T-Mobile’s data de-prioritization (aka “throttling” high users) – Explained

antenna

Just a couple of days before T-Mobile’s first quarterly earnings call of 2015 a thread on Reddit got our attention. Within it, a customer complained of being “throttled” when – in fact – he was feeling the result of data de-prioritization. It seemed like – from what he understood – that he’d hit some magic, hidden number of GBs in downloads on LTE and had been punished for it. What in fact had happened is that he felt the result of one of T-Mobile’s lesser-known network traffic easing policies. Known as de-prioritization, it’s a way to ensure someone’s incredibly heavy use doesn’t affect the experience of other, less data-intensive customers using a busy network.

We didn’t get an official response from T-Mobile on this issue but, thankfully, our sources have done some digging and come up with a few good explainers within T-Mo’s policies, guidelines and internal communications. It seems a small, but growing number of customers have been complaining about reduced data speeds in recent times.

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What is Data Prioritization?

Simply put, T-Mobile has a policy in place where, if you’re in the top 3% of data users, your access to data is prioritized below other people’s. There’s a practice in place which flags these users on the system. It’s given a brief mention in the “About T-Mobile” page under the consumer tab:

“To provide a good service experience for the majority of our customers, and minimize capacity issues and degradation in network performance, we may manage network traffic through prioritization. This means that customers who use more data than what is used by 97% of what all customers use in a given month, based on recent historical averages, might in some cases have their data usage prioritized below the data of other customers during times and in places of network contention. (Customers who use data in violation of their Rate Plan terms or T-Mobile’s Terms and Conditions may be excluded from this calculation.) “

Now, this is worked out on a month-by-month basis. Customers that are flagged for using more data than 97% of customers in a given month will be reset at the beginning of their next bill cycle. Sadly, there’s no specific figure in GBs downloaded to go by. Nothing anywhere that says that if you hit 20GB, you get throttled. It doesn’t work that way. It’s based on percentages. And chances are, if you use 20GB of mobile data in a month, you’re in the top 3%.

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Will I feel the effect?

The answer to that is “probably not”. First off, it’s very unlikely that you’re in the top 3% of data users unless you’re going crazy downloading tons of content over LTE. Secondly, it depends very much on what the network conditions are like in your area and how many people are using the same cell tower at once. If you’re a high user in an area where the network is unlikely to feel the effects of congestion, you won’t notice much difference, if any at all.

T-Mobile notes in its communication to staff that the “overwhelming majority of customers that have their data requests de-prioritized are in places of normal network contention. This means that while they may see their speeds drop a bit and will be slower than other folks on that tower, they are still getting really strong data speeds (and are not likely to call in to Care).”

Network contention is where multiple users are trying to access the same tower at the same time. Congestion is when there are so many that services/speeds are impacted.

In most cases, during normal contention, the difference in speed should be small enough that customers won’t even notice the difference. As an example, once customer might be getting 20Mbps download speeds while the de-prioritized next is getting 10-12Mbps.

During these busy times, if you’re in that 3% of high users, your access to the network is seen as less of a priority that those who use much less data.

Congestion doesn’t happen everywhere and only affects a small number of towers. But these are the areas where customers are more than likely going to feel the pinch of drastically reduced speeds if they have been de-prioritized. In many cases, in these heavily congested areas, speeds could be around or below 1Mbps.

De-prioritized customers will – more than likely – see their speeds increase during the evenings and weekends when the networks aren’t as busy. The traffic alleviating measures only really kick in during busy times and on busy sites.

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“This is NOT a throttle”

T-Mobile has reiterated a number of times that it doesn’t “throttle” customers. And, as much as this might feel like being throttled to the high users in congested areas, it isn’t. In fact, in T-Mobile’s systems, customer accounts which have been de-prioritized will have a flagged notice which makes it clear that it isn’t a throttle, and that they are being bumped down the network access priority list for using a lot of data. Unlike throttling, which effects a customer regardless of how busy or quiet the local network is. This is an effort to stop congestion from having a serious impact on the network performance rather than being a blanket targeting of every single high data user.

