21GB “soft cap” quietly added to T-Mobile’s unlimited 4G LTE Simple Choice plans

simplechoice

It has come to our attention over the past few days – thanks to a couple of our readers – that T-Mobile has changed the fine print to its unlimited 4G LTE Simple Choice plans. Head on over to the individual plans or family plans page on T-Mobile’s website and you’ll see the following short line added at the bottom of the page:

“*Unlimited 4G LTE customers who use more than 21 GB of data in a bill cycle will have their data usage de-prioritized compared to other customers for that bill cycle at locations and times when competing network demands occur, resulting in relatively slower speeds.”

Not that long ago one our biggest subjects of discussion here at TmoNews was T-Mobile’s use of network de-prioritization. In short: Customers who used more data than 97% of T-Mo subscribers would find they were being bumped down the pecking order in locations where the network was congested. With these terms – which have existed for a little while now – if you are in a particularly busy area, you’d see your 4G LTE data speeds drop considerably. Sometimes even lower than 1Mbps.

It’s worth reiterating that in most cases, you probably wouldn’t see an impact at all. It depends very much on how busy the network is when you’re trying to use it. Even then, those in the top 3% will only feel the slower speeds during peak times. Being in that top 3% of users, therefore,  isn’t a guarantee that you’ll be slowed down drastically. Being in a congested area is.

This change in fine print makes it clear exactly how much data you have to use in order to feel the pinch. Previously, the 97% marker was ambiguous at best. You have no idea how much data other customers are using, and so you will have no way of knowing if you’re in the top 3% of data users, or not. Now there’s a much clearer 21GB “soft” cap. If you hit 21GB in any billing cycle, you’re then flagged as a de-prioritized customer and might experience slower speeds in congested areas. Once your new monthly billing cycle starts, the flag is removed from your account and everything goes back to normal.

We’re not sure exactly how long the change in the fine print has existed. I suspect it could have been at least 6-7 days. Maybe longer. Thanks to the readers, Merik and Johnta, for pointing this out.

Personally I like this limit much more than the vague 97% we had before. What do you think? Does it bring T-Mobile’s claims of being unlimited in to doubt? Or is this a smart way to go as more customers start using even more data?

Source: T-Mobile

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  • Adrayven

    Worth noting that everyone else is 5GB then your on the list.. so 21GB is not bad.. Thats including grandfathered Verizon and ATT Unlimited customers..

    Not a bad thing, and I’m ok with it as an Unlimited customer.

    • Cellphone Chris

      Being the “tallest midget” doesn’t make it OK. T-Mobile has branded themselves the Uncarrier to set themselves apart from the other carriers. This move negates some of those efforts.

      • Joseph Torres

        not really. because it’s only during peak hours, and not almost a complete stop like on the others even during those hours.

  • 561Gunz

    They really shouldn’t be claiming Unlimited 4G LTE when they have a “Soft” Cap in place now. My phone is my source for Internet/work/fun, etc, there was no need for me to have Internet at home because of my Unlimited T-Mobile service. I had to call customer service and complain because my internet/downloads are so slow. Buffers like crazy trying to watch a 1 minute video. I’m currently at 25GB.

    • Joseph Torres

      I agree with the fact that if they say unlimited 4G LTE it should be, but to use it as a house connection is just sad. It was never intended to be a house connection and I hope they kick you out of their service.

      • Mschmal

        Are people using this much data exclusively on the phone? Its not an Unlimited tethering plan. I guess you could cast the screen from the phone to a monitor but I can’t function without a real keyboard.

        • Joseph Torres

          Sadly there are people out there that do abuse the system and trick the phone/tower into thinking it’s all legal data usage. The worse someone proved to me was that they used about 600 gb 3 or 4 days before their bill cycle restarted. And at the time I guess T-mobile wasn’t lowering speeds because they had a average of 50 – 60 mbps daily much better during night hours of course.

        • thepanttherlady

          Yep. Netflix, Hulu etc.

      • besweeet

        Define “house connection.” Tethering across multiple devices at home, or just using LTE on a single device at home exclusively? Nothing wrong with the latter.

        • Joseph Torres

          House connection = multiple connections to devices like computers, tvs, video game consoles, tablets, etc. they setup their phone to provide the connection as if it was a home router and modem.

        • besweeet

          Then I wouldn’t assume that that’s what the OP meant. He said his phone is his source for things, so if that’s the only device all the data is being used on, then I don’t see any real issue.

        • Joseph Torres

          I see that now, i did jump the gun. But reduced speeds after 21 gb hmm… we have yet to see T-mobiles version. The others well really AT&T n their version of reduce speeds are so bad u rather not even have a data plan. At this point T-Mobile… I doubt they will really hurt anyone being that it depends on the tower on congested times and basically all T-Mobile towers a Blazing fast. What I’m trying to say is that instead of hitting that 80mbps speed, you get only 50mbps that to me is still a great connection as a typical video requires at least 5mbps.

    • Things like this are a perfect example of why they have the soft cap in place. A mobile data connection isn’t a replacement for most home internet users, especially for consuming lots of video. For those who use it with average use (5-10GB or less per month) is one thing, but if you’re in the near 30s you should be considering the impact on the experience for other customers and be willing to accept the de-prioritization as a sign that you probably need home internet.

      • Cellphone Chris

        Why pay for the same thing twice if you don’t have to? It’s the carrier’s responsibility to maintain its network. They shouldn’t minimize their need for backhaul on the backs of their customers. Let’s not socialize services we pay for. T-Mobile loves to upsell customers during acquisition by positioning Unlimited plans and then reaping the additional Revenue/ARPU. We shouldn’t have to limit ourselves if we pay for unlimited usage. Whether I use 5GB or 50GB, what I signed up for at $30/mo. was the luxury of not having to think twice when using my phone, and not having to constantly look for wifi.

        • Joseph Torres

          You say that like if they are going to cut you off, it’s just reduced speeds. So what if you can’t reach that 80mbps speed and have to settle for a lower 30mbps. To stream a basic HD video (at least at 720p) you need 5mbps connection. Get over it.

        • Cellphone Chris

          The only time I have topped 70mbps was while traveling to Dallas, TX. I’m normally around 20-30 mbps in my area. Second, users have reported being limited to less than 1mbps during times of “deprioritization”. Check the comments on the article posted a while back regarding this.

        • Joseph Torres

          ok so 20 – 30 mpbs still overkill for a phone. and as for the other one, I doubt it. the should check to see if they even are getting signal.

        • Cvs5778

          The problem is people are getting less than 1 Mbps so the speed is unusable.

      • PC_Tool

        “A mobile data connection isn’t a replacement for most home internet users, especially for consuming lots of video.”

        …says….you?

        It’s data. It really shouldn’t matter *where* you use it.

        I can understand restricting unlimited tethering, or using it to set up a home wifi network…but just using it, on your device? Shouldn’t matter.

      • 561Gunz

        My job is to drive a Semi all day, and even though I’m home every night, what would justify the need for me to have Internet at home? I’m on the road all day and my phone is my only source of Internet/fun, so when I’m not driving or at the gym I’m on my phone. If I’m paying for “unlimited” service then I expect nothing less. If that’s the case T-Mobile needs to tell every unlimited customer that they really only have until 21GB and that after that it’ll be throttled. You pay for something that’s falsely advertised and then get back to me.

    • Bradley Karas

      25 GB is a lot of data even for a home user.

      • 561Gunz

        I drive a Semi all day, and even though I’m home every night, what would justify the need for me to have Internet at home? I’m on the road all day and my phone is my only source of Internet/fun, so when I’m not driving or at the gym I’m on my phone. If I’m paying for “unlimited” service then I expect nothing less. If that’s the case T-Mobile needs to tell every unlimited customer that they really only have until 21GB and that after that it’ll be throttled. You pay for something that’s falsely advertised and then get back to me.

  • carol argo

    There is no unlimited in any shape or form.if FCC were to do its job .they would need to sue all carrier,since vacation are close I suspect FCC doesn’t feel like working on this.when you need an atormey a lawyer,judge and supreme court to understand or create a justice version of the comprehension (and only for that narrow specific)no wonder people are just praying for google to hurt up with google FI and be done with Verizon ,att,t-mobile,sprint and all other in between.that never are good to their word and keep subtly changing x y z plan .

  • carol argo

    Me I hope FCC implement a per gigabyte rating (mandatory)this would simplify a lot the rating

  • Noremacam

    Realistically, promising unlimited data on a wireless network with real physical bandwidth limitations, is a stretch. I will say this though, At&t was found slowing down bandwidth *for the rest of the billing month* for users that used the most data on their grandfathered unlimited plans. T-Mobile seeks only to do that for bandwidth congested times.

    The question is, since there’s no hard limit to how much data you can use, can you still call it an unlimited data plan even with the bandwidth prioritization?

  • Cellphone Chris

    Didn’t AT&T just pay out a huge settlement for this? It’s not Unlimited if there’s a cap. Period. I routinely use more than 21GB, without tethering. And it’s not my carrier’s business what I use that data for, since they charge me for the right to use it. If I’m going to now have to look for wifi regularly, I might as well consider carriers with more robust coverage for calling. This is not an Uncarrier move.

    • Noremacam

      There’s real hard physical limitations to how much data you can push through a wireless network at any time. Other networks “fix it” by charging obscene amounts of money for more data. T-Mobile is vastly, unquestionably, better here.

      • Cellphone Chris

        Ultimately, T-Mobile should not have offered a plan they couldn’t fulfill. Also, this stipulation didn’t exist when signing on – This is an example of how not having a contract benefits the carrier and not the consumer. Those on EIP who choose to leave pay the equivalent of a penalty by having to pay off a device if they don’t like the carrier changing terms whenever they choose.

        • Joseph Torres

          nope wrong and wrong. Although it is true they can switch it up anytime they want with proper notification to the end users (customers) of course. It is highly unlikely they would do anything like that until they are at or past AT&T subscribers, that could take so many years. But seriously you can leave at anytime, and you don’t need a EIP plan to scare you into staying with them. you could always bring a compatible handset (phone) and bam your good and can leave without any problems at anytime. but for the real question, they are fulfilling it, you still will get a great speed after you hit the 21 gb cap and they never said oh our speeds are guaranteed at said amount. No wireless can guarantee that period. So if you don’t like it, stick to a wired connection forever cus no one can meet ur expectations. I say wired because wifi is not reliable with all those signals messing up from time to time. Especially at a place like apartments, hospitals, etc..

        • Cellphone Chris

          A few issues with what you posted. Regarding EIP – after you’ve agreed to the terms when purchasing, you don’t have recourse if things are changed. BYOD only applies if you have reservations before signing on. Also, where is this “proper notification” you speak of? According to the article, this was slid into the fine print some time during the last week – The author can’t even pinpoint t exactly when. Lastly, what is this great speed you reference? Users have reported less than 1mbps when “de-prioritized”.

        • Joseph Torres

          Whenever something has changed i get spammed text messages on my phone. So what? They have yet to send everyone their message just yet. This is something they might be slowly implementing and they aren’t ready to announce it but you gotta cover the ground first so that new customers are aware. As for EIP if you have a phone that works with their service all you need is a sim card. EIP is for those that don’t have a phone or would like a phone through T-Mobile so that they know it will work correctly. EIP is not a trap and as you don’t have to pay a fee if you chose to close your account. You just owe the remaining balance on the device.That is 100% fair, you can’t decide later I want my money back on the device just because you don’t agree anymore. T-Mobile is not guaranteeing you a said speed, they even say speeds up to, so if you feel tricked thats your own fault. Also as for the 1mbps, like I have been saying to others. I doubt it, get better signal or get out of a place that could be messing up the connection. I have experienced their slower 4G speeds and it has never gone below 7 mbps ever.

        • maestroalvarez

          Well, not being under contract kind of voids the statement, “that’s not what I signed up for”, frankly. Not that I agree with measures taken, I am just saying that T-Mobile is not under contract to offer you anything more than what their monthly fine print reads. That was a savvy business move by T-Mobile to give themselves flexibility to deal with network issues, knowing that they would likely have higher-than-ever network traffic to deal with. I believe that once more 4GLTE wideband and lowband is deployed and more people get the phones that ride on this network, there will be less network issues as more towers will more equally distribute data, minimizing individual towers that have to cover much larger coverage areas. Meanwhile, T-Mobile has to do what T-Mobile has to do to deal with network congestion issues. At least, we know they care and are working on the issue to extend unlimited to as many people as possible. Believe me, if Legere was able to offer unlimited to EVERYONE who joined, he would. It will take some time AND cooperation by the FCC to set aside low-band spectrum for T-Mo and the other smaller companies so that AT&T and Verizon don’t hog it all up with their almost bottomless pockets.
          IF the FCC rules in favor of T-Mobile, Legere’s dream of offering TRULY unlimited data will finally come true. T-Mobile will be in a much better position to make it a sustainable move. That is why, knowing the incertainty of the FCC’s decision, Legere promised unlimited passengers at least two more years of truly unlimited data. If the FCC sides with T-Mo and other smaller companies to strengthen competition, you will see T-Mobile offer more of everything and the tide will turn in T-Mobile’s favor, propelling it to the #1 spot in the US Wireless Market. John Legere, will then be the United States’ first Billionaire CEO (ok, that was a little bit of a stretch… hehe he) ;-)

    • Ashton Haynes-Lofft

      They didn’t pay a damn dime. The FCC slapped them with a $100 million fine for throttling unlimited users and the FTC bitch slapped them with a lawsuit for throttling unlimited data users.

    • Joseph Torres

      No because with AT&T it was found that their version of reduced speeds was so bad you might as well not have had a connection at all. At least on t-mobile you get a good connection. sure it wont be so freaking fast but good enough to watch netflix.

      • Cvs5778

        Um .1 Mbps is hardly useable and that’s what people are reporting.

    • Noremacam

      Additionally, AT&T was found to throttle their heaviest users regardless of the level of congestion – for the rest of the billing cycle. T-Mobile seeks only to alleviate network congestion by prioritizing data. To those who disagree with T-Mobile on this – how would *you* prioritize a finite amount of wireless bandwidth?

      • maestroalvarez

        This is really about the threshold of each tower, not necessarily a network-wide specific approach. Now that I understand de-prioritization more, I have come to the conclusion that the only solution is to add more (smaller, neighborhood) towers, even if less powerful to ease the congestion. Too, if the speed were increased, the majority of the smartphones in the area would be on the network for shorter periods of time as they would get done with their packet downloads much quicker, thus easing network congestion.
        Personally, I would not buy three busses that hold 30 passengers each and sell 100 tickets. It does not make sense. Unless the passengers are picked up along the way and I know that customers will be de-boarding in between cities. I would appreciate it if T-Mobile allowed for everyone to have a 4MB speed experience, rather than some using the network at 30MBps vs a de-prioritized person using it at less than 1MBps. I would not complain if I had at least 4MBps if I were to be de-prioritized.
        The fact of the matter is that the deployment of more lowband and wideband bandwidth will address this issues and de-prioritization will slowly be a thing of the past as 5G technologies are adopted. Frankly, I am amazed that T-Mo is not agressively persuing LTE-A at this time. The only other solution, as a suggestion would be to set your phone to connect ONLY to 4G, which generally gives you much better speeds than trying to remain on a 4G LTE connection.

        • Cellphone Chris

          Love the bus analogy. I have wifi at home and work but do not use them on my phone out of principle. If I pay for unlimited mobile data, that’s what I should receive.

      • Chris

        The people who pay more for usage get the higher priority? I know, it’s a crazy concept.

        • PC_Tool

          Data for the 1%!

          (The rest of you get to pretend it’s the 1980’s…)

          Brilliant idea, Sir. I’ll file that right next to “euthanize the homeless”. We’ll get rid of all these pesky unwashed peasants right quick with good folks like you around. /s

        • Noremacam

          lol

      • archerian

        how would you differentiate between throttling and prioritization? Isn’t what T-mobile doing temporary throttling?

        • Noremacam

          At&T was throttling the connection even when there was extra bandwidth to spare – for the rest of the billing month. This means AT&T was deliberately sabotaging the user’s data connection. Prioritization applies when the bandwidth is already maxed out, and performance loss is a guarantee. T-Mobile feels that the largest users of data should shoulder the bandwidth congestion more than those who use their data more modestly.

          Considering I keep hearing tales of those using 100gb or so a month, it makes sense to me. I for one would be frustrated if other users on the same tower were using huge amounts of data and significantly reducing my performance as a result. But I can see why others would disagree.

          I really hope T-Mobile is successful in acquiring more bandwidth from the FCC. The more bandwidth T-Mobile has, the less often it will be maxed out, and the less often prioritization would take affect.

    • gmo8492

      To be fair At&t was being fined because they didn’t specify the terms of their agreement with unlimited data plan customers. What they did after they stopped offering unlimited data plans was sort of a bait and switch since they altered the terms of service without prior knowledge or consent of their customers. They also would often lie to about throttling their connections according to numerous complaints made to the FCC and later included as part of their 4 year investigation.

  • Zach Mauch

    Many will balk here, but I think this is an ok move. They aren’t throttling, they are just pushing you down the totem poll when demands on your tower are high.

  • Zach Mauch

    One more thing, if the FCC fines T-Mobile for a move a basic as this, I doubt unlimited will stick around. They are trying to offer it without compromising network integrity. That is hard. This is a good middle ground between nothing and throttling.

    • Cellphone Chris

      This is the definition of throttling. Masking it conditional doesn’t change what it is.

      • Zach Mauch

        no, it’s not. It’s prioritization. throttling is setting a speed and not letting you go above it. Even in congestion, they never do that.

        Now it is still ambiguous what the impact of that is on your speeds/latency. that could use some explaining.

        • Joseph Torres

          Yup, only during peak hours will u see reduced speeds after it settles down you get that top speed back. This is better then what the others are doing.

        • Cellphone Chris

          Excuse me, but wouldn’t peak hours be the times you’d be most likely to need to use data?

        • Joseph Torres

          Well if your not happy then just leave. When you signed up they didn’t guarantee a speed to you. So just leave.

        • Cvs5778

          Actually when I signed up they promised unlimited 4g lte. Not just data but 4g lte. They’re still doing it. Go to their site and see the unlimited 4g lte plan advertisement.

        • Chris

          The problem is I use most of my 40GB off peak at home when I get 15mbps+ but then I get sub 1mbps at work when I go to stream music and often I can’t connect to anything. This policy is not taking into consideration when and where you are using your “unlimited” data.

        • Joseph Torres

          I doubt that 1mbps as my friend is at currently at 47 gb on his line. I can prove it, he is able to watch netflix with no problem or skipping.

      • Zach Mauch

        Oh, and would you rather have this or loose unlimited all together, because that is what would happen if this got struck down.

    • As I said many times before, one cannot manage the quality of service of a network without discriminating traffic. Network neutrality is the sure path to congestion and to control of the internet by the state via the SOPA like provisions that the FCC sneaked into its 300 page proposal.

  • I have no clue how it is even possible for people to use 21GB of data through their phone when they’re not using it as a tethering device. I’d consider myself somewhat of a “power user” and I can hardly crack the 5GB limit. With Music Freedom, I barely crack 3GB. If you are actually complaining about this, I would consider you find a hobby. It really isn’t that big of a deal. You aren’t being charged extra. You likely won’t even be affected *most* of the time. Stop whining.

    • gmo8492

      If you can’t crack over 5GB, than I really can’t consider you a power user. Stream 1 hour of Netflix everyday and you will burn through 20GB during half or your billing cycle. This isn’t about making T-Mobile your next ISP, data is data and anything remotely demanding will use large amounts of data. I’m glad tmo is clarifying their data priorities, but I’m more concerned if this will lead to negative press or issues with the FCC.

      • In the sense that I use my phone for business a LOT, I am a power user. I don’t see why it’s necessary to watch Netflix on a phone all day through cellular, but that’s just my personal preference. I’d rather watch something on my TV, and have WiFi in my home.

