T-Mobile amping up Un-carrier 7.0 with new 4G LTE CellSpot

Thinking that there won’t be any big T-Mobile news until Un-carrier X next week? Think again.

T-Mobile today surprised us all with another Un-carrier Amped move. This time, T-Mo is amping up Un-carrier 7.0, which included the launch of the the Personal CellSpot. Well now Magenta is launching the new T-Mobile 4G LTE CellSpot, a new deice that supports T-Mobile 3G LTE as well as VoLTE, HD voice, video calling, and Advanced Messaging.

The 4G LTE CellSpot is a box that measures 8.5 inches wide, 8.5 inches tall, and 1.3 inches thick. Once it’s plugged in, you’ll get a T-Mo LTE signal that covers an average of 3,000 square feet. The unit can support up to 16 calls at once, and it works with any 3G, 4G, or LTE device that works with T-Mo’s band 2 UMTS or band 4 LTE networks. The new CellSpot also offers call handoffs from the unit to T-Mo’s network. Any T-Mobile customer can connect to the unit without logging in.

tmo4gltecellspotofficial

Launching Wednesday, November 4, the T-Mobile 4G LTE CellSpot will be available free for Simple Choice postpaid customers with a refundable $25 deposit and a non-return fee. It’ll be available in stores and through Customer care. T-Mo will give one free CellSpot per business or home location.

T-Mo says that last year’s CellSpot was a hit, with more than 1 million units in the wild. This new 4G LTE CellSpot offers an upgrade over the Personal CellSpot in that it creates a T-Mo signal using your Internet connection, so it works even where cellular signals aren’t available. The good news is that like the Personal CellSpot, the new 4G LTE CellSpot is free with a $25 deposit, so long as you’re on a postpaid Simple Choice plan.

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  • D_Wall__

    Meh, $25? Ill bite.. I wonder if it will interfere with my Home Wifi? I have the Asus router but dont use it..

    • Dokman

      I think this is the cell repeater and not the wifi router. I know this who thing was confusing as they called both a cell spot but you had to specifically ask for the cell repeater which does not interfere with your wifi. I have one in my house works decent if this supports band 12 count me in.

      • warpwiz

        The video specifically states there is no requirements to have a cell signal available. Tough to repeat what is not there.

        • Will

          It is not that it needs a cell signal to work. Instead it requires a GPS signal to verify e911 location AND that T-Mobile is allowed to broadcast a signal in the area of operation. Of course GPS signals can be faked but if you can do that, then you probably don’t need a femtocell in the first place and probably already route your calls over IP.

    • Nivek

      it’s not a repeater. it has a wired ethernet port that routes traffic back to T-Mobile in a secure VPN through the internet.

  • bydavidrosen

    This may sound stupid, but is this an upgraded version of the thing that T-Mobile sent my parents to stick one box in the window and one box on the other side of the house, and it improves the T-Mobile signal (no Wi-Fi involved, just the existing signal)? I thought they called it a Signal Booster, not Cell Spot, which is why I’m confused. It worked too, although far from perfect, but much better than it is without the booster/thing.

    • Robert H

      Yes, this is most likely just an upgraded version of what your mentioned.

      • John Wentworth

        No, it’s not it uses your home internet connection and produces it’s own signal

    • Nivek

      The upgraded one they got was most likely a new LTE one that replaced the older HSPA ONLY one. this device uses your internet like John said.

      • UMA_Fan

        Wrong. This more like an advanced femtocell. T-Mobiles old repeater worked on LTE but was just… A repeater.

        This is new for T-Mobile because it creates LTE using Internet.

        It’s like an Internet to LTE converter.

        • Will

          Actually it seems to be a return to something they already had called Mobile @Home which allowed unlimited calls.

        • UMA_Fan

          This is nothing like that at all.

          @Home was a landline replacement. It was a dedicated linksys router optimized for wifi calling but also had a SIM card slot and a landline phone jack which you could plug in any traditional landline phone and get unlimited calls for $10/month.

    • UMA_Fan

      No the old one was really a repeater

      This is more like an advanced femtocell.

      So it will work even if there is no existing signal.

  • kev2684

    can you get both wifi router cellspot AND 4G LTE cellspot? also i read this 4G LTE cellspot needs to be tethered to the internet? does that use data from comcast is to push data to any T-Mobile subscriber who connect to my 4G LTE data??!

    • Steve_NYC

      I don’t see why not. The WiFi router cellspot is more for the individual home, whereas this new LTE cellspot helps your home and anyone else that is around it. That helps T-Mobile even more. It offloads a little bit extra off of their network. The more of these LTE cellspots they deploy, the better for T-Mobile. I can’t see why they wouldn’t want you to have this too. Heck, they would probably prefer you had the LTE cellspot more than the WiFi router cellspot.

      • Eric

        Except without your cable, without you paying for your Comcast bill, this device wouldn’t work. So yeah, Tmobile must love it because it offloads all the data and voice to your cable, yet they can charge for it in the form of counting it against your mobile data!!!. This is taken right from their faq page: “…4G LTE CellSpot customers use their existing service plan with T-Mobile, meaning data used over the 4G LTE CellSpot counts against your data plan. To access data without it counting against your plan, use Wi-Fi..”

        Most of what Tmobile does, I love. I am a customer and have their unlimited data plan, but this whole thing totally baffles me. Partly because there hasn’t been a single person in this thread who seems to know what it is either. This is not a hotspot, it doesn’t apparently use it’s own “connection” to the internet (it needs your cable). So it uses your internet, but they charge you for the data use. Other people apparently can tap into it. Why? If it uses your data, you’d have to be nuts. Shaking me head. Don’t get it :)

        • Troy

          Because it goes though their VPN. The device makes a secure VPN connection to Tmobile services which uses bandwidth.

  • Brian

    No this is not a signal booster. It creates its own signal but uses your homes internet to do the dirty work. Hence why he said in the video that it’s your own personal cell tower just in a much smaller form. Sounds great to me.

  • Bradley Karas

    Why buy this when your phone supports Wi-Fi calling?

    • Andrew

      This is the Wi-Fi for that Wi-Fi Calling. The Cellspot replaces the current router that you’re using.

      • Jon

        This specific device is actually a LTE microcell- its not a wifi router. You can get wifi routers from tmobile but this one is a new item.

    • Troy

      Because you can go from lte to wifi calling. So if you’re out and about and come home where your service is bad inside you won’t connect to wifi calling until you disconnect the call.

  • Steve_NYC

    It’s always good when T-Mobile offers a new options, but keep in mind that you’re going to be be offering up your home broadband to outsiders. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but if you don’t have a good high-speed broadband internet package, this could (potentially) hurt, That said, I don’t know what options are available in the device, maybe they allow you to limit the number of simultaneous streams, maybe it scales based on your available bandwidth. But whatever it is, it’s going to benefit T-Mobile as well. That’s for certain.

    • Hmmm

      It has passwords

      • Steve_NYC

        There’s passwords on cellular service? This isn’t about WiFi calling. This device has nothing to do with WiFi.

    • Matthew Ramsdell

      They only mention that it covers about 3000 sq-ft. So depending on how close your neighbors are and if they are t mobile customers this could provide cellular service to them through your internet.

  • Rob H.

    Can you get this for a location that has no current T-Mo coverage in the US?

    • Matthew Ramsdell

      Yes. You must have high speed internet to use this micro-cell though. As all voice and data will be transferred through your home internet.

      • Will

        High Speed is a relative term. Any connection that has at least 800 kbps would be sufficient for the voice connection. Of course for data, you would probably want something greater than 3 Mbps or else what would be the point?

    • Will

      You will only be able to use it in an area that T-Mobile owns a license for the LTE band that it is using. For example you would not be able to use this in Canada or Mexico.

  • YABD

    Does it work with cable Internet?

    • Mike Palomba

      I believe it does, the one I have has one box you put near a place in the house and one that you put in the dead zone of your house. No internet needed

      • Andrew

        I think you have the Signal Booster, which is the same outcome but a different method. Yours uses strictly cellular signal, while the Cellspot series uses Wi-Fi signal to boost everything.

      • Matthew Ramsdell

        The unit you have is a wireless repeater. It uses a weak signal and amplifies it to reach dead zones in your home. The unit in this article connects to your home internet to provide a connection and the box is a small cell tower broadcasting its own signal.

        • Eric

          based on this description then, what exactly is the difference? So I have a wifi repeater in my house (another router basically, but set to that mode). Anyone with the key can login and if your phone supports wifi caling, use that. How does the Tmobile thing diff except that it seems like it’s more open, allowing people on the street to use as well?

          You write, “box is a small cell tower broadcasting its own signal.”.

          Well yes and no. It’s running off YOUR wifi or cable connection. It’s not running off tmobile’s connection. It broadcasts a signal, but no different from the repeater. You still need to make wifi calls. That’s the catch, right from the description on their page…. “For all T-Mobile customers with a Wi-Fi Calling capable device.”

          It’s not a mini-cell phone tower. It’s a wireless repeater as far as I can tell. Just not locked down.

        • Matthew Ramsdell

          Simply put, this is not a wifi device of any kind. You can turn off the wifi on your phone and still make calls though this box.
          This uses your home Internet connection as a backend, but it transmits a cellular signal, 3g and lte on band 2 and 4.

        • Eric

          Yeah, I think I might be reading incorrect info. At the time of this post, tmobile didn’t have this listed on their pages. Now they do. I Was looking at totally wrong info

        • Eric

          Well after re-reading the info, I’m still baffled what advantages this has over a wifi repeater. Voice and data is still going over your cable internet service, yet if used this way, it DOES count towards your data cap on tmobile (makes no sense to me). They say up to 16 devices can be connect. Who on earth would knowingly let 16 people tap into their DATA cap per months? Again, why not just get a repeater.

          From what it sounds like, it basically spoofs your phone into >thinking< there's a 4glte connection there, but really it's your home internet doing the lifting. Yet now Tmobile counts the traffic.

          I'll be curious to understand the real point of this.

  • Chris

    If T-Mo can offload data onto these personal LTE cell spots, can they then offer free video streaming as their Un-carrier X move?

    • KrisKordova

      No that would be silly. These don’t have enough reach and T-Mobile already heavily pushes WiFi to offload the network with the WiFi Router cell spot.

      No unlimited video streaming. It would be a nightmare for revenue, and the network. The idea itself sounds horrible.

      • Chris

        Turns out it wasn’t a silly idea- BingeOn. ;)

  • KrisKordova

    WANT!!!!!!!

  • Mike Palomba

    I can’t wait to replace my current cell spot with this one.

  • Ascertion

    The issue with this is your neighbors will be eating your bandwidth, if they’re also on T-Mobile. The range is likely a good amount. Think of having a router function as a cell tower in your house, feeding off your ISP for backhaul.

    Still, for those totally remote areas or people without any signal at their homes, this will likely come in handy.

  • warpwiz

    Something isn’t jelling here. First I took this to mean we would not need a wifi router for the phones. As stated, we’d have 4GLTE via internet.
    But Stated Below: “This specific device is actually a LTE microcell” Does this mean it is an amplifier for OTA LTE? If that is the case, what’s the point? I live in a near TMo deadspot (despite the optimistic maps) with EDGE coverage at best. We use our current Cellspot router extensively for TMo calls and data service.
    So it sounds as if this won’t do me any good(?) Can the same scheme occur by being connected to my cable internet? And if so, will TMo traffic through this thing count against my data quotas?

    • Internet

      If you are using your data from your home internet, it will not count towards your data. You’ll just get a really good signal at home with fast (depending on your internet speed) speeds.

      • Steve_NYC

        That’s a good clarification. It won’t count against a user’s cellular data allocation, but it could count against a user’s home broadband data allocation if they use an ISP that has usage caps like Comcast in certain cities.

        • Will

          Actually if you used LTE data on your device connecting to this device, then the data would count against your data allotment with T-Mobile AND at the same time it would count against the data usage on your broadband connection (FIOS, Comcast, etc.) Voice minutes will also count against your voice minutes AND data usage on your broadband connection.

          That’s how all femtocells work.

        • Steve_NYC

          Yep. You’re right. I was answering a different question in the back of my mind and muffed the answer. This will definitely count against your data allocation on both sides.

        • warpwiz

          Something to confirm with TMo. I would think they could parse out the Cellspot activity and not count it in the OTA data allotment.

      • Jeremy Turnley

        Important: it does not count against your CELLULAR data. If you have a data cap on your HOME internet, it DOES count against that.