Brandon, the original poster on Reddit stated later on that he spoke to someone from John Legere’s office who reiterated as much to him.

Long story short: Don’t worry about it unless you’re constantly watching movies over LTE and you live in a busy area.

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  • simcity

    if t-mobile throttles people who uses a lot of data, they should change the name of the plan from unlimited to limited. Otherwise this is miss advertising. Don’t promise something that you can’t do.

    • Tyler Smith

      You must not have read the article. It isn’t throttling. It’s a network management practice so the few can’t ruin the network for the many.

      • jakematic

        Precisely.
        Same reason the guy who eats 17 plates of crab legs at the ‘all you can eat’ buffet is asked to leave…

        • MKashi

          if he’s asked to leave, he gets a refund on the way out right?

        • jakematic

          Absolutely not.
          He’s consumed what he paid for and then some, so there is no responsibility on the business’ part to compensate a hog.
          The entitlement of some people is mindboggling…

        • MKashi

          I agree he was eating far more than average people, but the offer was “Unlimited” and if the service cannot offer that, then a refund is warranted, at least from a legal perspective. The buffet must have done the math and seen that there will be a few food hogs and several small kids, and come up with a cost structure that handle these outliers.

          I would think this analogy doesn’t apply straight to data throttling, it would be more like if there are 20 crab legs on the buffet table, one person cannot take all 20 in one go but leave some for others. But he should be allowed to (after others have taken their portion) wait for the next batch and continue eating. Not take all the crab legs coming in from the kitchen every time.

        • jakematic

          Then I suggest you try just that.
          Don’t forget to sue for pain and suffering, and mental anguish.
          There is something called ‘reasonable expectation’ which people need to get a grip on and is upheld in a court of law.

          T-Mobile and other carriers detail all of this in the fine print of the agreement you sign when you join them as a customer.

          Oh and don’t forget to dial 911 or 112 because the phone company or restaurant didn’t do exactly what you wanted :)

        • MKashi

          so because I faulted your analogy I have to go and test it out? I’m willing to bet that any buffet that asks a person to leave for eating 17 plates of crab legs would rather refund the person and not allow him access in the future than risk any legal hassles from his eviction. I didn’t say they had to tolerate him every time all the time, but that on his final visit if he was asked to leave he would be given a refund for that visit, which is a reasonable thing to do.

          Like I said, the buffet analogy doesn’t apply to T-mobile data throttling. Don’t mix them both and say that buffets have fine prints and ToS. Its a freaking buffet for around $15, they’d rather lose that $15 once.

        • jakematic

          You have faulted nothing, you simply say that everyone deserves the maximum at no cost to them because they do not understand the semantics of advertising, nor read the contract they signed.

          There is actually a ToS for the buffet in the example. They have the right to refuse service to anyone for any reason.

        • MKashi

          lol, you really think the signs on bars and other establishments that state “We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone” is actually a legal ToS? It’s actually illegal in many states to refuse service for “any” reason, it has to be something explicit like intoxication or violence. Nowhere would “he eats too much” stand any legal scrutiny. “They have the right to refuse service to anyone for any reason” would never stand legal challenge, even if the buffet owners wanted it to.

          I do not state everyone deserves maximum at no cost, but that if a person was asked to leave a buffet because he “ate too much” then he is entitled to a refund as the service he was there for was not satisfied. I didn’t say anything about T-mobile or its throttling practices. It’s not entitlement when someone promises a buffet and you are asked to leave before you’ev had your fill for eating too much. After all the person did pay for entry right?

        • jakematic

          Actually it is legal to refuse service, and we business owners know that.

          The reality is in the example cited most establishments would in fact refund the money when the arrogant customer became belligerent, even though it was not deserved, and ban them from returning. Simple as that.

          Nothing is truly unlimited, and customers should never have an expectation that it is; whether it is bites or bytes.

    • besweeet

      How so? You have an unlimited data plan, of which you’re still getting after being prioritized differently.