        Like the post says, if it’ll only affect towers that are in need of prioritization, and only then, I can’t see much of an issue here. You’re still unlimited and your speeds will likely still be good enough for your Netflix addiction if the 1Mbps limit is factual.

        • gmo8492

          Netflix struggles to stream at 1mbps unless you’re watching SD video, there is no problem if your connection is at around 5mbps for HD. But my point was not to defend the people who use excessive amounts of data. I was pointing out that its very easy to use a lot of data on a device alone. Yeah you can make the argument about watching everything at home. But what about people who go to work and on their break they want to watch a show to pass the time. These are real world situations and WiFi is not always readily available everywhere you go especially if you travel.

        • I get that. I just don’t believe that 21GB and deprioritizing in times of need is *that* big of a compromise. I think it’s too early to judge until people start seeing the effects of the change.

        • gmo8492

          I have no problem with that, as unlimited data plan customer I get what I pay for being with T-Mobile. Of course in times where I’ve used a lot of data I got to experience when you get deprioritze. So I can sympathize with some people on this issue. But we also have to preserve the integrity of the network for everyone else and this is just one of the ways it has to be done.

        • Joseph Torres

          On average 1 hour of netflix streaming is about 1 gb. if you get a 30 min break everyday (if you work everyday lol) thats 15 gb for the month (30 days) But seriously everything should be good enough even with the 21 cap well past during the bill cycle.

        • Cvs5778

          Watching Netflix 1 hour a day during a commute to work for example is hardly all day.

    • PC_Tool

      You “have no clue” how they are doing it…yet you feel free to tell them to “find a hobby”.

      Well aren’t you just a bit judge-y today.

      I pull down over 10GB a month. Music streaming 8+ hours a day during work as well as netflix/youtube after. Easy-peasy, and absolutely nothing out of the ordinary.

      • Joseph Torres

        Well then you shouldn’t have a problem with anything. As you don’t go near the 21 gb.

        • skywalkr2

          Don’t think so. Only data counted should count against the soft cap. Music freedom usage should not.

        • PC_Tool

          If I don’t have a problem with it now, it would be somewhat hypocritical if I were to suddenly “have a problem with it” if/when I do start using over 21. Of course, that’s not really the point here.

          OP couldn’t imagine how people could go over 5GB (and then felt the need to slam anyone who did – regardless of why or how).

          My response had nothing to do with the 21GB soft-cap as it was irrelevant to the point I was trying to make.

      • skywalkr2

        If you are using the right music provider… the music should count for ZERO.

        • PC_Tool

          Data used is data used. I’m on the unlimited plan so all of my data “counts for zero”.

          Ya missed the point, friend.

        • skywalkr2

          Don’t think so. Only data counted should count against the soft cap. Music freedom usage should not count.

        • PC_Tool

          Think so. My response had nothing to do with the Soft-cap. :)

          I’ll explain:

          OP: Pfft…how could anyone go over 5GB? Get a life!

          Response: Judge much? This is how – nothing out of the ordinary.

        • Paul

          Not all are covered, and I’m not leaving SiriusXM just because they aren’t supported. So my data will increase.

    • JTrip

      I stream 1 hour of video every day at the gym while doing cardio. That puts me well over the 21GB cap.

      • Joseph Torres

        Y lol. :/ but whatever. I doubt you will get connection errors or video skipping.

        • JTrip

          Why? I work a lot and don’t have much free time to watch tv at home. I catch up on shows while doing cardio at the gym.

        • Paul

          PLUS it helps the time to pass when you’re doing cardio. I could do a marathon if I could watch sports while running one.

      • vinnyjr

        Try using gym wifi, most gyms have it. The one I go to supplies very fast wifi.

        • Paul

          Mine does NOT have good wifi, and every iPhone or iPad user is connected to it. My cell speed is way faster. Wish the wifi was fast.

        • JTrip

          My gym doesn’t have wifi, You would think that an LA Fitness would but mine doesn’t.

    • Paul

      Surfing the web, MMS messaging, downloading large files like via a cloud server, streaming movies, streaming music, etc. Music freedom doesn’t cover ALL streaming music. MNY Sirius XM and Milk Music are not covered. I can break 10Gigs pretty easily, and when there’s a new ROM for my phone I can break 40Gigs pretty easily. It just depends on how you use your phone.

      The complaint is that we aren’t being capped, but we’re being soft capped. Personally, I’m cool with it so long as I’m not dropped to 2G speeds.

      • SiriusXM and Milk Music are covered in Music Freedom, by the way.

        • Paul

          AND you are correct. The last list I had seen didn’t include them. It does now.

  • sushimane

    Im fine with this. i have unlimited data but its not my main internet source i do have wifi at home and im on it. just like what other people say having unlimited data shouldn’t be the alternative for home internet. there are places where there isnt wifi but that’s what the mobile internet is for. Its the abusers that kills it for everybody but that’s just my opinion.

  • mikey

    Im currently in the dallas area on business for two weeks so i have been using video chat and netflix alot more. As of last night i noticed my speeds drop significantly as well as constant loss of connections in the same hotel where it was fine previously. Checked my account and am only at 13 GB. First they took away my corporate discount due to changing phones and now this throttling. If im getting throttled this quick i might as well forget unlimited and the 9 years i have been with tmobile.

    • slybacon08

      Why do you think you are being throttled at 13GB??? Also, they can’t just cause your phone to lose connection…

  • lomsha

    Lol, people using mobile data like it’s a home connection.

    • Ascertion

      It’s unfortunate that people are oblivious to the side-effects to using an enormous amounts of cellular data, but you can thank Legere for properly implanting into user’s heads that they can do anything and everything with their mobile connection.

      • guest

        lets thank marcelo claure sprint for slowest speeds hehe

    • Kogashuko

      Because providers like Verizon thought it was a good idea to stop expanding fios and rape people with their mobile data. They then realized that it is actually more expensive to buy more spectrum than to bury fiber. This is why you are seeing AT&T, Comcast, and Google fiber becoming popular.

  • dcmtnbkr

    Must be part of the new uncarrier move. LoL.

  • Saige CB

    The only time i hit 21 gb was when i just moved and was waiting on Verizon to come install internet. I watched netflix, used it for work and everything. I DESERVED to have my speeds dropped, because thats not what the mobile network was meant for and I understand that.. During peak times (usually 5) my speeds dropped heavily (im in Tampa) and I didnt care because It was only fair that users who dont well “abuse” the network, get the most out of it during congestion. Once 7pm hit my speeds went right back to normal.. Now that I have wifi I rarely hit 5gb a month lol

    • mikey

      Mobile means just that mobile, so anytime you are not stationary it os conceivable that it would be used. My kids use their connections for netflix and YouTube when we travel or when driving around town.

  • oldmantiburon

    does this also go for just 4G no LTE in area?

    • slybacon08

      I believe it is for any “high-speed” internet used over 21GB, which they define as 3G, 4G, and 4GLTE.

  • Alex

    Interesting move by T-Mobile. Network constraints are starting to really show and it starts with the limitation of apeed during peak hours for unlimited users who go over 21 GB of data a month. I would consider it temporary throttling the consumer and I would not be surprised if someone finds a crack in this that leads to lawsuit against T-Mobile for this practice. Many people I know tend to watch YouTube and Netflix on their mobile devices and almost always hit 20 plus gigs of data a month on their phones usage alone. I think T-mobile is starting to show how much it really needs that low spectrum to stay competitive and offer great plans in the long run. For those of you with unlimited 4g data, consider yourseld lucky as these plans will be long gone before years end. The unlimited data hogs have used and abused their data to the point where it finally catches up to them becauae such abuse violates the terms of service and consequently, everyone has to pay the price for that. Consider it a damn shame. Uncarrier is starting to fail.

    • Derrick

      I’m on the 5gb plan. But honestly can you blame them? John did sell them the notion that it’s your data do what you want with it and I believe a while back he said something about use as much as you want but don’t get crazy with it like using 1tb a month. So I can see why some are upset. They are just enjoying their service based on what was told to them. Now they feel as though the rug has been pulled from up under them.

      • thepanttherlady

        Exactly!

        Unlimited Nationwide 4G Data:

        Perfect for video chat, streaming music/movies/tv and playing online games:
        http://www.tmonews.com/2013/01/t-mobiles-unlimited-data-plan-coming-soon-to-monthly4g/

        • Protect yo net

          Get home internet you data piglet :) … or a life, that doesn’t have you streaming 24/7. I’m so glad this policy is now explicit in the terms of service. Don’t like it take your lines to Verison, or a Sprint buahahaha… yeah none of you will.

          www .dontfeedthepigs(dot)com

        • thepanttherlady

          #notfeedingthetrollstoday

        • Paul

          Aaawwww, how am I to be enteretained if you don’t feed them?!?!?!

        • thepanttherlady

          I could do a jig for you if you’d like. That’d be pretty entertaining. :)

        • Paul

          Not gonna lie…I’d accept that.
          #PatherLadyJig

        • Cam Bunton

          lol!

        • Fabian Cortez

          #notfeedingthetrollstoday

          There he is! Mr. Protect yo net!

        • thepanttherlady

          I should have added:

          #mypersonalstalker

          ;)

        • Frankwhitess

          Bravo for not entertaining ” Protect yo net ” Nonsense….Some people are not that bright enough to figure that if you pay for a service, you should be able to use the service… Not half way… With that said,… I hope the date went well with that dude that you mentioned had sprint … -_-

        • Fabian Cortez

          I do appreciate the transparency that T-Mobile has provided. We now have a hard number to go off of.

      • Paul

        Slowing the speed down a bit, say 4G, and throttling to 2G are very diffferent. It depends on the speeds they are being dropped to.
        But you are right, as an unlimited user I don’t like the idea that I can be regulated for using my unlimited data. Then again, if it’s just dropping me to 4G I’d likely not notice.

    • Edgar Gomez

      How is it abuse, unlimited means unlimited. You don’t go to a buffet and only eat a little because you have more food at home. You eat till your full.

      • Valid argument, but the buffet eventually runs out of food.

        • archerian

          this is more like the buffet didn’t cook more food while the maitre’d keeps letting in a far far more crowd than they could reasonably support at any time.

    • justin l

      use it responisbly people. imagine if everyone used 21 gbs a month. Not going to work is it? Tmobile lets people do what they want as far as data goes but eventually if too many people take advantage, it will come tumbling down. free unlimited only goes for so long. It eventually dries up

  • vinnyjr

    I have the unlimited data, I also have killer fast data speeds and very strong signal. 5 bars of LTE signal inside my house all the time. On that note I still use my wifi just because it’s the right thing to do. Why use data when I don’t have to.

    • skywalkr2

      Good for you. When i go to the basement… I have no service whatsoever.

      • Edgar Gomez

        Call T-Mobile they will send you a signal booster.

        • skywalkr2

          If so,I will try that.

        • Sushimane

          If not why not try the tmobile personal WiFi cell spot. I got it and great.

        • Goat

          But you can’t have a signal booster if you already have their router D: It’s terrible.

          EDIT: Terrible that we can’t have both- love the router.

        • Edgar Gomez

          You can have both just buy the router for $100. I have both.

        • Hector Arteaga

          You can get both. I did.

        • archerian

          did you have to pay full price for the 2nd device?

        • Goat

          Was repeatedly told that it’s only 1 per account..I have definitely tried.

        • orlando duran

          The asus router has the call booster built in, so you do get both

        • archerian

          incorrect, it’s a regular ASUS RT-68U router with custom firmware. It doesn’t do squat for cellular signal.

        • orlando duran
        • archerian

          I don’t know how you think this device has a call booster in it, it actually acts as a conduit for Wifi Calling and nothing more. If you read the article in detail, it will say VoIP is facilitated by this device, via Wifi, and not as an intermediary to the traditional cellular signal.

          If you don’t agree, please check the FCC certification for this device, it’s certified only for operation on 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz. No t-mobile cellular network operates on this frequency, so this device cannot boost a cell signal.

      • slybacon08

        Get a wifi-capable phone. You will have no problems and take congestion off of the towers

        • archerian

          ha, this is so like T-mobile Customer care asking people to get Wifi calling phones when they called about coverage issues.

        • Fabian Cortez

          ha, this is so like T-mobile Customer care asking people to get Wifi calling phones when they called about coverage issues.

          Just like AT&T and Verizon do for excessive data usage, right?

          Also, low band spectrum isn’t the solution to basements, no matter how much you think it is. Ever been up north?

        • archerian

          This isn’t for basements but on level ground.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This isn’t for basements but on level ground.

          That’s glorious. But if you paid attention to what was being said and didn’t insist on trolling, you would have noticed that skywalkr2‘s comment was about the basement.

          Try harder.

        • archerian

          This = for situations where customer care pushed for WiFi calling phones when people called about coverage issues.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This = for situations where customer care pushed for WiFi calling phones when people called about coverage issues.

          Anecdotal statement at best.

          I thought I told you to try harder.

        • archerian

          Ah, the anecdotal classification. This was actually one way of handling coverage issues as per instructions given to customer care reps once.

          You keep saying try harder, to what end? Move over, try harder, etc etc .. I already told you once, if you don’t like what I post, say that and keep quiet or better yet just keep quiet. It’s not within your right to ask me to move over when I post something unfavorable about your beloved carrier.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Ah, the anecdotal classification. This was actually one way of handling coverage issues as per instructions given to customer care reps once, everywhere not just basements.

          Again, try to stay on topic and focus on one thing. We’re discussing skywalkr2‘s basement.

          You keep saying try harder, to what end? Move over, try harder, etc etc .. I already told you once, if you don’t like what I post, say that and keep quiet or better yet just keep quiet. It’s not within your right to ask me to move over when I post something unfavorable about your beloved carrier. You have no obligation to respond to me, I swear I won’t be upset!! :)

          Yet you feel the need to respond to me when I’m engaging other people. It all makes sense now.

        • archerian

          Yet you feel the need to respond to me when I’m engaging other people. It all makes sense now.

          It should, if you really look at what transpired, you’ll notice that you replied to a comment of mine initially today, I thought we mutually agreed to disagree and not to respond to each other since last week’s discussion. Doesn’t mean I will stop posting, doesn’t mean you would either, and on it goes…

        • Fabian Cortez

          It should, if you really look at what transpired, you’ll notice that you replied to a comment of mine initially today, I thought we mutually agreed to disagree and not to respond to each other since last week’s discussion. Doesn’t mean I will stop posting, doesn’t mean you would either, and on it goes…

          Yet you’re still replying and I didn’t agree to anything.

          And I’m not talking about this thread. There’s another thread where you felt the need to reply to me when it didn’t involve you, and that’s when I told you to move along since you felt the need to troll me as if I was seeking a moderator position. Silliness.

          Here, I told you to try harder, so please take the appropriate steps to do so with your argument. If not, there’s not need for sidetracking.

        • archerian

          This “other” thread reply you talk about was AFTER you chimed into a discussion I was having in yet another thread, but hey let’s leave it at that and move on. This try harder quip is getting old. No one here is trying for anything, its a voluntary blog discussion board.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This “other” thread reply you talk about was AFTER you chimed into a discussion I was having in this thread, but hey let’s leave it at that and move on. This try harder quip is getting old. No one here is trying for anything, its a voluntary blog discussion board. The sooner you realize that the sooner you can save three extra final lines from each comment.

          Who are you telling?

          I’ve completely ignored your other replies from the other article.

          When I get around to them, I’ll reply accordingly. But at this point, it’s clear to anyone with basic comprehension skills that this had nothing to do with T-Mobile reps. and everything to do with skywalkr2‘s basement.

          Understand the error you made and the limitations (yes, they exist) of low band spectrum and move on.

        • Whiskers

          The down side is wifi calling drains your battery on your phone quickly .

          I have to use it a lot when i visit my daughter where she lives and it’s great , just know your battery power will drop like a rock .

        • Fabian Cortez

          The down side is wifi calling drains your battery on your phone quickly .

          That’s not true. Wi-Fi Calling actually uses less battery than being connected to the cellular network.

          It’s even more efficient if you put the phone in airplane mode and turn on Wi-Fi.

    • gpt2010

      I agree Vinny. Data hoggers can screw it up for many. If you have wifi, USE IT! I understand there are situations where there is no wifi available. However, there are times when users know wifi is available, but they don’t use it. If the data hoggers got their way with unlimited data and speed, then the 97% would complain about the network being slow.

      • Good2Go

        Umm My Wifi is thru At&t and the speed they can get to my house via dsl is slower than 3g on my phone! so why on earth would I use slow wifi when the lte and unlimited data is faster than my wifi? Mind you if you have better internet service at home [faster than lte] then by all means use wifi, but not everybody has awesome internet at home.

        • gpt2010

          I understand the wifi being terrible at home. But wouldn’t that be a good reason to switch to an ISP that can provide better speeds? Or is AT&T your only choice?

        • Usually it’s the only choice. In my area we have ATT with at most 24Mbps and Charter with like 30Mbps. It’s not much, and you pay quite a bit for that. Surrounding areas get less. (Birmingham, AL)

        • orlando duran

          Charter has 60 Meg service $29.99 a month. https://www.charter.com/browse/content/lfo-8n?v=LFOSEMM&affpn=1-888-201-4415&cmp=pds_lfo&TransID=55670292125::vancouver%20+charter%20internet::b::Google::m&o=sem&lfokp=vancouver%20+charter%20internet&kob=false&lfokp=vancouver%20%2Bcharter%20internet&TransID=55670292125::vancouver%20%2Bcharter%20internet::b::Google::m&gclid=CMP7tZDfqMYCFVNufgod1XsGlQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

        • 21stNow

          I’m in a similar situation, where my only choices are Verizon DSL (which they sell as 1Mbps) or Comcast. I refuse to patronize Comcast, so that leaves Verizon for me.

      • justin l

        i use wifi whenever i can. some wifi areas suck though, slow as hell

    • Misha Bear Lipkin

      This brings up the point that there has to be change, and soon. I feel that we’ve Out grown the existing technology and network infrastructure. We should already be using Wi-Fi and as widely spread as xfinity has done. The reason is MONEY $$$…. Everyone is still greedy and needs money and wifi would probably cut costs to consumers. So until cell phone companies figure out how to monetize using widespread wifi we will still be at the mercy of cell towers.

    • slybacon08

      And you should get better battery life on WiFi

      • 21stNow

        My battery life is noticeably worse on Wi-Fi, especially in standby.

  • kgraham182

    It’s starting yall, some 21 will be 15 than 10 and so on. T-Mobile can’t fight the good war on coverage, unlimited high speed data is all they have. If you use 1 GB per day, your last week of service would be downgraded.

    • slybacon08

      Only if you are connected to a congested tower at a congested time. Otherwise, you won’t see any difference!

      • Cvs5778

        Basically if you live in a large city.

  • Edgar Gomez

    I use a lot of my data! I’m one of the guilty ones, I’m already at 18.5 gig mid cycle. I’m getting 32mbs down in Chicago@ 8:00 am. I’ve wasted 6gigs on HBO Go, 5gig on YouTube, 2 gigs in browsing, 1.6 in Google service (might be Google photos uploading my pictures and videos, I took lots of video during Blankhawks Rally). Netflix .5gig. I tether maybe 4gigs. I’ll see how it goes. But I use my data while working out at work on the treadmill. It’ll be a learning curve but I think I use my data when people are not using it. So I should be good, or when the hell do people use data, what are the times?

    • justin l

      2 gigs in browsing? jesus dude, Are you literally glued to your phone?

      • Edgar Gomez

        My job is easy. And don’t have a computer at work. But yeah I’m glued to the phone.

    • Misha Bear Lipkin

      work/commuting… once people get home I’d assume they switch Wi-Fi on?

      • Edgar Gomez

        At home I’m barely on my phone, and if I am it’s on WiFi.

