. R u serious.. I’ve never ever had any congestion problems no matter what time it was. Stop making excuses, it is wat it is..

          So you tell me what adding millions upon millions of new subs. per quarter for the last 11 quarters does to a carrier when new macro sites take a good 18 months to come online?

          Deal with the congestion or port out. I will say that the grass is never greener on the other side.

  • riverhorse

    All of yous(now why does it rhyme with ewes?) proposing Opt-In need to take Crítical Thinking & Decision Making coursework. You’re right in theory BUT wrong in practice.
    IF you want to rise above self–absorbed, reactionary, MOTO, Monday morning qb levels, that is.
    Further to those very upset about it- also take Logics & Philosophy…thou cans’t keep dumping on those who give thou a Fair Shake(good people) whilest keeping mum about the fleecers(evildoers)…thou wilst have a dysfunctional life without solid relationships.

    So sayeth the Raven.

    • Medion

      So basically, “For those of you who disagree with me, I’m going to be condescending towards you.”

      • riverhorse

        Well, if you wish to look at it that way…the “condescendees” were already condescending themselves…

        • Medion

          No, they weren’t. You’re just an ass.

        • riverhorse

          You just lost the argument, while missing the point… this is going on in college demonstrations ad nauseam.
          1. Binge On @ Opt In = DOA, this way is its only chance.

          2. Tmobile does not have the bandwidth of the Other 3, it has to try something drastic to not implode.

          3. Tmobile is giving more while charging less, something only the Other 3 are in a secure enough position to do. I see This example daily in the subway and bus…a pregnant or old woman gets on, and it’s not usually an able bodied man who offers their seat- but another old woman who does.

          So let’s be supportive and not bite the ONE hand that feeds us(with negative publicity).
          Let’s consider Tmobile family…and not go dysfunctional.

          For the record, I’ve opted Out without resorting to low tactics.

        • Medion

          I didn’t lose an argument. You simply failed to comprehend the argument. Good job inserting your own though.

        • Medion

          I didn’t lose an argument. I called you out for being an ass, because well, you were being an ass.

          I didn’t agree with your feelings on Binge On. I disagreed with your stance of being condescending towards those who disagree with you.

  • Kurt Schultz

    You only need to opt-out once for the entire account right, not per individual line?

    • Juan Carlos Tejada

      Individual

      • Kurt Schultz

        Thanks. I don’t even think my wife has an account as I added to line under my account though?

        • icwhatudidthere

          You’ll need to access her line info from your account.

    • kamikaze

      Business plans required only account managers to be able to de-activate BingeON.. Why in the world would BingeON be turned ON for business lines and users not have the option to turn it off?

  • Juan Carlos Tejada

    This situation with legere, reminds me O.J Simpson case, when he’s getting caught?

    • Tmobile…Tmobile

      I do not understand the correlation and/or your comment. Tmobile has been cutting edge in the industry under John’s Leadership…and if we do not like a promotion or maybe, more-so the Service, then we have the option of changing carriers.

  • Cam Fas

    At least we can opt out regardless how we fell about the service. The funny thing is I live in las vegas and yesterday a verizon co worker kept trying to show me a video on youtube his video quality kept pausing and downgrading the image quality. He tried playing the video three times after letting it load. The 4th time he finally got the quality to run at a decent yet still fuzzy resolution. Even with the binge my video loaded faster and I had yet to buffer. It may have been the fact that I changed some settings in youtube while off wifi but regardless no carrier is perfect. At least we have the choice and overall the network management was put in place to help with congestion and I think it is helping. Yesterday I was frustrated about the throttle but after giving it some thought I figure since I can just flick it off then what am I really complaining about? Also the 23 gig soft cap binge helps me stay way away form this when in previous months I could easily achieve the 23 gig soft cap just from watching a few youtube and netflix videos per week. When I did hit the soft cap and was in a congested area even the webpages wouldn’t load. So since we have the option I figure its not all bad. Working in a major airport really shows the difference when my att verizon and sprint co workers have numerous issues working in an area that congests towers so heavily along with all the interference around airports. Yet my service overall is far better then any of theirs. And it makes sense that they had the country opt in automatically since it was the only way to make the network congestion reduction policy work. The only thing is since I pay for unlimited high speed data maybe for those paying for unlimited high speed data should have bandwidth for video closer to the 5 or even 10mbs mark hell even if it was 3.5mbs for unlimited users since the 1.5mbs average doesn’t seem right but then again we can always opt out but it would be a better reason for unlimited users to leave binge on rather then getting a free movie rental I think the idea would be far better for those that are paying for non throttled speeds since it would sort of defeat the purpose of using unlimited high speed. So I can understand why this could be seen as a grey area even if you can opt out. Mainly because I believed that I wasn’t throttled initially after reading the headline after binge was introduced I believed the video was compressed and not throttled.

    • Well said, ultimately it helps everyone. The user gets more data, and more video. The network runs more efficiently, and the video site gets users watching longer without worrying about limits. No one loses in this, let’s just hope they get the technical issues smoothed out a bit… maybe this could even become an official internet “standard”.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Exactly. It’s a win-win-win.

      • kamikaze

        The user gets more data

        exactly how does the user get MORE data with BingeOn?

        You seriously advocate an official Internet standard where the ISP can regulate Internet speed based on type of traffic?

  • John Doe

    That is exactly the same criticism John Legere uses against the other carriers. He said they deceive you into paying overages, fees, etc.

    Well, they “signed on the dotted line.” LoL

    • Fabian Cortez

      That is exactly the same criticism John Legere uses against the other carriers. He said they deceive you into paying overages, fees, etc.

      Well, they “signed on the dotted line.” LoL

      Troll and obsess over someone else please.

      • John Doe

        This is not trolling buddy but nice try changing topics lmaoo

        • Fabian Cortez

          This is not trolling buddy but nice try changing topics lmaoo

          Troll and obsess over someone else please.

  • TK – Indy

    YouTube, which is owned by Google, who is a partner with T-mobile on Project Fi and other things – considers this program so terrible that it is willing to risk damaging that relationship to get rid of the problem. That in and of itself should make Legere see that this was a terrible decision and make hime come off his Binge. Did you know that in French, “a la legere” means to do things without thought, or thoughtlessly? Seems to apply in this case.

    • Fabian Cortez

      YouTube, which is owned by Google, who is a partner with T-mobile on Project Fi and other things – considers this program so terrible that it is willing to risk damaging that relationship to get rid of the problem. That in and of itself should make Legere see that this was a terrible decision and make hime come off his Binge. Did you know that in French, “a la legere” means to do things without thought, or thoughtlessly? Seems to apply in this case.

      Absolutely irrelevant and nothing but a red herring from you.

