Android M will include native visual voicemail, and T-Mobile will support it

androidmofficial

If you’re an Android user, you’ve probably been looking forward to Android M ever since Google announced it nearly two months ago. Now you’re going to get even more excited for the next major Android release.

Google has revealed that Android M will offer native visual voicemail support, meaning that you’ll be able to view different voicemail messages and not only play them out of order, but play only specific messages. This was revealed by a Google employee in an Android Developer Preview issue tracker.

androidmvisualvoicemailtmonews

What does this have to do with T-Mobile, you ask? Well, the Googler in question specifically called out T-Mobile US as a carrier that will be included in this visual voicemail support when it launches to the public. It’s said that the feature will be baked into the public release of M, but several T-Mobile customers are actually able to use it right now.

While voice calling may not be quite as big as it used to be, it doesn’t appear that calls and voicemails are going away permanently any time soon. That’s why visual voicemail comes in handy, letting you pick and choose which messages you want to listen to and eliminating wasted time from having to listen to messages that you don’t care about to get to the one that you do. And while some carrier-branded apps and services like Google Voice have offered visual voicemail on Android in the past, it’ll be nice to have the feature built into Android M and its dialer app.

Via: Android Police
Source: Google

 

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  • Gar1

    Don’t we already have that from tmobil. More importantly let’s hope m get tested for more then a hour unlike lollicrap and all bugs I have on my phone now thanks to this shameful software.

    • Joe P

      Well, I’m running the second developer release of M on my Nexus 6, and it’s pretty great so far. Maybe a rare dropped call, but otherwise it’s great! This isn’t even the final version, and I’m using it as my daily driver.

      • Gar1

        I’ll keep my hopes up. It can’t come too soon

  • UMA_Fan

    Now what would be REALLY cool is if we could save voicemails right from the dialer as a file to google drive.

    • steveb944

      Well we already can kind of. It’s just a few extra steps and it’s done through T-mobile visual voicemail app to the phone and then a file explorer app to share to drive.

  • Btbcc12859

    I would be happy if the translation in hangout was better at its job

  • Just like the one in for calls to the Google Voice number? Yawn!

    • kbiel

      Yeah, but now that they’re making it part of Android, they will no longer allow it to sit and rot as they have with all things GV.

  • steveb944

    Good. T-Mobile visual voicemail sucks at times.

  • Android_Merde

    no Android M for you, and no Android M for you, you good sir, no Android M for you.

    Please upgrade to newer hardware if you wish to run M.

    • Hilton GoWahoos Redskins

      Running it now on my Nexus 6 on T-mo. Hadn’t even notice they had added that feature to the dialer until I saw this article. Cool stuff.

  • Technosquid

    This is a positive development, but the inclusion a native WiFi calling standard compatible with T-Mobile in Android M (as it is in iOS 8.0+) is definitely the more important feature. It will allow those coming to the network without a T-Mobile logo phone to use it. Hopefully it will also cut down the testing and approval times for updates to T-Mobile handsets, as they won’t have to integrate their own WiFi calling app into the system.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Google’s had more than enough time to get this together.

      Their first ever phone [in the world] was launched on T-Mobile in 2008 and T-Mobile has had UMA/Wi-Fi Calling since 2007.

      • skywalkr2

        What a troll this guy is.

        • Fabian Cortez

          What a troll this guy is.

          Who?

      • archerian

        Why would Google spend time to support a feature that only around 15% of wireless users in the USA had access to until 2015?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Why would Google spend time to support a feature that only around 15% of wireless users in the USA had access to until 2015?

          Yeah, no.

          Troll along.

        • Technosquid

          WiFi calling is a big part of their Google Fi multi-carrier MVNO service. That’s something they’re testing with the 5.1.1 Lollipop update to the Nexus 6. Maybe Google felt it was a waste of time before, maybe not, but in June 2014 when Apple announced that T-Mobile was the first carrier partner to support WiFi calling in iOS 8, that’s probably what made adding it to Android M a priority. Now with Sprint supporting the feature in iOS 8.3+ and AT&T and Verizon confirmed working to add it soon, if Android didn’t have the same support in M, considering how long it takes for a new version of Android to reach penetration in the market, they would be playing catchup with iOS in this feature for quite some time.

    • Aaron C

      In fact, is there any reason for me to have Google Voice at all anymore if I’m only using it for voicemail? I just used it for translation and so I could get messages when I’m in areas that only have wifi but no service. With WiFi calling, I don’t need to worry about that anymore. Hmmmm.

  • Zach Chadwick

    iOS has had Visual Voicemail since…. iOS 5. That was in 2011. If Android is so advanced, why had they not have such a basic feature?

    • Fabian Cortez

      Nope.

      It’s been there since the beginning in 2007 with iPhone OS 1.