        • Misha Bear Lipkin

          Yea, that should be common practice, but you have users that have DSL at home as one of the commenters said and enjoy their 4G LTE speed as opposed to DSL which I think the highest available is 6mb (most expensive DSL).

        • AT&T DSL only offers 24Mbps in my area at most, so yeah, when T-Mobile hits 90-100Mbps sometimes, and usually never drops below 30, why would I EVER connect to WiFi? WiFi is for my home computers, not my phones. That 18-22Mbps downlink and 1-2Mbps uplink gets saturated awfully quickly by my desktop running servers, my mom’s laptop browsing, and my grandma usually making a Skype call or streaming Arabic soap operas on YouTube on the tablet. Meanwhile, here’s a completely unused LTE connection with way more bandwidth and throughput than you know what to do with.

          I use 20-30GB per month on my phone, no tethering. On WiFi, my desktop alone uses 200GB per month, easily. My laptop uses 120GB. I’m sure my mom uses 30-50GB on her laptop. Another 10-15GB on my grandma’s tablet. These are all still pretty normal usage numbers.

          If the “soft cap” were 30GB it would make a bit more sense, given usage. I can exceed 21GB easily without doing much. Just use Tumblr for a few hours, and if you haven’t downloaded close to 1GB in images then you must not follow very many people. Same with Twitter, which is slightly more text-based but now has plenty of pictures, too. Not to mention the actual web. Throw in the occasional YouTube, app updates, picture uploading, etc, and you’ve easily got 20GB. 10 minutes of 1080p Youtube = 34MB. If you watch an hour a day, you use 6.3GB of data per month. Say you watch YouTube 2 hours per day (12.6GB), do some social media with pictures (about 2 hours Twitter / 1 hour Tumblr gets me perhaps 8GB combined usage)… that’s basically your 21GB. Assuming about 4-5 hours per day of social media / video, and nothing else, and you’re deprioritized. Maybe most people don’t use social media for 4 hours, but this is meant to show that 21GB isn’t really all that much when you consider what goes into it. Anyone who uses the internet for photos/videos at least 4 hours per day can hit 20GB, assuming they watch at 1080p.

  • alex

    does it affect the grandfathered $70 plan?

    • Ascertion

      It affects all “truly” unlimited data plans.

    • Misha Bear Lipkin

      It definitely does, has not always been in effect, I’ve used 100Gb before and ended up seeing the change since about last November (started asking T-Mobile why it’s so slow) they didn’t know either. They kept mentioning that I was not connected to all “T-Mobile” towers and they would reset something in their system to reconnect me but a few days each time I’d notice it would go back down. Had I known they were using this “Prioritization” (soft cap) it would of saved a lot of frustrated phone calls.

  • MeoDen

    I think T-Mobile should prioritize only voice and text on congested towers. The rest of the data services, let them crawling at the snail speed. No need to distinguish and discriminate the guys on unlimited plans who use more than 21Gb or 1Gb, or 2Gb…

    When you stuck on traffic on highways, only the ambulance/firetruck and police car can be priority passed on shoulder lane. The rest of the traffic, doesn’t matter if you drive a Bentley or a Geometro, just slowly crawl. Some drivers will decide to drive off the highway to different exits, and vow never be back. But the majority will still keep the highway because it will still take them to their destinations.

  • justin l

    im sure 21 is the number they are using because very seldom does anyone ever go over that. I love my tmobile data use, i never get throttled or prioritized.i regularly use around 7-10gigs . Youre not going to get that anywhere else

  • Jay

    Well this will suck for my son who uses around 70 gigs a mont

    • Mike

      Not necessarily. It may if 1) he is in a congested area, 2) when he’s accessing during the peak congested times, and 3) if even notices the slow down.

      At least that’s the way I read it.

      • Jay

        Well he has he cant even browse lol

    • Frankwhitess

      70 gigs?? Your son is not Strong with the Force…….. I average 110 gigs… I blame Netflix,you tube, vibe, and of course, downloading movies to watch…

      • Jay

        Yeah he does that too while on the road.

    • slybacon08

      Your son needs to get off his butt and go outside every once in a while!

      • Jay

        He does he plays sports. He at home playing video games

        • Why is your son using LTE to play video games?

  • GersonT1000

    While I think this is a fair CONCEPT, I think the limit should be more than 21GB because it’s easy to rack up a couple dozen gigs in a month if you watch video during your lunch break and on your commute.

    However, I think T-Mobile will run into legal problems with this and will get sued. The reason is that unlike the other carriers, all of T-Mobile’s plans are “unlimited”, but they have different plans for the amounts of LTE speed data usage allowed in a month. Those who pay for Unlimited 4G LTE are paying to have LTE speed data usage at ALL TIMES they have a signal, without end.

    • Visvism

      Exactly. They sold me on the top tier which they sold as unthrottled and even went as far to market it as such instead of the gimmicks other carriers offer with their unlimited data plans. Now they are using the same gimmicks when the plan they sold me was to have fully unrestricted 4G LTE speed.

      • orlando duran

        The DE prioritization is automatic. …..it will be fine

        • Visvism

          LOL how does the automation of the process make any sort of difference in this scenario? I don’t care if it’s a person or a machine deprioritizing my data and thus slowing it down. I signed up and continue to pay for what T-Mobile originally sold me, an unlimited 4G data plan with no limits.

        • orlando duran

          If the tower you are using is not congested, nothing would change

        • Cvs5778

          Smh most towers would be congested in large cities. The only ones who wouldn’t be impacted are those that live in less populated areas or more specifically those who live in areas with a small t mobile footprint.

    • Cvs5778

      Exactly my point. That is why I switched. They advertised unlimited 4g lte. 21 GB is not a lot. That is 1 hour of sd Netflix a day. That’s basically half a movie a day. I don’t watch Netflix all day just pointing out how little that really is.

  • Adam Barrett

    Hopefully my networks aren’t congested. I’m at 19.92GB right now with a week of commuting left on my cycle. I regularly break the 21GB mark. Watching Netflix while I ride the bus to/from work, streaming music almost all the rest of the time. This “truly” unlimited crap… Ugh. Time to alert the FTC again.

    • maximus1901

      Prioritization is not same as limiting your speed

      • Hector Arteaga

        Try feeling that to everyone that has reported unusable data once they hit the soft cap.

        • maximus1901

          Then go to vzw and pay $140 for 20gb
          Or
          Pay $10/2gb to TMO for every amount over $50/1gb.

          The only reason unlimited was ever viable is if the vast majority uses very little.

          Boo hoo. You believe you’re entitled to the lower usage users subsidizing you? Tough.

          But go ahead consonant. I think one more complaint oughta reverse the laws of physics.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Dude seriously. I would be fine if Tmo stopped advertising it as unlimited. It is not. Ridiculing others cause they don’t like what Tmo is doing is wrong on your part. Money is not the issue for me. If Tmo pi$$ed me off enough, I’d go to VZW and pay more. At least then I know what they are offering. In the meantime, Tmo is the “un-carrier” and I will let them know this is now a pain point for me.

        • orlando duran

          You have unlimited data, use as much as you want……my god , do some phucking research. Slowing the download speed is not the same as cutting your data off. Read …read #!!!!

        • oryan_dunn

          When a tower is congested, it’s congested. My god, what do you want? Them to follow you around with a temporary tower just for you?

          You’re data is still unlimited, you’re not throttled. Just when the tower can’t support full speed, not everyone can have full speed. Those on tiered plans before they hit their cap pay far more per gig than those on unlimited above 21GB, so how do you think they’d feel if they were the ones being slowed down?

        • donnybee

          Where exactly do you feel justified in this attitude? Nobody is attacking you. And to be fair, your take it or leave it attitude is exactly what T-Mobile has been trying to get away from.

      • Cvs5778

        .1 Mbps is unusable! That is what de prioritizing does.

        • maximus1901

          The de prioritized speed depends on how many other people on the tower; it’s not a constant.

    • slybacon08

      streaming music does not count against your data…

      • queenren

        I think it does if you are on an unlimited plan.

    • Dustin Roe

      Have you tried setting your netflix playback quality to a lower setting? They use 1GB per hour at SD and 3GB/hour at HD quality but there is also a low setting that looks perfectly fine on a 5″ screen and would give you 3 times the hours commuting as auto.From netflix site:

      Low (0.3 GB per hour)

      Medium (SD: 0.7 GB per hour)

      High (Best video quality, up to 3 GB per hour for HD and 7 GB per hour for Ultra HD)

      Auto (Adjusts automatically to deliver the highest possible quality, based on your current Internet connection speed)

  • Paul

    My issue is the speeds at which the reduction drops one down to. If it’s enough to function, but obviously not at the full LTE potential, then it’s totally fair. If it’s dropping them down to 2G speeds then it’s a throttle and isn’t fair for the user. If they, as higher up employees, wouldn’t accept the speed when de-prioritized then they shouldn’t push it on us.

    I DO feel this is a fair idea. I tend to jump just above 20Gigs a month and most of what I use my data for functions just fine at 4G speeds. As an unlimited subscriber, I shouldn’t be punished for using my data plan, which is unlimited because I don’t want a limit.

    • Dustin Roe

      IMO it isn’t a throttle which would be what AT&T and Verizon seem to do which is to identify customers over a limit and set there data speed to 2G until the next billing cycle. This appears to be that once you have used 21GB other people on your tower will get priority over the bandwidth and you will get a smaller piece of the pipe relative to those who most likely are receiving reduced speeds as well as the throughput is shared mostly evenly across a demand greater than 100% of capacity. if there is room for you and everyone else to use the full pipe then you all use the pipe evenly(eg. Total capacity 100GB/s ;demand 150GB/s; everyone below 21GB speeds of 70% of normal, everyone above 21GB speeds of 20% of normal. I am guessing on the percentages but it would seem fair to me).

      • Cvs5778

        They drop the speed to .1 Mbps how is that fair?

    • orlando duran

      You don’t have a limit, use as much data as want.

  • Bradley Karas

    I have unlimited and use Wifi whenever I can. I have to have it at home to stream Apple TV so why not??? Its faster than LTE and a better connection and it doesn’t congest the network. I want my LTE to remain unlimited and if this helps I’m willing to do that and not take advantage of the system that I consider to be a privilege to have. Claim you pay for it all you want T Mobile could easily do away with unlimited and there’s nothing we can do to stop it.

  • JBLmobileG1

    Maybe this is part of Amped? While still unlimited there is a soft cap of 21GB of data before they promise to prioritize you. If I am not mistaken, they could prioritze your data over the higher paying customer tiers or during peak times. Maybe by Amped they will make it equal for everyone where they promise not to prioritize you before you hit the softcap, whether you pay less or not or use your data during peak times. Just a thought.

    • That’s not a very uncarrier way of doing things…

    • orlando duran

      There is no cap on data. You can use as much as you want. The cap is on the download speed. That’s different. When you are in traffic, and the speed limit sign says 65mph, do you get pissed off and force people off the road ? Nope, you can only go as fast as traffic will allow. All companies do this. It’s automatic.

      • Cvs5778

        But they advertise unlimited 4g lte. Capping it is wrong!

  • lomsha

    It’s weird i stream audio video, update apps on the go, download big files and i can’t make a dent in my data stash.

  • archerian

    When will customers know its a ‘Forever 21’ speed throttle that’s the cause of low speeds? A text message or will they have to keep checking their usage?

    Well, in any place with over a handful T-mobile customers like a Mall or Movie theater everyone is already throttled, not artificially however.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    Maybe they want to give $100 Million donation to FCC like AT&T.

    • Prod1702

      I was waiting for this. Someone will try and sue we all know it.

      • JaswinderSinghJammu

        I said donation. Lol

        • Prod1702

          :)

    • orlando duran

      Except, throttling download speed doesn’t mean the data is being cut off. You still get to use as much data as you want. This prioritization is in areas like a stadium that sort of thing. Funny, I just used over 40 GB of data, no slowing down at all

    • orlando duran

      Att won’t pay that…..it will be passed down to every subscriber.

  • donnybee

    So, if this change wasn’t in the fine print when I signed up, it’s not affecting me, right?

    I mean, going in and changing my terms that were previously agreed to would be very carrier like, and pretty unethical. Is there a way we can look up our specific T&Cs? I’ll be pissed if they are going to try and hold me to different terms than what I agreed to.

    Going forward, whatever.. But don’t sneakily change someone’s terms when they aren’t looking.

    • maximus1901

      You’re not on a contract. Don’t like it? Move to diff carrier.

      • donnybee

        It’s still an agreement to use service. Agreeing to terms requires the consent of the user.

        • maximus1901

          And part of it is that unless you’re on a contract, TMO can change whatever.
          Vzw 20gb is $140

          Did you think TMO could do this unlimited thing forever all while charging less than anyone?
          Tsk tsk.

        • donnybee

          Actually, no. I didn’t. What I did think was that when they could no longer keep doing the “..unlimited thing forever” they would affect all those signing up from then on, as opposed to making it retroactive. In fact, I don’t think I would be alone in that thinking.

          The problem here isn’t so much the “soft” cap, but what happens after the cap. Are we throttled to 3G speeds? Or the unusable 2G speeds? I actually got the unlimited plan so I would never have to experience 2G (unless the network had no 4G).
          Also, of concern, is the fact that T-Mobile made no mention of this to the users in which they want to affect. Effectively blindsiding them.

          Your take it or leave it attitude makes no sense. Didn’t we all fall in love with T-Mo because they didn’t think like that? Because they actually listened to the customers? I don’t think I’m wrong in worrying about what speeds I’ll be reduced to and why I never was notified, unless they’re only affecting those going forward, which I don’t disagree with either.

        • maximus1901

          You fell in love w

        • archerian

          you believed that Legere was your buddy instead of a wireless CEO.

          He’s still everyone’s buddy while trying to wrangle another 10Mhz from the FCC, feigning injustice and inequality.

        • 21stNow

          Your service is on a month-to-month basis. By using a cellular device on the T-Mobile network, you are agreeing to T-Mobile’s Terms of Service. That is your consent. If you don’t want to consent the Terms of Service, then you can’t use a device on T-Mobile’s network.

        • archerian

          so it was bait and switch?

      • Hector Arteaga

        Too many Tmo users are becoming like VZW users. You’re a good example. Dismissing others concerns is high horse attitude.

    • Paul

      Not surprising is that ALL carriers do something like that, as well as cable providers and such. They can make a change, and as long as they give you ample notice they can change the terms of the contract. While still keeping the bulk of the contract intact they avoid many eyes being raised. It’s likely a note in the contract that alludes to them being able to make changes that reflect the company’s direction.

  • iMotoXperiaGalaxy

    Typical behavior from T-Maybe. Not suprised. #FireLegere #NeverSettle4Pink

    Haha!

    • maximus1901

      Switch to vzw. Let us know how it feels to pay for 21gb

      • archerian

        If I’m not mistaken it’s $65 all inclusive for that at Cricket..

        • maximus1901

          You’re mistaken.
          $35/45/55 for 2.5/5/10 gb for single lines, autopay.

        • archerian

          The $55 plan had a double data offer, not sure if it’s still available and $10 for an extra gig.

    • Paul

      Well this is a lame attempt at trolling.

      • Fabian Cortez

        He’s nothing but a troll who goes by other user names. fuzzylumpkins and saltines_for_my_butt to name a few.

        • archerian

          Someone’s trying hard jockeying for a mod position with the regime change

        • Fabian Cortez

          Someone’s trying hard jockeying for a mod position with the regime change

          I’d keep trolling too if I had nothing to say and was factually incorrect 100% of the time.

          Move along, sir.

        • archerian

          factually incorrect 100% of the time

          LOL … I don’t claim 100% accuracy but no one can claim 100% inaccuracy either… can’t ban me from this forum as I don’t violate any policy, so trying to discredit me claiming I’m factually incorrect 100% of the time is quite lame.

        • Fabian Cortez

          LOL … I don’t claim 100% accuracy but no one can claim 100% inaccuracy either… can’t ban me from this forum as I don’t violate any policy, so trying to discredit me claiming I’m factually incorrect 100% of the time is quite lame.

          Who said anything about “ban?”

          The extreme gets more extreme it seems.

    • androidkin

      Let us know how much AT&T and Verizon charges you for using 21GB.

  • Jay J. Blanco

    The crazy thing is I switched from my grandfathered plan to this plan smh never should have. Should have read the fine print. I know next time. I can hit 21GB in no time. I almost ed used 40GB last month

    • Hector Arteaga

      I don’t think the old plans are exampt from this.

  • mingkee

    I have used 18GB in the past cycle. I think the limit is OK for now except I am on travel.

  • Chris

    I used 28GB last billing cycle. No problems here.

  • Jose Hernandez

    They really need to make this know to everyone as opposed to just posting new small print on the terms. When I got the Unlimited Plan it was with the understanding that I could use as much data at full LTE as I wanted for whatever I wanted. I can and have gone over 25gb a month watching Netflix and YouTube since we do not have HSI at home. We had no need to get HSI (an almost $60 a month bill) because we have Unlimited on all 4 lines. My kids can easily reach this limit since they like to also watch videos and play games.

    Just be upfront about this T-Mobile. I have experienced the slow downs and can confirm that when they are put in effect, we can’t even browse the internet. It is that slow.

    I understand whey they need to do this, but I’s still not happy about it.

    • Hector Arteaga

      That’s the problem with it. When the soft cap hits, it feels more like a hard throttle in moderate to heavy congested areas.

      • Chris

        The bigger issue now is most likely infrastructure improvements that are killing everyone. My tablet on the 250MB plan is just as bad as my phone when I hit 40+ GB. I think this whole deprioritization thing is a coincidence for most people. I haven’t broke 2mbps and rarely get above 1mbps at work in Fort Mill, SC (near Carowinds Park) since March.

    • Anthony S Jennings

      “When I got the Unlimited Plan it was with the understanding that I could use as much data at full LTE as I wanted for whatever I wanted.”

      If they cut you off completely at 21gb, you’d have a good argument, but they don’t cut you off. So you are still getting unlimited data. It’s also trying to tell you that you and your kids should use your phones a bit less. :-)

      It’s the same as if you are caught in traffic on a congested road with a posted speed limit of 70mph. You can’t drive 70mph in a congested area. You don’t get banned from the road, you just have to share what space is available.

      • Joe

        Yeah but T-mobile does not tell us how to use our phones. And also if I hade no WiFi I would be using 50 gig on my phone. And that is not even considering how much I use on my pc which is probably like 200 gig at the least.

      • Great analogy!

      • It’s people like you that are causing the problem in the first place. Cellular data is not meant to be a replacement for home HSI. You’re exactly the kind of abuse they’re trying to mitigate.

  • Travis Tabbal

    I don’t mind this, based on what little we know about it. I do wish they would be more clear on a few points, but I’ve always thought the basic idea was the best way to deal with providing an unlimited tier. The highest users get lower priority when there is network congestion. And ONLY when there is network congestion. On off-peak times when the network is idle, why not let those users suck up bandwidth?

    I would prefer a lower time scale than a billing period, perhaps 4-8 hours, but that can be tough to implement. At least this way, we have a number to go on that we can check against.

    I would also like it if they would provide a way to check if the network is congested for the cell we are connected to. Perhaps a dialer code or similar that sends a text back saying what’s going on. Ideally, it could also tell us what they plan to do about it, but that might be asking a bit much.

  • Luis Correa

    i called them last week cause i notice my speed slow and the rep told me that i was on the list but funny thing is that i travel all across tulsa,ok and i’m still receiving the slow speed now i don’t know how many towers are in tulsa but i figure i would at least get a different tower to speed up my services. also the rep told me that this has been happening for quite awhile. I’ve been with them for 9 yrs and I’ve never heard of this until i called them.