    • Steve_NYC

      This would help you a lot. It would create cellular service for you where it doesn’t really exist. It’s not an amplifier (or a “booster”). It’s an actually LTE antenna. Just smaller and much lower powered. The negative is, as you guessed, is that it will count against your data quotas for your home broadband when you use it and whenever anyone in the vicinity uses it. I doubt you’ll have the ability to limit outside users (other than reception). On the other hand, if you’re already using their T-Mobile Cellspot WiFi router, you can do WiFi calling (on a compatible handset) and limit the usage to only those who have access to your WiFi. I think the WiFi router is better for the individual, but this new LTE cellspot is better for T-Mobile because it enhances their overall coverage a little bit for each one of these that is deployed. Both are good though.

    • Matthew Ramsdell

      All cell towers are connected to landlines to move data. What this device does is uses your home internet to transfer voice and data, but the box itself is a very small cell tower broadcasting in your home. A huge benefit of this box would be if you purchased an unlocked device that doesn’t currently support wifi calling.

    • taxandspend

      It’s not an amplifier. It’s a mini LTE tower. Hardwired to your router. Should behave like you live right next to a cell tower once it’s installed. And just as a cell tower has fiber/internet running to the tower, this box needs to be connected to the internet, ie. you must have internet access at home. It is not a signal booster/repeater.

  • Technosquid

    Do I get to select which devices are allowed to connect to this unit? Since this uses my (metered) cable internet connection, does that mean my neighbors can use my monthly transfer cap?

    • Internet

      Just like a router, you need a password to connect to a secure network.

      If you password protect your internet, you’ll be fine.

      • Technosquid

        Are you so sure? How does that work? You didn’t need a password to connect to the repeater. This doesn’t transmit WiFi, it transmits 4G. Where would you enter a password for a 4G connection? In APN settings?

      • Matthew Ramsdell

        This is incorrect. The box is securely connected to your network but the signal it broadcasts is an open cellular signal that you have no control over.

        • Eric

          But how can they do that, make it open, yet lump all the data usage to your account? Totally crazy. Feel like I’m still missing a piece to this puzzle.

        • Matthew Ramsdell

          The data used isn’t associated with your tmobile account. But you are providing your home Internet bandwidth. If you have a data cap for home Internet it will eat into that, but so does wifi calling.

    • warpwiz

      John LeGere said specifically that anyone with a TMo device could use Cellspot LTE. That tells me my cable internet allotment could be devoured if I’m in a very TMo neighborhood. That may be TMo’s payback for the devices.

      • Technosquid

        While I’m sure they’ll explain this to you when you’re ordering the device, many people are totally unaware of their internet transfer caps. There are some who are relegated to 250-350GB per month on their home internet connections. Maybe this is the real reason LeGere is so concerned about cracking down on unlimited plan abusers who “use up to 2TB per month.” if your neighbor is one, they could end up costing you hundreds in overage fees by connecting through this device.

        • warpwiz

          It would be essential to watch the internet usage daily until you got to know better what to expect. My cable provider includes this in their app. I’m one of those saddled with a 350gb limit!

  • Fabian Cortez

    Band 12 or not necessary?

    • kbiel

      It looks like a Internet to 4G/3G/LTE box, not a repeater. So, no it wouldn’t matter which band it serves (with the exception of FCC rules).

      • Fabian Cortez

        It looks like a Internet to 4G/3G/LTE box, not a repeater. So, no it wouldn’t matter which band it serves (with the exception of FCC rules).

        Correct. Which means it generates a T-Mobile signal using bands.

        Band 12 would be great for its propagation characteristics within office buildings, etc.

        • kbiel

          I agree that band 12 would be more effective, but I believe there are still areas where it is still reserved for terrestrial TV broadcast. I think the FCC would be very upset if T-Mobile shipped out a bunch of tiny interference generators to those areas. If that is the case, it makes sense that they would stick to safe bands.

        • Fabian Cortez

          That’s another good point!

          T-Mobile doesn’t own nationwide Band 12 either so that would indeed pose a problem along with the interference with Channel 51 in those remaining locales as you mentioned.

    • take the good person test

      I was just at the keyboard with the same question :)

    • warpwiz

      No band 12 according to the news release

    • Matthew Ramsdell

      According to the article it’s band 2 and 4.

    • Frankenstu

      The whole point of Band 12 is that you wouldn’t need this anyway. So I would suspect this is only for areas with poor signal and no band 12.

    • Will

      I guess the assumption here is that Band 12 would carry too far. By using Band 2 or 4, you limit issues with neighbors, although that is still bound to happen in dense areas like the East Coast.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Good point.

        I figured Band 12 would be great for office buildings, etc.

        • Will

          In theory they can adjust the transmit power just like the one Verizon uses. By default it could be lower power but tech support would be able to increase based upon location. For example, you could transmit at the legal max if you lived on 5 acres. But if you had an apartment in Manhattan, it would configured for the lowest power to avoid interference with the neighbors.

          The biggest issue will always be interference with your neighbor. Your femtocell can cause their phone to constantly try to connect to it instead of a regular cell tower.

  • user

    Can anyone with a T-Mobile phone that has the same frequencies as this ‘cellspot’ connect to it, or you have to register each device?

    Does this ‘cellspot’ provide internet data to the phones or is it just limited to calls, VoLTE, messages and only things call related?

    Can you limit, for example turn off 3G or 4G depending on the devices you have? This to limit other unknown devices from to the ‘cellspot’.

  • user

    Maybe we should call it Cellular Signal Over IP.

  • Critic4U

    The problem with this Legre is this is not a solution either this is just like sprints airave 2.5 device (so much for your copying speach on your scarriers YouTube video pot calling the kettle black on that one). The other factor with these devices is that it utilizes the customers internet connection to make the calls, get texts and download content, if someone lives cloes by then they will be able to connect to it becuase it will show up as a normal tower, thus if you only have 150gb, 250gb or even lower data cap then all the 16 possible people will be able to connect to it and drain their data causing overages with their internet company not you…

    • guest

      Dude, it is a great option and it is free, relax.

      People just need to learn how it works and decide if it is for them or not.

      • yankeesusa

        He’s relaxed. He’s just making a valid point. Most internet companies cap the data you use and if you have random people connecting to your wifi then yes, that is going to affect you. Plus, if i’m going to be helping the network with this signal sharing then i should be compensated for it. A free signal booster is not enough.

        • guest

          It’s an option that looks like it’s not for everyone. No one is forcing you to put this in your house.

          But if, let’s say, you live in the outskirts of town where signal is poor and there’s not many people around you, it’s perfect. Same if you want signal deep inside a building.

        • Critic4U

          I’m just saying if you have a data cap with your internet company and you have someone sucking your data away I’m sure you would be pissed off… and These rely on a GPS lock it needs to be near a window…

        • yankeesusa

          Yea, that is why the asus tmobile router is the best route as it can be secured and you still get the wifi calling features.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Except if your phone doesn’t support Wi-Fi Calling.

        • yankeesusa

          It’s very hard to find a phone from t-mobile that doesn’t have Wi-Fi calling unless it’s unlocked like the moto x. The good news is that the nexus phones from n6 and on all have Wi-Fi calling and if you are into custom roms the marshmallow update from cm will have Wi-Fi calling built in.

        • Fabian Cortez

          BYOD

        • yankeesusa

          Yep, that’s why I said unlocked phones like moto x and oneplus one. And it was just announced that phones running cm will soon get Wi-Fi calling.

        • Fabian Cortez

          CM needs to be compiled for each and every phone.

          Likewise, there are other unlocked devices out that don’t run Android and that support bands that T-Mobile broadcasts on.

          In short, this device takes care of them.

        • yankeesusa

          True, that is definitely a plus.

        • guest

          Okay, that’s good. I guess i misread your tone.
          Sorry.

        • yankeesusa

          Or you can just get their tmobile asus router which does the same thing and it is actually one of the best routers asus makes and your connection is secure.

        • dtam

          the router only does wifi calling though which is hit or miss and may or may not be supported by your phone

        • Richard Roma

          Ok sparky, so then go over to the other carriers where you have to pay for this.

          You have 3 free options with mobile, what the heck else do you want…

        • yankeesusa

          No need to get your panties in a bunch. Just making a statement. If it offended you in some way well then i am sorry for that.

  • Question for those that seem to better understand this. I have an unlimited plan with no throttling, and strong 4G LTE signal where i live. I have Time Warner Cable/Internet and I get close to 200mbps down. Is there any real benefit for me to acquire this? Thanks!

    • gomaze

      Nope. This is for people that might have an internet connection like that but on the fringe of the current network.

    • Will

      Do you have a basement? If so, you can stick this in the basement, as long as the GPS can still get a signal lock. Of course a signal booster might work better for that situation as the booster can be deep in a basement.

      • guest

        I like the way you think.

        Other people only look for the negative, you look for the solutions.

        Great idea.

  • yankeesusa

    This is great and all but i don’t want my signal being used by random people on the street and from what iv’e read their is no way of stopping any random tmobile users from hopping on your signal.

    • Critic4U

      No there is not unfortunately, I would of rather had some option to only allow certain T-Mobile devices to connect that are in your household, I am a T-Mobile customer myself and I wouldn’t want anyone sucking my bandwidth down that wasn’t authorized. This was obviously never thought out by the T-Mobile engineers…

      • Will

        I don’t think anyone knows the answer to this question yet. Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T all currently let you lock down their femtocells to only your cell number. I am willing to bet T-Mobile will do the same.

        • Critic4U

          Sprint doesn’t allow you to lock down your airave…

        • Will

          It’s in the FAQs for the Airave. You can lock down the device but by default it is open. The same is true for Verizon’s network extender.

          Can customers limit access to their AIRAVE?

          Yes, you can limit access to your AIRAVE device by creating a list of up to 50 approved Sprint phone
          numbers (a.k.a. Whitelist). You can create your list on sprint.com by logging into your Sprint account and
          selecting “I want to update my AIRAVE” within the “My Device and Media” tab. You also may call
          AIRAVE Customer Support at 866-556‐7310. Once a change is made to the Whitelist, a reboot is needed
          for the changes to go into effect on the AIRAVE device.

        • Will

          Actually Sprint does allow you to lockdown the device by calling their support line.

        • Critic4U

          Actually they don’t as i work for them, we do not allow you to lock down your airave at all… its part of the reason why we give it to you for free…

        • Will

          If that is true, then that is new policy and you should use your connections to update their FAQs as it clearly states that it can be locked down:

          http://www.sprint.com/landings/airave/files/AIRAVE_Access_Point_FAQs.pdf?INTMKT=MKT:MS:20131
          030:AIR:MSU:EEE:FAQs

        • imrf

          Neither Sprints nor Verizon’s will allow you to do that. I’ve had both.

        • Will

          I have both Sprint and Verizon femtocells and you can lock them. With Sprint you have to call customer care. With Verizon you can just lock them by adding in your cell phone numbers or by calling customer care.

          Maybe you had the old versions?

        • imrf

          I’ve tried that with both and they don’t allow it.

      • Ross Fisher

        It was thought out by T-Mobile Engineers, the company saves money while you foot the bandwidth bill :)

        • imrf

          Veizon, AT&T and Sprint all have similar devices that do the same thing. So I would go throwing rocks in a glass house.

      • Bradley Block

        This does not connect to your internet connection at home. It is a standalone device. Why on earth would you care if someone walking down the street temporarily connected to your cellspot? Hell you as a TMO customer should want and wish that every other customer had one of these. If they were everywhere then our signal would be much much better than what it currently is. That’s just my 2 cents.

        • warpwiz

          It is NOT a standalone device. You have to have an internet connection. LeGere says Power, an Internet connection and a location within the TMo network (whether there is OTA signal or not). Watch the video.

        • Critic4U

          It does use your internet connection, I know this because I work for one of the carriers that uses this technology, so go take your misinformation elsewhere

    • Richard Roma

      So don’t get one.

      • yankeesusa

        Great, thanks for your informative and useful response lol

  • Ray

    Could this interfere with the signal booster device that TMO offered last year? (Please note that I am speaking of the signal booster from last year not the cellspot).

    • Will

      More likely it would just confuse the device as to which signal to lock onto. This already happens with femtocells on the market.

      • warpwiz

        I believe all you’ll have to do is turn off the phone’s wifi. it should then go for the 4GLTE signal off your new Cellspot.

        • Will

          No I was talking about the use case where you have a strongish signal from a cell tower and then also have the femtocell. Some phones can have a hard time figuring out whether to lock onto the outside cell signal or the femtocell.

          You would never want to turn off your Wifi connection on your device as most likely the Wifi connection would be a stronger and more stable connection (and possibly more secure but that depends upon the router).

        • warpwiz

          That depends. We have a Cellspot device. It is a good wifi router. But the voice quality on VOIP is not good (sounds like the phone is under a pillow many times). OTOH, the voice is excellent over OTA LTE. I’m hoping this will solve that issue. We’ll leave the wifi for the PCs & the printer.