      • YeaForAndroid

        Hate to break it to you but, Visual Voice mail has been around since my first android the Samsung Galaxy 1 AKA the Vibrant, of course T-mobile charged [and still does] extra to convert your voice mails to text, but this will be nice to have for free.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You’re not breaking anything to me.

          Your comment still does not change the fact that Google is unnecessarily behind with their Android developments.

        • TK – Indy

          This is laughable. Android features are almost always light-years ahead of Apple. I am surprised at you, usually your drivel is based on a kernel of reality that is then shaped to your liking.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This is laughable. Android features are almost always light-years ahead of Apple. I am surprised at you, usually your drivel is based on a kernel of reality that is then shaped to your liking.

          Except there’s still no native Visual Voicemail nor OS-wide Wi-Fi Calling…

        • TK – Indy

          There has been a native SIP client functionality in Android since 2.3.

        • Fabian Cortez

          There has been a native SIP client functionality in Android since 2.3.

          Straw man.

          Again, there still is no native visual voicemail.

        • TK – Indy

          I suspect this was purposefully omitted so that T-mobile could charge for the service on the N1. iPhones are a recent addition to T-mobile so there was no influence to leave it out.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I suspect this was purposefully omitted so that T-mobile could charge for the service on the N1. iPhones are a recent addition to T-mobile so there was no influence to leave it out.

          Visual Voicemail was always free.

        • TK – Indy

          No, you paid extra for it originally.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Do you have a link?

        • Medion

          Some of you guys are being truly dense (Fabian, this isn’t aimed at you, your name is just the one where I clicked reply).

          iOS supports a native VVM client built into the device. Android as a whole does not (Android M will be the first).

          Using another app for VVM doesn’t change the fact that Android doesn’t have it built in. In fact, that further reinforces the idea. You’re using another app BECAUSE you don’t have native functionality.

          Google Voice won’t access your carrier voicemail, You have to use a GV number (for voicemail only, if you prefer). It works fine most of the time, but it has some annoyances which is why I stopped using it.

          When Fabian was talking about native VVM and Wi-Fi calling, talking about anything else (especially SIP) is literally a straw man argument. Android does not currently have full Wi-Fi calling baked into a public distribution. You have to flash a specific update that was pushed only to Nexus 6 users on T-Mobile (yes, the OTA was really only pushed to TMO users, and at least one of those updates isn’t on the Nexus images page). Google still hasn’t put Wi-Fi calling into stock Android to a point where other OEMs can natively use it with their builds.

          As for cost – VVM has always been free on iPhones through the native functionality across all supported carriers (TMO added support April 2013). It’s also free to use with third party services, such as Google Voice, that can’t pull from the carrier’s phone number. But to access visual voicemail from a carrier using your actual number is typically an add-on fee for Android phones, and the use of a carrier-app.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Google Voice won’t access your carrier voicemail, You have to use a GV number (for voicemail only, if you prefer). It works fine most of the time, but it has some annoyances which is why I stopped using it.

          I believe the exception to this is Sprint since they allow their numbers to be natively integrated with Google Voice.

        • Medion

          Fabian:

          https://support.t-mobile.com/docs/DOC-10421

          They reference the “free” VVM app, which I have installed. You get a 30-day free trial of VVM. After that, there’s a popup asking you to pay $3.99/mo to subscribe to the service. Without a subscription, all you get is an overview of your voicemails and the ability to listen to them, but no voice to text transcription. Do, it depends on what you consider to be “visual voicemail.” If all you consider to be VVM is the ability to look at a screen and see that you have text messages without calling a number, then yes, VVM is free. If you consider VVM to be the ability to read a voicemail, then no, VVM is not free for most users direct from a carrier (iPhone being THE major exception).

        • skywalkr2

          this is just out of hand. google voice has been out forever and is FREE. now they are just baking it in… reducing customer choice. So if you hare happy that Android is becoming less flexible then fine… but that just means you are happy that Android is being crappier and moving towards Apple and their no flexibility ecosystem.

        • Fabian Cortez

          this is just out of hand. google voice has been out forever and is FREE. now they are just baking it in… reducing customer choice. So if you hare happy that Android is becoming less flexible then fine… but that just means you are happy that Android is being crappier and moving towards Apple and their no flexibility ecosystem.

          This isn’t Google Voice nor is it related.

          Google Voice is an OTT service.

        • Durandal_1707
          There has been a native SIP client functionality in Android since2.3.

          Straw man.

          Straw man? What did he accuse of you of saying that you didn’t actually say?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Straw man? What did he accuse of you of saying that you didn’t actually say?

          Very off topic but try using Google for a definition.

        • Durandal_1707
          Straw man? What did he accuse of you of saying that you didn’t actually say?

          Very off topic but try using Google for a definition.