  • Joe

    So this is really hard for them to make it completely fair. Cuz yes u pay for unlimited LTE and expect to get that. But in order to keep the network running smoothly for everyone when it gets congested it makes sense to prioritize. Maybe unfair, but for them to lose 3% of customers because of this is better than losing more cuz of pore network experience. Also no one will leave because on Verizon u would pay a but lode for this and sprint well it still is not that good.

  • Bill Berry

    By definition, “Unlimited” means NO limits. How hard is that?

    • Visvism

      I agree. I was sold a “truly” unlimited data plan with no limit restrictions instead of the lower tiered offerings which clearly stated I would be throttled after reaching a soft limit. Now T-Mobile is reversing course and saying I have a soft limit as well but hasn’t adjusted my pricing to match…

    • unlimited sped

      They are giving you unlimited data. Just not unlimited speeds LTE speeds. You can have 500GB a month if you wanted.

      • thepanttherlady

        Incorrect. I am paying for unlimited high speed (4G LTE) data.

        • Cvs5778

          Agreed. The website advertises unlimited 4g lte. They make the distinction!

    • Fabian Cortez

      By definition, “Unlimited” means NO limits. How hard is that? It’s like data; I pay for 5 GBs, what and why does it matter how I use that data – Device or tethered to my PC? It’s data, it’s common sense!

      It’s unlimited high speed smartphone data. Notice how there’s no unlimited high speed tablet data plan.

      There’s a difference.

      • Hector Arteaga

        If you say unlimited, but not make a distinction about what’s unlimited, then it should be unlimited. That means usage and speed.

        • Fabian Cortez

          If you say unlimited, but not make a distinction about what’s unlimited, then it should be unlimited. That means usage and speed.

          There has always been a distinction. It’s always been “unlimited high speed smartphone data.”

          5 GB of tethering was nothing but the cherry on top.

        • oryan_dunn

          Just because there is no speed limit on the autobahn doesn’t mean you can go as fast as you want when there is a traffic jam…

  • Joe

    I would like to see T-mobile go to a pay by the gig type of plan as I feel like that would save some ppl money like when you need more data (vacation) you would pay a bit more but when not needed u would be paying less.

    • That’s what Google is doing.

      • David

        Yep, I’m subscribed to Project Fi. But use T-Mobile.

      • Joe

        Yeah I know

  • HR

    This seems to be in opposition to the new net neutrality rules, no?

  • Ray

    Thank goodness I’m a night owl. I average 50gb the past couple months. Most of that data is used between 10pm to 4am. However, when I need to do a quick search during the day like looking up definitions, pages won’t load at all. Ookla says my speeds are at best .1 mbps. How is that acceptable ? It’s an annoyance but whatever.

  • tommest

    The CEO John Legere getting greedy. I think tmobile need a new CEO every couple of years, to keep things in place. I think there’s going to be a lot of lawsuit.

    • David

      Greedy? LOL.

    • You’re an idiot

      How is he greedy? A company needs to make profits. They’re not suppose to make a dollar on every user. They’re providing a service. Without profits they cannot grow. Start your own cell company if you think you can do it better or maybe you should apply for the CEO position you think he’s going to get fired from LOL.

    • Hector Arteaga

      All CEO’s have some level of greed. Obviously their job is to make money for their company. He is greedy, but still not as greedy as some of the others.

  • Jose

    In a month I rather used 4 gb of the unlimited plan I have, and the network speed is the worst in every way, the videos won’t load or buffer every 2 seconds, the same with my music subscriptions so in resume t-mo is winning in money and I’m losing in service.

  • Alvin Mathew

    If youre in the softcap group and ever try to go to a major sporting/concert event, good luck using your phone. Data speeds are unusable!

    • archerian

      You don’t really need to be in the softcap group for that to happen.. just be in a crowd of around 50-100, very good chance your data would suck

      • Mike Palomba

        Was at a college campus for a graduation today, in addition to the college kids that are usually there there were 400 graduates and probably 800 parents and staff attending and I got 40mbs down.

  • Whiskers

    I feel robbed , i just switch me and my wife’s two lines to the $100/month unlimited deal and now this goes down.
    So much for watching Netflix and YouTube on my smartphones , much less using the hotspots for my tablet on top of that .
    I feel something big is about to change about T-Mobile and i’m not going to like it .

    • Visvism

      I just switched to the same plan to lock it in before the promotion disappears in a few days not knowing whats on the horizon. I was planning on bringing three additional lines from Verizon over to this plan as well but was waiting on more expansion for the band 12 spectrum as well as an iPhone to support it. Now I may be waiting to see just exactly will happen with T-Mobile as this soft cap is put in place and the future of the company is questioned with all these potential buyers and DT wanting out of the US market.

      • Mike Palomba

        It’s almost definite that the next Iphone will have band 12.

    • John Wentworth

      My wife and I are on the same plan. You only get 5 gb of tethering data so I don’t see the complaint there.
      Also you can watch Netflix and Youtube, I do. It’s just if you go over 20GB you may be deprioritized when in a congested area, not all of the time.
      20GB is actually quite a lot of netflix and youtube on a mobile device, they only run at like 1 mbps normally.

    • UMA_Fan

      You still have unlimited access to high speed!

      This article is click bait.

      If the tower is congested (which is the only scenario you’ll get deprioritized) you would have slower speeds regardless.

    • David

      Using T-Mobile as a designated service for watching Netflix and YouTube is ridiculous. Using your data connection to stream Netflix and YouTube here and there most likely won’t lead you to a softcap, so you have nothing to worry about. Plus, it’s temporary, unlike a hardcap throttle. If you use it primarily over a home ISP, then yes, you deserve that softcap. You’re ruining it for everyone else. #PayForAnISP

    • Pay for an ISP

      The other providers charge your more if you go over your allocated plan. T-mobile isn’t slowing you down all the time. They’re only doing it if the tower you’re connected too is overloaded.

  • Visvism

    @cam_bunton:disqus on a side note I understand the site needs to make money but this may be the absolute highest offending site for advertisements and trackers of any site I have ever visited. Ghostery is currently blocking 23 trackers and ABP is blocking 22 ads. That’s the only way the site is manageable for me to be able to read.

  • I think this is a smart move. “Unlimited” anything just encourages abuse, like people watching movies at home. This is cellular data people, that just won’t scale.

    • archerian

      Smart = Bait and Switch… Switch mode now operational as all the lemmings who moved for UL data are now on board .. now we need to start milking them…

      • Did you really think it’d last forever? There’s not enough bandwidth to sustain “unlimited”, that’s why more and more people are complaining about congestion. They only have two choices. Have a really slow congested network OR caps.

        • archerian

          I never thought anything proposed under the new Tmobile management would be sustainable for long, to be fair I don’t think they did either. T-Mobile was being fattened for a sale, now the calf is aging and no real buyers.

        • Android_God

          You can’t reason with some of these retards. They have their tin foil hat secured a little too tightly to their pea-sized brain

    • Derek

      That’s got to be one of the stupidest things I have heard! Go back to Verizon with your overpriced data with hard caps and extreme overages you troll! People like you are why we can’t have nice things and why American company’s continue to rape our wallets.

      • You’re missing the point here. They can’t give you what they don’t have. When a small percentage of people abuse the system they gobble up the capacity for the rest of us. These caps will make it faster for the rest of us.

        If you really want to watch Netflix at home, get a HOME internet account right?

        • David

          Exactly, T-Mobile isn’t an ISP, so don’t use it as an ISP. Simple.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I agree, people shouldn’t use mobile to replace their ISP, but people shouldn’t be upset about people using unlimited data as intended (watching Netflix on the go for example).

        • The issue is not how much data they have. Its what single cell tower can support at a given time. Land line isps often there are more wired hubs all over the place to support the masses then there are cell towers built to support a wider range. Not support more people. If u try to let one too many people on ur home network’s wifi for example its going to break down from the over user and burn up or slow down because there only so much bandwidth at a given second.

          This is where a softcaps not a bad idea. If ur in a heavy area and used allot slowing u down to allow others not heavy on data makes sence. But ur still online which is why its still unlimited just slowed. Leave to a less heavy used tower urs speeds return. Or when peak hours end where ur currently. How the data is used via netflex or torrenting really is irrelevant i think because who care if there on a under used tower. If the tower gets more on it the system will adjust and slow the heavy user regardless if there a bit overboard or use it as isp replacement.

          Using as a isp replacement at times is the only answer outside of the city where land line uilties are still to outdated for brodband but there in range of a cell tower. Really this term make me want to return to T-Mobile when I’m back in a covered area that isn’t just edge.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Then they shouldn’t offer it. Why are you upset at the end user for using what they pay for but not upset at Tmo for offering what they can’t provide? Gotta love America.

      • Android_God

        There is so much wrong with you and what you said it would take 10 experts about a year to fix you.

    • Whiskers

      Just watch a couple hours a day of Netflix and YouTube and you will easily go over that cap .
      If they don’t want to give you unlimited then they should’nt offer it as unlimited , they should say what it really is then soft capped .

      • No one should be watching “a couple hours a day” on a cellular device. That’s EXACTLY the problem, there isn’t enough spectrum for a even fraction of people to do that.

        It does suck the word “unlimited” made people think that was OK, when there’s no technical way to support it.

        • Android_God

          People are entitled a-holes and either they can’t afford cable or satellite to watch movies on or they have it and are such douchebags that they still watch content using the T Mobile network.

        • thepanttherlady

          Those are really the only scenario’s you’re able to come up with for someone using as much data as they do? C’mon now.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I’m not exactly sure why it bothers you if people use what they pay for. I would understand being upset for people that do torrenting. Otherwise, Netflix shouldn’t be a problem. If they can’t do unlimited data, then they shouldn’t offer it or charge more for it. It is that simple. I understand there is people that generally abuse, but Netflix is not abuse. Now, people that replace their home internet with mobile. That makes me upset, but otherwise how is it abuse?

        • By abuse, I meant people who use mobile bandwidth in a way or amount other than reasonable or intended like (but not limited to) home internet access. I’d make an analogy of a 24 gym. Yes, you can go there as often as you want, but you can’t LIVE there right? It is kind of the same thing, but in this case those people cause congestion for the rest of us. That’s why I like these soft caps.

        • Hector Arteaga

          If the can’t offer unlimited, then they shouldn’t sell it. The gym analogy is bad, because if you could workout 24 hrs straight, you bet they’d let you. Living at the gym would be more like using your mobile data as your ISP. Using your unlimited mobile data on the go,, is the same as staying at the gym sctually worling out, for as long as you can.

        • Whiskers

          Really Brett , there’s a reason why smartphone companies offer large 1080HD screens with LTE and notifications on their phones .
          Are you just checking mail and weather all day and never really use the smartphone for what it is ?
          You know some people actually are mobile and rely on a smartphone to get business done .
          And for the record , i do have home internet through WOW for personal use .

      • David

        Even if you are hit by the soft cap, it’s only temporary unlike a full throttle in the bill cycle. Plus, it’s still unlimited.

        • Whiskers

          But if i’m traveling and need that service which i paid for , then i expect to have it available or i would of chose the cheaper plans .
          If i have to rely on wifi 90% of the time , what’s the point in a unlimited plan that’s really now limited with options .

  • JJCommonSense

    My question is this.. I may be likely to fall into this “Soft Cap” group every now and again but thats because i stream my music at the highest quality. Since music streaming doesnt count towards your data usage when it comes to those 2, 5, 7GB, etc., data plans, does it a count when factoring the Soft Cap??

    • THAT is a great question. Does music contribute to the soft cap? I’d bet it does, otherwise there’s a neutrality issue.

    • trio0

      As far as i know this only affects you based on the GB used on your account. The apps they allow and don’t count do just that not count. That was their whole reason for making them not count because running Pandora would kill your data in a day.

  • TaylorW86

    It’s crazy how everyone is suddenly a heavy user whenever network management/prioritization comes up.

    • dtam

      I agree, it’s very short-sighted. more than likely, they aren’t even being affected by prioritization but there is the off chance that it might affect them once in a 6 month span so they scream about how it’s not right, not thinking about the other 99% of the time when prioritization is helping their experience

      • archerian

        but you have to think whether this is the beginning of the sunset for true unlimited data, the one which JL proudly asked everyone to use to watch video, stream music to their hearts content. He himself claimed he used over 50GB a month (this was maybe a year ago) so I wonder if he is on the “de-prioritizeable” list … of course not, his IMSI gets an exception.

        • dtam

          you’re probably correct in thinking that unlimited high speed data will be phased out. JL was a bit short-sighted in knowing what his network could handle (10 million new subs). they still have more capacity per user than the big 2 though so maybe they can sustain this a few more years.

          considering how much traction this story has, I have a feeling that this soft cap will be temporary for tmo. they will either phase out unlimited or will insert another tier (like 20 gigs) at the same price point and increase the cost for un-deprioritized unlimited

  • Jacob Galea

    We are their most highly paying customers! Don’t trottle our speeds!

    • Fabian Cortez

      We are their most highly paying customers! Don’t trottle our speeds!

      Understand the difference between data de-prioritization and throttling.

    • Gnashy

      Except this isn’t throttling.

  • UMA_Fan

    De prioritization is NOT the same as throttling.

    You COULD have fast speeds as normal after 21 GB but if that specific tower is congested you’re only going to get the fastest speed available after the people who’ve barely used any data that cycle get priority access. Unlimited plan or not.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Thank you.

      I am actually thankful for the clarification from T-Mobile. At least now someone has an idea at what point he or she will be de-prioritized at certain congested cell sites.

      • Hector Arteaga

        In the end, it is not the end of the world. It just didn’t feel too transparent to me as I’m accustomed to from Tmo. I have to say, Sprint was more transparent on this. Anyway, this is not something that would make me leave.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sprint was more transparent on this.

          Where?

        • Hector Arteaga

          Well, they removed the policy for one.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Please find this policy.

          Archive.org?

        • Hector Arteaga

          I mean, it was major news. I shouldn’t have to find that for you. I’m sure you saw the news reports.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I was asking about their transparency, no their policy.

    • archerian

      priority access? I really don’t think they would do a per device QoS shaping, just plain speed shaping which is in reality a throttle, albeit temporarily.

  • trio0

    I’m a heavy data user. Even when it was the shady top 3% i had no questions that i was in it. For a while my lowest data ussage was 80GB with highs around 200+GB. That being said i live in a metro area and have never felt slowed. I have compared other peoples speeds and yes i would get 10mbps while they had 14mbps but that’s only something i looked into after hearing the top3% thing. All in all this only affects people in areas where T-Mobile isn’t data strong. That beong saod they plan on fortifying theor network this year and boosting rural coverage so if you currently experience a slow down it probably won’t last.

    • Ray

      What metro area do you live in? I live in LA, West Side/UCLA area to be specific and consistently get speeds at around 0.1 mbps during the day time. I use 50 gb no where near as much as you.

      • trio0

        Phoenix Arizona

  • UMA_Fan

    What would everyone here propose Tmobile do when a tower is congested?

    If it’s a choice between EVERYONE getting slower speeds and SOME. I think what they have in place makes sense.

    • Hector Arteaga

      How about not offer a plan that’s unsustainable? Do a 20-30gb month plan with a hard throttle after limit instead. That could be properly advertised and not quietly introduced.

      • UMA_Fan

        Because the current offering is better than that?

        You can use 100GB at full speed LTE if you want but a congested tower is a congested tower.

        That’s not plan related.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I get that, but it is unsustainable and this is something that cannot continue. Even with the soft cap.

    • compuguy1088

      Uh deprioritize everyone on the tower and divide up the available bandwidth based on tier (postpad, prepaid, metropcs). once you leave range of the tower and/or congestion, its back to normal.

    • Kogashuko

      They add more fiber to the tower, buy more spectrum, build more towers, or do what they have been and pay a $100million fine like AT&T. One thing is clear, after they pay the fine the FCC can just hit them with another and another until they straighten up or they end them. Either way, this business practice will be over soon.

      • UMA_Fan

        Att was fined for slowing down customers after a set amount of data usage.

        Tmobile doesn’t do this. You can still use as much data as you want at full speed but if there’s heavy traffic at that time and in that place the people who’ve uses the most data in their cycle take a back seat to those that have barely used any.

        Seems fair to me.

  • Rylan Leese

    I used to work for T-Mobile, and due to the vast amounts of infrastructure that TMO has to lease from the other big carriers it only makes sense that they limit the top users at a certain point. I’m all for it, and I’m one of those top users. I use upwards of 25gigs a month.

  • NardVa

    Keep in mind, the 21GB number is updated quarterly based on usage statistics. Data usesage will only increase so I would anticipate the cap number going up.

  • Go Cheap and Be Happy

    This is why I only subscribe to the cheapest T-Mobile family plan that includes 2.5GB of high-speed data. I have 10 lines, pay $160 per month, and my high-speed data is clearly written in stone.

    I recommend everyone just sign up for the cheapest plan, use wi-fi whenever possible, and be grateful there are no overages. At least I don’t “pay” for data, per se, and I don’t have to worry about all these stipulations with unlimited High-speed data.

  • CEO via Twitter -SoftCap

    All, Suggestion Only, let your thoughts and concerns be known, positively, by contacting the CEO via Twitter @johnlegere. He does read his messages and will respond, if not, maybe reconsider the change (soft-cap).

    • Fabian Cortez

      I guess transparency is bad.

      • Hector Arteaga

        It isn’t bad, but the point of un-carrier was to solve customer pain points. Obviously, this is causing customers pain.

        • Fabian Cortez

          They’re solving a pain point.

          People with grandfathered unlimited data plans on AT&T would never know why and when they’d get throttled, not de-prioritized – there’s a difference.

          All this does is provide clarity to the reason why one may be de-prioritized at a specific cell site.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I understand, but depriotization was recent as well. It wasn’t something that always existed.

        • Fabian Cortez

          They’re growing such a fast rate that their backhaul providers aren’t keeping up.

          That’s the difference.

        • Hector Arteaga

          That’s true. Century Link in Phoenix for example.

        • Logan C.

          of course, but if you’ve got 3% of customers using 40% of your data, its better to deprioritize them than have all of your customers suffer over it.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Then don’t offer the plan. That’s a fair solution, because at any given time, you are treating your unlimited data users as second class citizens. What’s if 99% of your data was used at 2:00Am. A time when you won’t affect the network? But then you try to use 1mb at 3pm and they slow you down over all those other users that never use any data at 2am? You’re a second class citizen on the network now.

        • Logan C.

          except that’s not how it works. If you’re the only one on the network, you’re not slowed down even after 21 GB. If you’re trying to download a 40 GB torrent on your cell phone at 12 PM though, they’re gonna slow you down so I can send my emails

        • Hector Arteaga

          I know that’s how it works, but if all your data is being used at 2AM, how then am affecting you?

        • Logan C.

          You’re not. You’re also not being throttled in that case.

        • Latasha

          Hey its Truly Unlimited Data. It is mainly for those that wanna follow right into that 3% category is what they really mean bud. Other than that I’m so glad that T-Mobile will be the only carrier to offer Truly Unlimited Data for a life time, while Sprint on the other hand will eventually demolish Truly Unlimited Data. T-Mobile rules.

        • Justin

          This is exactly my situation. I use the vast majority of my data at night between 11pm and 5am.

          And I have been deprioritized during the day for it. It’s really annoying to me.

        • Arnold Shoon

          Same here – time usage should be built into their prioritization metrics!

        • Hector Arteaga

          I understand, it is bull.

        • SirStephenH

          Or if 99% of your traffic is on non-congested towers but you’re slowed for the 5 minutes you’re connected to a congested one.

          At the very least usage should be based only on data used on congested towers.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Good example.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I believe they should have a set GB plan to make things more clear. Say 30gb for 80 per month.