        • Will

          If your VOIP call sounds like it is under a pillow, it is dropping packets or the latency on the network is really high. IP calls don’t need very much bandwidth at all (800 kbps connection is fine), but you do need low latency. You can check latency on your phone using a tool like Speedtest. Latency needs to be very low. Anything with a ping of under 80 ms will work. High latency on Wifi can be caused by interference with microwave ovens, baby monitors, Bluetooth, or anything that uses unlicensed frequency. To fix that, try changing the Wifi channel to any unused channel.

    • Ontwowheels

      I don’t think TM will allow you to have both devices, the 4GLTG Celfi booster, the Asus router or this new device.

  • Toan Ngo

    Just configure your router to QoS this IP to low speeds. Ideally, you’d only need this for voice and be connected to your home wifi for data. Visitor/roamers will get voice and slow data speeds instead of a dead zone. They came use all the bandwidth they want at 2G speeds, lol.

    • Will

      Ironically the Asus router that was released by T-Mobile last year has per IP bandwidth control restrictions disabled. Of course that may have changed in a later firmware. I immediately switched mine over to AsusWRT Merlin firmware and can do just what you described.

  • Chad Dalton

    I need this at work…terrible connection. barely 1 or 2 bars…only edge! I have picked up LTE before but its very unstable.

    • Ontwowheels

      Your work will probably not allow you connect this device to the corporate network.

  • jonzey231

    I bet they’re doing this to help relieve the strain after they release VideoUnleashed!!!

    • Fabian Cortez

      The coverage area of these device are similar to wireless routers. Hardly any type of true densification required for why some believe is video freedom.

  • Richard Roma

    Some of the responses here are a prime example of what happens when you give away stuff for free. Complain Complain Complain.

    • warpwiz

      Free doesn’t always make it a good solution for certain individuals. Problem is when everyone gets hyped up about something that sounds good, then they read the fine print. Turns out it’s not a solution for everyone! And so if you have an issue that you thought would be solved, you vent.

      • Richard Roma

        Well, T-Mobile provides you of three options now. Whereas, most other carriers only provide you with one. Plus you have to pay them well over $200 for this option.

    • PC_Tool

      Right?

      Thought this crowd would be smarter than the comments are indicating. /smh

    • NEO2U

      Exactly. Critics of a devices capabilities without having used it will stay stuck in the Matrix.

    • guest

      They should’ve said it is on a $25 lease, and you get a $25 refund when you return it.

      Maybe people respond better when companies BS us with psychological marketing techniques. Or just have people on a short leash like Verizon and AT&T.

  • Matt

    The only thing I’m not crazy about is that any T-Mobile customer can hop on your LTE CellSpot. I wish there was a way to restrict it based on your phone’s IMEI.

    • guest

      Someone posted the idea to put it in your basement, if you have one.

    • Travis Tabbal

      I see where you’re coming from, but from TMO’s perspective, they want any customer to get a signal in more buildings etc.. That makes it worth it to them to provide the equipment for low cost to you.

      Out of curiosity, would you feel better about it if TMO were to offer a small bill credit for having it open? I’ve always thought they should do something like that for using my internet connection to serve any random customer that gets a signal from me.

      If I could get a decent unlimited home connection I’d consider one of these.

      • Matt

        I have a decent unlimited connection so I guess it really doesn’t matter. I’m more concerned about the security implications and people using my CellSpot for criminal activity.

        • Will

          I wouldn’t worry about criminal activity. In this case, you would be seen in the same light as any other ISP and not held accountable for criminal behavior, unless you were the one doing the criminal behavior. You being the “broadband provider” would be protected under current federal laws.

        • Travis Tabbal

          In addition to the other comment about ISPs being protected, the data is supposed to be tunneled and encrypted to TMO. So anyone connected to you will have their data sent out from a TMO IP, not yours. So any illegal activity wouldn’t come back to your IP anyway. This would also protect anyone connecting to your device from having you intercept and/or manipulate their data. So I would think this would be the case. Someone would have to watch the traffic from one to be 100% sure.

        • Ven

          You have no clue what so ever. No one can hack in to your cellspot. And a criminal using your cell spot is similar to he using a regular macro cell. It would not matter. You are better off living under a ROCK.

        • guest

          I don’t think you have anything to worry about. I read the server to cellspot communication is thru VPN.

        • You can hack wifi routers. I would worry more about that than anything someone doing criminal activity on their cell phones. Since it connects to tmobile via a vpn t-mobile will know what they’re doing such as torrents.

    • NEO2U

      I think T-Mobile may view it as their T-Mobile signal and not necessarily yours just because of the location of the device. You would probably be signing something to that effect. But i would guess that you could unplug or shut it down at anytime too. I do have a Directv DVR but Directv still owns it. But I do see your point.

      • Dan

        Sure the DVR is still owned by DirectTV but they don’t let anyone with DirectTV service to come along and connect to your DVR do they?

        • NEO2U

          You do realize this is by design that you can not do that .But since AT&T just bought Directv you never know ;)

        • Dan

          Yeah I completely understand your position. I would be wary of any device that you attach to your personal network without having any control over how it is managed.

    • Ordeith

      But if they use LTE data on your LTE CellSpot.. does it count against their Data Cap? Does yours if you connect to it instead if your WiFi?

      • Mystery Man

        Yes it counts against theirs but it uses your home internets data.

        • Ordeith

          So they are billing people for data they don’t provide? That doesn’t sound right.

  • Moe Smalls

    What about for non postpaid customers? What about regular customers?

    • Will

      For the previous Cellspot router (the Wifi one) you could purchase them for $99 if you were prepaid. For the previous Cellspot signal booster, you could not purchase them from T-Mobile, but you could pay a $300 deposit. Hopefully they will also extend this to the new femtocell.

  • justanormalguy13

    I wonder if they’ll trade my one from last year for this new one.

    • guest

      I have same question also. Do we need to return the last year Wifi cellspot?

      • justanormalguy13

        I asked customer care that too. They said they’d send you a return label, then I they get it back you can go get the new one.

    • Mystery Man

      Depends if your talking about the router or the cell booster they offered?

  • justanormalguy13

    I also wonder if using this will count against the monthly mobile data allowance.

    • guest

      I think so. Think of this as t- mobile’s mini cell tower.

      • justanormalguy13

        Just chatted with customer care, and you’re correct, it counts against your data allotment. Very interesting, since they’re using my data from my home internet. Being unlimited, I don’t care. But it was still an interesting question.

        • guest

          I think it would be complicated for t-mobile to make a system that also differentiates data spent over regular towers and cellspots.
          Thanks for posting your confirmation talk with customer care.

        • justanormalguy13

          I don’t think it’d be any harder then differentiating if data is streaming audio or not.

        • Terry

          Technically it should be the same. But there’s only 20(?) or so music services out there? If this has the same uptake as the previous extender we’re talking like a million cellspots. That’d make for a long whitelist. They might be able to do it with some clever network engineering but I don’t really know how hard that would be.

    • kbiel

      My guess is that it would, but since this is to be plugged into an existing Internet connection, I would assume that anyone using it will be connected to WiFi as well.

  • disqus_d85ULs0u9e

    Tmobile should give consumer quickbacks on number of phones(based on IMEI) utilizing your cellspot. Keep in mind nothing is free, the consumer still has a power and internet bill

    • Will

      I like the idea but think that it would create a billing mess for both you and T-Mobile. Do you remember the AT&T cell bills that were like 50 pages long and listed every data connection?

      • disqus_d85ULs0u9e

        Not really, if you have a point system model or just provide a drop in my monthly bill (-$15) to cover internet and electric bill. its a deal.

        • maximus1901

          or they could just filter by the IP address of the cell spot lol.

  • Sushimane

    Can we just trade lol.

  • schova

    Gimme gimme gimme!

  • Ordeith

    so… WiFi calling a bust?

    • Ontwowheels

      I tried it a few times on an iPhone 6, thought the call quality was poor and I have very fast internet. So I have the function turned off….so for me yes, it’s a bust.

    • imrf

      No. WIFI calling works great on my iPhone 6s Plus and worked just as fine on my Nexus 6, LG G2 phones as well.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Flag. He’s just trolling.

        They show up every now and then.

    • No. Wi-Fi Calling works on my Lumia 925. Only problem is the lack of updates on Wi-Fi Calling app from T-Mobile on WP 8.1.

  • LUL

    lovin the sprint party

  • Ascertion

    Wow, usage on this thing counts towards your actual T-Mobile usage.
    https://support.t-mobile.com/docs/DOC-21332#question9

    That is totally lame. They’re essentially letting T-Mobile customers supply the backhaul to their network in areas where they do not want to expand.

  • David

    Currently on T-Mobile CellSpot router. 2 questions.
    1. 10 lines in my family plan w/relatives who live in their own house, can I get 2 of this, one for me and one for my relative’s house who’s also on the postpaid plan?
    2. Can this be used overseas, say when travelling to asia, europe, Will it work as if I’m still in the US?

    • DisqusNatin

      Hope somebody can shed light on @David’s question #2.

    • Ascertion

      For question number 2. Very doubtful. It must be in an area where it’s approved to broadcast on T-Mobile’s frequencies. Likely those same frequencies are used overseas by other carriers and would cause interference, so I believe it would not work there.

    • maximus1901

      if you threaten to cancel, yes.

    • Rupesh

      On 2 – No. It’s locked to the GPS and this is what T-mo mentioned:
      Device must be installed in a location where T-Mobile:
      Offers service
      Owns licensed spectrum
      Has local E911 relationship

      This means that it will not overseas.

    • Goat

      1. I actually believe you can, instruct the representative to set up the order by using a different address. In other words it’s by address so they can. Just don’t exchange them between the addresses.
      2. I don’t believe so.

  • Ascertion

    For whatever reason, the mods of TmoNews denied my post because it had T-Mobile’s FAQ source in it…

    This DOES count towards your usage on T-Mobile, even if you are supplying the backhaul (via ISP.)

    Is there a separate pricing plan for T-Mobile 4G LTE CellSpot?

    No.
    4G LTE CellSpot customers use their existing service plan with
    T-Mobile, meaning data used over the 4G LTE CellSpot counts against your
    data plan. To access data without it counting against your plan, use
    Wi-Fi.

    • guest

      Thanks.

      How did you found the faq?

    • h

      I ask TMo on twitter they say any Tmobile Phone can connect to it. They are not going into detail about security. I have to use my ISP bandwidth for others not liking this so far unless we are missing some detail

    • Will

      This is typical for all of the carriers that offer femtocell (network extenders). Data and voice minutes count against your data bucket at T-Mobile AND your ISP.

    • maximus1901

      More I think about it, the worse it is.
      You’re still charged for connecting to it even though you’re taking load off of TMO’s network and eating up your wired ISP data.

    • Ordeith

      Double dipping.
      Bad form, T-Mobile.

      • Fabian Cortez

        How is T-Mobile double dipping again?

        Double dipping implies they’re collecting twice.

  • Bluemoon737

    I can see this being useful in a business but why on earth would you want this in your home?

    • pjp1

      if you have no cell coverage at your house, and your cell doesn’t support wi-fi calling or you don’t have wi-fi at your house, you will be missing calls unless you have this gadget.

      • Bluemoon737

        Come on now, how many t-mobile phones are left out there that don’t support WiFi calling? Get the free WiFi router from T-Mobile instead and upgrade to a new phone. As I said, this makes great sense for a business but IMHO has limited usefulness in the home environment.

        • Mystery Man

          Because what if you have crap signal at your home but don’t feel like letting people know your WiFi?

        • Bluemoon737

          Again, just get the free T-Mobile router which has guest features…no need to allow them on “your” network.

        • fechhelm

          The original Moto X, the 2nd gen Moto X, all variations of the Moto G, all variations of the Moto E, The Asus Zen, The Alcatel OneTouch Idol, and a host of other highly rated carrier free phones not sold by T-mobile.

      • Ordeith

        Or switch to a carrier that actually provides coverage.

  • Robert Arutunian

    I am using the 4GLTE booster now. Occasionally signal for to H+ and call drops. Would this be better option? Think it would.

    • Tom Bodnar

      Yes, Becuase it’s not repeater but a classic femtocell.

      • Robert Arutunian

        Thanks Tom. Also read can handle hand off cellular to unit and vice versa without dropping call. Talked to Customer Service yesterday and they were nice enough to agree to send one out.

    • Mystery Man

      Much better option if you have unlimited broadband for your home connection.

  • John Kichiy

    Would a Tmobile client be able to take this device to a Canadian address and install it for WiFi access to celular service without Roaming constraints?

    • Will

      No it has a GPS lock that would prevent it from working outside of a T-Mobile licensed area.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Which makes sense.

        Nothing like interfering with Wind Mobile’s AWS-1 network in Canada.