          Actually, what I was hinting at there was that perhaps you should do that. A straw man is when you misrepresent someone else’s argument, changing it into something absurd that’s easily knocked down. There’s no way that simply stating that Android has had a SIP client built-in for a while is a straw man, sorry.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Actually, what I was hinting at there was that perhaps you should do that. A straw man is when you misrepresent someone else’s argument, changing it into something absurd that’s easily knocked down. There’s no way that simply stating that Android has had a SIP client built-in for a while is a straw man, sorry.

          Negative on that.

          I suggest you investigate “straw man” and “straw man arguments.”

          TK – Indy‘s response was made as if to distort the fact that Visual Voicemail and Wi-Fi Calling are still not OS-wide, completely ignoring what Wi-Fi Calling truly represents.

        • Durandal_1707

          I just defined a straw man argument for you above. It had nothing to do with his post. I really suggest you refrain from using terms that you don’t understand.

          Wi-Fi Calling of the sort T-Mobile uses *is* OS-wide in Android 5.1.1, and I’m using it right now on my Nexus 6. Before this, as TK-Indy pointed out, Android had SIP calling built-in, although to my knowledge none of the US carriers supported it (of course, until very recently, iOS didn’t have any kind of Wi-Fi calling at all, so this isn’t much of a point in its favor), and of course there were third-party options like T-Mobile’s WFC app, as well as Google Voice.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I just defined a straw man argument for you above. It had nothing to do with his post.
          Wi-Fi Calling of the sort T-Mobile uses *is* OS-wide in Android 5.1.1, and I’m using it right now on my Nexus 6.

          Show me an android phone with 5.1.1, other than the T-Mobile build of the Nexus 6, that natively supports Wi-Fi Calling on any carrier that supports it the moment I pop in the appropriate SIM card.

          Before this, as TK – Indy pointed out, Android had SIP calling built-in, although to my knowledge none of the US carriers supported it

          SIP calling is absolutely unrelated to this.

          (of course, until very recently, iOS didn’t have any kind of Wi-Fi calling at all, so this isn’t much of a point in its favor),

          Native Wi-First Calling on iOS is absolutely a point in its favor. T-Mobile’s relationship with Apple is very recent while Google’s relationship with T-Mobile has been ongoing for the past seven (7) years.

          and of course there were third-party options like T-Mobile’s WFC app, as well as Google Voice.

          Irrelevant as all are not native and two are OTT and the other isn’t.

        • Durandal_1707

          Show me an android phone with 5.1.1, other than the T-Mobile build of the Nexus 6, that natively supports Wi-Fi Calling on any carrier that supports it the moment I pop in the appropriate SIM card.

          The non-T-Mobile build of the Nexus 6, from the Play Store.

          Actually there is no “T-Mobile build”, it’s the same device as the Play Store build, because all together now, this is an OS-level feature.

          SIP calling is absolutely unrelated to this.

          SIP calling is the ability to make phone calls over the Internet (including Wi-Fi). It’s absolutely related to this.

          Native Wi-First Calling on iOS is absolutely a point in its favor. T-Mobile’s relationship with Apple is very recent while Google’s relationship with T-Mobile has been ongoing for the past seven (7) years.

          T-Mobile obviously started negotiations with both Apple and Google at the same time, given that the announcements on both ends came within months of each other and coincided with the “Wi-Fi Unleashed” thing. Apple finished their implementation slightly sooner. Hooray, I guess?

          Irrelevant as all are not native and two are OTT and the other isn’t.

          Given the choice between using a third-party app and not being able to do something at all, I’d obviously go with the third-party app.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The non-T-Mobile build of the Nexus 6, from the Play Store.

          Actually there is no “T-Mobile build”, it’s the same device as the Play Store build, because all together now, this is an OS-level feature.

          Now to be more specific: other than the Nexus 6.

          SIP calling lets you make phone calls over the Internet (including Wi-Fi). You can also use it to receive incoming calls. Gee, I don’t see the similarity at all.

          Understand the difference between Wi-Fi Calling and VoIP over Wi-Fi before continuing this conversation.

          T-Mobile obviously started negotiations with both Apple and Google at the same time, given that the announcements on both ends came within months of each other and coincided with the “Wi-Fi Unleashed” thing. Apple finished their implementation slightly sooner. Hooray, I guess?

          No.

          This is a clear case of competition and not wanting to fall behind a competitor.

          The only reason Apple added Wi-Fi Calling to iOS is due to their partnership with T-Mobile and T-Mobile’s Wi-Fi Calling requirement.

          Google, on the other hand, partnered with T-Mobile in 2007/2008 to launch the first ever Android phone in the world. T-Mobile has had Wi-Fi Calling since 2007 with their HotSpot @Home service so Google has had more than enough time to “innovate” and integrate WIiFi Calling OS-wide. Yet they didn’t and haven’t to this day.