        • archerian

          Wow you spin this 21gb soft cap on unlimited data into an Uncarrier initiative or line of thinking of solving a pain point ?!! The koolaid is strong in this one.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Wow you spin this 21gb soft cap on unlimited data into an Uncarrier initiative or line of thinking of solving a pain point ?!! The koolaid is strong in this one.

          And your trolling is ever apparent. Explain to everyone here why you continue to pay T-Mobile if you insist on trolling the company’s fan site?

          What do you not understand about the following and the fact that the other three carriers, whose customers most definitely experience de-prioritization, don’t disclose at which point their users would experience de-prioritization.

          *Unlimited 4G LTE customers who use more than 21 GB of data in a bill cycle will have their data usage de-prioritized compared to other customers for that bill cycle at locations and times when competing network demands occur, resulting in relatively slower speeds.

        • archerian

          Wow so stating something that doesn’t portray T-Mobile in a favorable light is trolling? There are mods who will decide if thats so and deal with it if necessary.

          And who gave you the notion that you cannot be a paying T-Mobile customer and post non favorable comments on tmonews?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Wow so stating something that doesn’t portray T-Mobile in a favorable light is trolling? There are mods who will decide if thats so and deal with it if necessary.

          Asking a question when you know the right answer isn’t counterintuitive?

          And who gave you the notion that you cannot be a paying T-Mobile customer and post non favorable comments on tmonews?

          It displays your level of intellect and lack reasoning.

          You live in a market with access to the four largest carriers in this country. You should port out so that you no longer have a need to put T-Mobile in a negative light. At the very least, your trollish behavior would have more merit.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I agree. Fabian, you’re stretching it on this one and I usually agree with you.

  • Goku

    This is why I don’t trust politicians because they tell you one thing and do something else. This is no different than Verizon or AT&T doing it. So T-mobile is just the same but a smaller network. Between that and the S5 5.1.1 update that turned my phone into a slow data machine. I am going to go back to a flip phone and give up the smart phone. Don’t need this shit any more.

    • fw

      agreed!

  • Karly Johnston

    they should just throttle them like everyone else, $80 = 20GB sounds like a good plan. data hogs are a scourge on our network.

    • no

      They sell ‘unlimited’.

      Do you understand?

    • john

      How do you clarify a data hog?
      Everyone that uses the Web could be considered a data hog?

      • Karly Johnston

        T-Mobile already clarified it.

    • fw

      80 for 20 is not a good deal when using tmo as a home ISP.

      • Ek

        Tmo is not an at home isp. It’s your cell phone.

        • fw

          for you maybe, for me it is a home ISP.

        • kiiKane

          I think we have our answer there. If you try deliver pallets of bricks using a bicycle you shouldn’t be shouting at the bicycle manufacturer when things don’t work out. Tmobile is not a home isp, you may have been able to make it work as one for a while, probably at the expense of others, but your argument suggests you may be best served by a period of introspection.

        • fw

          shouting? No, I am looking for the obstacles on the road so the bricks do not fall. Not to the expense of others. Crazy?

        • kiiKane

          How crazy it is depends on how much you use a month. Fixed line connections have an inherent advantage capacity wise. The last mile connection is not contended (shared with others) and can have its capacity increased significantly beyond any current usage requirements (docsis 3.1 can easily put over 1gbps into each home). POTS based internet, dsl etc is more limited but vdsl is a stop gap before laying fiber.

          With wireless the air link is contended, shared with everyone else and its capacity is effectively reduced by people who have poor connections. While we can add more spectrum, bond links, use mimo, densify, split sectors and upgrade the protocol but when you look at the average capacity per user on a tower it is still much lower than what is available via a wired link.

          For most folks, usage in the home is far higher than via mobile, something the wired networks can support, but if you try and use a wireless link like you would a wired link you will likely find yourself running into roadblocks. Its just not suited to higher levels of usage typical of home use. It may be your only current option but as I suggested elsewhere, if tmobile is starting to make it harder for you to use their network as a home isp starting a wisp in your community might be more sustainable.

        • fw

          here in the exurb, most folks use legacy unlimited verizon 3g accounts for isp. I am one of maybe three that uses tmo. Most hold on to verizon like charlton heston held on to his gun, so a wisp might be a hard sell. The tmo network is not stressed.

        • kiiKane

          Ah, you should be alright to continue then, assuming your cell isn’t over stressed it won’t matter if you go over 21Gb. It would only impact you if you switched onto an overloaded cell (at work or shopping etc).

        • Hector Arteaga

          It shouldn’t be
          You’re wrong.

        • fw

          ok, if it makes you feel better hector, i am wrong, now back to using tmo as my home ISP.

      • Karly Johnston

        going over the 5GB hotspot limit is a violation of ToS and all violaters should be tossed.

        • fw

          Karly, I love it when you talk bad to me!

        • gmo8492

          Its not a violation of tos agreement, T-Mobile made some revisions to it plans and unlimited data plan customers and even grandfathered ones got a 2GB boost. They also sort of made the hotspot unlimited, but under the condition where you get throttled after you reached your data cap.

  • Benny

    tmo doesn’t have unlimited bandwidth/spectrum. It’s irresponsible to sell unlimited data plan. 21GB soft cap is a good start.

    • Hector Arteaga

      Precisely.

      • Latasha

        Hey deprioritizing is so much better than throttling. Deprioritizing is just something that will slow your speeds down to 2mbps or 5mbps for example, it does not simply mean that you will be throttled down to 2g 128kbps speeds is what they really mean. I think 2mbps or perhaps 5mbps is a good enough speed to make use of there.

        • Joe

          It is usually under 1mbs if I’m not mistaken

        • Latasha

          Deprioritization you mean? You would usually be slowed down to 8mbps or at least 3mbps at the least?? Throttling would be at 128kbps speeds.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          Read the article. In most cases speeds are reduced to under 1mbps

        • Latasha

          Oh I thought it was throttling perhaps?? Its only temporary though, not a forever thing though depending on where you are at, at that moment.

        • Cam Fas

          I have been de prioritized to less then half a Meg

        • thepanttherlady

          Same here and it’s frustrating as hell.

        • Cam Fas

          If they slowed us down to say something reasonable like 3-5mbs that’s fine we Could still use our divice they told me when I signed up stream music and watch Netflix 247 then it changed to this when I’m at work and they slow me to kilobytes i just stop using my phone completely because I can’t do anything with it. I can understand if they don’t give me 90mbs or 40-50 mbs but at least if it was between 3-5 mbs it would be usable going to 100kbs isn’t exactly fair when all the carriers bragged how lte was supposed to lower the costs and increase efficiency for the user

        • Arnold Shoon

          The worst time this happened was when I landed in LAX and couldn’t load google maps for directions… or when sitting on a plane in LGA and wanting to watch netflix to pass the delay. yes I used over 50GB this cycle but most of the time it’s in uncongested areas. My desire will be to fine tune the soft cap counter for when I use high data amounts in congested areas and times. I mean network use at 4am vs. 6pm is quite different.

        • fw

          well said, this was the point I was trying to make.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I’ve seen it as well. Wife and my phone side by side. She’s at 20Mbps and I’m at .5Mbps. Sad.

        • Ascertion

          That’s disappointing. Looks like the issue here is they don’t necessarily say which towers are affected, nor do they say the threshold of use that they consider “congested”. If somebody is hitting 20Mbps, it does not sound congested to me. I think they’re spinning off the de-prioritization line as a coverup for throttling heavy users. Likely in an attempt to either enlighten users to user less data than necessary, or to cause those that use excessive amounts to hop to another carrier, as I doubt T-Mobile profits off them anyways.

        • Clippers FANactic

          Amen!

        • Cvs5778

          I’ve read several complaints on different message boards where the speeds were far below 2-5 Mbps more closer to 128k

    • archerian

      Then they should probably call it the Forever 21 Addon instead of Unlimited with asterisk.

      • guest

        trololololololollollololollololoolo

      • dtam

        it was in the TOS as top 3%, now it’s better defined as 21 gb

  • fw

    this is unfair to those of us who live in exurbs where tmo is the only choice for unlimited broadband. adios netflix!

    • kiiKane

      Have you considered getting together as a community and starting a WISP? It would probably be a more suitable and sustainable solution.

      • fw

        no, is there a website to discuss this?

        • kiiKane

          http://www.wispa.org/ & https://wiki.ubnt.com/Building_a_wisp Might get you started. It’s still wireless but its far more efficient with spectrum (compared to cellular phones) as you get to use much better directional (in the homes) antenna. It probably isn’t going to be right if everyone wants to use 2TB a month, but these days it should be alright for netflix etc. Another option might to be to find a WISP in a neighboring county and discuss them expanding or helping you setup.

  • Eh. I’m fine with this. I wanted clarity on the issue and that’s clarity. Between 19gb of total mobile hotspot, 5gb of tablet LTE, and unlimited LTE on two smartphones for $120 / mo., how can I possibly care about a 21gb soft cap? That’s a fair number.

    • Latasha

      Agreed.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Exactly. The clarity is here and de-prioritization is a limited experience and on a cell site basis.

      • fw

        clarity? clarity would be telling us which cell sites to avoid so that we dont get de-prioritized for the rest of the month.

        • Fabian Cortez

          clarity? clarity would be telling us which cell sites to avoid so that we dont get de-prioritized for the rest of the month.

          Do you not see the lack of logic in your statement?

          If such a system existed and if everyone was notified, then other sites would be congested due to people attempting to avoid the congested ones at the times.

          This is mobile wireless, not fixed wireless.

        • fw

          I doubt that most of the “herd” would clue in to the “bad” sites.

  • kiiKane

    This sounds fairly sensible. I can understand why people would be upset, but of all the ways of managing traffic de-prioritizing traffic over a published level seems one of the better methods.
    I am curious about how it works with multiple lines, on the two for 50 I assume its 21gb for each line, but if one line goes over do both get de-prioritized.

    • T-Mobile Cares

      Great question. The answer is this is on a per line basis. One lines usage does not affect another line on the same account. Each ate independent of each other. Thanks for the question.

  • nairb

    There is a workaround if you are de-prioritized. You can disable the LTE on the device and work on the much less congested HSPA+ network where you are far less likely to be de-prioritized.

    • T-Mobile HSPA+ will be disconnected soon

      • theseanteam

        True, which means more capacity for LTE!

        • fw

          sure, but you could still encounter a “bad” cell site and get de-prioritized.

        • theseanteam

          That can be said about anything though.

        • fw

          really? is that the best you can do?

      • Stefan Naumowicz

        HSPA+ isn’t getting disconnected, it’s getting moved from the AWS band to the PCS band which most phones support.

      • Fabian Cortez

        T-Mobile HSPA+ will be disconnected soon

        That’s not true.

        Do you have any proof of this?

        • Medion

          HSPA+ 42 is being turned off. TMO is shifting HSPA+ off AWS to be used exclusively for LTE.
          However, HSPA+21 is being used on the PCS band. It will be a LONG time before TMO completely turns it off. Too many legacy phones, and most phones don’t support VOLTE yet. That would mean using Edge for phone calls.

        • Fabian Cortez

          HSPA+ 42 is being turned off. TMO is shifting HSPA+ off AWS to be used exclusively for LTE.However, HSPA+21 is being used on the PCS band. It will be a LONG time before TMO completely turns it off. Too many legacy phones, and most phones don’t support VOLTE yet. That would mean using Edge for phone calls.

          Actually, market-dependent, T-Mobile is moving/shifting dual carrier from AWS to PCS.

          42 Mbps HSPA+ will still be around for quite some time.

        • Medion

          I hope you’re right. Got a link? I can’t find anything other than old info showing HSPA+42 on AWS and HSPA+ 21 on PCS.

          I’d like to be wrong on this, just need to see it with my own eyes.

        • Fabian Cortez

          i.imgur.com/b4Nrfnh.png

      • Cam Fas

        Hspa+ was slowed down for me too both lte and hdpa+ was less then a Meg

  • Mackin Cheez

    People in these comments saying that people shouldn’t use their smartphones to watch Netflix or YouTube or just plain ignorant. I have a samsung galaxy note 4 and it is a media powerhouse and I’m going to use it the way I intend to use it and want to use it. So far I haven’t experienced any of the issues of slow down but if I do then I’ll just let it buffer.

    • kiiKane

      Too right. When I signed up tmo had adverts saying stream videos and music 24 7. While my usage is only about 15-20GB a month I don’t think a bit of Netflix is abuse, it’s something they encouraged. It’s handy when waiting for kids or clients.

      • Mackin Cheez

        Agreed. Although some months I use more data than you.

        • kiiKane

          I can imagine it’s very easy to add a zero on the end of that without falling into the stereotypical abuser running their entire home via the cellular connection and downloading loads of blurays (or whatever peoples impressions are). TMO rolled the dice with unlimited and it got them this far but if the choice is this cap or it going away altogether, I think this is the better solution.

      • Kiwini

        But it will be what leads to end of truly unlimited data, especially as Tmobile gets more customers that its network can’t handle

        • Cvs5778

          Then it’s tmobile’s fault for offering a service they can’t support. 1 Netflix episode a day is a far cry from abuse but will result in more than 20 gigs a month. How is that right?

    • Benny

      There’s no unlimited data plan for tablets. It’s 11GB for $70 per month instead. It’s obvious that tmo knows HD video streaming can hurt their network significantly. tmo thought people won’t spending too much time on watching video at tiny cell phone screen. So it assumes the average data usage won’t be too much. When large screen phones like Note became popular, the rapid growing video watching bandwidth becomes a serious issue. 21Gb soft cap is the first step to mitigate the issue.

      • compuguy1088

        Incorrect. I checked my data devices on my plan, and the max plan is 21 GBs.

    • Medion

      Little know fact – for MOST Android phones, Netflix only runs at 480p max. There are very few phones that Netflix has certified for 720p and 1080p. So for most Android users, Netflix data won’t be a huge deal. I used to split a 42-44m episode between my morning and after train commute. I watched literally 20-22 of these episodes per month. I rarely surpassed 10GB of Netflix usage. If I was streaming at 1080p, it would have been 6-10x higher in usage.

      • Mackin Cheez

        Well my netflix with my note 4 streams in HD

        • Medion

          You’re correct, and I wanted to amend my prior post. I went looking for a list of Android devices that support HD streams.

          Initially, due to copyright concerns, Netflix only ran on up to 480p on Android devices. However, some OEM devices (specifically Motorola) supported 720p when HD displays started coming to smartphones. The Galaxy Nexus also did.

          With Android 4.3, all smartphones now have the proper DRM as it’s now included with Android. So if you have Android 4.3 or higher, you’re getting Netflix in HD up to 1080p.

  • VG

    I’m sure this is a response to the $100mil fine being proposed by the FCC against AT&T for its data-throttling practices on unlimited data plans. My guess is that this is T-Mobile’s way of saying it doesn’t throttle, but it does de-prioritize once a user goes beyond a certain number of GB. Eventually, I believe T-Mobile will need to label each of their plans “unlimited” with a certain allotment of high-speed 4G LTE data included each month. For example, the basic Simple Choice plan iPod “unlimited” with 1GB high-speed per month. Maybe the truly unlimited plan will eventually be called the “unlimited with 21GB high-speed per month”? If they don’t, they risk an FCC fine.

    • Fabian Cortez

      This isn’t throttling.

      Therefore, this is unrelated to AT&T’s throttling fine.

      • VG

        If the net result of de-prioritization is you “might experience slower speeds in congested areas”, that sounds like throttling. I know John Legere likes to say T-mobile doesn’t throttle, but the FCC might have a different interpretation of de-prioritization if the act of de-prioritization results in slower speeds.

        • kiiKane

          It may sound like it but it isn’t. The connection isn’t unlimited either, a better description would be unmetered, but the marketing goons won that war which is kind of the problem, the industry misuses some terms and customers don’t understand the differences. While the results may be very similar both techniques are different and deserve to be viewed differently. I’m not a tmo fan boy, they just happen to offer a product that suits what I want. No bill shock and a reasonable service. I can buy a fixed amount of data or I can get my share of whats left over, I choose the latter.

        • moonoverparma

          Like the term, 4g verses LTE?

        • kiiKane

          Very much like that. And like how some of the technologies being discussed for 5g will make an earlier appearance and the marketing goons will be falling over each other to call it 5g when it’s only a subset of the full idea. Just drown all the marketing drones along with the lawyers and politicians.

        • Kiwini

          So would customers who believed they were get TRULY UNLIMITED HIGH SPEED DATA

        • archerian

          De-prioritization is to Data Stash as Throttling is to Rollover…. Throttling is soo 2010…

        • Fabian Cortez

          Except this policy update and clarity is in effect due to the new rules going into effect. That’s why AT&T was fined and that’s why Sprint removed their policy.

          With Sprint still offering unlimited data and not having as much site density as T-Mobile, I fully expect them to reintroduce another policy with clearer language.

      • Kiwini

        If it affects you, it’s throttling no matter what they call it.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Exactly.

      • archerian

        How is it not throttling? Is there a way to de-prioritize traffic from certain devices unless a speed shaping policy is applied? Isn’t that throttling in the classic sense, or are they planning a different QoS for de-prioritized traffic?

        • Medion

          I’m going to borrow someone’s analogy from earlier and modify it. Hopefully this better explains the different between throttling and prioritization.

          Imagine you’re at an all you can eat buffet. There are no lines (congestion) so you can eat what you want, when you want.

          With throttling, once you eat so much food, you’re then limited to smaller portions until you leave and come back (new billing cycle). With deprioritization, you can still eat all you want, but you have to wait at the end of the line because you’ve eaten more than others, and there’s congestion. You’ll still get your food, you just have to wait longer. But once lines are clear, you’re free to once again eat what you want when you want, even if you’re still in the same billing cycle.

          Does that make sense? I get why people think this is throttling, but it technically is a different thing.

  • JLV90

    I regularly use 30-40 GB of data monthly. I have yet to run into deprioritization and my home has terrible T-mobile speeds still get 1-3 Mbps during peak hours. 5-15 off peak hours.

  • FanboisSuck

    This is a great example of how forced “Net Neutrality” is a BAD thing (despite the media/blogs biased coverage)

    If “Net Neutrality” were not forced, after you hit the 21GB Tmo could still allow regular web, tweet, email, music etc traffic come through full speed, and just deprioritize high bandwidth traffic like netflix streams and similar.

    • SirStephenH

      What!? This has absolutely nothing to do with net neutrality.

      Nice try troll.

      • FanboisSuck

        wrong. read it again sport.

  • Kiwini

    Just shows eventually unlimited data will be gone. Tmobile was able to offer this because they were desperate and had fewest customers. It may currently not affect alot of folks but when it affects you, it’s important. You basically have a brick when you’re throttled whatever name the company chooses to call slower data. I always laugh when people here are cheering for Tmobile to be #3 instead of #4. The truth is that doesnt help your situation ; if anything, it likely will eventually make it worse for you. More customers, more congestion,and likely worse service

    • Latasha

      That is not true at all. They are only doing it to those that so happen to fall right on deep into the top 3% of data users, depending on the area that they are in at that particular time there.

      • Cvs5778

        They changed the 3% rule. It’s now a firm 21gb.

    • Latasha

      It is not throttling. It is called Deprioritization for a short period of time once reaching 21gbs, just until you are no longer in an area that is very congested anymore. It all depends whether or not if you would end up falling right on deep as being one of the top 3% of heavy data users within a certain area you might be in that time.

      • archerian

        It is called Deprioritization for a short period of time

        How is that different from throttling for a short period of time?

        • randomnerd_number38

          With throttling, you are limited to 128kbps- no if, ands or buts. With deprioritization, you’re only slowed by a much lesser degree and whether or not you’re even slowed down depends on the tower load in the area.

        • archerian

          Thanks, I understand it might never happen, but when it does, deprioritization is basically throttling in the general Internet sense but based on an arbitrary speed and time duration. Also, if heavily congested, there is no guarantee it will even be 128kbps too, right?