      For someone who uses Sprint and pays T-Mobile for their dependent’s service, one has to wonder why you take such great effort in posting such nonsense on a T-Mobile fan site.

      • Ascertion

        Erm, it is on topic, the whole thing started when Google announced that T-Mobile is throttling YouTube. You did nothing but shift the topic from the actual thread to a discussion about a user.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Erm, it is on topic, the whole thing started when Google announced that T-Mobile is throttling YouTube. You did nothing but shift the topic from the actual thread to a discussion about a user.

          I’ve asked you many times not to reply to me.

          Respect that S4GRU troll.

        • Medion

          I’ve asked you not to reply to me. Didn’t stop you.

          Don’t demand consideration that you’re not willing to give.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’ve asked you not to reply to me. Didn’t stop you.

          Don’t demand consideration that you’re not willing to give.

          That is a lie that I’d like you to prove.

          I have, in total, thirteen (13) replies from you. The first one is dated 6/25/2015. And not a single one has such a request.

          So unless you have multiple accounts, I am going to ask you to rescind that statement altogether.

        • Medion

          You had your mod friend go through and delete my replies to you a few months back. The last reply is now her saying something like “This had gone on enough.”

          But I know that you got the email notice, so I know that you saw it before she deleted it.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You had your mod friend go through and delete my replies to you a few months back. The last reply is now her saying something like “This had gone on enough.”

          But I know that you got the email notice, so I know that you saw it before she deleted it.

          You’ve lost it or you have another profile. Which one is it?

          What article are you referencing? Again, [now] 14 original replies from you in my inbox and that’s it. Nothing more, nothing less.

        • Medion

          You remind me of the David Duchovny scene in Zoolander.

          “Are you serious? I just answered that.”

          To be clear, I’m not saying that you could be a male model like Derek Zoolander. I’m making the other insinuation :)

        • Fabian Cortez

          You remind me of the David Duchovny scene in Zoolander.

          “Are you serious? I just answered that.”

          To be clear, I’m not saying that you could be a male model like Derek Zoolander. I’m making the other insinuation :)

          Again: What article are you referencing?

          Your vague “few months back” means nothing. Likewise, your claim of “your mod friend” is unsubstantiated.

          It sounds like you have a chip on your shoulder and am confusing me with someone else.

          Please provide proof that you previously asked me to not reply to you. Also provide proof that I had my “mod friend go through and delete my replies to you a few months back.” At the very least, provide the article name and/or link.

        • Medion

          No Derek, you’re ruining the scene. You only say, “But why male models,” once after the explanation.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No Derek, you’re ruining the scene. You only say, “But why male models,” once after the explanation.

          Good, so it’s settled.

          You fabricated a story without evidence in an effort to drag both the moderator of this site and I through the mud.

          You owe both of us apologies and I will now respectfully ask you not to reply to me again until you own up to your mistake.

        • Medion

          Good, so it’s settled. You’ve owned up to your mistake and will from now on honor my request and not reply to my posts.

          As such, I expect this to be our last communication, out of mutual respect for each other. Should you respond to this or any other message, the agreement is off. Should your mod friend again delete this request, the agreement is off.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Good, so it’s settled. You’ve owned up to your mistake and will from now on honor my request and not reply to my posts.

          Mistake? You’re the one mistaken here. That or you must have multiple accounts…

          Likewise, you have not honored my recent request so why should I honor yours? Especially since you decided to start something out of nothing. No wonder you take issue with thepanttherlady; she puts you in check when you’re clearly out of line.

          As such, I expect this to be our last communication, out of mutual respect for each other. Should you respond to this or any other message, the agreement is off. Should your mod friend again delete this request, the agreement is off.

          Again, you’re providing zero evidence of anything.

          On the other hand, I have decided to do some investigative work of my own. No, I did not have to do it because I don’t have to disprove your claim. You have to prove your claims; that’s how it works.

          A quick look at the past 7 months (this goes back to Cam Bunton!) of thepanttherlady‘s posts shows that she has not replied to you, Medion, once! Zero, zilch, nada.

          So who are you again and what are your other aliases, friend? ;)

        • Medion

          I knew you’d take the bait. You just can’t help yourself :)

          Like our last argument, if you want replies to stop, you’re in total control. Just stop replying. But since you’ve reneged on our agreement (rather quickly, I might add), I will continue to respond to your posts.

          Additionally, since you’ve repeatedly shown an inability to honor a request to not reply, you shouldn’t expect Ascertion to honor your request. That would be hypocritical!

          Your desire to have the last word in any discussion trumps your ability to keep your word. And I enjoy trolling you, so I suspect that this argument will end the same as the last one – with you crying and your mod friend siding with you (as she does in all the arguments that you create on this website).

        • Fabian Cortez

          I knew you’d take the bait. You just can’t help yourself :)

          Like our last argument, if you want replies to stop, you’re in total control. Just stop replying. But since you’ve reneged on our agreement (rather quickly, I might add), I will continue to respond to your posts.

          Additionally, since you’ve repeatedly shown an inability to honor a request to not reply, you shouldn’t expect Ascertion to honor your request. That would be hypocritical!

          Your desire to have the last word in any discussion trumps your ability to keep your word. And I enjoy trolling you, so I suspect that this argument will end the same as the last one – with you crying and your mod friend siding with you (as she does in all the arguments that you create on this website).

          That’s where you continue to live in a fantasy land and continue to drudge things up. There was never an agreement. Also, your paranoia has peaked as the actions that you take (trolling) get you into trouble with authority figures. So you then improperly equate it to some conspiracy that I have a “mod friend” out there to get you.

          And unfortunately, the tin foil hat will not protect you against any of this.

          But again, I am still waiting for you to prove my “mod friend” deletes your posts on my behalf. Likewise, I am still waiting for evidence that you and I had some random issue “months ago” where you told me not to reply to you.

          And I enjoy trolling you,

          Solidified.

        • Medion

          I’m running out of ideas. One of these times I’m going to have to read one of your posts before I reply.

        • Medion

          Ascertion, you are 100% correct.

    • I have the feeling they’ll work it out, it’s really in their best interest too. The more people can watch YouTube, the more ads they sell. They’ll probably work out the technical concerns and officially join the program.

  • Frettfreak

    No your not… Just buy your phone out right… Not “contract” then or just pay off your equipment when you leave. Your not stuck

    • maximus1901

      Then I guess people were never stuck in contracts before either since they could buy themselves out.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Then I guess people were never stuck in contracts before either since they could buy themselves out.

        There’s a difference between a service contract and a device contract.

        Previous service contracts were required to get postpaid service. No one is forced into a device contract. Are they attractive? Sure.