  • Bob Masters

    What I wonder about is: how safe it is for your health to host a mini cell tower at your home? We don’t want smart meters, but we welcome cell towers at home? Isn’t it a bit nonsensical? Come on, TMO, build real towers… Don’t turn your customers into your free (for you) cell network

    • Anon

      The coverage area (3000 sq ft) is same as WiFi Cellspot, so imagine it’s radiating same power level as a WiFi router.

      Helpful TMO site to answer some questions:
      https://support.t-mobile.com/community/coverage/personal-cellspot/4g-lte-cellspot

    • maximus1901

      So you agree to increase your bill so tmo can match att/vzw arpu?

    • Will

      I have network extenders from Verizon, Sprint, and now will have one from T-Mobile. I guess I will start glowing at any moment and my future kids will have two or more heads.

    • Mystery Man

      Your complaining about a free offering that you don’t have to take if you do not want. Makes sense….

    • Jason

      Step 1: Find a wooden shack in the woods if you fear your health from something that a majority of Americans use. . Americans are suffering from a case of paranoia. Sheesh, you do realize T-Mob knows more about you than you know. If you want to be safe Bob, step away for your internet, cell phones, tv, etc and see Step 1.

  • Soke Well

    Is there any data on the affect to your health with regards to these boosters/amplifiers?

    • maximus1901

      yes there is. NO effect.

    • Mystery Man

      It uses existing T-Mobile bands not new ones. So the same bad health effects as before.

    • Adam

      With all the potential money from these health lawsuits, I think if there really are health concerns, we would have seen at least one lawsuit won by now.

  • Jimmy James

    I have the 4g LTE booster model they were giving out last year. What is the difference over that, besides being able to use Wi-Fi now when you have no signal? Is this a single unit? My model has two units, one for boosting the signal to the house, then the other box for actual connecting your phone to.

    • maximus1901

      that’s the WIFI cellspot. that connects via wifi.
      this is the LTE/umts cellspot. it connects via lte or umts/3g/hspa.
      both need a wired connection.

      • Jimmy James

        No. Mine does not have any Wi-Fi, pure LTE.

        • maximus1901

          then that’s a booster. diff is booster doesn’t use wired internet connection.

        • Jimmy James

          So you have to have Internet in your home to use this new box?

        • maximus1901

          yes

        • Jimmy James

          Oh. I thought it would use your Internet connection as a backup. What is the purpose of this then if we already have Wi-Fi calling?

        • maximus1901

          To fix TMO’s network. That’s the point.

        • Fabian Cortez

          To fix TMO’s network. That’s the point.

          Sure.

          So why do AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon offer this?

        • maximus1901

          ATT and Verizon allow whitelisting though they charge you for the femtocell; I wonder how many people would pay the ~$168 in exchange for allowing whitelisting. I wouldn’t.

          Sprint gives airave for free but not sure if you can whitelist.

        • Fabian Cortez

          ATT and Verizon allow whitelisting though they charge you for the femtocell; I wonder how many people would pay the ~$168 in exchange for allowing whitelisting. I wouldn’t.
          Sprint gives airave for free but not sure if you can whitelist.

          Uh, do you have a source for this whitelisting?

          The other three carriers most definitely take from your data bucket, and apply overages (!), with these micro/pico/femto cells. Overages and data buckets are a core part of their business, especially the duopoly.

        • maximus1901

          google “att femtocell whitelist”, “sprint airave whitelist” and you’ll get support docs stating so.

          All carriers take from your data bucket. Fine. I could live with that. But the possibility that someone next door could, unintentionally, latch on and drain your comcast bucket is not appealing.

          Att and VZW charge ~$250 for femtocell. If I could pay that over 2 years and have peace of mind that there was a MAX monthly data amount that ALL non-account holders could use on my cellspot – 10 or 20GB – I’d do it.

        • Fabian Cortez

          google “att femtocell whitelist”, “sprint airave whitelist” and you’ll get support docs stating so.

          I know about the whitelist. Maybe I misconstrued your statement, thinking that you were advocating that the whitelist absolves the end user from deductions from their data bucket while using these cells.

          All carriers take from your data bucket. Fine. I could live with that. But the possibility that someone next door could, unintentionally, latch on and drain your comcast bucket is not appealing.

          That’s clearly the worry but it only takes into account a portion of the target audience. The small business example counters this.

          Att and VZW charge ~$250 for femtocell. If I could pay that over 2 years and have peace of mind that there was a MAX monthly data amount that ALL non-account holders could use on my cellspot – 10 or 20GB – I’d do it.

          Again, you’re ignoring businesses that would be interested in this along with people who don’t live in close-knit apartments. You also act as if this limitation (lack of whitelisting) would require new hardware when it’s clearly something software-based that could be handled on T-Mobile’s end. Possibly via an option in the user’s My T-Mobile account.

          I wouldn’t be surprised if it was in the works.

        • maximus1901

          I would be shocked if it isn’t. this is clearly a (american and canadian) pain point and they don’t want to create one problem while solving another.

        • GovGeek

          The point is very simple I believe. This is the clear choice for your cabin in the woods that has zero signal to a T-MO tower, but you have broadband. Or for the remote Hotelier in the same scenario that wants to provide T-MO to their guests.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Yes, both need an Internet connection. Only one uses your LTE allotment and only one requires you to have a Wi-Fi Calling-capable phone.

  • Jimmy James

    Okay. So this does nothing for someone who uses only T-Mobile unlimited
    Internet and does not have home Internet, but has a bad signal at their
    home like my house does, even though the maps list it as having an
    excellent signal. So to use a T-Mobile phone normally, you need Internet
    access for this. Is this a cell tower, as everyone is stating, or is this just a unit that connects to your home Wi-Fi?

    • Dada

      Just how poor are you that you can’t afford a broadband connection?

      • thepanttherlady

        I don’t see where OP said anything about not being able to afford a broadband connection.

        I don’t have internet connection at home either. It doesn’t mean I can’t afford it.

        • its my understanding that you need an internet concoction to hook this up to for it to work.

        • thepanttherlady

          Hi John,

          I am not looking to get one of these but rather commenting on the assumption made by Dada that one is poor because they do not have (assumption: can’t afford) a broadband connection. :)

        • ahh gothca…I did not even see that comment…I saw it via a email notification….sorry bout’ that…

  • Jimmy James

    Okay. So this does nothing for someone who uses only T-Mobile unlimited
    Internet and does not have home Internet, but has a bad signal at their
    home like my house does, even though the maps list it as having an
    excellent signal. So to use a T-Mobile phone normally in a bad area, you must
    have Internet access now? Are they getting rid of the signal booster and forcing everyone to this femtocell Internet only device? And they count data against you over your own home Internet? Read the wikipedia on femtocell and the “controversy on consumer proposition” section.

    • matt

      well, what what ever they are doing they are not asking for $200 for the equipment and asking you $25 a month for att’s microcell calling plan

      i think the regular boosters , like the ones you put outside your house are still available

      • Jimmy James

        Okay. I am assuming they probably are also, but not in the future.

    • Flip Jumpman

      Why don’t you have home Internet?

      • Jimmy James

        I didn’t for many many months.
        You don’t know what hard times are daddy. Hard times are when the constructions workers around this country are out of work, they got 4 or 5 kids and can’t pay their wages, can’t buy their food. Hard times are when the auto workers are out of work and they tell ‘em to go home. And hard times are when a man has worked at a job for thirty years, thirty years, and they give him a watch, kick him in the butt and say “hey a computer took your place, daddy”, that’s hard times! That’s hard times!

        • Flip Jumpman

          Yea, I feel you!

        • Fabian Cortez

          Up vote for “daddy.”

        • guest

          That’s good, but it’s not T-M’s fault.

          Maybe a signal repeater is a better option for you, Or get some internet service, move to a less expensive T-Mobile plan and use the CellSpot.

    • GovGeek

      You sir are a candidate for a 4G LTE Cel-Fi ‘RS3 Duo’ signal booster. Cellspot type#1 as David above describes. “1. Booster. comes in a pair, basically grab T-Mobile signal from the air and rebroadcast through the paired device located in a place that has weak/no signal.”

      • Jimmy James

        Thank you. This is the answer I was looking for.

  • David

    To clarify a few different cellspot types:
    1. Booster. comes in a pair, basically grab T-Mobile signal from the air and rebroadcast through the paired device located in a place that has weak/no signal.
    2. Wifi-router. This is just a regular router, except it’s optimized for wifi-calling feature if your phone supports it.
    3. new 4G LTE cellspot. It connects to your router and broadcast actual cellular signal. It turns your internet connection into a mini T-Mobile tower, public tower.

    I like #3 because here I have 100MB internet speed so I don’t mind other people get on the tower at all. I won’t mind the slightest once I get Google Fiber’s gigabyte connection in a year or two.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Exactly.

      Many places provide free Wi-Fi as it is. Popping this in to an existing Ethernet jack wouldn’t be too different.

      But as you showed: options.

      • Technosquid

        As long as the T-Mobile rep who’s helping resolve the customer’s coverage issue makes sure they’re recommending the right option, and they’re not just pushing the 4G LTE CellSpot because it’s the new hotness. I think the 4G LTE CellSpot should be used as a last resort. Why open your internet to the public if you don’t absolutely need to?

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’s an option and my example was mainly geared toward businesses.

          Likewise, the coverage range on this would only pose a problem for those who dwell in close-knit apartments with not-so-thick walls.

    • I’m really hoping for public places to get on this. It would be great if larger buildings could install these and provide seamless coverage indoors—even where low band spectrum can’t reach.

  • Ordeith

    how secure is the data stream from the device to the internet? Could I use this to build my own personal Stingray device?

  • D—- J——-

    Did I miss the part about cheap unlimited data for individuals, people like you and me? I already have an unlimited talk and text and free tethering for $20 per month through Google’s Project fi but they still charge $10 per gig of data!

    • Ordeith

      > but they still charge $10 per gig of data!
      and you sell out your privacy and data to Google’s Ad Indexing so they can refine the target on your back.

      • D—- J——-

        Yes, but most of my communication is by text so I have a record of what was said and when said. Also if I do not use a full gig I get a refund for unused portion on next bill and if I go over a gig I only pay for that used portion. As far as being targeted with advertising, I only buy what I want and need. I am not a coupon shopper buying stuff I don’t need just because I have a coupon or see an ad!

        • Ordeith

          It isn’t the advertising that should worry you, it’s the data collection and profiling that is behind it that is a problem.

  • Shreddie88

    “FIRST EVER CELLSPOT”…John AT&T already did this EXACT same thing back in 2009 with the 3g “MicroCell”. I remember AT&T sent me one for free when I had a Iphone 3g with them. Now I’m all for T-Mobile but don’t pee on my leg and tell me it’s raining.

    • Shreddie88
    • Aaron Tillery

      you obviously didnt read or watch the whole article/video its the first lte cell spot that supports every part of the carriers normal network. Cant stand when people read a headline and comment on it without knowing the fact
      first.

      • Shreddie88

        …wow again I said this was from 2009 and Edge and 3g was only two technologies available at the time on AT&T. ” Cant stand when people read a headline and comment on it without knowing the fact
        first.”

        • JNawaz

          Watch the video. Legere meant to say the first 4G LTE cellspot from a US carrier. He acknowledged that other carriers have had femtocells. He also mentioned the limitations of those offered by other carriers. So he’s peeing while its raining to cover the fact that he’s peeing. ;)

        • Shreddie88

          My only point was that femtocells are nothing new but yes the first ever “4G LTE” cellspot is awesome and will give people another option to get coverage where towers cannot reach and for phones that don’t support WIFI calling.

  • D—- J——-

    What happened to my question? Did I ask the wrong question or was it the mention of Google’s project fi

  • Matt

    I don’t know if anyone has asked this yet, but the true question is whether being connected to a LTE signal from a “4G Cell Spot” which is piggybacking off someone’s home internet connection will count against your data cap.

    If you are the home owner and have your wifi off, you could be “paying” double by using the LTE signal produced by your home internet. Not that this is really an issue, just an interesting thought. Overall, this sounds like a nice addition to T-Mobile’s cell service support offerings.

    • Ordeith

      Yes, it has been asked, and answered.
      Yes, it will continue to count against your Data Cap.
      Yes, T-Mobile is double dipping.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Yes, T-Mobile is double dipping.

        How is T-Mobile “double dipping” when they don’t provide home broadband service?

        • kev2684

          I think by that, he meant that T-Mobile is piggyback riding your own internet giving free access to other T-Mobile customers without any form of compensation or account credit. T-Mobile gets extra coverage out of you while you’re still paying them for a service they should’ve provided in the first place

        • Ordeith

          They also charge you (and others) for data that T-Mobile ultimately doesn’t provide.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I get what he’s saying.

          The others do the same and even charge you overages even though you pay for the home internet service.

          The problem here is the charge of “double dipping” to which he has zero evidence.