        • Medion

          Correct. It’s based on actual network need and not some arbitrary number. To better explain the difference:

          T-Mobile limits speed based on what the network can support so that the highest number of customers get a good experience. It’s not a money grab, but a network protection scheme.

          AT&T, however, limited your speed to a set amount to encourage you switch to a plan where you pay overage fees. It was a clear money grab.

        • compuguy1088

          True, but on the new plan, they have overages, but don’t throttle you if you use the data within your bucket + rollover, which depending on the plan, can be more than t-mobile’s soft cap. Hence why I’m scratching my head at this move. Wouldn’t the more reasonable thing to do is deprioritize based on tower congestion, irregardless of data used in a billing period, for period of high loads?

        • Medion

          “True, but on the new plan, they have overages, but don’t throttle you if you use the data within your bucket + rollover, which depending on the plan, can be more than t-mobile’s soft cap.”

          It’s because the motivation is different. Verizon wants you to go over your cap as a money grab. They get to charge extra. TMO’s motivation is to keep the network running smoothly for everyone. More happy customers.

          “Wouldn’t the more reasonable thing to do is deprioritize based on tower congestion, irregardless of data used in a billing period, for period of high loads?”
          That’s one way to do it, and each person will have their own opinion on what is reasonable.

  • LuvMusic

    Doesn’t seem very uncarrier like to me….when the “uncarrier” says unlimited, it should be unlimited. TMo is now acting like AT&T and VZW. Maybe we should say “the carrier formerly known as the uncarrier?”

    • phonefreak

      Any carrier can prioritize any of their unlimited customers since data caps been in place. They will give you unlimited data just 2g. Always read terms and condition before aigning up for a contract

      • archerian

        If the Uncarrier adds a limit in its terms and conditions and doesn’t offer any more details on how exactly it’s implemented and what it means to a de-prioritized user, its not very Uncarrier of it.

        • fw

          we will call it: non-uncarrier 1. when we get to number 3 it is adios!

        • T-Mobile Cares

          Again, I wish to clarify your comments. Our Terms and Conditions have always stated that we reserve the right to maintain the capacity of our network. Thus can be found in Section 11 of our Terms and Conditions. Additionally, we clarify, in Section 18, the acceptable use policy of data on our network. As of March 18th, 2015, we have updated our prioritization policy to specifically state  “To provide the best possible experience for the most possible customers and minimize capacity issues and degradation in network performance, we take certain steps to manage our network, including, but not limited to, prioritizing the data usage of Unlimited high-speed data customers who use more than 21 GB of data during a billing cycle below that of other customers in times and locations where there are competing customer demands for network resources for the remainder of their billing cycle.” I hope this helps you to post factual information in the future.

        • archerian

          Great you mentioned the TOS. Can you clarify this – how exactly is “prioritization” done? It’s speed shaping or something else? What is the minimum speed possible under such a scenario? When does a ‘tagged’ user get his tag reset, tagged being > 21 GB – it is per billing cycle or month? What granularity do you use to calculate congestion in a cell – per hour, per day .. ? How does a user know if he’s been de-prioritized – does he have to call and find out or is there some other way? Isn’t it possible that due to backhaul limitations some sites are always congested, so any user > 21 GB will be slowed down there, even a user who happened to use that 21Gb in a non-congested site and moved to this one?

        • T-Mobile Cares

          You can find more information about your questions at:

          http://www.T-Mobile.com/OpenInternet 

        • Perry_F

          This is one of my main points. How do we the customer verify that a tower is congested? And if you live in a densely populated place won’t the towers always be congested? I’m certain Tmo knows how many users are in a given area and what the average usage is for that area. So if that area is known to be congested why not increase capacity? And not by slowing users down but by adding additional resources!

        • Fabian Cortez

          Exactly. The terms have been that way as far back as 2011.

          Some people just don’t read what they sign.

    • FanboisSuck

      still unlimited.

      do you know what unlimited means?

  • NardVa

    I wonder if Cam can do a poll to see how many Tmonews readers have been recently de-priotized. It would be interesting to see how many Tmonews readers fall in the category.

  • hanfeedback

    Glad to hear they have said an official limit pretty much. I don’t use much data and I was worried that at one point in the future the people who’s lives consist of watching Netflix on a mobile phone and who brag about using 100+ GB a month would ruin my Tmobile experience. At least now it doesn’t look like Tmobile is going to let this happen.

  • Bonedatt

    …so what happens when T-Mobile’s map tells me I’m surrounded by 4G LTE, never use up to 21GB per month, yet my download speeds are averaging 0.79Mbps? Do I get compensated for their lousy network?

    • archerian

      no, in THAT scenario people will mention you get what you paid for and to switch if it’s too bothersome. Or that coverage maps are inaccurate but everybody does it as if it somehow solves your issue. Or maybe get a Wifi capable phone and let T-mobile provide you wireless service via your Wifi that you paid for.

      • Bonedatt

        That’s exactly what a T-Mobile rep told me to do. She asked “do you have Wi-Fi”? When I responded in the affirmative, she said ” use it till we figure this out”. Typical T-Mobile style :). They’re not all that bad but they’re no Angel either.

        • archerian

          well, its the typical script/flowchart given to them to ‘troubleshoot’ the issue.

        • T-Mobile Cares

          I wish to clarify your comment. T-Mobile representatives, in no way shape or form use scripts or flowcharts of any kind to troubleshoot any customer issue. Our representatives are provided the highest quality training in the industry. What we aim to offer is the best customer service in the wireless industry. We empower our representatives to offer solutions that meet our customers needs. Since we offer the only complete line of devices with the Wi-Fi Calling feature, our free CellSpot Router is just another way to enhance our customers in-home coverage options.

        • archerian

          Now this sounds like a script!! I have several times heard reps read aloud the troubleshooting pointers when they encounter something they haven’t come across before like a phone that acts up, data not working etc. It’s not a bad thing when the documentation asks for a series of checks and steps to be followed, it might actually be better than the rep winging it. And believe me when I say several of them wing it and speak total nonsense. I don’t say they all do, and you might be one of the far better ones, but this is common.

    • fentonr

      Are you able to connect to LTE? I know there are some areas that get LTE but some customers won’t ever connect to it because their phone doesn’t support it.

      • Bonedatt

        I’ve been able to connect to LTE with my Note 2, HTC One and Nexus 6. It’s not the devices.

    • Goat

      Let me explain something that I’m not seeing below. The T-Mobile standard for LTE is 1mbps down, so if you’re averaging less then that, you can call and be compensated until there is a solution. In my situation, my LTE was below standard, and they blatantly said they were building a tower. I then switched to Postpaid, which was like a month afterwards, and they just gave me 30$ credit.

      Just let them know and they should compensate you :)

      • Trevnerdio

        The standard is for sure nottt 1mbps. That’s abysmal. That’s like HSPA speed on a poor day. T-Mobile’s nationwide average is around 10.

        • Goat

          Not when I called, you can confirm with any T-Mobile rep..I actually think there’s a T-Mobile DOC out there somewhere with it on as well : /

    • Kogashuko

      This is why I left Tmobile. When I switched to them I was getting 30mb in populated areas and roaming in rural areas. When I left I was lucky to get 9mb and no coverage in rural areas. They think they can sustain this growth without building more towers, buying more spectrum, and increasing backhaul bandwidth. They pay some looser like Robert whatshisface from S4gru (just like sprint did) to fabricate all of these awesome stories that are nowhere near reality and block out the people that don’t agree. They screw you in all of those ways and AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint have all matched or beaten the price of their shotty network.

  • Bud

    so glad i put one of my lines on cricket 20 gig for $55.

    • Hector Arteaga

      That promo is bound to comeback at some point. Would be perfect timing.

  • FILA

    net neutrality case brewing?

    • FanboisSuck

      not at all. if there WASNT “net neutrality”, they could just deprioritize high bandwidth applications like netflix, while letting your web and app data stay high priority.
      net neutrality is a BAD thing in this instance.

  • kiiKane

    Interesting they chose to release this today, a day before their next ‘big announcement’. Do we think tomorrows announcement of free fluffers for everyones birthday parties will bury this?

  • Andrew

    This has been on the T-mobile page for about a month now.

  • Genecio

    One time I used 7 to 8 gigs in a bill cycle, I was so surprised. I usually average about 2-3 gigs per month. *I have home Wifi at 100mbps. I switched to Unlimited 4g for $20 back when (possibly a month before) they were scheduled to increase the price. I’m so glad I did. Although I have been noticing some slight congestion maybe due to more users in NYC. I need an iPhone 6S Plus with Band 12, and I needed it yesterday, lol. I’m okay with the de-prioritization cap of 21GB although they should just make it 30GB that way if one uses on average 1GB/day they’ll be okay….anything more than they’ll just be slowed down during peak usage on a congested tower.

    • AS118

      Yeah, 30gb is a nice round number that does average out to 1gb a day.

  • Austin

    Glad I moved to sprint a few months ago. I always used 100 gb on tmobile and now I’m doing it over on sprint

    • gmo8492

      Marcelo Claure went on record saying they will no longer be able to offer unlimited data within the next 2 years or “18 months” as he put it. The only people I know who wont be effected are the ones who got the unlimited for life plan a few years ago. Of course I could be wrong and everyone who has unlimited data will be grandfathered in. But it seems unlikely since my friend who has the unlimited for life plan keeps telling me that CS wants him to switch to a different plan everytime he calls in.

      • Bonedatt

        There’s no such thing as unlimited for life plan. Really?!?!? Where did you pull that one out from? Also, what Marcelo (sp) was referring to was price guarantee.

        • gmo8492

          It was a plan that cost $80 dollars for a single line and I forgot how much for each additional one. Sprint ran a zombie commercial promoting the damn thing. But I agree that I need to revisit the Marcelo interview for better clarification.

        • TK – Indy

          That was just one of the plans that had the “Unlimited Guarantee”, which means you are guaranteed unlimited data as long as you don’t change plans. All unlimited plans had this through the end of the “Framily” plan about a year ago.

        • Andre Dionne

          The confusion was because somehow he thought you were referring to T-Mobile, not Sprint.

          In case you were curious, the first additional line was $40 for a second line, $30 for the third, and $20 for each line after that. It was promoted as a “save money with more lines” kind of thing. I had completely forgotten about it until you mentioned it though… lol.

        • Bonedatt

          My fault. Andre Dionne just cleared things up. I have no idea on Sprint plans. I only use their network now because of my testing out project Fi.

        • gmo8492

          No problem, I really can’t say that I know everything myself. I wish I can just try project fi, but I don’t have a Nexus 6 :(

        • Bonedatt

          Yeah Project Fi would have been perfect for me if we had access to Verizon’s network too. Unfortunately, I’m still having to deal with T-Mobile since they are one of the two network partners. The Nexus 6 may still be on sale from the Google store.

        • gmo8492

          It was rumored that Google tried to reach out to Verizon to presumably launch it’s Fi network on, but they couldn’t come up with an agreement. But I going to wait and see what new Nexus devices come out later this year before I switch to a new phone.

        • Bonedatt

          OK. Just remember that there’s no guarantee that a new NEXUS device would work with Project Fi since the NEXUS 6 is the only supported device during this Early access program that we’re in. If Google opens Fi to the public prior to the release of a new NEXUS device then maybe the possibility (if all radios are also included) may be there.

        • Andre Dionne

          Not sure if my last comment didn’t get approved or not (it had links), but a quick search on Google shows that they did indeed offer an “Unlimited for Life” deal, about two years ago. And a recent interview indicated that prices on unlimited data plans would go up by the end of the year, and *might* end up being eliminated completely sometime in the future. I didn’t see an interview giving any certainty to them being eliminated, though I didn’t search very hard either.

        • Bonedatt

          I’ve been with T-Mobile since 2005 (when they bought SunCom wireless). I’ve had their $70 unlimited TT&D 4G LTE plan for a while now (This plan is no longer offered). What unlimited for life deal are you referring to? My plan is locked in as long as I don’t change services or leave and come back. The “price guarantee” just let’s customers know that their rate plan will not go up but has the potential of coming down. If that’s what you’re referring to as unlimited for life deal then OK. I just don’t see it as that.

        • Andre Dionne

          Marcelo Claure is the current CEO of Sprint. The initial comment you replied to in this thread was specifically talking about what Marcelo had said about unlimited data with Sprint, which was a response to someone saying they switched to Sprint.

          So yes, Sprint had a “Unlimited for Life” promotion going on a couple years ago, and Marcelo Claure, the president and CEO of Sprint, said their unlimited data will go up in cost and may eventually be eliminated.

        • Bonedatt

          Aha! That explains it. My fault. I was thinking of a T-Mobile executive (not the foul mouth CEO) who had responded to a similar question about unlimited data and their prices. My apologies.

        • Hector Arteaga

          It was actually The Sprint Unlimited Guarantee. You can still get it with the Unlimited My Way, My All In or Framily plans (you need a Framily code).

        • Hector Arteaga

          He’s talking about the plans with the Unlimited Data Guarantee. They are the following: Unlimited My All In, Unlimited My Way and Framily plans.

      • Austin

        I saw somebody tweet Marcelo when the news of unlimited came out, and he said that yes, we would be grandfathered in.

  • Genecio

    Yeah, I have to find an old t-mobile bill or flyer, but they’ve always had the Network De-prioritization clause in the fine print. However they never associated an actual cap “number” so to speak.

    • Medion

      You’re correct. They also stated it, but because it became a topic lately, T-Mobile is providing an actual number now that people can understand.

      • Genecio

        Exactly. So it’s not like it’s new.

        • Medion

          The change is new. Before it was vague, and now it’s concrete.

  • Josh

    interesting . I wonder how this works if you have an unlimited data plan +11 / 13 gb mobile hotspot plan, still a 21 GB soft cap or would it 13GB + 21GB soft cap

    • Tim Furru

      From what I understand when I called TMO about this, the 21 GB includes what you use for hotspot. It’s your “total” usage.

  • TK – Indy

    I wouldn’t be too concerned about this unless you frequent congested areas or your area becomes congested sometime in the future. A data hog at a major event or shopping mall/airport/downtown area will be SOL.

    • Fabian Cortez

      I actually agree with you.

  • kaream

    21GB ≠ ∞GB, ∞GB = unlimited data, 21GB ≠ unlimited data. what the f**k do you have us pay for then. how fair is it to pay for a loaf of bread and only get a slice in return. #T-mo_is_T-worst.

    • dontsh00tmesanta

      However i am paying $50 a month for 21gb lol only cricket had a similar price

    • Ascertion

      It’s more like paying for an all you can eat buffet, and then them kicking you out once you’ve had “your share” and others start coming into the restaurant.

      • FanboisSuck

        no, its like after you pig out, they ask you to let other people eat first before you go back for 4ths

        • Ascertion

          Actually, I’d agree this is a better analogy.

    • Medion

      FBS’ analogy below is perfect. It’s till unlimited. There’s no cap. But once you cross a certain threshold, you go to the back of the line when there is a line.

  • damn_u

    T-Mobile is just trying to stress people out .

  • Johnnola504

    Because spectrum is finite, I don’t have a problem with a soft cap.

    • archerian

      Spectrum is actually infinite, usable spectrum is finite.

      • FanboisSuck

        thanks for clarifying captain nitpick

  • Richard Darrington

    Seriously I think this is fair. If your using that much data in a month you need to not be slowing down the network for normal ppl.
    This from an “unlimited ” plan holder

    • Perry_F

      Or the company can decide they need additional resources in an area they realize is congested. A high volume user is not slowing down the network for others. The company is to blame for not having the capacity to service the customers they have.

  • zx6guy

    Unlimited is unlimited

    • Medion

      This is still unlimited.

      • patt

        actually no it isn’t word unlimited explains it self no matter how you try to justify it. Unlimited is no limits as simple as that.

        • Medion

          Ok, then please tell me the limit at which data stops.

        • TechHog

          It doesn’t say “unlimited speed” anywhere. You’re still getting what’s advertised, but not as fast as you expect under a specific set of conditions.

        • Perry_F

          agreed. Unlimited 4g speeds to me means just that. At 4g speeds. If you “lower” my speed to less than 4G then it’s not truly unlimited since my speed will be lowered below 4G until the “congestion” issue is resolved.

        • TechHog

          The throttle isn’t to 2G speeds though.

      • zx6guy

        Congrats Jr high class of 2015! You have successfully followed someone else’s
        trolly yet factual comment.

  • Chris Taylor

    This is what I don’t get, why do the cell companies boast anout their network speeds when any services that people need faster data speeds movies or videos those services take up a lot of data. If they need to slow people because their network cant handle or to be unconjested because people using the fast data to watch a movie. Well cell companies should worry less about the speeds and more on how the network can run right and people can use data that they pay for how they want. They networks wouldn’t be as congested if they stopped giving data to people who go over the amount they pay for. I pay for unlimted LTE and some else pays for 2.5 GB but then continues using at a slower speed and I’m the one who jammin up their network! What? I’m not saying some should be paying for unlimited data and use peer to peer services and be ok peer to peer is stealing and wrong on many levels those people should lose data all together but people using data they pay for legally, no matter what for or how much should not be capped .

    • Austin

      The people on the 2.5 GB plan are NOT “jamming” the network if they continue to use data at 128 kbps on an LTE connection. Actually, speeds like those are so slow, they could do it on verizon’s overcongested 3G network.

      • Chris Taylor

        So what your saying is network congestion is caused by the speed not how much data is traveling through a network at any given moment by all users. So to me it would make more sense to slow everyone slightly to free up room. If network is capable of 60mbps and you only allow 25mbps for example wouldn’t that free up room or am I not understanding it right? Even better why doesn’t a company offer what the network can handle instead of maxing it out then penalizing the customer. When spending money building network worry less about speed and more about availalibily and amount of traffic that the network can handle.

  • Randall Lind

    I read this has a drop in speed not a cut off. So I don’t care and I use wifi mostly at home anyway.

    • Medion

      It’s not even a drop in speed most of the time.

      The majority of users who go over 21GB will rarely see throttled data. It’s only when two conditions are met that your data slows; 1) You must be over 21GB, and 2) You must be on a congested tower.

      • compuguy1088

        True, but for data devices (tablets + hotspots, etc) there is a 21 gb plan (if anybody is crazy enough to choose that). If you went over the base plan, would they deprioritize you?

        • Medion

          You’d have to look at the terms. Because apparently it’s coming out that the terms mentioned in this article don’t apply to all customers, just customers who signed up on or after June 12.

        • Flip Jumpman

          So this 21gb soft cap doesnt apply to unlimited data users that had it before June 12th?

  • T Wheat

    How can you say you have unlimited data when you have a cap on data?

    • FanboisSuck

      did you even read? not a cap.
      you might not even notice

      • T Wheat

        Might not notice what? The word cap mentioned several times. Did you even read?

        • Medion

          He read. You failed to comprehend.

          It’s not a cap. A cap means “no more data after this point.” On TMO’s limit plans (the 1/3/5GB) plans, when you hit your 4G cap, you get unlimited 2G data. Unlimited is different.

          On unlimited, once you hit 21GB of data, you still keep going. The majority of users who go over 21GB will rarely see throttled data. It’s only when two conditions are met that your data slows; 1) You must be over 21GB, and 2) You must be on a congested tower.

        • T Wheat

          Well the point still stands. It’s not unlimited 4gLTE as advertise. Better to call it “Softly Limited” or “Potentially Unlimited” or “Unlimited if you don’t use Netflix”.

        • Medion

          No, your point does not stand. Your point was completely obliterated.

          Your speed is not limited. You still get full speed. However, on a congested site where no one gets full speed, you get deprioritized in favor of the person with lower usage. Once congestion is lifted, you all go back to full available speed.