        But as an individual, you need to practice due diligence with respect to your decisions.

  • Juan Carlos Tejada

    No. No problems with the contract, I’m old enough to pay my debts , problems with:
    – how my account was manipulated.
    – how due a bad update thru tmUS network broke a S5.
    Want more?, have to wait for the fcc , ftc, conclusions

    • Fabian Cortez

      No. No problems with the contract, I’m old enough to pay my debts ,

      Sure. Then your statement of “I’m Stuck with the equipment installment payments CONTRACT…!” was in reference to what then?

      problems with:- how my account was manipulated.

      How was your account manipulated?

      – how due a bad update thru tmUS network broke a S5.

      Really? Then the same update that went to millions of other Galaxy S5s on T-Mobile’s network should be bad as well.

      Want more?, have to wait for the fcc , ftc, conclusions

      The FCC and FTC doesn’t affect you in the slightest. But as someone else suggested, pay off your phone, since you claimed you’re “old enough to pay my debts” and port out to another carrier who will not manipulate your account, etc.

      • Juan Carlos Tejada

        OK, if you say so….let’s wait then… .

        • Fabian Cortez

          OK, if you say so….let’s wait then… .

          Yes, we’ll wait and see [with respect to the FCC and FTC].

        • Juan Carlos Tejada

          Lol, not that, let’s wait for Mr. CEO, say something …..as 01/05/2016, 1:12 pm, Nada yet from him….in twitter…or media

        • Juan Carlos Tejada

          Lol, took him 25hours to rweet and still avoiding to tweet about the worse Cringe-On,..rejection from his customers and industry

  • maximus1901

    Not his point: payment plans are no diff from carrier contract in practice. Like at all.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Not his point: payment plans are no diff from carrier contract in practice. Like at all.

      Oh but they are different.

      No one is forced to finance a device for postpaid service. Meanwhile, previously, service contracts were required for postpaid service.

      • maximus1901

        yes i def agree with that. that was lame beyond belief to require contract for bringing your own phone.

        • Fabian Cortez

          yes i def agree with that. that was lame beyond belief to require contract for bringing your own phone.

          I saw this reply after my recent post. Sorry.

      • Juan Carlos Tejada

        Fabian, you’re the real deal, people…this is how a brainwashed person reacts. #sorryNOTsorry

        • Fabian Cortez

          Fabian, you’re the real deal, people…this is how a brainwashed person reacts. #sorryNOTsorry

          Ah, so someone forced you to sign a device contract? Funny because those aren’t mandatory.

          Those T-Mobile jedi mind tricks are something else. Then again, the mind tricks only work on a certain type of individual…

    • T-Mobile Fan

      Then instead of using T-Mobile as a no interest credit card…Use your own credit card, or buy the phone outright. T-Mobile financing is a courtesy not a right. Problem solved cry baby.

    • Except they’re nothing like a service contract, there’s no etf, no interest, and you can leave at anytime without penalty. In any case, all three major carriers have gotten rid of service contracts anyway so the point is moot.

      • maximus1901

        what happen when you leave a carrier on:
        1) payment plan – you pay a lump sum that decreases over time

        2) service contract – you pay a lump sum that decreases over time

        If you say you can leave a payment plan “without any penalty”, then you can leave a contract also “without any penalty”. lol

        • Except that’s not how it works, but whatever. The top three don’t do contracts anymore, I think maybe a Sprint and other discount brands might still.

        • maximus1901

          you cancel service, you pay the remaining phone payments lump sum except if you have tmobile lifetime coverage guarantee; exactly how it works.

          if they were to all allow you to cancel service, unlock phone, continue making payments to former carrier . . . THEN it would be nothing like a contract.

        • Fabian Cortez

          you cancel service, you pay the remaining phone payments lump sum except if you have tmobile lifetime coverage guarantee; exactly how it works.

          if they were to all allow you to cancel service, unlock phone, continue making payments to former carrier . . . THEN it would be nothing like a contract.

          You’re having an issue with disconnecting “service contract” and “device contract.” Likewise, no one is obligated to finance a phone.

        • Fabian Cortez

          what happen when you leave a carrier on:

          1) payment plan – you pay a lump sum that decreases over time

          2) service contract – you pay a lump sum that decreases over time

          If you say you can leave a payment plan “without any penalty”, then you can leave a contract also “without any penalty”. lol

          Again, you’re not forced into financing a device.

  • Robert Jensen

    I had to opt-in for the Binge On service.

    Videos look fine to me on my LG G3 and I’m picky about video quality. Might be different if I were casting the video to a large screen HDTV but that’s not what Binge On is about.

    I’d bet that the loudest complaints are coming from people who saw this as a way to cut cable entirely for TV watching and save themselves some money.

    • I screen cast and I don’t notice a difference at all except that it doesn’t stutter anymore. I’ve been enjoying it. Maybe if someone had a 4K, 55″ TV, they’d feel differently, but on my 32″ 1080p, it’s been perfect. I love BingeOn so far.

      BTW, I have unlimited, but I use BingeOn because there’s no buffering at all.

  • Philip

    I read from a post here just turn OFF the binge thing on the website and it will be fast. Thats what I did. I have unlimited data. Looks fast to me. Did they test this for unlimited data people?

  • GinaDee

    Well I’ve set this before. Binge-On is more about managing network resources than providing users with a cheaper data experience bar none.

    Video is going to explore a hundred fold in 2016/17 and T-Mobile won’t be able to deploy its AWS-3 winning at least until late 2017 and any 600 MHz spectrum most likely till 2019/20 so they are going to keep deploying more network management style services otherwise they may face huge capacity restraints given the amount of new subs that keep signing up with them.

    I don’t blame T-Mobile for doing this. I’m not a fan however of the way this service was advertised. I for one opted out because I like to get the most of my data service at the highest quality and that applies to video or music streaming.

    • Kiwini

      When will people realize Tmobile does what’s best for Tmobile. They’re not your friend or some nice guy. They’re doing things to stay competitive and all these new users are inevitably going to stress their network

    • Definfately sounds like a bug. Did you escalate the issue? Good thing You have a work around with the VPN until they fix it. And as I said, I’m not having any issues myself but if I do I’ll eat it and let you know.

  • Paul

    Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Video, YouTube all look fine to me on my phone.

    • kamikaze

      that’s coz you’re on Wifi

      • Paul

        I have unlimited data, i hardly ever jump onto WiFi. On 4G LTE the quality is fine for my phone.

  • Peace Love and Death Metal

    Seems to be working fine on my Note 5

  • Kiwini

    Bad PR move for Tmobile

    • Or is it… the majority of users seems very happy with it, I think the PR will give them a sales bump.