          The only carriers capable of double dipping, and do, in this scenario are AT&T and Verizon as they both provide cellular and wireline service.

        • maximus1901

          They’re forcing you to double dip: your data allotment and your ISP allotment.

    • Flip Jumpman

      Yes it does count against your data cap. For all the people complaining, it’s free and one one’s forcing you to get this. It’s just another option you can choose if it works for you. I like it but don’t really need it bc the LTE booster gives me full bars at home… Full Bars Son!

      • Fabian Cortez

        Exactly.

        The other carriers’ personal cells do the same but they charge you for the boxes, they don’t do LTE, and “they still charge overages (!).”

        • Adam

          I saw a company that wanted to install these for AT&T customers that were also their own. You can imagine the shock when AT&T explained their vision of which direction the money should be flowing.

        • maximus1901

          That’s not an excuse. TMO could choose to exempt data coming from these things.
          With a small cell, TMO would pay for:
          Small cell
          Backhaul
          Site rental
          Electricity

          While with this solution they’re getting the latter 3 FREE ie free OPEX.

        • guest

          Jesus Christ when are you coming back?

          This is too much. Life is miserable here.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Maybe it just isn’t technically possible to do so.

        • maximus1901

          Each one has a unique sector/site ID like a macro site. Don’t see how it’s impossible.
          At least, they should:

          1) exempt all phones on an account on that account’s cellspot
          2) provide SOME confidence that someone won’t eat your 300GB Comcast cap.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Each one has a unique sector/site ID like a macro site. Don’t see how it’s impossible.

          At least, they should:

          1) exempt all phones on an account on that account’s cellspot
          2) provide SOME confidence that someone won’t eat your 300GB Comcast cap.

          It’s a nonobligatory third option for coverage.

          You’re looking at it in a limited way.

          If a small business puts one of these up, just like they’d put up a Wi-Fi router for their customers, why shouldn’t a customer who walks in not have their data deducted from their bucket as they would if they walked outside on the street and connected to the macro site?

          But yes, maybe the account holder could be flagged in the system so that the data doesn’t count against their bucket since they’re providing the backhaul and electricity.

        • maximus1901

          a small business would be paying business class unlimited internet whether its uverse or comcast. that’s the difference.

        • Fabian Cortez

          a small business would be paying business class unlimited internet whether its uverse or comcast. that’s the difference.

          No one is talking about backhaul here. You also failed to address the issue that you’ve been bringing up to which I countered.

          I’ll ask again: why shouldn’t a customer who walks in not have their data deducted from their bucket as they would if they walked outside on the street and connected to the macro site?

        • maximus1901

          ok fine the femtocell is part of network just like macro site even though tmo is getting FREE opex: backhaul, electricity, site rental.
          Fine.
          No consumer cares about electricity or site rental. They care about someone eating up their comcast 300GB. Sievert says “oh then you can just get a wifi cellspot; we provide choice” which is true but it taking that attitude won’t help the lte cellspots proliferate.

        • Fabian Cortez

          ok fine the femtocell is part of network just like macro site even though tmo is getting FREE opex: backhaul, electricity, site rental.Fine.

          There’s no free OPEX. The extra expensive of offering the units for “free” and data traffic back to their services costs money.

          No consumer cares about electricity or site rental. They care about someone eating up their comcast 300GB. Sievert says “oh then you can just get a wifi cellspot; we provide choice” which is true but it taking that attitude won’t help the lte cellspots proliferate.

          You’re still ignoring those that don’t live in close-knit apartments that will not suffer from this boogeyman you keep perpetuating.

          Again, options.

        • maximus1901

          Backhaul, electricity, site rental.
          OPEX and definitely free with these cellspots.

          Well since this won’t be a problem then TMO should have no issue with making a hard limit for non-account lines on non-business cellspots eh?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Backhaul, electricity, site rental.OPEX and definitely free with these cellspots.

          I’m going to stop conversing with you if you intend on ignoring the facts.

          These are not small cells. In fact, they are so “useless” that they can only handle 16 simultaneous calls.

          So no, popping these up all over the place is not going to augment or replace T-Mobile’s macro network. The same can be applied to the Wi-Fi Calling router and/or even Wi-Fi Calling in general, like some uninformed trolls used to think. This is not like Sprint employing Wi-Fi as the 4th layer (behind PCS, SMR, and BRS/EBS) of their network.

          There is an expense involved with this and the extra traffic coming back to T-Mobile via this cell along with handing these out costs money. Hardly “free” as you’d like to believe.

          Well since this won’t be a problem then TMO should have no issue with making a hard limit for non-account lines on non-business cellspots eh?

          “Eh?”

    • Dude

      Yes it would. Not many people ask smart questions like yours. They just get the gizmo and forget it. TMO should be giving these away and then show their coverage map of US filled with magenta color.

  • HumorPrint

    That thing is bigger than my Blu-Ray player, it will not fit in my entertainment system.

    • guest

      LOL.
      That’s a good one.
      Are making fun of the complainers aren’t you?

  • GovGeek

    Wow, people sure like to complain about something completely optional. Just like this post.

    • Flip Jumpman

      Tell me about it… It’s pathetic!

    • Will

      I am just waiting for someone to complain that it has too many lights.

      • Elier Ruiz

        I’m sure someone’s has thought that, just won’t post their comment.

        • guest

          The lights will corrupt their brains registry.

      • raidergrr

        put electrical tape over them…

  • RideScheduler.com

    If someone uses a 4G LTE CellSpot connected to my IP address, will their browsing traffic appear as through they came from my IP? Or will the 4G LTE CellSpot create a VPN back to TMobile? All I need is someone to download illegal content and then they go after me. I cant imagine that it will use my IP. It must be a VPN back to TMobile.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Your home internet acts as the backhaul provider.

      Every device that authenticates will be provided with its own T-Mobile IP address.

    • Kirn Gill

      VPN’d back to the T-Mobile core network.

  • D—- J——-

    My original question which got deleted very quickly had to do with cheap data! How does this new super duper revolutionary gismo process data? Oh and I also mentioned Google’s project fi

    • Fabian Cortez

      Did your post contain a link?

      • thepanttherlady

        Nothing was pending at the time he posted this question. Either he didn’t refresh his page to see his comment had already been approved or Disqus is messed up on his end. It happens.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yep.

          You usually don’t just delete posts.

          You provide warnings and/or make mod. edits.

  • Fabian Cortez

    Many different frequencies and different technologies and modulation schemes.

    If you want to view the power output, the FCC documents are available.

  • Phillip Bee

    Over the last 3 yrs my service in Phoenix went from ok to great back to ok. Barely getting legit LTE speeds in most areas. 2/3 towers that triangulate my house are 3G, 3rd is 2G. I have opened many tickets and had many complaints.

    After hearing about this device, I called tech support. I said that I wanted this device. I asked the rep to simply review the notes and tickets on my account, and waive the deposit. After some review and industry talk, it was done. I will be getting the device next week, because they can’t fulfill the order until 11/4, and had the deposit waived. Just my experience though. You don’t have to be rude, just call, be personable, and ask.

    • Adam

      What made you pick LTE over WiFI? Are you using it for home or business?

      • Phillip Bee

        I didn’t pick .. I pay for both services regardless. I want the best of both and monies worth.

        • RealShit

          Have you been using wi-fi calling in the meantime?

        • Phillip Bee

          Sporadically. But I don’t have an issue with make/receiving calls. I have an issue of paying for unlimited LTE and inconsistent data speeds.

          I’m not in a small town. I’m in one of the countries largest cities Phoenix. We were one of the 1st to get Tmobile’s LTE. Instead of flying planes and air writing over VZW and AT&T, which isn’t going to change a thing, John needs to reinvest in the network and/or the people at the bottom that really make Tmobile run.

      • My reason is because Wifi calling can hand off to LTE but LTE can’t hand off to wifi calling. For my place my signal drops like a rock once I go downstairs. This solves that problem. I have the celfi right now but VOLTE bandwidth is not strong enough going from tower to booster to have reliable volte. Data packets get lost and it doesn’t switch to 4G. I turned off volte calling but when I go into town my phone won’t dial out unless I’m on volte.

    • RealShit

      People just have to take the time out to call. Just like you said–be personable and literally everything works out. Even if you have to request a supervisor it doesn’t have to be in the manner of a jackass.

      I hope the new cell spot works out for ya. I mean if it’s its own small tower there’s no reason why it won’t solve your problem.

  • Myphone007

    If it is only good for 3000 Sq feet..the only issue some may have is if a stranger is walking infront of your house and stands in that spot to use your free signal.

    • guest

      How will they know there’s signal there?

      • Kirn Gill

        By looking at the bars on his phone’s signal meter.

        • guest

          I mean, people don’t usually walk the streets looking for signal. Now the neighbors living next to his house, yes they will figure it out where the signal is coming from and their phones will use his signal if regular signal is weaker.
          If he’s afraid of strangers maybe he can turn it off when not home.

        • NEO2U

          T-Mobile customers, People who are not customers won’t be able to use the signal.

          Those trapped in the Scarriers Matrix will be left out.

        • guest

          That too, of course. I was assuming for the sake of the discussion that both of his next door neighbors were smart and they are with T-Mo.
          Anyway. What do you think of reducing the reach of the signal, by blocking it?

        • NEO2U

          Being as this is made to share I would not block it but I was thinking the same thing would be asked by someone. I guess it would be possible but I have not investigated how to do it. That brings up another question. Would blocking it end up hurting the access of the actual home users working or playing in the front yard or out side on the side walk? You still want coverage outside. As for me I have good home coverage without this new device. Plus T-Mobile picked my family for unlimited high speed LTE for 6 months. There is good signal through my neighborhood and shopping areas throughout my town and surrounding areas.

        • guest

          Some posted the idea of placing this thing in the basement. I’m thinking bricks.
          All this for people who have slow or limited internet.

    • NEO2U

      Its not a free signal since it only works for Paying T-Mobile customers in or out of the house. You have a better chance of having your WiFi hacked by a wardriver than having a problem with people surfing off your LTE signal.

    • Barbosa

      A circle with a 3000 square feet area has a radius of about 31 feet. That would mean the phone has to be within 31 feet of the cellspot to pick up the signal. Maybe I’m not understanding what they mean by 3000 square feet.

      • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

        It’s more of a sphere, not just a 2D “circle,” so if you’re in an apartment, condo or townhome, there could be an issue with others using your cellspot.

  • Elier Ruiz

    This is a great device. I want to get it and take to work and use the cell spot at work . My cellphone signal is weak there.

    • guest

      First talk to your boss to see if they will allow it. Look for other T-Mo users at work.

    • maximus1901

      You new to hook it up to internet connection.

    • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

      Usually IT folks are a bit paranoid when it comes to adding devices to the network so it would be advisable to check with them before just plugging the device in.

  • AnthonyReyes

    I take it this replaces the ASUS cellspot. Man I should see if I can get the Asus before they start handing out the new one

  • D. Duran

    Man I love what John is doing with T-Mobile, glad to have such a bold and outspoken CEO for T-Mobile but every time i see him, I can’t help but think of smeagul/gollum from lord of the rings…

  • R.M.

    ok i immediately called and tried to order this device. the csr kept calling it a router. they said it should arrive on nov 9th. i was not charged the $25 fee. I really think they are sending me something older even though i specifically asked for the new cell spot.

    • Seunghyun

      Itsnt launched yet

    • Drewski

      No dude this device has not launched yet. It does not arrive in stores until November 4th of this week, Bro. So there you have it!!

      • R.M.

        I called them back and the csr said the 4g lte cellspot wouldn’t be available until the 14th, even though I read that its coming on the 4th. they said just refuse the cellspot wifi router when it arrives and reorder the correct device on the 14th

        • Just called and confirmed they’re sending me one of the new ones. They were calling it a router as well but they confirmed it was the new 4G LTE CellSpot not a wifi router. I told them I don’t want wifi router because if I’m upstairs and go downstairs it won’t switch to wifi calling. It only goes wifi calling to VOLTE. This cellspot solves the issue.

          I have the LTE CelFi but when I’m downstairs VOLTE lags because the bandwidth transfer from the tower outside to the booster drops down. This solution will fix issues such as that as well.

  • R.M.

    here is the link that describes how each device works https://support.t-mobile.com/community/coverage/personal-cellspot

  • Seunghyun

    Everything is nice except it let strngers hogging my bandwidth. A 3000 sqft area is rather big,approx 4 bedrooms house.so i think i will pass on this until tmobile figure out a way to secure the connection.And using this device would make me vulnerable to being hacked as well

  • I don’t like this one bit. This unit allows anyone off the street use your bandwidth for their consumption who is a T-Mobile user. In my opinion the Asus wifi router is a better option.

    • taxandspend

      3000sq feet. So unless your house is in the street, it’s not going to be an issue.

      • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

        30 ft radius could be an issue in the case of townhomes, apartments, condos, etc.

        • Then only use the booster function for better signals. Use your home router that you already own for your wifi. You get better signals, and keep your internet speed to yourself. Problem solved.

    • Matthew Ramsdell

      Unless you don’t have a tmobile branded phone and can’t use wifi calling.

      • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

        CM13 is rumored to support tmobile wifi-calling, if you’re into rooting and flashing custom ROMS (assuming you’re on an android device).

    • qpinto

      anyone who is near your house and you have the signal repeater works the same way….

    • What is your bandwidth limits? I know with my provider its 2TB so for that to happen I would have to have 100 user download 20GB a month to use up all of my bandwidth.

  • Gavriel Ostrow

    first of all band 4 lte? useless! might as well throw it out the window! what is the use of a cell spot that doesn’t use band 12 volte?
    2. looks like john is trying to compensate for dead spots by using their biggest resource, us the customers! if every house had this it would greatly improve coverage of anywhere for anyone and whats the reward for such help from us? an expensive bill if the thing breaks?

    • taxandspend

      First of all – band 4 is EXACTLY what you would want to use. Or band 2. Not sure why you think this device would be better if it was band 12. Since they will be subject to the constraints of the spectrum they own in your area, you’ll have much better performance with band 4 or band 2 than band 12, since they own far more bandwidth.

    • Matthew Ramsdell

      In addition to taxandspend’s comments, the device’s power output only covers about 3000 sqft, hardly a large enough area to massively expand the tmobile network. The best use case for this box is for tmobile users that have unlocked, phones that don’t support wifi calling.

      • Tom@L

        yeah but thing is in big metro cities like SF or NYC, many people live close by in apartments. So that 3000 sq ft is quite a big area.

  • taxandspend

    As someone else pointed out, and I verified doing the math, that’s a radius of about 31 feet from the cellspot. Area = pi * radius^2. So that’s 3.14 * 31 * 31 = 3017. If they are within about 31 feet of your cellspot, then yes, their phone call will go through your internet connection if their phone switches from the signal outside to the one coming from your cellspot.

    • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

      Apartments, condos, townhomes… etc…. not everyone is living in single-family homes. Easy fix on Tmobile’s side: allow whitelisting of numbers through tmobile account page.

    • Seunghyun

      You do know that area sqft can also be calculated as lxw right?let say u live in an apartment,and the tower is inur room.a straight line of 100ft still within range,that may cover average 2 3 apt around u.thus if you live in a complex,say 2nd floor,ppl above and below also can have access.i know this bc my current cellspot generate signal that my phone can pick up from 1st fl,and i live in 3rd fl

      • taxandspend

        Yes. I assumed that the antenna radiated equally in all directions and the pattern would most closely resemble a circle where the cellspot is the “spot” at the center. And as you have pointed out, the “circle” is really probably more like a “sphere” where the people above and below could also pick up the signal.

  • guest

    The CellSpot (Mini Cell Tower Over VPN Over IP) broadcasts cellular signal not Wi-Fi. There is nothing to hack there.

    • Seunghyun

      The cellular signal is piggybacking on wifi,one you have access to that signal,a simple trojan would be able to infect and compromise wifi ntwork.then u know what happen

      • guest

        These is from the support page:

        3. Connect one end of the yellow Ethernet cable to the yellow WAN port on the CellSpot.
        4. Connect the other end to any available Ethernet port on your router or router/modem combo unit.
        5. Plug in the AC power adapter into the power outlet and connect the power cable to the CellSpot port.

        No Wi-Fi.

  • Jimmy James

    Hello again. Phones released in the past year or two on T-Mobile have Wi-Fi calling and Wi-Fi texting. What is the purpose of using this femtocell in a home?

    • Medion

      It provides expanded T-Mobile coverage by using your internet connection. It’s a gain for T-Mobile, not the customer. When Comcast did this, they got hammered over it.

      • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

        A good point but overall it should be a low-risk situation for most people. I would hope most ISPs have moved away from those rediculous overage schemes. Bandwidth constraints shouldn’t be an issue for most folks, even on DSL.

    • Uxorious

      One big usecase is for stores inside malls or other places with shoddy coverage.
      You can’t really expect consumers to enter wifi information for local shops – but a local femtocell will make it work for all guests.

      • Jimmy James

        So, there is no benefit for use in the home with Wi-Fi calling and texting already in place?

        • Uxorious

          My guess is you would have a smoother hand-off when leaving your home while on a call.
          Also, if you have T-Mobile guests visiting, you would not have to give them your WiFi information for them to be able to use their phone.

        • Jimmy James

          My family and friends are stubborn and won’t leave AT&T and Verizon no matter what I tell them. Funny.

      • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

        A good use case but they could easily offer a more home-oriented option by doing the following:
        – include the ability to whitelist numbers via the Tmobile account webpage or some other means. Should be fairly straightforward to implement.
        – allow post-paid Tmobile users to have both a WiFi CellSpot and 4G LTE cellspot coexist in their home (should be straightforward as wirelessly they don’t use overlapping frequencies. perhaps an issue on the network side when tunneling calls over ISP)

        • Uxorious

          > include the ability to whitelist numbers via the Tmobile account
          > webpage or some other means.

          Yeah that surprises me too.
          Personally I would probably just put it behind a firewall limiter to stop it from using too much bandwidth…

          > allow post-paid Tmobile users to have both a WiFi CellSpot
          > and 4G LTE cellspot coexist in their home

          They don’t?
          I thought they were just saying no to the Signal Booster and CellSpot.

        • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

          I was told by a TMob Customer Rep that you must process a return request for your wifi cellspot before you can request a 4G LTE Cellspot. They claim the two can’t coexist due to interference, which is strange as they use different wireless frequencies. Also, I doubt they would use the same network ports to tunnel traffic to tmobile’s network. There’s a way around that even if that was the case. The individual did not clearly explain the potential interference issue.

          I plan on keeping my wifi cellspot, it’s a rock-solid wifi router and we current use wifi-calling enabled phones in our apartment (things were bearable before we upgraded to wifi-calling phones though).

        • Uxorious

          They probably don’t want to sponsor your collection of gear :-)
          Either of the 2 devices will solve your “no connectivity problems” issue, so why should they pay for 2 devices.

        • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

          That’s true. Once they get around to bringing band 12 online here ideally there shouldn’t be a need for any signal boosters.

        • Uxorious

          Supposedly T-Mobile and KDTV signed a “concurrent operations” agreement back in July. How long does deployment typically take after that?

        • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

          It could take a while and they haven’t provided any meaningful updates. This is a substantial market that would greatly benefit from good Band 12 coverage and combined with carrier aggregation, this would be game-over for competing carriers.

          There are a lot of hurdles they have to go through. My understanding is that Tmobile doesn’t typically own cellular base stations but rather leases resources on them, so deploying b12 would mean having a contractor install the HW and whatever else is needed, not including any Tmobile network qualification work. Towers are a bit of an eyesore as well so there are probably a few rounds of public comment, etc etc etc. Sadly, not as easy as flipping a switch or pushing a button.

        • jmhays

          I was told the exact same thing. I was VERY hesitant and she finally said that she would process the return of my cell wi-fi cellspot router while placing the order for the new LTE cellspot. After processing the return she found out that she could NOT process the order for my new LTE cellspot (as mentioned above). She said she will call me back tomorrow afternoon when she gets in the office so she can process the order of my new TLE cellspot.

          I will hold on to both until I figure out which one is better for me. I currently have between 1-2 bars on my phone on a good day in my house and wi-fi calls get dropped all the time. My wife and I just got new iPhone 6S phones because I was told that the LTE coverage would be better. This will be the test for us. This will be our 3rd cellspot, I have used all the different types TMobile has offered, hopefully this one will work the best.

        • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

          Assuming you know which network ports are used, you could use QoS rules to control bandwidth usage, etc.

  • Yasir Faheem

    I came to tmobile from att with a unlocked samsung galaxy note 4 that does not have wifi calling. In my house I only get one signal bar on my cell phone since i am on the very edge of the tmobile 4g lte network. This would help me alot. This is only useful if you have a non tmobile brand cell phone without wifi calling.

    • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

      If you’re a fan of rooting and installing custom ROMs, CM13 is rumored to support WiFi calling for Tmobile; this may be of use to you…

      • Yasir Faheem

        I did not think it is possible to root the at&t samsung galaxy note 4 on 5.1.1 because the bootloader is locked and if you go to the cm website I did not see a version of their rom for the at&t version of the smartphone i have. I would love to have wifi calling for tmobile without having to pay a lease payment.

  • lzc753

    So if I get the femtocell and I use it with my Internet connection at home my Data plan is not going to be affected

    • Will

      It will count against your data cap with T-Mobile AND your home internet provider.

    • Hollywood J Blaq

      No, your data plan is not going to be affected. The femtocell is a device that simply acts as an antenna piggy backing off of your home internet connection. It will only affect it if you are using data just like you would anywhere else.

  • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

    Confirmed via TMobile Support Rep:
    Tmobile won’t allow both a Wifi CellSpot router and a 4G LTE Cellspot in the same household. You must return the Wifi Cellspot in order to get a 4G LTE Cellspot. As long as you have a wifi-calling enabled phone, makes more sense to keep the WiFi Cellspot for home use (functions very nicely as a wireless router). Also confirmed, no access controls provided for 4G LTE, so anyone using Tmobile near it can use this device (which is silly, AT&T for two generations of their MicroCell devices provided access control via webpage).

    Good idea but needs another iteration for home use. Please also allow customers to use both a Wifi cellspot and 4G LTE Cellspot so that phones without wifi-calling can benefit. There is no overlap in wireless frequencies used by the two cellspot devices and should not pose any interference issues.

    • AnthonyReyes

      Will they still offer the Wifi cellspot

      • SFBayAreaWaitingForBand12

        It seems like it is still available as an option for post-paid customers.

    • qpinto

      i have both. idk but it happened. i told them i used the signal repeater at work in my office and i use the wifi router at home. told them it would benefit more than just me in the office as others have tmobile as well. they easily sent me both. that was easy

    • David

      were you charged deposit and shipping? $25 deposit plus $7 shipping here.

  • mardi burden

    I went to my t-mo store today..they do have it in stock but the system won’t let them sell it till 10/4/15

    • Seth Lee-Yee

      *11/4/15

  • Critic4U

    I will check when i go in on Wednesday with our tech team and find out if the airave 2.5 system is still able to be locked down but I have had similar customers ask it is possible and when i asked my supervisor he told me that it no longer works and I just dismissed it. I will update when i get home on Wednesday and let you know what I find out…

  • Brian

    Keep in mind that, unless something has changed, wifi calling does put much more strain on your battery than normal cellular (4G LTE) calling. Therefore, even if your phone is wifi calling enabled, the newer router might be a bettwr solution.

    Any additional comments on this woukd be appreciated.

    • walt

      i thought using wifi would save battery compared to using the cellular data network.

      • Brian

        It’s the wifi calling itself that uses a lot of battery (aka actually talking using the wifi calling feature). Using wifi for data does use less, although I am not sure exactly how much as I seem to get more battery life on my S5 using TMO network.

    • Adam

      The difference in power usage between WiFi and LTE is minimal compared to the impact of distance to the access point or cell tower.

    • seancaldwell

      The biggest drain from my experience is a low cellular signal. If this helps that, then I’m all for it. Low cellular signal seems to keep the phone hunting for a better signal.

  • walt

    will it work with t-mobile mvno’s? ie metro pcs, simple mobile, gosmart

    • guest

      No. Nâo. Nein.

    • dontsh00tmesanta

      yes

  • Brian Richards

    “Any T-Mobile customer can connect to the unit without logging in.”

    Plus

    “it creates a T-Mo signal using your Internet connection”

    If I can’t restrict who’s on it while it’s on my internet, then no deal.

    • They’re not giving this to you for free so you can hog it yourself. Come on man. If you want to keep your internet connection to yourself then why get this? You can just use your home wifi for both calling and data.

      Besides you can just use the booster function and that doesn’t need your internet connection. Then you get the best of both worlds. You would now have better signals and keep your entire home wifi bandwidth to yourself.

      Your argument makes no sense.

      • derk p

        um what if someone happens to know theyre connected to one of these things and tried to do something illegal? im sure it’d be easy to clear your name but is it worth the hassle

        • Seeing as any usage while connected to the LTE CellSpot counts against your plan allocations I’m going to assume this device opens a secure tunnel back up to the T-Mobile network for all traffic, much like what WiFi calling already does. Any device connected to the LTE CellSpot will have data originating from a T-Mobile IP address and edge router, not your home internet connection.

        • Brian Richards

          And what about my bandwidth?