        • Perry_F

          So how do you verify that the tower you’re using is congested? and what about if you live in an area that is usually congested, like a big city. Say NY or LA. My gripe is twofold, there is no way to verify that the tower is congested, we have to take Tmo’s word for it and the fact that the company continues to sign up customers in areas they know to be congested. So rather than address the capacity issue they instead penalize the customers who are using the service they pay for the most.

        • Medion

          Ok, you have two concerns: Is TMO lying about congestion, and how to reduce congestion:
          1) T-Mobile isn’t going to artificially congest a tower. That would be suicide. You’d lose customers. You’d need a big tinfoil hat to believe this to be the case.

          2) It’s not as easy as flipping a switch. Congestion is limited by backhaul, spectrum, radio technology, and number of concurrent users. The laws of physics determine that a tower can only support so many concurrent users. Erecting new towers is expensive and requires serious local and national regulatory approval, not to mention NIMBY (not in my back yard) from the locals. To combat this, TMO and other carriers try using small cell cites for local events and such, but even then you get the NIMBY issue (OMG, it’s gunna give me brain cancer!)

          If you have a workable, affordable solution, patent it and take it to the carriers.

        • TechHog

          Actually, it is. You’re not getting throttled to 2G speeds; you’re getting speeds which are lower than other users by comparison. So, legally speaking, you’re getting what you paid for since T-Mobile doesn’t promise to give you the fastest speed you can get at the time.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Exactly.

          Plus once you move cell sites, it’s back to “normalcy.”

    • ArchangelRenzoku

      It’s an unlimited amount, not unlimited speed.

      • thepanttherlady

        I pay for unlimited high speed.

        • Medion

          You’re right, you do. However, when a tower is congested, no one gets high speed, and due to that, high users have their packets moved to the end of the line.

        • ArchangelRenzoku

          High speed is classified as 2G and above, so technically you’re still getting it, even when congested. 128kbps

        • thepanttherlady

          Let me correct that:

          I pay for “Unlimited Nationwide 4G data”. When I have been “de-prioritized” it was to a speed that is unusable.

        • ArchangelRenzoku

          Hmm. It would be beneficial for you to learn the ##Band# trick then. You can change the frequency of your radios (LTE/4G/3G) to manually connect to a different tower. Whenever LTE towers are too crowded, I’ll switch to a 4G one and it usually solves the problem.

        • Andrew Singleton

          i assume you know this because you’re a pro, but if you switch your radio to “gsm/cdma” instead the the LTE option, hspa+ is unaffected by deprioritization, and since most people are rocking an LTE phone and don’t know the trick, speeds are insane.

        • Marcelo_L

          Ditto…and by “HIGH” speed. I don’t mean EDGE (which was never really anywhere near the actual speed of EDGE on TMobile to begin with). I should know, I beta tested one of the first EDGE capable phone for TMo 10 years ago. Yes, it was that long ago. It’s taken us that long to get to where we are in speed, and we’re STILL carrying around that heap. C’mon….throttling down to the speed of a 48Kbps modem is NOT high speed.

          Not in 2015.

    • Medion

      What’s the cap? At what point does data stop entirely?

      • Andrew Singleton

        i understand your discretion, but t-mobile openly advertises “truly unlimited LTE.” that is simply not true, or at the very least, intentional omission. i love t-mobile but a case cannot be made that they are being honest.

  • yankeesusa

    I love t-mobile but i hope the fcc looks into this and takes the same action they did with att.

    • Medion

      AT&T was throttling users over 3GB to force them to buy data plans that had overage fees. T-Mobile isn’t. That’s the difference. What T-Mobile is doing is beyond reasonable network management. That’s a very generous threshold and it’s not even a cap. The majority of users who go over 21GB will rarely see throttled data. It’s only when two conditions are met that your data slows; 1) You must be over 21GB, and 2) You must be on a congested tower.

      • yankeesusa

        That’s a good point. The good news is that 21gb cap is generous for most people. I rarely go over 15gb although lately i’m hitting around 18-20. Plus i don’t think i have ever felt throttling affect me if they ever did do it. I guess we’ll see.

  • Crucifixion Cruxi

    I hope they get fined and sued. No longer the uncarrier. Assholes

    • Medion

      They offer more data than any other carrier, and they don’t charge overages. You cannot indefinitely offer unlimited on wireless. Unlike wires, wireless has a finite amount of bandwidth based on backhaul (theorhetically unlimited), spectrum (limited), and the technology used (IE, LTE can handle more data within allotted spectrum than HSPA+).

      Unlimited data is meant as a loss leader until the carrier reaches their limits, at which point, they either kill unlimited data, find a new technology, acquire more spectrum, or risk having a pitiful network (Sprint). Sprint is the perfect example. They waited too long to kill off unlimited data, and now they’re paying the price.

      • Ascertion

        Sprint’s main issue was not deploying their spectrum in a timely manner. Sprint has the most spectrum of all of the carriers, but has the least amount of it deployed. This is, of course changing, but T-Mobile only had momentum from the AT&T breakup and utilized AT&T’s spectrum properly.

      • compuguy1088

        Technically AT&T and Verizon offer larger data buckets beyond t-mobile’s soft cap of 21 GBs. Honestly they should just retire the unlimited plans and add additional tiers beyond the 7 gb one they have now.

        • Medion

          You still get full speed 4G data beyond this 21GB soft cap most of the time. So, it’s better than the tiers that you propose. So long as it’s feasible, I’d rather see T-Mobile continue to use this.

          Yes, AT&T and Verizon do have larger data buckets. However, T-Mobile STILL lets you go beyond this 21GB soft cap, at full speed, and with no overages.

        • Cvs5778

          You don’t get full speeds if you live in an area that is constantly congested… Like I do.

        • Andrew Singleton

          the teirs are 1-21

      • Andrew Singleton

        wires are backhaul, so i wouold argue they’re the same.

      • EnterFredButts

        Dude, that’s all fine and good and practical and understandable. Now just advertise it that way and NOBODY has a problem. Advertising a nirvana where anyone can use any amount of an UNLIMITED data stream of data that you CANNOT IN REALITY DELIVER is FALSE ADVERTISING!

        No one is taking issue with what can be achieved by technology in reality. It’s the advertising that is the issue.

    • TechHog

      Fined and sued for what? For one, this isn’t anything new. This has ALWAYS been the case, but recently people have been complaining more and T-Mobile revealed an exact number. For another thing, they aren’t doing anything they can be successfully sued over. Net neutrality? This counts as bandwidth management, so no violation. False advertising? You’re still getting unlimited data and you’re not being capped to 2G speeds, so no violation. No lawyer would take this case because there’s no case to be made.

      • Crucifixion Cruxi

        It’s throttling plain and simple. AT&T and Sprint did the same thing. Now it’s T-Mobiles turn. False advertising that’s for sure since they claim they have more bandwidth then any other carrier.

  • What could be more Orwellian than designating something “unlimited” even though it has limits? In fact it’s beyond Orwellian; it’s just an ordinary lie, the kind told routinely by dishonest people.

    • Private_Eyescream

      On paper, this is called MAIL FRAUD.
      Over the phone, this is called WIRE FRAUD.
      Generally WIRE FRAUD was grandfathered in when the Internet came to exist, so fraudulent sales practices over the Internet are also considered generally legally WIRE FRAUD. T-Mobile is committing obvious WIRE FRAUD and MAIL FRAUD.
      This is a provable crime and very expensive to companies that engage in it.

  • Dac

    I need unlimited data I use over 200 gigs of data this is messed up 21 gigs is not enough

    • Ascertion

      Need and want are vastly different in this specific circumstance.

    • Medion

      You can still use over 200GB. You won’t be throttled at 21GB. In most cases after hitting 21 GB, you’ll still be going full speed. However, if you’re on a congested tower, you will be a second class citizen until the congestion fades.

    • NardVa

      If you need 200GB of data a month, you may want to sign up for home internet service through a local provider.

      • Dac

        Why do I need a home internet service. I have unlimited data that I paid for

        • Andrew Singleton

          you are lucky enough to live in a country with a super-fast, hardwired internet in almost every corner of residential areas. why in the world would you submit yourself to relying on a wireless connection for 200GB of data per month? PS if you’ve rooted your phone and are using unlimited tethering, you’re kindof a jerk.

        • fw

          you must be talking about korea or japan, because in this country wired internet is available only for city folk

      • compuguy1088

        Heres a more reasonable example. How about a business that has a hotspot with the 21 gb plan + data stash. Would they be put in the deprioritzation tier if they went over the soft cap?

  • Medion

    Here’s my concern. Someone WILL file a net neutrality complaint, and yes, this is a violation of net neutrality. When you have two customers paying for “unlimited” data, and customer A’s data is prioritized over customer B’s data, you’ve just violated the principals of net neutrality.

    TMO’s lower plans don’t fall under this. Those plans explicitly stay, “You get 1/3/5GB of 4G data, and then 2G thereafter is unlimited.” The unlimited plan does not carry this language. In fact, the change was buried and not advertised. It was because of this reason that AT&T recently stopped their deprioritization as well.

    The only real solution is to end the unlimited data gravy train. Right now if you go over 21GB, you’re not necessarily throttled. You will, however, have your priority reduced on a congested tower, giving you the feeling of being throttled, but it’s temporary. When congestion dissipates you go back to full speed.

    Under a modified plan where TMO offers 1/3/5/20GB of high speed data, you WILL be throttled upon going over your limit.

    So, this is one case where a net neutrality violation is beneficial to the customer, and I think that TMO can argue that it’s proper network management (they’re not charging overage fees). But I worry that some knucklehead will file a complaint and TMO would rather cave than fight it, thus ending unlimited mobile data.

    • Fabian Cortez

      AT&T was fined due to the lack of clarity in their throttling practices.

      T-Mobile’s change is geared toward complying with the new rules.

      Sprint removed theirs entirely due to not wanting to face any fines. I expect Sprint to implement a new policy with clearer language related to the de-prioritization threshold.

      • Medion

        Agreed.

        My poorly worded rambling was meant to convey my concern that someone would still complain, and that TMO would back down rather than fight it. See my response to Techhog.

        • EnterFredButts

          People trying to shame “data hogs” for making use of an offer for UNLIMITED service are idiots. It’s the company’s fault for making an offer for UNLIMITED service. You don’t offer something that you cannot provide in reality.

          If T-mobile cannot provide UNLIMITED 4G LTE AT 4G LTE SPEEDS AT ALL TIMES NO MATTER HOW MUCH YOU USE, that’s completely fine, but it needs to say so in it’s advertising, not just in its fine print. The commercials need to disclose this.

          If your service gets slower than 4GLTE for ANY reason, then it’s not an unlimited 4GLTE plan. In this case it’s a 21GB 4GLTE plan with “potentially deprioritzed speeds depending on network congestion” after 21GB for $80 a month. Advertise it as such and we don’t have a problem.

    • TechHog

      This doesn’t violate net neutrality. It falls under bandwidth management. Also, the soft cap doesn’t throttle to 2G speeds.

      • Medion

        I think we’re largely in agreement, and it’s a matter of semantics. Net neutrality is the principal that all traffic is equal. Deprioritization means that your traffic and my traffic is not equal. Therefore, this is a violation of the principal of net neutrality.

        However, as both you and I stated, the FCC allows an exception for reasonable network management, and both you and I believe that this falls under that exception.

        My concern is that some knucklehead (see DKBNYC above) will file a complaint based on the violation of the prinicpal, not understanding the reasonable exceptions with the rule.

        • ArchangelRenzoku

          I dunno if T-Mo even advocates to support NN, but they shouldn’t as long as we have whitelisting of app data like for music freedom and speed tests not counting against your data limits.

          Things like that probably put more strain on the network than they’re willing to admit.

          Full-bandwidth speed tests? During congestion? What moron thought that was going to be okay?

        • Medion

          Good point. However, MOST music streaming isn’t rough on the network. Pandora’s mobile app TOPS OUT at 64kbps music quality (it obvious is higher when buffering ahead). The majority of music streaming apps top out at 320kbps. Tidal is the major outlier. I can’t believe that TMO is allowing their 1.4mbps FLAC to be streamed and excluded from data computation. I mean, Netflix SD is lower than that!

        • ArchangelRenzoku

          Right? Utter nonsense.

          I’m a Spotify user myself and stream at Extreme quality (320kbps) because my ears are sensitive enough to notice the difference. But I’ll download most of the songs I want to listen to instead of streaming them. Or do it over WiFi it at home.

          If Tidal gets a big enough T Mobile fan base, our network will be in for a hard time.

        • Medion

          I can tell a minor difference, almost unnoticeable between Pandora’s low setting (presumably 48kbps, because high is 64kbps), and Google/Spotify’s 320kbps settings. My ears suck and ignorance is bliss. That said, I rip all my CDs to FLAC because, you never know.

          Eyes, however, are a different story. I must have 16xCSAA (minimum 4xMSAA) on games when available. Not a fan of FXAA but will use it in a pinch.

        • ArchangelRenzoku

          I’ll go into developer options after every reboot to ensure 4xMSAA is on, myself. I feel ya on that one. Damn Samsung for not letting the setting stick.

        • Medion

          I was talking more about PC gaming. On mobile it doesn’t bother me as much (for my desktop, I sit in front of a 27″ monitor, so the pixels are noticeable).

          As for mobile, I stopped using that dev setting. It only works for older OpenGL (ES 1.x) games, last time I checked. Newer titles are unaffected.

        • ArchangelRenzoku

          Yeah I could tell you were talking about PC when you said CSAA.

          for me the 4x MSAA setting is mostly used to tweak emulators that you can change the video rendering settings on.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I’d take 4x FSAA (RGSS), or even 8x, any day of the week.

          But who am I to derail?

        • Medion

          It’s already derailed :)

          And I agree, FXAA is beautiful when properly implemented. But in some cases it looks like someone spread butter on the screen.

        • Andrew Singleton

          t-mobile is one of the largest advocates of NN, as posted on placards in ALL stores, on ALL counters, all over our CEO’s twitter feed, tmo newsroom, and we actually just put up a sign, literally a sign that greets customers, in support of NN. hope that helps.

    • DKBNYC

      I would be the one to file a suit if it falls under NN. I’ve been with T-Mobile since day one. When this plan came about I signed up under the terms that I’d get unlimited data at 4G speeds. That was the term in my contract and I fully expect T-Mobile to honor it. I refuse to be penalized because some idiot wants to use unlimited for uses not authorized under contract. If T-Mobile is having issues with some customers using more data than what can possibly be used in a month on a phone then T-Mobile needs to go after those people and discontinue their service.

      • Medion

        This is the most ironic complaint ever. “Don’t throttle me, throttle the other high-usage users!”

    • PMB01

      This has nothing to do with net neutrality.

  • Cam Fas

    Funny two billing cycles later and two months later I’m only at 4 gigs and I am throttled to less then one meg when I get to a specific area and when I am near my house I’m pushing 60 and up I’m wondering why I get de prioritized in unlimited data when I am under 10 gigs this month

    • ArchangelRenzoku

      You are not being De-prioritized in this instance. You are merely in a congested area and that’s all the bandwidth available. Imagine how someone de-prioritized feels at that tower lol

      • Cam Fas

        I have been de prioritized before it felt exactly the same getting 0.2mbs when I went over 20-21 ish gigs it was miserable both times nothing loaded

        • Scoop003

          It’s not always that you’re being de prioritized. I live in Caldwell, just outside of Boise, and I know that if I go to certain areas of Nampa, the town next to us, I’m going to get crap speeds on LTE. The reason though, is not because of congestion, or prioritization. It’s because AT&T in our area is infringing on the airwaves T-Mobile owns. The solution I’ve found, is to turn off LTE, and run HSPA if I know I’m going to be in that area for awhile. And I know I’m not being de prioritized because I haven’t gone over 15gb, with the exception of March.

    • Andrew Singleton

      go there at 3am and do a speed test.

  • Perry_F

    So who’s to say a tower is congested? How does the consumer verify this? And if a tower is congested on a regular basis then isn’t it time to address the capacity issue rather than penalize the customers who pay for the service?

    I don’t see any carrier refusing to sign up new customers in areas that are known to be congested. And 21gbs is not as much as it seems. If you watcch a few youtube videos daily and add in all the app updates etc.. you will be close if not over the 21gb limit.

    I’ve been with Tmo since the voicestream days and a loyal customer. This leaves a bad taste in my mouth. If you can’t handle the data needs then stop signing up new customers until you improve your capacity. It’s no different than selling 200 tickets on a plane that only has 175 seats.

    • Benny

      Building or expanding a tower is not as easy as what you thought. And cellphones can be taken anywhere anytime. One can sign up in rural area and move to an urban city tomorrow. Stop selling unlimited data or putting a cap is a reasonable measure.

      • Cam Fas

        I say stop selling a product you can’t gurentee but you advertise for

  • drupi79

    how does this affect Family accounts, I use 10 to 15GB per month on my phone only and maybe 1 to 2GB tethering (legally) with my Tablet. now My Wife uses 20 to 30 GB per month just on her iPhone watching movies and TV Shows via Netflix, Hulu+, and from our Plex Server at home. unfortunately they don’t have WI-FI at her work so she is stuck doing it all on LTE.
    so if she breaks the Cap and I don’t will only her phone be deprioritized or both?

    • Benny

      Each line can have its own data plan. I think your line won’t be affected.

    • PMB01

      Maybe she should do her work instead of watching Netflix.

      • drupi79

        oh she does her work but most days she’s twiddling her thumbs waiting for a call. she handles the first calls and service center requests for the second largest alarm provider in the country.

    • Andrew Singleton

      all limits and treatment are line-level, never account level.

  • Botiemaster

    It’s time all involved faced the damn music. On our side: We need to accept that unlimited high speed cannot be a thing. We cannot treat our wireless like home internet. If you’re using 20 GB or more a month then you are treating it like home internet because you like the faster speeds on wireless. We all do if we have lesser ground net. But…bandwidth is what it is, and there’s going to be congestion in certain areas no matter how you slice it.

    On their side, ALL of their sides not just TMO, they need to realize that while their billions in profit is all fine and dandy for them, the pricing needs to change in this industry. We want unlimited data plans, but soft caps need to be in place at which point you get throttled, BUT it’s down to ACCEPTABLE LEVELS, and not just basically be useless, as bad as 2G or even 3G. It must be DSL speeds at the least. Alternatively, do away with unlimited but that doesn’t give you a license to charge an arm and a leg for service. Prices need to come WAY DOWN because as things stand, people are offering unlimited plans with soft caps of 21 GB in place. I’m using TMO for example here.

    That means TMO is offering 21 GB of data at full speed for 30 dollars. 30 fricking dollars. And they all want to charge $10 per GB at the end of the day on other plans, with giving small discounts to people who buy in bulk. This practice has to change. $10 is ridiculous highway robbery when it’s stacked on top of the base pricing. We can live without unlimited full speed data plans, but they have got to be fair about it. They all do, and I for one am sick and tired of them all going unchecked. It is unfortunate that this is something tmo probably does not want to lead the charge on to change because if they lowered their prices to the point that the others want to hire hitmen to take out John(lol), they simply would not have a chance in hell to compete for auctions.

    I get that, but once this next auction is done with, assuming it’s as bad as John leads on being years or decades before another one happens, perhaps then they can turn their attention to raising hell in the market place with fair pricing which would absolutely force ATT and Veri and Sprint to all follow suit or else watch millions after millions flee to TMO. So, go ahead ATT and Veri. I dare you to bid on this upcoming auction to try to block competition further. It’s going to come back to bite you in your ass. You’ll spend 15 billion dollars each on this, but in the end you’re going to lose that cash and even more billions when TMO fucks you back on massive price cuts, to the point that people who can afford a lesser service will choose to do so to save billions of dollars every year. Most people will be able to say yes to weaker coverage in buildings or whatnot if it means spending 50 bucks rather than 100+. Just wait and see.