          It took Apple and its iOS-wide native support for Google to get off of their ass.

          Given the choice between using a third-party app and not being able to do something at all, I’d obviously go with the third-party app.

          That’s still irrelevant to the topic and conversation at hand.

        • Durandal_1707

          Now to be more specific: other than the Nexus 6.

          How many non-Nexus phones have access to Android 5.1.1 right now? Well, the Galaxy S6 is one, I guess.

          Understand the difference between Wi-Fi Calling and VoIP over Wi-Fi before continuing this conversation.

          Wi-Fi Calling (and VoLTE) essentially are VoIP, just with handoffs.

          No.

          This is a clear case of competition and not wanting to fall behind a competitor.

          The only reason Apple added Wi-Fi Calling to iOS is due to their partnership with T-Mobile and T-Mobile’s Wi-Fi Calling requirement.

          Google, on the other hand, partnered with T-Mobile in 2007/2008 to launch the first ever Android phone in the world. T-Mobile has had Wi-Fi Calling since 2007 with their HotSpot @Home service so Google has had more than enough time to “innovate” and integrate WIiFi Calling OS-wide. Yet they didn’t and haven’t to this day.

          It took Apple and its iOS-wide native support for Google to get off of their ass.

          So, let me get this straight. When Apple adds Wi-Fi calling to the iPhone, it’s because of T-Mobile’s requirement that all phones they sell must support Wi-Fi Calling, but when Google announces Wi-Fi calling for the Nexus 6 at approximately the same time, it has nothing to do at all with T-Mobile’s requirement that all phones they sell must support Wi-Fi Calling.

          :lol:

          As for partnerships, for most of those seven years, T-Mobile was considered an also-ran carrier that would probably go out of business soon (which almost happened, thanks to the attempted AT&T buyout). Before Legere and the frankly remarkable comeback he’s orchestrated, T-Mobile had absolutely zero leverage to demand anything. Now, that’s changed.

          Also, T-Mobile may have released what was technically the first Android phone, but the first Android phone that anyone actually cared about was the Motorola Droid on Verizon. Noone but the geekiest of enthusiasts had ever heard of the G1.

          Given the choice between using a third-party app and not being able to do something at all, I’d obviously go with the third-party app.

          That’s still irrelevant to the topic and conversation at hand.

          Hardly irrelevant, when it shows that the Android platform has been far ahead of Apple’s for a long time when it comes to wi-fi calling.

        • Fabian Cortez

          How many non-Nexus phones have access to Android 5.1.1 right now? Well, the Galaxy S6 is one, I guess.

          Exactly. Thank you for proving my point.

          Wi-Fi Calling (and VoLTE) essentially are VoIP, just with handoffs.

          Thank you again for proving my point. You don’t know what you’re talking about.

          So, let me get this straight. When Apple adds Wi-Fi calling to the iPhone, it’s because of T-Mobile’s requirement that all phones they sell must support Wi-Fi Calling, but when Google announces Wi-Fi calling for the Nexus 6 at approximately the same time, it has nothing to do at all with T-Mobile’s requirement that all phones they sell must support Wi-Fi Calling.

          Right over your head.

          As for partnerships, for most of those seven years, T-Mobile was considered an also-ran carrier that would probably go out of business soon (which almost happened, thanks to the attempted AT&T buyout). Before Legere and the frankly remarkable comeback he’s orchestrated, T-Mobile had absolutely zero leverage to demand anything. Indeed, for the longest time they couldn’t manage to get Apple to offer their devices to them at all. Now, that’s changed.

          You seem to discount the length of seven years because it doesn’t fit your point of view. Google had other options to launch the first ever Android phone in the world. But instead, you’re dancing around the reality of the situation.

          Also, T-Mobile may have released what was technically the first Android phone, but the first Android phone that anyone actually caredabout was the Motorola Droid on Verizon. No one but the geekiest of enthusiasts had ever even heard of the G1.

          A subjective opinion that I know even Google wouldn’t agree with. Can you quantify your statement?

          Hardly irrelevant, when it shows that the Android platform has been farahead of Apple’s for a long time when it comes to wi-fi calling.

          You took your original irrelevant statement and countered with another even more irrelevant statement in an attempt to bolster your argument. You’re really doing great.

          Now you want to counter that Android has been ahead of Apple with respect to Wi-Fi Calling. Yet still, today, there’s zero native Wi-Fi Calling [or Visual Voicemail for that matter – article] within the operating system.

          I think both you and Google need to keep up.

        • Durandal_1707

          In that whole post, there’s not a single substantive point, just a bunch of personal attacks. The only exception is the bizarre insistence that there’s no native Wi-Fi Calling in Android, when it’s been clearly established that Android 5.1.1 *does* include native Wi-Fi Calling. With this in mind, I’m just going to consider myself as having won the argument at this point. Bye.