        • if it’s just grabbing tmobile’s signal and boosting it, anyone doing anything illegal does not affect you one bit regardless if it’s in your place or not. Do you know what boosting is? it’s not wifi

  • NEO2U

    They should promote this using a tv commercial saying “Tower To The People!”

    • seancaldwell

      go tweet that to JL. Great line.

      • AS118

        I agree, it fits with their marketing tone too.

  • dontsh00tmesanta

    so how are the lte speeds on it lol

  • TechnoRealz

    Odd that TMO would blatantly used your own personal internet connection to set up a personal tower & call it LTE.

    Am I missing something?

    • guest

      Yes.

      • TechnoRealz

        Like what?

    • seancaldwell

      If someone has poor signal quality at home, how else should they get data to you? The internet connection you already have seems like the most efficient way to provide your own LTE signal.

  • Dustin

    I just went to my T-Mo store to swap my Cellspot LTE for this new one. Their system was not letting him do the swap and he kept getting an error message. I called customer support and they had the same issue. Even though it is in stock, their system isn’t allowing them to process trade-ins on it. Anyone else having issues?

    • southphilly

      I had this at 6 am, was on phone for 40 mins to find out he couldnt “push it thru” so went to the twitter help thing and the woman who handled took good care of me, gave me free 2 day shipping for the headache, and a return kit for the cellspot swap, try twitter, be nice but let them know your frustration

      • Aaron C

        Twitter seems to be the preferred method of getting issues corrected these days. I had an issue with a phone trade in and conversed with three chat reps, two store reps and three phone reps and it still wasn’t handled. One tweet and it was handled completely to my satisfaction. Tremendous hassle, but I know where to go next time. Prior to this, it’s been pretty smooth sailing with customer service. T-Mo getting popular I guess. CS quality is falling.

    • R.M.

      yes i had a similar issue because i tried to order the 4glte cell spot before it was available and they sent me the cell spot router instead. so you will have to call tmo tech support and they will email you a return label and place your order for the new device. you will have to pay for it right then.

  • walt

    i don’t understand the point of this… if you have internet at your home and a wifi capable device just use the t-mobile wifi router. if you don’t have internet at your home just use 4G signal booster or is that not free?

    https://support.t-mobile.com/community/coverage/personal-cellspot

  • cloud strife

    Wouldn’t this consume double data for you if you use it or consume your data from your cable provider? I mean from some reason you preferred to use your mobile data at home and it’s connected to this. Would that consume your T-mo data + let’s say Comcast data? Or a stranger got connected. Would that use the cable provider’s data? I’m on Comcast and I think they have a cap but I’m not sure if it’s a soft or hard.

    • seancaldwell

      It could. The likelihood of the signal from this penetrating too many walls is low. If you’re in a house very unlikely your neighbor would grab this signal instead of the signal from a tower. If you’re in an apartment, it could happen with a direct neighbor.

      Yes, it would use the data from your internet provider, and afaik you are using t-mobile data.

      Put it in the middle of your living area, and keep wifi on for most of your data use and you’ll be golden. Seems this is really to help those without wifi calling or where wifi calling doesn’t work well with your device.

    • way to geekish

      You people are thinking way to deep into this. Just enjoy the great signal you get!

  • David

    I was charged $25 deposit and $7 shipping, is everyone else charged the same?

    • Prode

      yes this is the charge for the device and shipping. You were charged the $25 because they didnt want to wave it for yo. Also because you had it shipped and did not pick one up in the store, you were charged $7 for that.

    • R.M.

      yes i was charged that also.

    • sucks for u

      Nope, got mine for free across the board.

  • beans

    Can’t wait for my neighbors to get one of these! Maybe I’ll be able to drop my internet service and just use my phone if the 4G LTE is fast enough. :)

  • seancaldwell

    In my case, the 4g signal booster didn’t work great. I have low e windows and it keep much of the cell signal out. Had to place the “window” unit outside or in the attic to get that system to work well. Wifi calling has not worked well on one of the devices we have. Pretty good on the others.

    This is simpler and once some units are in people’s hands, it’ll be interesting to see how well it covers.

    • Right there with you. LTE booster works downstairs but the bandwidth from is is 2 down .5-1.0 up which cause VOLTE to lag sometimes. Can’t use wifi calling because if I’m upstairs on on the phone via lte or wifi calling it wont switch to wifi calling downstairs. You can only go wifi calling to volte not the other way around. Upstairs I get 3-4 bars but downstairs I get 1.

  • guest

    I think they should limit the data transfer rate for each line connected to the device to 128 kbps. You don’t need more than that because you have internet service, remember. And others using your device’s signal can’t use it for videos, downloading stuff or as internet service.
    Basically just calls and texts.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    Should Tmobile pay you for other tmo customers using your data?

  • Uxorious

    So much for getting one of these.
    My wife has her phone paid by her employer = can’t get it.
    I’m on prepaid ($30 impossible-to-beat online-only plan) = can’t get it.

    • Walt

      Just purchase it outright. Should be around $100

      • Uxorious

        Do they sell it outright?

        • Uxorious

          Just called my local store.
          It’s *only* for postpaid customers.
          No buying it outright.
          No getting it if your employer pays for your postpaid account.
          Disappointing given how much @JohnLegere talks about caring about his customers.

  • Ben

    Just called customer service to rage that my service has degraded so much that it’s now totally unusable in my house. The RS3 did nothing for me or any friends with T-Mobile, even though it appeared to be functioning. I was offered this after 2 transfers. The first lady told me my current LTE device is “obsolete” because it doesn’t have the 700 band. That means a good part of T-Mobiles phone lineup that they are currently selling to customers is ‘obsolete’ before it even reaches the customers hands. Well done on that one T-Mobile.

    My service has degraded so much the past couple of years that I don’t have much faith left. Fingers crossed on this device but it if doesn’t work my next step is to try out an AT&T sim card.

    • Ben

      The unit arrived today. Revision 00 manufactured 3/15 which I found curious.

      Here are the specs: https://www.alcatel-lucent.com/products/9961-multi-standard-home-cell

      Also: https://support.t-mobile.com/docs/DOC-24269

      It took an hour to do it’s thing when I plugged everything in but so far so good. Full bars throughout my entire house and no issues yet. I’d say the 3000 sq ft is very conservative. I’ve tried a couple of calls and texts, I’m on wifi for data so I cannot comment on that. It will use your data allotment if you’re not on wifi.

      Measures about 17 watts out of the wall when in use. Not bad. This will probably be the first weekend in 18 months I’ll be able to reliably make a call from my house. T-Mobiles lackluster coverage aside, this is absolutely THE solution if you don’t have coverage where you want it. It’s way better than wifi calling or the cel-fi. Thank you T-Mobile!

  • AS118

    This is a good idea, as long as you can put the cellspot close enough to your router for it to work well, and have a good enough router. Still, it’s better than what other carriers are doing. Which is not offering this stuff at all, and in fact, charging up to hundreds of dollars for them even if they do, after making you jump through hoops.

    • Ordeith

      The other carriers are offering something better for most, actual coverage.

  • alex

    got rep wave the deposit fee, was easy. just mention how long u been with tmobile, how much u love tmobile. had to pay shipping though. love tmobile.

    • Would much rather pay for the deposit than shipping. You can’ get your money back for shipping when you turn it back in.

  • Angel

    I prefer their Wi-Fi CellSpot router, since you control who uses your internet. This doesn’t seem like a step forward to me. Yes phones without wi-fi calling will be able to work better which is beneficial to the customer, since people will be able to buy any unlock phone without wifi calling and still be able to use their ISP lines. But yeah I rather decide who connect to my ISP than leave an open signal for everyone. I don’t care if it’s a T-Mo-buddy, my internet isn’t given to me free.
    As for non-wifi calling devices, if you at least get a bar on a window there is always their 4G LTE Signal Booster.

    • munkyBeatz

      The Wi-Fi cellspot is awesome if you have wifi calling phone, i’ve got it. As for the access to this personal cellspot, the signal is nothing like what people are thinking. It will work in your house, but doesn’t have massive range and severly degrades through walls/etc. If you live in a house, then pretty much the only phones that would switch to this would be people in your house or a most a neighbor that is using their phone in the side of their house that is closest to yours. Apartments are pretty much the only place someone outside your place, would actually pick up a good signal. They will even then only get enough for good voice/text, not data. The signal isn’t as strong as the wifi cellspot for data.

      • Angel

        As I stated on my previews comment, this is great for phones without wifi calling. My Wi-Fi currently reach well over 20 neighbors around me, and it’s a cheap router. And although 3,000 square feet is nothing to brag about, it is less than most Wi-Fi routers now day. It is still enough to reach neighbors. And yes apartments, many people live in those kind of places, its not like its a rarity. And buildings was a special problem to T-Mo on the past, since it’s signal didn’t get through wall that well which is where Wi-Fi calling was so magical. As for the data: “The device creates 3G/4G UMTS and 4G LTE signal to improve indoor
        coverage, providing you with more dependable voice calls and more
        consistent data speeds” a phone/tablet, connected will be able to use the data. As for speed, my home speed is less than 1 Mbps and still in the past 30 days I’ve used 82.59 GB of data And that’s just my laptop 1 of over 5 devices that uses my internet. And there are my american isp that have limits. I don’t have, but I still, prefer to have absolute control over who connect and who doesn’t without any possible surprise.

        So yeah this device it’s only truly beneficial to phones without Wi-Fi calling.

        Actually upon studying this I’m let to believe that this product not only is NOT an improvement for wifi calling capable devices. But also I think it might be disadvantageous. The page say “All usage over the 4G LTE CellSpot will be billed to your T-Mobile account just like usage over the T-Mobile’s network” So if the phone think is using it’s 4G data, then it will consume data from their plan (for those with data caps/not totally unlimited) even if the data you are using is actually from your ISP. Unlike sticking with Wi-Fi Calling that well, everything data related goes through Wi-Fi therefore not counting for the plan limits for high speed. Of course this merely an speculation, but there is nothing to state otherwise. I hope they do clarify this. Oh, and you have my gratitude. If not for your replay I wouldn’t have looked up more information on the subject.

  • Angel

    ALEX WAGNER, PLEASE READ (And hopefully replay)
    Can you find and publicize certain information about this product and use.
    It’s support page, overview and features state:

    Overview and features
    -The 4G LTE CellSpot is a simple plug-and-play dedicated 4G LTE mini-tower in your home or small office.
    -The
    device creates 3G/4G UMTS and 4G LTE signal to improve indoor coverage,
    providing you with more dependable voice calls and more consistent data
    speeds.
    -All usage over the 4G LTE CellSpot will be billed to your T-Mobile account just like usage over the T-Mobile’s network.

    -Data speeds cannot exceed your internet service provider’s (ISP) data speed

    So does this mean that the phone think it’s connected to T-Mo’s LTE./ 4G / Cell Tower? But then, wouldn’t that mean that whatever data you use is counted from your plan, if you have a limit for high speed data that is. Even thou you are really using your ISP data. Making this an unfavorable product compare to using Wi-Fi calling for the people with limited high speed data. Making this product truly only beneficial to those with phones that doesn’t not support T-Mobile Wi-Fi Calling.
    I’m concern with the possibility that customers will be consuming their high speed data wile been at home without even realizing it, for those that have limited data.

    • Roger Doger

      Just turn off wifi calling and have wifi on so that you are using wifi for data and the 4g LTE Cellspot for voice. simply solution for people that have limited high speed data plan.

      • Angel

        First, you are missing the point.
        And second that will be plain stupid, if I could use Wi-Fi, might as well use Wi-Fi Calling and not use this. Save on having unnecessary devices running and sending signals around the house,

        And I’m not concern about me, I get amazing signal. This is regarding those who might use this product without realizing the cost.

        • Tom@L

          and that is the thing tmobile is betting on. Many will expand their lte network coverage with this cellspot without even knowing lol.

  • AJ

    Can you get this even if you have the previous cellspot?

    • Rodger Doger

      YES..just return the other device

      • Ben

        They haven’t even asked me to yet. They were on top of that last time when I thought I just had a defective one, but I haven’t heard a thing yet. I was thinking about taking it back to a store if they’ll take it.

    • Jeff Marshall

      yup. when I called in to customer care I asked if I needed to send the wifi cell spot (its a great router) back they said no, I can keep both so long as I am a tmobile user

  • walt

    what’s the difference between this thing using your cell data vs wifi calling deducting from your plan minutes? it would be nice to make all calls on wifi without it deducting from your minutes but they still deduct even though you’re using your own home internet.
    ($30 100 min. 5GB plan)

    • guest

      Well, with data T-Mo is still connecting you to facebook and the rest of the internet not your ISP, same with calls and texts.
      If you don’t want to feel like you’re been cheated on life, don’t use the cellspot.