      • Medion

        Definitely some bad PR. The question is, will the bad PR out weigh the good PR down the road? I’m not qualified to speculate, but I have an opinion.

        We’ll see what happens.

      • kamikaze

        you mean the clueless ones taken on a ride by T-mobile’s “optimization”?

        • Everyone who doesn’t agree with you is “clueless”?

        • kamikaze

          No, just the ones who think tmobile is doing them a favor by throttling when they were under the impression it was transcoding with a more efficient codec and the millions who have no clue their buffering is due to this being automatically turned on

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, just the ones who think tmobile is doing them a favor by throttling when they were under the impression it was transcoding with a more efficient codec and the millions who have no clue their buffering is due to this being automatically turned on

          T-Mobile never stated that they were transcoding. In fact, it seems like you made a bad assumption on that front.

          He [Grant Castle, T-Mobile VP of engineering] said T-Mobile doesn’t use transcoding technology because he said that technology doesn’t scale — he said transcoding large numbers of video streams requires a significant amount of server and computing power.

  • Walter Pavlik II

    1.5mbps is not bad at all for mobile video. What they’re doing is helping manage their bandwidth.

    • Medion

      And that’s fine. However, when you do that for one class of data, it’s a net neutrality violation.

      The reason that the EFF and others are up in arms is that it’s opt-out instead of opt-in, and in the contents section we clearly have people on both sides of the fence.

      • I am *thrilled* it’s opt-out, because we all know almost no one will. Conservation of limited shared resources should ALWAYS be the default, whether it’s water, or power, or internet.

        • Medion

          Concurrent usage of spectrum is a limited resource. Internet is not.

          Just clarifying. I’m sure that’s what your meant, because only Comcast had been making the “Internet is a limited resource so we’ll bill you like a utility but please don’t regulate us like a utility” argument.

        • TK – Indy

          Yes, it makes us so happy to be deceived in this way and cheated out of what we have paid for.

        • I got the text notification, and I am getting more than I paid for. Sorry you aren’t, but I’m sure customer service will help you.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I got the text notification, and I am getting more than I paid for. Sorry you aren’t, but I’m sure customer service will help you.

          Unfortunately, T-Mobile customer service isn’t available to Sprint subs. Also, Band 41 doesn’t penetrate under bridges.

        • CareShill

          I but the end of the majority of your phone calls end with “Thank you so much for being such a “loyal” T-Mobile customer, and you have a great rest of your day!!”

        • calvin35

          Lol.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I but the end of the majority of your phone calls end with “Thank you so much for being such a “loyal” T-Mobile customer, and you have a great rest of your day!!”

          Absolutely.

          Thanks for your contribution.

        • TylerCameron

          The internet is not a limited resource. That’s preposterous.

        • No, but wireless spectrum sure is. That’s why it’s auctioned for billions of dollars.

        • Great article… check it out, let me know what you think? http://www.vox.com/2015/2/26/8114493/against-wireless-net-neutrality

    • galaxymaniac

      and yet they claim fastest speeds? What’s the point in advertisinf fastest network when its “optimized” to 1.5Mbps?

      • Fabian Cortez

        and yet they claim fastest speeds? What’s the point in advertisinf fastest network when its “optimized” to 1.5Mbps?

        Claimed and verified.

        • Ordeith

          Don’t you have a day job?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Don’t you have a day job?

          Red herring.

        • Ordeith

          Your day job is red herrings?
          I guess that fits.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Your day job is red herrings? I guess that fits.

          But I wouldn’t want you to quit yours so I suggest you get back to it. After all, T-Mobile needs your money every month.

        • TK – Indy

          But obviously, not for long.

      • vinnyjr

        Don’t listen to this crap. I watch my videos at the highest quality on my Note 5. My videos, 12 minute video, on YouTube will load up 100% by the time I’m 1/5th thru. This is high HD quality. No way HD video loads that fast being throttled at 1.5mbs. I get very fast data speeds on all my data intake including HD Video.. My T-Mobile service is fantastic. I’m no ass kisser, just telling it like it is. Thank You T-Mobile, Thank You John Legere.

        • John

          You are clearly an ass kisser.

  • Mike Palomba

    I I have binge on disabled but I think this is being blown way out of proportion. I read that, on a mobile device, there’s is little to no difference between 480p and 720p. I tested this for myself and I came to the conclusion that there really is no notificbke difference between the two ON A PHONE. On a computer is a different story. By the way this was tested on an iPhone 6s over Wi-Fi

    • galaxymaniac

      dude, BingOn works only when on the Mobile Network.. there is no throttling by T-mobile happening on WiFi … T-mobile also does not change the video resolution

      • Mike Palomba

        I know that but binge on is meant to stream video at 480p. The difference between 480p and 720p on a mobile device is minor

        • TK – Indy

          No, 480p is 50% worse. Today’s video is painstakingly edited and meant to be viewed in higher definition. You are saying something like, who needs that color TV, my black and white set can be watched just fine.

        • SirStephenH

          People said that about color TV when it first came out. People even didn’t understand how TV was better than radio when it first came out.

          I thought this whole HD IS better than SD thing was settled long ago. These people just need to have their eyes checked.

        • kgraham182

          The difference between 480 and 720 is major. Lets assume 1080p (10) is a dime, 720p (7) is your average next door neighbor, and 480p (4) is well you get the gist.

      • I think he meant he was tethering?

    • calvin35

      Isn’t the resolution on the 6s only slightly better than 480p anyway on a 4.6” screen? Of course you will have a hard time noticing any difference on the 6s. Viewing throttled 480p content on a 5.2″, or 5.7″ 1440p screen is totally different.

  • kgraham182

    I just did a test to see if T-Mobile is throttling and they are. I have BingeOn disable. I tether my laptop to phone and did a speedtest the results were 15 down and 25 up. Then I watch a couples of videos on YouTube with the quality at 1080HD with task manager open the downlink was a steady 1.5Mbps and of course the videos shuddered. To make sure I wasn’t crazy I run the test pattern on Netflix W10 app and from the website, and for sure my downlink was a steady 1.5Mbps and video quality maxed out at 640×480, not even 720×480. Since no porn services are included at the moment, I tried watching a HD video and yep the same happened downlink is a steady 1.5Mbps. I turned on my VPN service and did a speedtest the results were 6 down and 15 up, make sense vpn add an extra route for your data to travel. Went to youtube and watch the same videos at 1080HD quality, they played with no shuddering at all. Watched the test pattern from Netflix resolution was 1280×720 @ 2.353Mbps and the porn video played just fine. John needs to fix this.

    • stop

      lying too start trouble

      • Medion

        Capital “L,” to, and a period. Still not a complete sentence, but much closer!