        • Fabian Cortez

          In that whole post, there’s not a single substantive point, just a bunch of personal attacks. The only exception is the bizarre insistence that there’s no native Wi-Fi Calling in Android, when it’s been clearly established that Android 5.1.1 *does* include native Wi-Fi Calling. With this in mind, I’m just going to consider myself as having won the argument at this point. Bye.

          I can say the same with respect to your posts. You have zero evidence to back any of your claims and have even been disproven by your own comments, which is rather extraordinary.

          Again, where is the native Visual Voicemail in Android, today?

        • Durandal_1707

          Sure, just keep telling yourself that. This discussion is over.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sure, just keep telling yourself that. This discussion is over.

          Yet you keep replying and still, to this day, cannot provide any evidence to back your wild claims (minimizing the G1, using said minimization as an excuse for the seven (7) long years Google and T-Mobile have had, etc.).

          But we’re all still waiting.

    • Thomas Vu

      That’s like asking why it took so long to add a visual of lowercase letters to the keyboard in iOS?

      Appreciate that its there, and move on.

      • Zach Chadwick

        You might as well complain that the letters on your physical keyboard don’t decapitalize when you’re not holding the shift key. Wow. I was doing just fine with the previous keyboard in iOS 8 and lower.

    • Cruise Guy

      What an IDIOTIC comment Zack. Really? Are you kidding me? They have had it for all this time too with different versions that work great from the different manufacturers, but this is a more advanced version, and secondly why did IOS only get a quarter of Androids features in the last release. I’ve been paying with my phone for 3 years now, and IOS just got it a few months ago. Welcome to 2012 IOS. What an idiotic comment. There is so much more than the new Visual Voicemail that makes a phone. Oh, and Wi-Fi calling. I have had that for years now and love it. I use it all over the world. Why did your wonderful OS just get it now. Go back to bed, buddy.

      • Android_God

        Who hurt you?

      • Thatguy

        Damn bro you need hug?

    • skywalkr2

      Google has offered this via free download Voice since forever…

    • Alex Long

      The iPhone has always had visual voicemail. Meaning the original iPhone 2G on iPhone OS 1 in 2007. I always wondered why Android never had native VVM.

      • Mirad77

        Correct me if am wrong but a lot of features that were released with iPhone were at$t exclusive. It took veri$on almost 6 month and about a year to implement done of these features on sprint.
        VVM was from second gen iPhone. IPhone one was only in market for a couple of months and full of short comings.

    • vinnyjr

      Its called Google Voice, been around forever. I have iPhones and Google Voice is much better. Use it on my iPhone and Android. Only way to go, wake up and smell the coffee.

    • Kiwini

      Probably the same reason advanced ios doesnt have wireless charging or other Android features.. Or has been copying several Android features during the past couple upgrade cycles

    • Medion

      1) iOS VVM only works if the carrier supports it. Not all carriers support it. T-Mobile didn’t add support until April 2013. *The majority of major carrier support it globally and its typically MVNOs and smaller carriers that don’t.

      2)Google and Apple prioritize different things. Yes, this is clearly an example of Google adding a feature YEARS after Apple supported it. However, the same happens from the other side as well. The grass is always greener.

      If we were to call out missing features, or late features from either side of the argument, we’d have a never ending discussion. I don’t have a dog in this race, however, there is one annoyance I’ve noticed, and it drives me nuts. I ONLY see Apple users doing this. When Apple adds a new feature to the iPhone, even if Android has had it for years, a vocal minority of Apple users will act as if Apple invented the feature, and Google copied it. THAT gets old real fas.

      • Zach Chadwick

        Let’s wait. Android users do the same. You can’t say they don’t. That’s not just Apple Users. Haha. The reason why we act as if Apple invented the feature is because the feature is only vocalized as if it was the first feature of its kind of people use it more than they thought, and if it’s easily accessible. Like for example, Apple Pay, has more users than Google Wallet. Apple Pay to most users is the first of its kind because it’s easily accessible, and handy, and the simplest. Each ecosystem has their pro’s and cons. Google Wallet has been around a bit longer than Apple Pay which we can agree upon. But most users were unaware of what the heck it’s functions are, and what it does.

  • Karl

    I wish T-Mobile had 2 for $100 unlimited plan…

    • Unicorn

      Well heck… since we’re wishing… I wish T-Mobile had a 4 lines for $80 unlimited plan inclusive of all taxes and fees and all Uncarrier perks… and Unicorns with Rainbows coming out of their butts…. yeah…. :)

      • wicketr

        You’re not wishing big enough. I want T-Mobile to offer a deal for 4 lines and give me $1 million dollars for taking their offer. And the other 3 lines are for the hot babes that come with the package.