      • Unlimited is not the same as “unconstrained in all ways”, although carriers are happy for you to imagine that’s what it is when purchasing a plan.

        • besweeet

          I suppose you’re right. The main thing people are referring to when using the term “unlimited” is data usage more so than data speeds, neither of which are *technically* unlimited (1TB usage cap + speed prioritization).

  • brybry

    Uh it is throttling if your data is being slowed down

    • Verizonthunder

      Wrong it’s choking not throttling.

      • brybry

        same premise if it’s slowing you down

        • Verizonthunder

          I was using a more dramatic effect to this issue which still plagues T-Mobile.

        • KingofPing

          3% of any population is hardly considered a plague.

          Please leave the dramatics to the middle-school kids.

        • Verizonthunder

          You did not read carefully this issue concerning whether or not T-Mobile throttles true unlimited data customers which is a valid concern.

        • KingofPing

          You are claiming “I didn’t read” because I pointed out you and brybry can’t seem to pass up an opportunity to get over-dramatic?

          Isn’t that…special…

    • KingofPing

      So…

      You have no idea what an actual throttle is, do you?

  • Aurizen

    my speed is fine its really good, but I noticed texts are being delayed I’m getting texts from ppl late not sure if thats me or them. I’m in the philly area

    • SEBA

      This s**t happens more frequently lately. I had the same problems.

      • Aurizen

        Really? wow so it isn’t me! I contacted John Legere but he never got back to me.

        • thepanttherlady

          I’ve been having the same issues. Texts not coming through at all or spaced out over hours. Yesterday alone someone sent me a long text and this is how I received them:

          2/4
          1/4

          almost 3 hours later:

          1/2 (new texts)
          3/4 (from the original 4)

          2 hours later:

          2/2

          Never did receive 4/4

        • Pengko

          i guess t-mobile is trying to de-prioritize these few kb of data too… lol. Been happening to me a lot. Some messaging apps have it worse with none sent or when its sent theres a double text.

        • Aurizen

          yeah I’ve been having the same issue with double text too, I messaged John Legere and Cam on twitter but no response.. this is very annoying cuz i cant tell whats going though. or if people I’m texting are speaking in riddles.

        • SEBA

          Now you know why i didn’t reply.

        • MKashi

          maybe you contacted him via text?

        • thepanttherlady

          Hahaha!!

  • besweeet

    Didn’t Legere say that this is done on a site-by-site basis, rather than their customer base as a whole? All of this seems slightly blown out of proportion IMO.

    • KingofPing

      Well, as described, it would be both.

      Whole: Top 3% is likely determined across the entirety of the network.

      Site-by-Site: Prioritization occurs at the cell-site level, based on that particular site’s traffic (only highly congested towers).

    • Cam Bunton

      Yep, it’s why it doesn’t matter as much if you’re in the top 3%. If you’re not using a congested site/tower, you won’t feel any effects of the policy.

  • benben

    T mobile is playing games they won’t send you a msg that saying that you are being throttled so no onei s gonna be able to make any accusation

    • Fabian Cortez

      T mobile is playing games they won’t send you a msg that saying that you are being throttled so no onei s gonna be able to make any accusation

      Did you even read the article?

  • SEBA

    I would assume if you are heavy LTE user , data speeds and unlimited plan matter for you the most. It’s part of the reason customer chosen Tmobile over other carriers.

  • tB

    Good! Now all the asshats who buy a phone & then run their entire home network from it tethered will have to shit or get off the pot & but a hotspot & wont be able to cripple data speeds for all of us ‘normal’ mobile users!

    • Willie D

      Why would you assume hotspot is the reason for high usage. Even less than 3% users are using hotspot at home anyway, so little in fact that they have already been discovered abd kicked off network, de-prioritized, throttled or are still using so little it doesn’t impact the network as a whole. Facts! Get yours.

      • I am not sure what you are saying. Hotspot is explicitly part of the plan that I am paying for. I pay for it because I use it. And they certainly don’t kick me off the network for it either. Granted, I am not using 20 GB a month and I don’t stream movies or anything like that. But still, Hotspot is covered and acceptable use depending on your plan.