      • kgraham182

        Lying how? You can try the same thing I just did, check your speed first, try sereval video services and check the speed during watching a video. Then try it again with a vpn service.

        • tryagain

          site says ‘Allow up to two hours for changes to reflect on your account.’ so your quick test is not a good one

        • kgraham182

          I always had BingeOn disabled. Why wouldn’t I, I’m on an unlimited high speed data plan.

  • Jake

    For those on the unlimited plan. If you’re paying that much for data then I’m sure you’re no noob to technology. Just turn it off and quit being a shit raker

  • Grendel

    I had to turn my Binge On into Binge Off – otherwise I could not watch TV using FIOS Mobile app at work. How can one live like that..?

    • Fabian Cortez

      Binge On seems to affect less people. In other words: it’s working for a majority of people.

      • Ordeith

        Citation needed

        • Fabian Cortez

          Citation needed

          Sure do you have one?

        • Ordeith

          You’re the one making the claim, buddy.
          Not that you don’t ignore evidence that threatens your fragile little world, regardless.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You’re the one making the claim, buddy. Not that you don’t ignore evidence that threatens your fragile little world, regardless.

          Oh I was hoping you’d contribute to the discussion with your citation.

        • Ordeith

          and I was just hoping you’d contribute.
          still hasn’t happened.

        • kgraham182

          So umhhh Fabian, what plan do you have? Are you evening a TMO customer? Can you see how this would affect customers on an unlimited plan?

        • Medion

          You made the claim, he asked for a citation. Quit being a complete moron and provide the citation.

        • You can’t prove a negative. If you think there are a lot of people affected, prove it, otherwise there are not. #logic101

        • Fabian Cortez

          You can’t prove a negative. If you think there are a lot of people affected, prove it, otherwise there are not. #logic101

          Exactly, not to mention the fact that I said “seems.”

  • Bill

    I thought T-Mobile was “optimizing” data?

    • TK – Indy

      They are, entirely for their benefit. Think of it as the smaller “Twinkie” we ended up with after Hostess went under. To us, it is just a smaller hose with less water.

      • Why is it entirely for THEIR benefit? It benefits everyone. Yes, it benefits them, or they wouldn’t have done it. But it benefits the user to, ask anyone who can watch more video than they could before without any extra cost and they’ll tell you the same. Are there bugs? Maybe. But it’s still cool technology.

        • kamikaze

          It benefits EVERYONE? Really Brett, a blanket everyone?

        • kgraham182

          Please tell me how it benefits customers with an unlimited high speed data plan.

        • You don’t think 50 million people using less data makes the network and less congested and faster for everyone?

    • It’s a fair description. As I understand it, they limit the connection speed so the sending server sends a lower bandwidth version. So it is in fact “optimized”, and T-Mobile, caused it, so yeah… sort of right? It’s a great idea, though if forum comments are to believe it’s buggy. Anonymous forum people are always honest and true. ;)

  • DuH

    BingeOn, when activated, does throttle video to 1.5Mbps. This saves on video consumption as well as with network resources. The benefits to the customer are select white listed data services and data savings for other services.

    If you DO NOT like BingeOn, just disable it and enjoy your full speed data included with your plan (keeping in mind other network management disclaimers).

    • Fabian Cortez

      That makes too much sense and doesn’t resonate with the hot topics: Net Neutrality, John Legere, throttling, Sprint’s miraculous and fictitious rise from the ashes, multiple trolling accounts, and most importantly, me, the loud and vocal poster espousing about all of the above.

      All of those things are far more important that a simple option that is a win for consumers, a win for content providers, and a win for T-Mobile. /s

      • kgraham182

        What plan do you have, Fabian? I have the unlimited plan with BingeOn disabled, but still getting throttled. What should I do? And no it’s not a congestion or de-prioritize problem as I barely use 10GBs per month and get fairly good data speeds. Tell me what you do?

        • calvin35

          You should call tech support. How do you know your being throttled?

        • kgraham182

          I just tested Youtube and Netflix with and without a VPN service. When VPN is active I had no studdering and videos play in HD, when not active while playing a video downlink was limited to 1.5Mbps. Maybe Alex will try and confirm this for y’all, it’s not hard to test.

        • calvin35

          Damn, I’m not sure here. I’d call tech support and have them make sure that Binge On is indeed off. Something’s not right.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Damn, I’m not sure here. I’d call tech support and have them make sure that Binge On is indeed off. Something’s not right.

          Exactly. With Binge On off, speeds should be normal, provided there is no congestion.

          If speeds are still being “throttled” then there is a serious issue and T-Mobile needs to be investigated. Also, I am sure this would be all over the net as well.

        • kamikaze

          Fabian gets a free T-mobile phone as he’s on the employee discount plan .. it would have been 75% off for regular employees, but for full time online shills, its totally free

        • kgraham182

          I think Fabian is actually a she, her name on theverge is frost1 and on fiercewireless she go by Newcastle.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I think Fabian is actually a she, her name on theverge is frost1 and on fiercewireless she go by Newcastle.

          Flattering but you’re not even a good troll because unlike you and your S4GRU ilk, I don’t engage in aliases.

          But what’s wrong with being a “she?” Please don’t be so chauvinistic.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Fabian gets a free T-mobile phone as he’s on the employee discount plan .. it would have been 75% off for regular employees, but for full time online shills, its totally free

          Well there you go, you found me out!

        • vinnyjr

          You aren’t being throttled for those reasons. T-Mobile doesn’t throttle customers who use 10gbs of data. Why don’t you tell the truth, you’re just a troll or was caught stealing data.

        • JMccovery

          That’s odd, because I have the $80 unlimited prepaid plan, and with BingeOn disabled, none of the videos I watch are reduced below the quality chosen.

          I’ve tested it in crowded metro, and sparse rural areas; even tested video quality after using a *lot* of data, even directly on the phone and via tethering; not a single video issue.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yeah and another poster on here mentioned that it can take up to 2 hours for Binge On to be disabled/enabled.

      • kamikaze

        a win for content providers? Youtube begs to differ… why would content providers want their product offered at lower quality and throttled?

        a win for consumers? When they pay for video only to be throttled at 1.5MBps?

        • Fabian Cortez

          a win for content providers?

          Yes. Their content gets streamed more as customers feel no need to reserve their video viewing since it doesn’t count against their data. With a lot of these services serving ads, it’s a win.

          Youtube begs to differ…

          That sounds like YouTube’s problem. The other content providers seem to have joined just fine and I expect the list to grow.

          why would content providers want their product offered at lower quality and throttled?

          For years (at least 8 years), YouTube was okay with iOS users not being able to change the quality of their stream over the cellular network. Where is your issue with that?

          a win for consumers? When they pay for video only to be throttled at 1.5MBps?