    • Mike

      Well T-Mobile extended the promo to July 14th so it’s your own fault if you didn’t sign up for it in time

    • It’s grandfathered anyway right?

  • YABD

    Android M? Lollipop just got released with a bunch of bugs.

    • dtam

      haha, it’s been 9 months. this coincides with android upgrade cycle. it will be released in October but Samsung/HTC/LG phones probably won’t get it until early next year

      • YABD

        Well my phone was upgraded 2 month ago.

        • dtam

          maybe you’ll get M in 10 months then…

  • Mark

    So, when is Android M coming to the HTC M9?

    Heck, when is Android 5.1.x coming to the M9>

    • Justsomecommentator

      “Heck, when is Android 5.1.x coming to the M9>”

      Look at the previous articles. It was already announced.

      • Thatguy

        Heck, I’m not even going to ask when andriod 5.1 coming to Note 4.

      • Mark

        You’re probably right, so let me rephrase… Heck, when is Android 5.1.x coming to the M9 on T-Mobile? There was no sign the last time I looked at the Software Updates page.

        • Justsomecommentor

          Again, you need to go back and look at a previous article on this very website! It was published July 14th. The title of it clearly says,

          “T-Mobile HTC One M9′s Android 5.1 update is ‘on track’ for July 20 rollout”. There is is right there.

        • Mark

          If that’s the case, then I missed out and I apologize. I looked at the TMo Software Updates page and saw nothing.

        • Mark

          Missed it, not missed out.

        • NOYB

          No update yet as of this writing, sadly.

        • Tim O. Towers

          Good news! Update is available to download now.

  • vrm

    you could do this already ( for years now) if you are using google voice and giving out that # (forwarding calls/texts to carrier # but retrieving VM and texts from voice).

  • TK – Indy

    I am getting unhappy with Android because of all these new phones that are coming out that are so hard to unlock or root. On some, it appears that they will never be rooted. If we are going to have a locked-down OS, it might as well be Apple.

    • Suit yourself, but I’d still rather have a phone where I can esily swap batteries.

      • TK – Indy

        You have a point, I am going through this pain on my nearly 2 year-old Nexus 5 right now. I have never purchased an Apple product, but with readily available jailbreaks for all of them, I may look at them as an option for my next.

        • Chris

          As android became more mainstream, there’s really less and less need for root as you don’t have a lot of tech savvy people using it.

          I haven’t even rooted any of my new phones since I had a Nexus S. The features that Android has now totally works for my daily use.

          People screamed for security and now that we’re going to a more secure platform. People are screaming that we need more “freedom”.

          Can’t have both.

          And jailbreaks only work if Apple hasn’t patched the security hole the jailbreak uses to change system files.

          Jailbreaks and roots are pretty much security holes.

          You don’t want anyone who doesn’t know what they are doing in a linux server to have root access or sudo. You also don’t want a consumer without any root knowledge gaining that access.

          There are a lot of things that could go wrong especially on stolen phones + root access.

          Just my 2 cents.

        • Kris Giri

          Why not buy a battery and change it yourself? It’s very easy to open the case and remove the battery. Watch a YouTube video on how to do it.

        • TK – Indy

          My skills with a soldering iron resemble a kindergartner with the big crayons.

        • Kris Giri

          Lol mine too. All you need is a guitar pick to get the clips for the back cover and a screw driver. A heat gun helps loosen the adhesive. No soldering is required and its actually easy to do. I’ve done at least 10 battery swaps for people without any issues.

    • shamatuu

      not sure why you want to root in 2015. We have a good range of devices that are out now and new comes in the coming months.

      • TK – Indy

        Ad blockers, various server processes, personal VPNs, customization – standard open source type stuff. A million reasons to root, and I will use an old, rootable phone until they are all gone before getting fenced in.

        • Kris Giri

          Get a nexus and quite crying about it.

        • MatthewPDX

          He shouldn’t have to.

        • Manny

          He could build his own phone/software. People buy things, and if no one makes what you want… Boom, new business idea.

        • Kris Giri

          Well that’s what other manufactures, HTC in particular are doing. Android is open source and has always been so Android is not at fault. Rather the companies making the phones that run android. If you want a phone that has the biggest developer following, a phone that has an unlocked bootloader, and pure android experience Nexus is the way to go. If you want a locked down phone go a different direction or do some searching as most phones can be unlocked and rooted but may be harder to do. Try iPhone out and then come back and complain about rooting. Apple will go out of its way to fix jailbreak exploits and shut them down. Google on the other hand could care less. Like I said if you want easy one touch root pick a phone that is popular with developers.

        • archerian

          Android is Open Source, yeah keep believing that…

        • Kris Giri

          Ummm AOSP ever heard of that?
          Google has its code available for anyone to download for free. Not sure why you would think its not besides being an idiot.