    • Cam Fas

      Don’t forget when they advertised 247 streaming radio and Netflix when I signed up for unlimited data they bragged about how much you could use I think a 30 gig soft cap would be better 1 gig a day one Netflix show daily when your on the run isn’t excessive maybe a little streaming radio. They bragged about how they had the data strong network and every user had 70percent more capacity then the other guys the ceo kept talking about how they could handle it. Now we can’t have our cake we were promised and eat it too maybe we should also get a 20 percent discount on our bill every time we are throttled why should they get the full bill when we can’t have what were promised in the advertising

      • PMB01

        Streaming music doesn’t count against your data.

      • Cvs5778

        My point exactly. 20 gigs is less than 1 Netflix episode. Forget hd as that would be 3 gigs for 1 hour. Some people are so quick to spout off that 20 gigs is a lot without really thinking about today’s technology and how that amount is easily used in a short period of time.

        • Cam Fas

          Thank you it’s nice to see someone has common sense like me. You hit the nail on the head.

    • compuguy1088

      My confusion in this is that the two biggest carriers on their shared data plans have no soft cap, but its based on a fixed ammount per month + rollover (at least for AT&T). Are they indirectly in a way trying to push heavy data users off the network?

    • Cvs5778

      I have home internet and can easily use more than 20 gigs a month. One 40 minute Netflix episode a day would result in more than 20 gigs a month so there’s your theory.

  • Marco

    Has anyone mentioned that this only applies to users that signed up for service on or after June 12?

  • Botiemaster

    Just for the record, it’s the 100% that’s slowing the networks down, not the 3% going over 21 GBs. I know this violates the point I just made about limited bandwidth, but I’m just trying to be fair in my analysis. 3% of users using say…100 GB a month, isn’t slowing down the network. It’s everyone using the tower that’s slowing down the network. One heavy user suddenly throttled is going to do so very little for everyone else on that tower. It just doesn’t make a difference. What are we talking here at 3%? Like 1.5 million people? Across the country? On thousands of towers? 50 mil total subs right? So about 1.5 mil heavy users. It just doesn’t make a noticeable difference.

    What they(service providers) all should do is stop being dickheads about their pricing, and just offer huge data plans for cheaper for people that want to use wireless for their home internet. That pricing will be expensive to discourage it’s use, but it’s far less than what the carriers want to charge currently. I’m thinking $100 for 50 gigs on top of base pricing. Unlimited is now dangerous ground for carriers. They have to adapt, change prices, and charge a fair premium for users who want better home internet. This way carriers are forced to use their profits to upgrade networks to satisfy demand rather than hoard all of their money to buy out other companies and auctions and whatnot. Imagine that! Carriers need to stop answering the problem of congestion with throttling and start investing money into more towers and upgrading the bandwidth capacity. I’m tired of their shitty ways. All of them.

    When you can afford to spend countless billions of dollars every year because your profits make it possible, no excuse you can ever make will be of any value to me about why you can’t charge less for your services. You’re full of shit. You’ve fooled countless people into believing in that shit. They blindly defend you even though you rape their pockets every month. No excuse will suffice. You’re simply raping America. Profits should be great for you, but not “fuck me this is incredible!!!!” great. No one would let ground ISPs get away with this. Why are we letting YOU?

    I’m not even sure I haven’t fallen for your shit. Like I said in my other post, I seem to think wireless has it’s limits. It kind of does because of the use of towers. But again….buy more land…build more towers…stop hoarding your cash and penalizing users instead of upgrading your networks….you are keeping America in the high speed stone ages. Stop it.

  • Will Fay

    iam useing 74 GB of my tmobile truly unlimited data without be throttling.

    • NorCalOffspring

      And this is why we can’t have nice things

    • PMB01

      Because you aren’t in a congested area.

    • edfranco1

      not for long bud

  • Cam Fas

    Hi I’m Boeing I am going to sell you an airplane it flies at 500mph but on Fridays you can only fly at 250 because other people want to fly but please buy our airplane at full price

    • Medion

      Not the same.

      More like – Here’s a highway. Speed limit is 55mph, and you can drive 55mph anytime you want. However, during times of congestion, traffic lights will activate and you will have to wait until green before proceeding. Once you hit open road, you may continue driving at 55mph.

      • zx6guy

        Not even close. Assuming your bad logic other drivers could drive 55 but you could not. Further there is no “open road” until a new billing cycle starts. Please go play with the kids.

        • Medion

          No, others aren’t driving 55 during congestion.

          And yes, there is an open road. During periods without congestion, you still get max speed after your 21GB.

          Throwing out insults doesn’t make you correct.

        • zx6guy

          Yes they are. The whole point of the cap is to allow those who have not hit it to go faster.

          And if you’ve hit it there is no open road as long as there are other users around you who have not hit theirs and want to use their device.

          Insults? Correct? Lets not pretend these matter. Just be happy that we’re working together and I’m ok with feeding a troll.

        • Andrew Singleton

          wrong. congestion does not mean “at least one other connection.” i dont know what the threshold is, but those who have been deprioritized are only affected during times of the worst congestion. my service usually slows between about 6-9pm, but is super fast the rest of the day. (edit) i should mention i use about 50GBmonth.

        • jack mehoff

          it is not a cap though it is just that you don’t get to use the data first
          . it is more like a road block set up by the cops have a tool see how many miles you drove for the month if you drove over 2100 mile this month he tell you to proceed on to the freeway. If you didn’t drive 2100 miles this month he will direct you to a special hov lane that goes around the congested part the freeway back to a clear part of the freeway there will be a yeild sign at the other end for the regular freeway so freeway traffic will have to yeild right of way to the hov lane. so if others on the regular freeway will have to stop and yield to the hov lane. the ones that drove over 2100 miles can still do the speed limit as long as the other cars are doing the limit, but if it is congested you will have to adjust your speed accordingly. the cops are not saying you can’t do the speed limit but you know if it is congested you can’t do the limit.

  • Matt

    I wonder if this will be applicable to MetroPCS as well.

    • Andrew Singleton

      its already applicable. this has been in effect for a while.

      • Matt

        How do you figure? I’ve routinely used more than 21GB of data w/o throttle on MetroPCS.

        • Andrew Singleton

          1. its not throttling, which helps explain my next point. 2. not all customers are de-prioritized – if there are not other streams demanding large amounts of data, you will see the same speeds you normally see. 3. metropcs is ALREADY de-prioritized in comparison to t-mobile customers, so it would be hard to measure your speed differences.

  • Irfan

    its cheating .

  • Joe

    WTH Speedtest 0.73 Mbps Download, 7.73 Mbps Upload. Downtown LA

    • Andrew Singleton

      put your network preference on gsmcdma. as long as your area has hspa+ you’ll have full speeds restored.

      • Mister Phone

        That might not be the best advice for him if he has a band 12 capable device since he’s in L.A. and L.A. is a band 12 market. By turning off LTE he might run into situations where he might might not have any coverage at all if he’s somewhere where there’s reception on 700Mhz only.

  • Ziich

    I always hit 30 to 40 gbs per month. Guess I will have to switch to WiFi more often

    • PMB01

      Not necessarily. Depends on how busy your area is.

  • JBrowne1012

    This is absolute crap because it’s the truly unlimited 4g plan with happened to no limits? A cap is a cap and a limit BTW

    • PMB01

      This isn’t a cap, bro.

      • D l

        It is a limit though.

        • PMB01

          Not really. You can still use as much data as you want.

  • Tim Furru

    There’s a soft cap of 5 “fucks” per comment. You had 6, you will now be deprioritized. LOL

  • Seabass

    I’m on the grandfathered $70 unlimited plan and I don’t mind this change. I typically use <5 GBs a month and the most I've ever used was 8 GBs.

  • Damn_u

    My speed being throttle so much. I cant even use the web. There’s going to be a class lawsuit against tmobile. Another typical greedy CEO.

    • Andrew Singleton

      swith your phone to gsm/cdma when you experience slower speeds. the limitation only appears to apply to LTE.

  • Don B.

    I am a little over 45gb and haven’t seen to much of a slowdown in my speeds. I am still able to stream video podcast at work without a problem.

    • PMB01

      Then you aren’t in a congested area and not what this is talking about.

  • David Smith

    I don’t see why people don’t get upset when they see stuff like this. You are paying for unlimited lte point blank period, if it’s not unlimited then it should not be called I e unlimited. Smart people start to ask, wtf does unlimited mean then. Im more then willing to pay for real unlimited, just give me a decent price for it. Im so sick of stupid people.

    • Andrew Singleton

      people do…

    • Mark Reese

      would you pay over $100 a line

    • CSR2

      no one is complaining because outside of a small handful people complaining on a blog not to tmobile , no is one being slowed down on unl data at 21 gb lol.

    • edfranco1

      It is unlimited but not unlimited LTE obviously.

      • jack mehoff

        it IS unlimited LTE you just don’t have first dibs to the data pot. it is still super fast as long as a lot of people is not using data. in rural areas you won’t even notice a difference.

  • Daniel Marcus

    It’s worth noting that this is deprioritization, not a “soft cap”. A cap implies that they are actually restricting the data going to your phone (you may receive *n* bytes of data per second). In this case, they are only saying “go to the back of the line”. In other words, your data might end up a bit slower, or your ping times a bit higher than those around you, but remember, the other 97% of the people are sharing all the rest of the bandwidth anyway.

  • fw

    tmo needs an app that monitors usage and cell site traffic that automatically switches your phone to hspa to avoid de-prioritization. they could call it “unlimited AMPED”

  • Kogashuko

    Deprioritization or soft cap, I thought the FCC made it abundantly clear last week that the penalty for doing this is $100 million.

    • D l

      They did.

    • Somebody else just mentioned this to me. They can’t throttle right?

  • CSR2

    this is not true, if it is your sources who are upper past customer service managers, that info has not been passed down, only the original explanation , we sell 21 gb packages so that wouldn’t even make sense. I’ve seen several users above 21 gb since this news broke in heavily populated areas, that have no memo like customers do that have been de-prioritized.

    • Steve Rodriguez

      I believe it only applies to the “Unlimited” customers, not those with set-data plans.

      • CSR2

        i was talking about unlimited customers ive seen plenty use more then 21 gb so it being a soft cap is bs, it depends on where you are using the data.

  • TK – Indy

    Now, to add to the confusion – be aware that T-mobile unlimited does have a hard cap where data stops working completely that is undocumented. If you use 2TB of data in a billing cycle, data will stop. Search XDA for the thread that documents it, and believe it or not, the fellow that it happened to had the ‘nads to complain about it.

    • mingkee

      Do you think who can reach such cap?
      Can a user run a datacenter in a smartphone?
      2TB is next to impossible to reach.

      • dontsh00tmesanta

        I cant even get 500gb at home with all that streaming video and youtube

        • D l

          Well up the Video Quality to 4K and watch you probably go to 750GB-1TB easily. Especially when watching Netflix.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          thats not an issue

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          why? 1080 is more than enough?

        • D l

          Depends on the person. I Find 1080p to be lacking on a Phone and a T.V. for me. Also I just mentioned a Use case where your Data Usage would greatly ramp up just from Video alone.

        • dontsh00tmesanta

          of course 4k will but noone has a 4k phone. pc perhaps

      • D l

        No it’s completely possible. There are many ways to hit that. Like Uploading Videos to YouTube on a Daily Basis. I’ve seen some 4K video that is Raw and had to be uploaded close to 600GBs+

  • Kevin

    lol. people complain about data hogs who congested the network, and when tmobile put cap on it people start whining about throttles.

  • mingkee

    I think this strategy can discourage some data hogs or abusers in busy areas like Downtown Brooklyn, but I have to wait until near the ending of billing cycle when my unlimited is getting close to 21GB, and I will compare the performance with Data Match which has 5GB quota.

  • Nerdlust

    Don’t let the data hogs ruin it for everybody else!

    • edfranco1

      to late its already been done… lucky me, I am on Verizon and now they wont ever lower our prices because of the data hogs.

      • D l

        There is no such thing as a Data hog. Its just corporate greed that is the problem.

      • Cvs5778

        They won’t lower prices because they’re greedy.

    • D l

      There is no such thing as A Data Hog. Someone who uses 300GBs/Month is no different than someone who use just 1GB/Month. All everyone is doing is using a Service they paid for. The Heavy Users aren’t the problem at all anyway. Its the Carriers who won’t actually upgrade or add more towers that are the problem. Hell they won’t even invest into R&D to actually improve the Network to solve these issues. There is already Technology for wireless that will Triple the Bandwidth and handle Congestion better but they refuse to use it not because of Cost but because of greed. Also Data Usage isn’t representative of how much strain it puts on the network.

    • Cvs5778

      You don’t get it. Why is someone a data hog in your eyes? Because they’re using the service they pay for? Don’t get me started on this soft cap? Using less than an hour of Netflix a day will result in hitting the cap in less than 3 weeks. So someone that watches a single 40 minute episode on Netflix daily is a data hog? That’s all it takes to hit this cap, get a life and quit judging people for using a service they PAY for!

      • Salvatore Candeloro

        The people that use the term data hog are people who are used to throwing their money away and then not using the service or merchandise they paid for because they simply don’t believe they deserve it. People don’t even seen when they are being abused and manipulated. Blind ignorance is simply bliss.

        • Cvs5778

          Agreed. That term irks me to no end. Who are they to dictate the way I use a service that I pay for? Pure arrogance.

  • walt

    Just switched on Friday to Crickets $45 5GB plan from T-Mobile’s walmart $30 100 min 5GB plan and already loving that AT&T coverage! My iPhone 6 hasn’t gone below two bars of LTE signal and never fluctuates between LTE/4G HSPA and EDGE like t-mobiles coverage did here in the Akron/Canton Ohio area.

    T-MOBILE you NEED low band spectrum to compete against the big boys! (wish the iphone 6 had band 12) I guess it’s true what they say, you get what you pay for lol

  • Jimmy James

    I am frequently outside at parks or during my lunch and watch Hulu/Netflix. Netlfix uses like 1 to 3 GBs an hour. I also download 320kbps file from Rhapsody or stream it, and this easily has put me at 25GBs or more a month a few times. They underestimated the power of the customers. Forget about using TIDAL Hi-Fi music, that put me over 40GBs one month.

  • Joseph Torres

    Lol what a child, people r cheated out of stuff all the time. Including me, get over it. Besides its only trottled at certain times not after a certain amount was passed for the remainder of the month. They never promised you a certain speed, and if they do then read the fine print “speeds up to”. Lol

    • 561Gunz

      A child? I’m a grown ass man, trust me. And plus, did I ever say I was crying about it? Nope. I just don’t like how companies can get away with things like this, promise you one thing, then outta the blue change up. And what really sucks about it all at the end of the day is that there isn’t anything that you can do about it. Either suck it up, or leave to go to another crappy company.

      • Joseph Torres

        Alright.

  • J.R. Reyes

    Shoot and I use 20 gb in less than a week on Cricket Wireless Advanced plan.

  • Rheta

    T-Mobile sells smartphones loaded with apps which use lots of data…especially Galaxy by Google and also iphones & HTC. I have “Truly Unlimited” and was told that’s as high as you can go yet and I was throttled. I bought phone from T-mobile and have been a customer since 2002. I live in a high use area. It is awful

  • Davy

    Wow, it’s amazing how these top companies have brainwashed the masses. What’s the point of a smart phone? Why have one if I’m going to be limited with what I can do with it? Why claim to have the best, and the fastest network when I can’t sit back and enjoy it due to idiotic restrictions pushed by greed. If I pay for unlimited I expect to get unlimited. There is no such thing as a data hog, we’re just using what we pay for, I pay for unlimited and dam it I will use as much as I want whenever I please. The only reason people today use less data with certain carriers is due to their caps, and of course the masses bend over and take it. The only reason price doesn’t go down is because of greed. I have tmobile and use between 20 to 30gb a month due to my job since I’m always out on the road. I live in NYC so it works perfectly for me and I have yet to run into issues regarding their service or coverage. I love my unlimited service and I will sure use the hell out of it every month without any worries ever that I’ll be slowed down.

    • Cvs5778

      I completely agree. I hate when people use the term “data hog”. I have home wifi and still use a ton of lte data. Why? Because I pay for it and I refuse to let anyone make me feel bad about it!

    • Salvatore Candeloro

      So t-mobile advertised unlimited plans about two years ago. Gained how many new customers and had old customers up their plans for the great bargain? Now their merger with Metro PCS had them advertising unlimited high speed data plans again, gaining how many thousands of new customers???? Now at 21gigs, sorry we can’t give you high speed anymore. I did not get a price change memo, or refund for my now lessor plan. They deliberately sold the plans, then deliberately sold the plans again under Metro PCS, then took the plans away with no compensation. THIS IS AGAINST THE LAW AND WORDING THE POLICY A CERTAIN WAY DOES NOT GET THEM OFF THE HOOK. This is grounds for a class action suit. I will bet there is a legal team already working on it. Saying their network is conjested IS AN EXCUSE. The company sold the plans, therefore the network should be able to handle the volume. Afterall, this is their business, they should know what their network capacity is. Accepting their excuses as rational responses is ignorant. They are a huge technological corporation. They know exactly what they are doing. Americans can still be so gullible and just accept the lies and bait and swith they are given. If 1,000,000 customers left t-mobile and Metro PCS, they would be gone. Plain and simple. They need to honor the plans they sold people or renegotiate the pricing on the plans, since the plans ARE not what was sold.

  • Salvatore Candeloro

    So t-mobile advertised unlimited plans about two years ago. Gained how many new customers and had old customers up their plans for the great bargain? Now their merger with Metro PCS had them advertising unlimited high speed data plans again, gaining how many thousands of new customers???? Now at 21gigs, sorry we can’t give you high speed anymore. I did not get a price change memo, or refund for my now lessor plan. They deliberately sold the plans, then deliberately sold the plans again under Metro PCS, then took the plans away with no compensation. THIS IS AGAINST THE LAW AND WORDING THE POLICY A CERTAIN WAY DOES NOT GET THEM OFF THE HOOK. This is grounds for a class action suit. I will bet there is a legal team already working on it. Saying their network is conjested IS AN EXCUSE. The company sold the plans, therefore the network should be able to handle the volume. Afterall, this is their business, they should know what their network capacity is. Accepting their excuses as rational responses is ignorant. They are a huge technological corporation. They know exactly what they are doing. Americans can still be so gullible and just accept the lies and bait and swith they are given. If 1,000,000 customers left t-mobile and Metro PCS, they would be gone. Plain and simple. They need to honor the plans they sold people or renegotiate the pricing on the plans, since the plans ARE not what was sold.

    • tnt

      I completely agree. I have 2 months with the $80 umlmited data plan and its worse than when i had the $60 plan (5gb). Tmobile is defrauding me! They should be upheld to the contract i, and they agreed to at the time of my purchase. Just tried to post my comment and was notified there is a problem with my internet connection. (im at 10gb) of usage!!!!

    • Salvatore Candeloro

      I have written to the FCC. I have been contacted by TM, which of course was some phone clerk reading his computer screen why deprioritising happens. I called TM twice and got the same song and dance from very nice automatons that have no power to do anything. I continue to search the Internet for the class action suit OR to see what actions customers have taken. It is funny to Google angry TM customers and see what they have done to TM stores. People are outraged. Between the government lying about everything and corperations blatantly ripping customers off, I’m not surprised in the least some of the actions people are taking around the country. I’m actually surprised there isn’t more chaos.

    • “The company sold the plans, therefore the network should be able to handle the volume.”

      Isn’t that a bit like joining a health club then complaining that the machines are all busy when you want to use them? I’m not sure that the club would be responsible for being busy. Why not try another carrier?

  • NardVa

    I’ve been getting throttled every month since T-Mobile put the 21GB limit in place. My phone becomes useless for streaming YouTube. They keep saying the De-prioritization is only happening when the tower is congested, but I stay throttled all day where ever I go.