      • Ben

        I originally had walts attitude and can empathize. Part of me is pissed because I’m paying for a service that’s piggybacking on my electricity, space, and paid internet. At the same, I’m likely being hit with a massive dose of radiation right now that I wouldn’t otherwise be exposed to. If T-Mobile had a superior network, none of these would be an issue because the cellspot wouldn’t be needed.

        At the same time, I’m somewhat getting what I paid for. T-Mobile, for all of its shortcomings, is actually a pretty awesome company. They’ve gone out of their way to brand and buy a device so that I can use whatever phone I want and get great service where I need it most. I certainly like them more than I like most corporations.

        • guest

          I understand the radiation issue and the issue of others connecting to your signal and consuming your home internet data. I think for the next version of the device they should limit the data rate to 128 kbps. And to reduce the radiation exposure, placing the device somewhere less frequented by living beings will help a lot. I don’t know but i think every couple of feet from the device could be like a block from a cell tower.

        • Ben

          I think that’s a great idea and I wish T-Mobile gave us the option on the device. I don’t need superfast LTE as I’m at home and I have wifi for data. Wifi calls are unreliable however. I need the cellspot to reliably make phone calls and send and receive text messages. I’m not knocking the cellspot, but an option to turn off the 4G output and accompanying power and radiation would be appreciated.

          I actually can’t think of many use cases where this device needs to support high speed data. It needs high speed internet on location to function in the first place so supporting fast LTE seems redundant.

        • vinnyjr

          All Carriers offer a very similar product, the other Carriers charge over $200+ bucks for theirs. T-Mobile gives theirs away. All Carriers have dead areas, all Carriers offer these products for that reason. If you aren’t happy leave T-Mobile and quit whining about it. I have fantastic service, very strong signal with lightening fast data speeds. If I had issues with my service I would be thrilled my Carrier offered a fix for no cost to me. T-Mobile has 3 different products to fix this problem depending on where you live and your service. Thank You T-Mobile Thank You John Legere.

        • Ben

          You were out of line there as I wasn’t whining at all. Also, T-Mobile states I should have excellent coverage at my home according to their coverage map when the signal is in fact almost non-existent. As stated, their fix is appreciated but not without downsides. A true fix would be putting a micro-cell in my neighborhood.

      • walt

        so what you’re saying is, i can have a 2 mbps TWC home internet connection and still get T-mobile 15×15 speeds of over 100 mbps on my iphone 6s? is there proof to your claim?

  • Ben

    I did get a text today telling me it’s “not installed at the registered address.” I plugged it in at the same address I shipped it to, so I’m not sure what the problem is there. Other than that, it’s been flawless today. One text took a while to send out but I have my suspicions that’s on my blackberry. I really wish they’d get their s*** together and stabilize BB10.

  • Romdude

    Use a personal cellspot, not this, the personal one is a normal top of the line Asus router that gives preference to t-mobile calls for your personal use. You also control all passwords and other settings like any other router. Same price too, I got mine without a deposit fee.

    • Jeff Marshall

      While I love the personal cellspot. as a router, I’ve had nothing but issues on both my Nexus 6 and S6 with the wifi calling feature with calls not ringing through. texts not sending. only had the new cellspot for a few hours before bed last night, but I did notice and instant difference in how quickly text send out.. I defiantly wouldn’t recommend this if you live in a dense area. were you might encounter a lot of tmobile users. but if you got some distance around your residence I would recommend this over wifi calling from my experience so far

      • Romdude

        Sorry for your experience, I’ve had no problems at all with it. But then again my dl speed is from 35mbps to 70mbps in downtown Honolulu. That could be it.

        • Jeff Marshall

          I suspect it maybe ISP related some how. I get 100Mb down/10 up and have issues on 2 different model phones. this works for me since I got plenty of space between me and my neighbors. assuming the 3000SQFT range is accurate it shouldn’t even be hitting my neighbors houses/street. but yeah I defiantly wouldn’t want this in my old apartment

  • R.M.

    took an hour to get mine up and running. i get 40-50mb downloads using 4glte and i’m connected to a netgear n900 router. my 4glte light is always flashing and sometimes the 3g/4g light flashes. according to the quick start guide, the lights flash when you reach a maximum 8 connections to your device. I live in an apartment so I dont like that my 8 connections are being taken and there is nothing i can do about it. this thing is very slow to come back online after you unplug it. takes about 5 minutes.

    • Jimmy1974

      OK I called tmobile yesterday and they told me that when the light is flashing that mean it’s has data are voice traffic meaning that a phone are tablet is connected to it

  • R.M.

    i’m happy. now i get 8x faster(40/50mb down/3mb up) data transfers without having to jump on wifi as soon as i get home. for me, that was the whole point of getting it. with the 10gb data plan with rollover, i only use wifi when streaming movies.

    • Danial

      Well with the new announcement, you won’t even use you data when you stream video too (like listening to music that won’t use your data)

    • Jimmy1974

      How is the call quality I have one but the problem I’m running into whenever I’m connected to it after five minutes on the phone the person on the other end complain that my call keep going in and out

      • R.M.

        I havent made any calls. Does your 4glte light always flash?

        • Jimmy197r

          Yes the light flash because ur phone is connected to the 4glte if it’s connected to the regular 4g then the regular 4g will flash

  • squiggleslash

    Is this a real picocell or is this another Wi-fi hotspot like its predecessor? Description seems to suggest it is the former, but some comments here imply the latter.

    • Anon

      It’s a picocell. No Wifi chip on the device

  • Ace Boogie

    Got mine today, definitely happy with the performance. I have decent coverage at home with Band 12 on my Nexus 6 but its slowwww. This device gives me great signal under Band 4 and I get much faster speeds (30mbps vs 6mbps or so). Yes I could use WiFi but I live in a large house and the 5GHz doesn’t reach very far. For a $25 refundable deposit not bad at all. If you want to keep it the cost will be $138.

    • Wish it was Band 12 LTE on the device huh? That’d give it even great range, but it’d work on less devices.

  • Yasir Faheem

    I have this device and i put the mac address in my router and gave it an ip. So everytime the device asks for an ip it will get the same one based on the mac address. I also turned on mac address authentication. So if the mac address is not there the of the device like cell phone it can not be used. I have a password on my wireless network. But knowing the password is not good enough you still need the mac address in the router. Will this work to stop other people that have t-mobile from using my cell tower since all the data of the cell tower goes through the router out to the internet?

    • Jeff Marshall

      that shouldn’t work, once the device is connected to your network any phone that can connect to this cellspot will connect. MAC filtering on the router should only apply to the CellSpot not the individual phones that connect to the Cellspot. if you have data caps or live in an area like an apartment, or your neighborhood has the houses really close together. then this device really isn’t for you. If your in an apartment might as well send it back. if your in a house. then you should figure out how far around you it covers (every thing says about 3000sqft give or take)if we are talking a circular siginal distribution then about 30ft radius around the device. give or take. or about 60ft all the way across the signal area, however I suspect by the outside design the signal maybe more directional then circular. Would be nice if the phone would tell you if you were on the cellspt vs a normal tower so you could try and see where the signal ends.

    • Troy

      Yeah won’t work. The only mac address your router sees is the unit itself. Only the unit sees the mac address of the phones. You can’t stop someone from using it. If you don’t like it get another one of their boosters. The device also creates a VPN connection to Tmobile so you can’t see what’s going across it unless you have the same VPN keys.

  • Jimmy1974

    Next thing we have 20 x20 in Miami but when I use the cellspot I only can 10 x10

  • raidergrr

    If I dont have an LTE signal in my house, and I only have 1 bar of 4g signal, is this going to help me. The Tmo reps at the store said to give it a try. They couldnt give me one in the store, lame, but had customer care mail me one. I get it wed.

    Edit; if there’s no signal to boost, whats the point?

    • Matt Macaluso

      This doesn’t boost a signal it creates one.

      • raidergrr

        So i ordered one. The one that came doesn’t look like the one in the video. I got a 2 part device, one goes in a window and the other goes to a central location in the house. Also labeled a LG LTE Booster CellSpot.

        I want a personal cell tower

    • Troy

      They create your own cell phone tower in your house. It’s awesome

    • Ozgur Sen

      I also used to have 1 bar of lte now I have 5 bars of lte even when I’m 3 miles away from my house.

  • Matt Macaluso

    I had zero bars at my house. I hooked this up and I have full coverage and am getting 50mb+. My wifi however, is completely bogged down, and I can barely run a speed test. When I unhook the LTE device, wifi is back in business. WTF? Pretty sure I am providing the whole neighborhood T-Mobile coverage too, as the light is blinking indicating I have 8 connections.

    • Michael Barnes

      how long did yours take to active it self ?

      • Matt Macaluso

        2+ hours.

        • Michael Barnes

          thanks mine has been flashing power light for almost 4 hours now

        • Troy

          Give it time there backlog mine took two days. Giving them a call they speed up the process.

        • Michael Barnes

          Ya ended up calling them yesterday they opened a ticket for me they said it happening to lots of people 72 hours they will have it activated I guess business hours so maybe Wednesday

        • Troy

          Yeah mine turned on yesterday. Love it.

        • james

          Do have in wan

        • Michael Barnes

          Yes

        • james

          Here is what i would do unconect it from your router make sure u got a good solid internet connection. Once you are sure u got good internet conection . conect yellow cord to one of the ports on router labeled 1234 into yellow sspot on cell spot. It will then flash green for about 15 to 20 min shut down start flashing green again it will repeat this for a while then you will notice lights begining to stay on. Do you have gps in window

        • Michael Barnes

          Thanks but I already contacted them and told them what’s up there’s a huge backlog of people activating them they opened a ticket to fix it on there end

      • james

        2 hours but it works awesome

      • james

        2 hours

        • Michael Barnes

          thanks ya i opened a ticket they said 72 hours it will be activated the rep said there is a huge backlog of people activating them

      • Ozgur Sen

        45 minutes I don’t know why it took such a short time.

    • Troy

      The LTE light blinks any tine cell service is being used that is voice SMS or GPS location.

    • bmak

      my wifi seemed too slow down as well, reset routers and reset cellspot seems better but yeah my 4g/lte always blinks too meaning someone close is always using my tower, really need a whitelist option thru website or something!

    • Ozgur Sen

      This Cell spot is awesome I am connected to this device from 3 miles away as I’m driving in my car.
      I used LTE discovery to see which tower I was connected to

      I’m really impressed with the range of this device too

    • anon

      if you separate your wifi device and this 4G/LTE Cellspot, it will help

      • anon

        by about 5 ft or more

  • james

    Ive had signal boosters 3 of them cell spot router this works flawlesly. It does take up to two hours to set up. Best device. I live in 80 ft long trailer full bars every were im getting 25 down 5 up crystal calls thx t mobile i dont have any problems with wifi while in use im getting 60 down 5 up on router

    • Matt Macaluso

      Weird… I wonder why my wifi basically stops working. I had to unhook the LTE device.

  • Jeremy

    For anyone who’s got one of these. Do you have 4G LTE in your area? My store has 6 of these but they will not release them. They won’t ring out. Customer support says I must have 4G LTE in my area. I thought the purpose of this was to create a personal signal, not a signal booster.

  • joe

    My Experience with t MOBILE signal augmentation devices

    WI-FI Router:::
    Pro: Excellent router very good for video streaming and gaming
    Con: WI-fi Calling is ok or manageable ,it can drop calls,not good for making business call,it doesn’t work with the phone that do not supper wi-fi calls.

    LTE Signal booster:::
    Pro: very useful in situation where you don’t have cable or internet access, it boost the signal inside your house. it gives decent coverage in your home
    Con: u need at least one 4g LTE bar outside home or at your windows at corner of your home
    LTE PERSONAL CELLSPOT:::
    Pro :Very useful in an area where you don’t have any signal from your t mobile tower. i work in a basement of my office where i don’t have any signal from any carriers , after hooking this device to commercial ethernet port oookla test upload speed 19 mbps and download sped 64 mbps. .The speed i got from my home with this device was download 9.8 and upload 0.97. which is connected to residential time warner cable.
    Con: 1)Any T mobile customer can access from your cell spot if u live in aappatment or condo.
    2)Data usage will be counted from your allowed plan

  • I got one. Love it. Way better than the booster POS.

  • If you haven’t notice, having one of these will save your battery too… the cellular radio doesn’t have to blast full power. I can think of a half dozen restaurants and night clubs to put this in.

  • Robert Schmead

    Will this work with Carriers like Ting that Sublet T-mobiles network? or is it locked to T-mobile only?

  • mooch

    Just make sure it’s no warmer than 60 degrees F in the room, otherwise it will overheat. I have to keep it right by my air conditioning vent with a fan blowing directly on it in order to keep it from overheating and shutting itself down. I thought maybe it was just that unit but I’ve been through three so far and they all do it.