        • archerian

          you’re the idiot if you think just having the sources available means Open Source. And Google doesn’t have to nor has released the Source Code for all Android versions. If it decided to it does. The Android name, the logo are Google trademarks and not available as part of AOSP.

          Tell me, when was the last time a non-Google private individual made a check-in to the Android main branch? All major platform decisions, road-map discussions, feature matrices and source code modifications are done inside Google and then announced to the public. If this is how you think Open Source works, you’re the idiot. AOSP isn’t real Open Source, regardless of what it’s called. It’s just a code drop.

        • Kris Giri

          OK calm down. If android was open source in the true sense of the word it would probably be garbage. Google hires the best engineers and minds to create and develop Android and they do a great job with it. The fact that anyone can compile the code into their own customized version of Android is freedom and the reason you can find so many great android based ROMs for a wide range of devices. Your right its not open source but the sources exist and are available to anyone. That’s pretty nice for the biggest most installed OS in the world and something its competitor’s (apple, Microsoft) fights against and had never shared publicly.

        • yankeesusa

          No reason to call someone an idiot. We are all just having a conversation. Like Kris Giri said, CALM DOWN, everything will be alright.

        • yankeesusa

          Whether it is or it’s not, you still have more freedom with android than any other os. I think that’s the main point here.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          quit bro

        • Critic4U

          My only worry about rooting and doing those custom roms is that what if the developer has a secret agenda of getting your personal information…

        • TK – Indy

          Well, if you are one of the few that hasn’t already had the government, an insurance company, or someplace that you shop allow your personal information to be compromised, I guess this would be a concern. Mine has already been accessed during 5 different major data security breach scandals.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          reason why I stick to stock roms is due to new bugs being introduced

      • yankeesusa

        Ad blocker and app specific controlling. Although that will be native in android m which makes root less needed.

    • dontsh00tmesanta

      its the OEMs not google…..get a nexus those are super easy to root and keep updated.

  • Imtiaz

    I already have this on my oneplus one, Exodus ROm

  • HeatFan786

    It’s a nice a feature. I enjoy a variation of it on my iPhone.

  • Phill

    What’s the point? T-Mobile will probably not update bunch of flagship phones like the Note 2 still on Android 4.3 while others are 4.4.2. S4 which is on Android 4.4.4 while others are on 5.0.1. Even antisamsung Japan has those updates. Shame on Tmobile.

    • Phill

      Note 3 and s5 will never see the Android M update on Tmobile if tmobile keeps its track records.

      • Mike Palomba

        I believe that both will receive Android M, they are fairly new devices.

      • g2a5b0e

        I think the S5 will. I think you’re right on the Note 3 though. All the other carriers probably will though.

    • williejackbrainer

      You should do as much research as possible to find out what the update path would be if any before purchasing a phone. I’ve learned by lesson and sticking with the Nexus line of phones. No need to concerning yourself with updates, because OEM’s put there UI’s and boatware on the phones they sell. That is why some phones do not receive updates in a timely manner or at all.

  • itguy08

    Welcome to 2007 Android. Nice to see you are learning from your master, iOS.

    But, God that’s one Fugly UI you got there.

    • MMA Prints

      Stop your iCrying.

    • james

      Ios sux

    • idisestablish

      First of all, visual voicemail has been offered by Google for years, it’s just being baked-in now instead of being an optional download. Secondly, if you want to talk about learning from your master, let’s talk about the swipe down notification panel and the control center. I wonder where Apple got that idea. Welcome to 2007? How long did it take iPhone to get 3G? LTE? NFC? Custom notification sounds? Freaking wallpaper? They’ve been years behind even on the basics that you got on flip phones, let alone cutting-edge technology. For goodness sake, iPhone still doesn’t even have a way to access the file system. I eagerly await welcoming you to 1980.

      • itguy08

        LOL.

        So the iPhone had 3G 1 year after it came out – 2008. Back then 3G networks were pretty spotty.

        LTE did take a while and there is no excuse for it.

        NFC is cute but with real limited use. The only thing I used it for on my GS5 was for the poor Google Wallet “experience”.

        Custom notification sounds were present in the iPhone 3G. As was custom wallpaper.

        I don’t need or want a way to access the file system. In case you have not noticed, Google is neutering that on Android too.

        Android is a garbage experience. I know, I made that mistake TWICE.

  • james

    Itguy08 ios sux

  • dontsh00tmesanta

    As much as I love my g4 I will be getting the next LG Nexus for the constant updates. Plus I am hoping they nexusify the g4 for the camera

    • williejackbrainer

      I can’t wait to see the next Nexus. Not sure if I will be able to part ways with the Nexus 6 tho.