          Yes, a win. Not having data counted against you for video which looks marginally different on a 5″-6″ screen is a win for consumers.

          Go ask any Sprint users. They’ve had their video compress for years and don’t seem to complain. Except they cannot disable it.

  • Juan Carlos Tejada

    Holy crap….

    • Fabian Cortez

      Holy crap….

      And where is that located?

  • kamikaze

    he’s getting coached by his lawyers on what to say next… all you T-mobile groupies never figured out that BingeOn was to decrease data usage through simple throttling when you thought it was some fantastic transcoding going on..

    • calvin35

      I’ve been saying that since day one. T-mobile’s main objective with Binge On was to throttle as many people as possible. Everything else is just a distraction.

    • Juan Carlos Tejada

      Before of the deadline, (12/13/2015), I opt-out from Cringe-On, Legere is not only a executive, he’s a seller who would sell you the idea.
      This is not the only-one, more fraud/deceptions to come.

  • John Brown

    How about increasing throttle speeds to 1.5mbps across the board? If throttling video traffic isn’t crippling the network, then neither should increasing throttle speeds from 2G to 3G. That would’ve been a better move instead of binge on.

    • Cam Fas

      If that happened I would turn off binge in a heartbeat. Screw a 23gig soft cap if I am on unlimited data and in congested areas I go to 1.5mbs that would be awesome for me.

    • Interesting idea. What’s also interesting is how quickly “throttling” doesn’t sound so bad to people.

      • John Brown

        Here’s my take on it. There is a difference between unusable sub 56k “2G” throttling and 1.5mbps 3G throttling that can actually be used. I’m appalled at the throttled speeds I get on my metroPCS plan. The speed test will literally show 0.00 with an occasional burst of 0.01 when I’m throttled. I’ve been on multiple throttled carriers and this is the worst I’ve seen. On Boost Mobile I had a solid 0.15, on cricket I had 0.1, and on the old EDGE system before my area was upgraded to LTE I had 0.09-0.14.
        The current system of throttling to 2G speeds was developed when LTE didn’t even exist and 3G was the fastest speeds available. Now LTE is the fastest network available, and we should increase throttle speeds to 3G levels. At least you can watch SD video and use most smartphone features on 3G. And compared to the 25-75mbps I see on un-throttled LTE, I’d still notice the slower speeds. But I would still have unlimited data. The current system of throttling is like turning a faucet back and forth between off and drip

  • Guest

    LET’S VOTE.
    Just for fun.

    I vote: Cringe OFF

  • Aurizen

    I noticed my youtube and Facebook videos slower I had to turn it off, felt like 2005.

  • TBN27

    So I have the unlimited 80 dollar plan with 7GB hotspot. With the Binge on opted in I did not notice any throttling or slow down or lower quality videos. Looking at my nieces phone with the 3GB a month she has, I haven’t noticed anything out of the ordinary either. Still high quality videos. So I left it alone

  • For those of you who don’t like Binge On and think it’s a “Net Neutrality” issue Sprint is even worse… https://www.sprint.com/legal/open_internet_information.html

    “Video optimization is always deployed and active on the Sprint network for all identifiable video traffic…users may experience minor discernable reductions in image quality when viewing video”

    • Fabian Cortez

      Your post will be ignored because it isn’t trendy to focus on things other than T-Mobile and myself.

  • Angel

    Well Binge On is to help with the load on the network. Binge On videos are 480p 1.5 is more than enough to handle it. If you are watching a SD video you don’t need 30Mbps. The problem is that some videos are been throttle even if they are not part of the Binge On list. The idea behind it is great, for someone who can afford those truly unlimited plan I’m happy with 480p videos that don’t consume my data. But the implementation is not so good. If they somehow manage to throttle videos when you are watching them on SD resolution would be awesome but I don’t think that’s even possible without violating certain rules. I just theater to my laptop to see and apparently even my youtube did average a 1.5 speeds maxing at 2.3 at most. When speed test give me about 25. I did watched a few HD videos and they didn’t stutter, maybe 1080p would but can’t test that. and still 720p is not the end of the world. I didn’t see people with torches and pitchfork when Sprint lower video speed to less than a meg. Now watching videos at that speed IS annoying. They should atleast throttle to 2M or 3M whatever is enough for none or minimal stutter on 1080p and that would be great.

  • Cam Fas

    Off subject but does anyone know the lte setup in Seattle is it 10+10 or 15+15? Is it carrier aggragated with band 12? Flying up there later today.

  • Huh? He tweets all the time.

  • Juan Carlos Tejada

    This dispute is not for a switch ON/OFF.
    This dispute is against FRAUD and DECEPTION.
    I personally have 3 claims against T-Mobile, which one is for my data is being cap , and yea all documented.
    On December, 2015, I initially start my first (1) claim, with the Federal Communication Commission (fcc).
    1- Account.
    2- Software’s Update.
    3- Equipment Installment Payments (EIP).

    As soon I’m done with my complaint, will public all files in regard to this 3 claims.

    Feeling bad, for the deception, Legere is the same thing as others, or even worst.
    Customers forget sometimes that Legere, is a well-paid sells person’s, Freebies are not FREE, customers will end paying the tab.
    New Plans, may look nice, but don’t forget to read the FULL description of the Contract to sign.

    • Fabian Cortez

      What ” FRAUD and DECEPTION.”

      How did T-Mobile defraud you? Did they take your money?

      What deception? T-Mobile doesn’t guarantee you a certain speed. Likewise, if anything, this doesn’t count toward your data.

      Customers forget sometimes that Legere, is a well-paid sells person’s, Freebies are not FREE, customers will end paying the tab.

      Silliness. Binge On, when enabled, doesn’t count against your data for the included services. So please elaborate on how “customers will end paying the tab?”

      It sounds like your issues with T-Mobile are of another nature.

      • Juan Carlos Tejada

        Can Someone take Fabian off my back PLEASE…..!

        • Ordeith

          I wish someone would take him off this site. It’s telling that on a T-Mobile fan site that T-Mobile’s most annoying fan isn’t getting up votes.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I wish someone would take him off this site. It’s telling that on a T-Mobile fan site that T-Mobile’s most annoying fan isn’t getting up votes.

          The people upvoting you are opportunistic trolls that take personal issue with me when presented with facts that are not conducive to their argument.

          DollarsnSense being the latest one who came here from S4GRU (thanks for the tip you-know-who) where they’re actively discussing me and referencing this article.

          But again, this isn’t about me in the slightest.