      • dontsh00tmesanta

        I loved the nexus 6 but it was just too big

        • williejackbrainer

          It was at first, however I got use to it. And I love the dual speakers and the screen size when watching Netflix or Flixster.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          I do miss it

        • williejackbrainer

          I believe the Nexus 5 2015 will redeem itself to those that didn’t care for the Nexus 6.

  • MoveOutTheWay

    Someone should let the CEO about that stupid minimum $50 on top of paying full price for a device in stores. Maybe I’ll get that $480 G4 that’s on sale but nope, they’ll slap on $50…greedy

    • JLV90

      The minimum for most people is $16.

      If you work for a business that has a T-mobile business plan the minimum is $10

    • idisestablish

      Are you talking about the security deposit? You only have to pay that if you have bad credit or decline a credit check. And you get it back with interest when you cancel or after a year of good payment history. They are not profiting from the deposit, it’s a security against loss for people who have a history of not paying their bills.

      • MoveOutTheWay

        I’m on prepaid…paid $400+$50 minimun on top…bill was already paid days before. Like I said, someone let the CEO know about it.

  • nycplayboy78

    Hmmm so what does this mean for YouMail??!!

    • williejackbrainer

      YouMail should still work as an alternative for voicemail.

  • Fabian Cortez

    VVM is free.

    The fee is associated with Voicemail-to-text.

    • Medion

      We’ll have to agree to disagree there.

      The iPhone gets full functionality for free. Android, when using a carrier’s VVM, gets partial free service, and a subscription fee for the remainder.

      • Fabian Cortez

        We’ll have to agree to disagree there.

        The iPhone gets full functionality for free. Android, when using a carrier’s VVM, gets partial free service, and a subscription fee for the remainder.

        As far as I’m aware, voicemail-to-text was never a feature of Visual Voicemail [or iOS for that matter] and more of a carrier feature.

        • Medion

          It was always a feature of visual voicemail for iOS for free, one that required me to pay a subscription if I wanted it. My wife, on the other hand, for it for free on her iPhone 3G, 4, 4s, and 5s.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Okay but that’s not Visual Voicemail and is a carrier-provided service.

          Sure, it’s visual in the sense that you can read/see your voicemail. But Visual Voicemail is about seeing each and every single voicemail and selecting which one you want to listen to and skip through and delete, etc.

        • Medion

          I’m not going to argue with you. I’ve already explained it twice and I won’t repeat myself. We’ll have to agree to disagree.

          Summary for other readers – iOS offered the complete VVM suite for free since day one. Android never did in an integrated fashion. T-Mobile users can use the T-Mobile VVM app for free limited VVM access, but the voice to text transcription aspect of VVM requires a monthly fee for non-iOS users.

          All of the above is 100% factual.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Unless you can provide a source that proves voicemail-to-text is part of Visual Voicemail, I will maintain that the fee exists as a premium carrier service and was never part of the “Visual” part of “Visual Voicemail.”

        • Medion

          Fabian – We both know that even after I provide links, you will continue to argue. It’s what you do. You have a habit of taking a small disagreement, and turning it into a major argument. And, you’ve never admitted to being wroing. Getting in the last word is important to you.

          That said, here’s the links for other readers. YOU are a lost cause :)

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_voicemail

          “Visual voicemail is random-access voicemail with a visual interface. Such an interface presents a list of messages for playback and may include a transcript of each message.”

          http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/V/visual_voicemail.html

          “Visual voicemail is a feature typically provided by cellular telephone service providers that adds a visual interface to standard voicemail capabilities. With visual voicemail users can quickly view and access a list of their voicemail messages for playback as well as manage their personal greetings and upload messages to a voicemail server using a graphical interface. With some visual voicemail services e-mail-based and text-based transcripts of audio messages can be provided as well.”

          http://www.verizonwireless.com/support/visual-voice-mail-faqs/

          Regarding basic visual voicemail:
          “Visual Voice Mail is an app that lets you view information about voice mail messages you receive and listen to your messages in any order on your devices. You can scroll through your messages, pick the ones you want to listen to, and erase or archive them right from your device screen.

          Other features include:

          •Reply to messages by call back, text and even Voice Mail message
          •Get onscreen access to message status
          •Access Voice Mail with 1 button and get instant playback
          •Save up to 40 messages for 40 days, or archive them permanently
          •Create 10 different greetings based on Caller-ID

          Note: iPhone® comes with its own built-in Visual Voicemail service. Refer to Apple’s website for more information.”

          And regarding premium visual voiemail:

          Conclusion – As I have stated repeatedly, voice-to-text transcription is a feature of VVM. iOS devices have that this for free since day one. Andorid users when using a carrier applictation have had only the basic VVM for free, and the premium requires a subscription. This will supposedly change to some degree in Android M.

          Everything above is 100% factual.