        • Ordeith

          I’m not the only one getting upvotes.
          But you are the only one with a clear lack of them.
          It appears your self delusions are strong enough for you to maintain your obvious shortcomings in the face of fierce opposition, though. So congratulations, I guess.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’m not the only one getting upvotes. But you are the only one with a clear lack of them.
          It appears your self delusions are strong enough for you to maintain your obvious shortcomings in the face of fierce opposition, though. So congratulations, I guess.

          Right, you and the others that are upvoting you are receiving upvotes, as you all cross-upvote each other. That’s quite objective, especially when the source/target is me. /s

          Wrong, in that I am lacking any upvotes.

          But if you live by upvotes, then there are deeper issues at hand and I am not interested in discussing this with you any further.

        • pssst……..

          dollarsnnonsense is courtney

        • pssst……..

          ;)

        • Fabian Cortez

          Interesting.

        • calvin35

          In his defense he does get some but they are usually from people who are T-Mobile apologists like he is.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Can Someone take Fabian off my back PLEASE…..!

          So I take it T-Mobile didn’t defraud you as you claimed.

        • Juan Carlos Tejada

          S.O.S…..please…..S.O.S

        • Fabian Cortez

          S.O.S…..please…..S.O.S

          Again, what is your complaint? Because this is about Binge On, which is something that can be turned off. So filing with the FCC won’t do much.

          I maintain that you have other issues with T-Mobile that you’re masking with Binge On.

          There is no fraud.

  • JMccovery

    EFF says that non-video downloads are throttled to 1.5Mbps with BingeOn enabled, correct?

    I just tested that on a 2nd line that I have, which is part of a family service that has BingeOn enabled; downloaded several 200+MB files to my Moto X, and each file was downloading at 700KB/s to 2.5MB/s (5.6-20mbps).

    Unless there was something wrong with the account, or the test was done in a highly congested area, I call bull.

    • Ordeith

      EFF says that video files that are downloaded, not streamed, have their downloads capped at 1.5mbps. They made no claim about non-video files.

      • Fabian Cortez

        EFF says that video files that are downloaded, not streamed, have their downloads capped at 1.5mbps. They made no claim about non-video files.

        Correct. Which means that novice tricks such as file extension changes or omissions will not skirt the system. Much like the trivial tethering hacks from before.

        • Ordeith

          Which is actually a problem. If one wanted to download a video from their personal library to their device so they could watch it later when they are inevitably offline due to the multitude of T-Mobile coverage holes they would have that download capped to an abysmal 1.5mbps due to T-Mobile’s ridiculous policies. Binge On should only affect the players that are directly involved and should leave all the other content alone.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Which is actually a problem. If one wanted to download a video from their personal library to their device so they could watch it later when they are inevitably offline due to the multitude of T-Mobile coverage holes they would have that download capped to an abysmal 1.5mbps due to T-Mobile’s ridiculous policies. Binge On should only affect the players that are directly involved and should leave all the other content alone.

          I agree, that would be a problem. T-Mobile clearly needs to tweak their optimization. That video download should be at the highest speed possible and should be deducted from the user’s bucket.

          Alternatively, you can turn it off…

        • Ordeith

          Unfortunately, it is currently both throttled AND deducted from the user’s bucket.

          It’s refreshing to see, after 600 or so comments, you actually admit that there might be a problem here, instead of your normal knee-jerk defense of all things magenta.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Unfortunately, it is currently both throttled AND deducted from the user’s bucket.

          It can be turned off.

          It’s refreshing to see, after 600 or so comments, you actually admit that there might be a problem here, instead of your normal knee-jerk defense of all things magenta.

          You had yet to bring up this point. Instead, you preferred engaging in personal attacks all while screaming “throttle.”

          But to conclude they are intentionally throttling video files because of this test is shortsighted. Especially when the optimization is new and also when you can turn it off.

        • Ordeith

          Many people brought up this point, only to have you dismiss it or attack them or claim they were making things up. I guess it took a night of rest for the truth of it to finally sink in for you.

          And the conclusion is they are intentionally throttling video CONTENT, no matter the source, even if it is just a file download. Intentionally throttling video that comes from binge on “partners” and EVERYONE ELSE whether or not the content provider chose to participate.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Many people brought up this point, only to have you dismiss it or attack them or claim they were making things up.

          Where?

          I guess it took a night of rest for the truth of it to finally sink in for you.

          Yeah, that must have been it.

          Intentionally throttling video that comes from binge on “partners”

          You have no evidence of that. In fact, there is clear evidence that their Binge On partners send them the appropriate stream, which T-Mobile then optimizes using adaptive bitrate coding (source: Grant Castle, T-Mobile VP of Engineering).

        • kgraham182

          I gave proof they were throttling video, but since I’m not credible I advise you or Alex Wagner to test this. Tether a laptop to your phone, do a speedtest, now open task manager, play video from various sites in HD quality, then check downlink speed in task manager. Now connect to a VPN and repeat. T-Mobile is limited speed to 1.5Mbps. I wouldn’t have a problem with this if I was on a limited high speed data plan, but I’m not.

        • calvin35

          Why would anyone turn something off to fix something they don’t know is happening? Now you’re just making yourself look foolish. I’m sure there are limited users who like Binge On for it’s stated benefits who are not happy to find out that not only are they being throttled when they are streaming video, but they are being throttled just about anytime they download anything.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Why would anyone turn something off to fix something they don’t know is happening? Now you’re just making yourself look foolish. I’m sure there are limited users who like Binge On for it’s stated benefits who are not happy to find out that not only are they being throttled when they are streaming video, but they are being throttled just about anytime they download anything.

          This isn’t a hard concept. I swear.

          If your speeds are slow and your data is being deducted. You’re going to call and complain. You will then be presented with an option to turn it off.

          Have a wonderful rest of the day.

        • calvin35

          You won’t call and complain if T-Mobile is slowing them down just enough to the where the user doesn’t realize what’s happening or what’s causing the problem. Especially when direct downloads aren’t supposed to be affected with Binge On enabled, which they are.

        • calvin35

          It’s already being deducted from the user’s bucket. It’s a video “download”. It’s also being throttled like i told you yesterday. You know, when you said it was a complete non issue.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’s already being deducted from the user’s bucket. It’s a video “download”. It’s also being throttled like i told you yesterday. You know, when you said it was a complete non issue.

          If you’re going to claim I made statements, you may want to get them right.

          The nonissue I clearly stated was in regard to the nonvideo download difference of ~1.1 Mbps.

        • calvin35

          Your are correct. I would still like to know how much T-Mobile would have to throttle you without your knowledge before it became an issue for you. Since you clearly don’t seem mind that that’s what they’re doing. 2 Mbps, 4Mbps, how about 6Mbps? If it were truly a non-issue or inconsequential T-Mobile wouldn’t be doing it at all. 1 Mbps or 100Mbps, makes no difference, it’s wrong and T-Mobile shouldn’t be doing it. They got caught.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Your are correct. I would still like to know how much T-Mobile would have to throttle you without your knowledge before it became an issue for you. Since you clearly don’t seem mind that that’s what they’re doing. 2 Mbps, 4Mbps, how about 6Mbps? If it were truly a non-issue or inconsequential T-Mobile wouldn’t be doing it at all. 1 Mbps or 100Mbps, makes no difference, it’s wrong and T-Mobile shouldn’t be doing it. They got caught.

          You’re still not understanding. Here are a couple things…

          1) The difference in speed for the nonvideo download means nothing. That’s not a throttle at all. The EFF provided zero information related to the time of day that they performed these tests or how long they waited after disabling Binge On.

          Right now, I can perform two concurrent speed tests and I can guarantee you that they will be different and well within 1.1 Mbps or more.

          Nonissue even though the EFF decided to include it. Red herring much? After all, it worked on you and others.

          2) This isn’t about me.

        • calvin35

          1a) of course it’s a throttle
          1b) time of day has absolutely no relevance as to whether or not throttling will happen. 2am, 2pm, 5pm, T-Mobile will throttle at all hours of the day, they don’t care.

          I could do direct downloads back to back as well with Binge On enabled and disabled and the results would be different also. Each time the downloads would be slower by a varying amount when Binge On is enabled than when it isn’t. I don’t know who you are but it’s clear that you are trying to do damage control for T-Mobile and i don’t wish to engage with you anymore. You may have the last word.

        • Fabian Cortez

          1a) of course it’s a throttle1b) time of day has absolutely no relevance as to whether or not throttling will happen. 2am, 2pm, 5pm, T-Mobile will throttle at all hours of the day, they don’t care.

          You still don’t get it.

          We’re discussing the nonvideo download. There is no throttling occurring. Also, if you don’t think that the time of day matters on a cellular network then I have no reason to further communicate with you.

          I could do direct downloads back to back as well with Binge On enabled and disabled and the results would be different also. Each time the downloads would be slower by a varying amount when Binge On is enabled than when it isn’t. I don’t know who you are but it’s clear that you are trying to do damage control for T-Mobile and i don’t wish to engage with you anymore. You may have the last word.

          Exactly, in the case of the EFF, a difference of ~1.1 Mbps. To which you incorrectly attribute to “throttling” when in reality, you don’t have all of the information. The point that the EFF was trying to make, which you missed, with respect to the nonvideo download, was that there is no optimization occurring in that respect. I challenge you to read the article again…

          But you don’t believe that time of day matters with respect to cellular networks. At least according to your latest comment. So have a good rest of your afternoon.

        • calvin35

          Changed my mind for the time being. If course time of day matters when it comes to network congestion. However, said congestion would be the same whether Binge On is enabled it not. The time of day would have no effect on the fact that running said tests with Binge On will result in slower speeds than when running it with Binge On disabled. Are you trying to say that Binge On won’t throttle users depending on the time of day? It doesn’t matter when EFF ran these tests, with Binge On enabled T-Mobile will throttle just about all downloads, and yes, the time of day makes no difference.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Changed my mind for the time being. If course time of day matters when it comes to network congestion. However, said congestion would be the same whether Binge On is enabled it not. The time of day would have no effect on the fact that running said tests with Binge On will result in slower speeds than when running it with Binge On disabled. Are you trying to say that Binge On won’t throttle users depending on the time of day? It doesn’t matter when EFF ran these tests, with Binge On enabled T-Mobile will throttle just about all downloads, and yes, the time of day makes no difference.

          There is absolutely zero evidence out there that shows that T-Mobile is throttling “just about all downloads” with Binge On enabled.

        • Dustin Roe

          If they make a press event stating they are going to do it, tell that you can turn it off if you like but they are turning it on by default, and provide the means to turn it off then how are they doing it without your knowledge? My only complaint is that they buried the setting on the web portal only under user settings rather than making it prominent in the data plan settings and putting it on the phone app right upfront.

        • calvin35

          I’m taking about the fact that T-Mobile is also throttling direct downloads, not just streaming video. That was never mentioned in any announcement T-Mobile has made.

        • calvin35

          Just to add here, T-Mobile is not optimizing video. They are throttling your speeds and expecting providers to adjust there streams accordingly. Binge on is nothing more than a throttling service with the goal of throttling as many of its users as it possible can and i have no doubt that they have been very successful.

        • Dustin Roe

          Or they could do what the rest of us do and turn on Wifi on both devices to transfer the file faster and more securely using normal IP protocols in windows/MacOS

      • JMccovery

        https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/01/eff-confirms-t-mobiles-bingeon-optimization-just-throttling-applies

        “Downloading a large non-video file for comparison”

        Look at the chart.

        “The second major finding in our tests is that T-Mobile is throttling video downloads even when the filename and HTTP headers (specifically the Content-Type) indicate the file is not a video file. We asked T-Mobile if this means they are looking deeper than TCP and HTTP headers, and identifying video streams by inspecting the content of their customers’ communications, and they told us that they have solutions to detect video-specific protocols/patterns that do not involve the examination of actual content.”

        Performed a similar test with one of the files, which was a 1.3GB video recorded on my Note 4, stored on Google Drive. Downloaded the video directly, no throttling; changed the file name and extension, wasn’t throttled either.

        • Ordeith

          I’m guessing Google drive is an https session, as Google wants to be the only entity that is able to spy on your data. T-Mobile’s filters probably couldn’t see into the encrypted session. Your test is invalid.

      • JMccovery

        One of the files I used to test with was a 1.3GB MP4 file recorded on my Note 4, which was stored on Google Drive.

        Whether it was the original name, or renamed, the video downloaded at speeds far greater than 1.5Mbps.

        • Ordeith

          I’m guessing Google drive is an https session, as Google wants to be the only entity that is able to spy on your data. T-Mobile’s filters probably couldn’t see into the encrypted session. Your test is invalid.

        • JMccovery

          YouTube utilizes HTTPS as well when you log in…

        • Ordeith

          Not for the video streams.

        • kgraham182

          Just tried to download a video I had on OneDrive, and it worked at full speed no throttling. So problem seems to be video file on the open web, as I tried yesterday to download a video and was limited to 1.5Mbps.

  • Joe

    I don’t have a problem with how they are “throttling” the speed but the fact that there trying to hide it from costumers is a problem. Also they should make it a separate option to throttle non binge-on services, and when trying to play higher quality video it should automatically un-throttle or up the speed to a suitable speed.

  • What fiasco?!