        • Acdc1a

          Hotspot through your T-Mobile app is included and limited to 5GB. Certain others use other apps to get around that limit.

        • Willie D

          What the comment below mine says. Legal Hotspot is limited to whatever your data plan allows if you are on a tiered data plan, or 5GB usage on an unlimited data plan. That said, there are a few, very few in fact that use tethering work-arounds, illegal tethering, etc. Which is in this case what I referred to as people who have been kicked off for breaching the T&C’s of the monthly contract terms of T-Mobile.

        • Thanks for clarifying.

      • tB

        You obviously didn’t even read (or understand?) my post.. I said people tethering from their phones and running an entire home network from it.. for gaming, torrents & the like. That’s not what its intended for & a burden on the network!

        • Willie D

          Uhh, yes I did read AND understand what your post. I retorted with, “Even less than 3% users are using hotspot at home anyway…” emphasis on “..hotspot at home..” meaning someone who is running a whole house on a single hotspot tether on their device, legally OR illegally. I am very well aware of insinuations, innuendos and metaphorical colored language, so don’t sit and try to insult me. I am also very well aware what networks are capable of, what they can handle, and what intent of the network is for. The intent of T-Mobile’s network is for data, they tout it themselves. DataStrong. Can’t be upset for telling us to use the hell out of it when we do, regardless how we do it. You can however kick off those who are using it illegally – and believe me, all the root and secret tether methods in the world don’t hide that data usage, packet streams, port numbers, and IP addresses from T-Mobile. They know, and have kicked off many of the illegal tethering users. Those who are still connected, clearly are not using enough to get caught, meaning, they are not a burden. So please think of something new than blaming “hotspot” usage. It clearly is not as prevalent as you believe it to be.

  • Pengko

    de-prioritized aka throttle… verizon tried to pull this crap on their grandfathered unlimited data users… i left them when the first announced it. Several months after they retracted it saying they wont do it. T-mobile better change this before i leave them. This is such a “carrier” practice. If you are on unlimited chances are you will be de-prioritized since the majority of users are on 2.5 – 3gb data plans on which they base the top tier data users. I wouldnt have such a big problem with this but you dont hear tier data users complaining about throttling…This is the same crap verizon tried to pull on their unlimited data users.

    BTW, I get “de-prioritized” just going past 5 gbs… I get consistant 20mbps to 24mbps at home then throttle down to 12mbps after i pass that 5gb mark. And this is not at peak times.
    Seriously, t-moble needs to own up to its brand…

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      Can you really tell the difference between 24 and 12mbps? If you can its because your torrenting, which is against the t&c anyway

      • Craig Foster

        I could deal with 12 mbps. My throttling was .05 mbps.

      • Pengko

        since you made the assumption that i torrent for some reason… i will make the assumption that you dont watch any videos or stream media and are clueless about speeds. Youtube videos can go up to 1440p with my note 4 is just one example. Not to mention 1080 at 12mbps with network congestion. Pretty much unusable.

  • brybry

    The whole point of T-mobile LTE was consume as much as you want when ever you want on the FASTEST LTE Network.
    DE-prioritizing your data because you’re using it the way they wanted you to use it when they initially signed you up is ridiculous.

  • TK – Indy

    Three-percenters, unite! #WeGotStopped

  • Anthony S Jennings

    Prioritization is temporary and inconsistent. Throttling is permanent and consistent. If what you are experiencing feels like “throttling” and it happens to you permanently and consistently, please leave T-Mobile. I don’t want you screwing up the quality of my access to any T-Mobile tower’s resources.

  • Adrayven

    It’s called being a good neighbor by not hogging the freaking road.. I see this as a good thing. Only people that don’t are by nature data hogs..

    This example actually takes into account average data used.. Which means the more data we ALL use, the more the top tier (3%) can use..

    This makes complete sense to me because it doesn’t artificially cap (5GB, as ATT does) overall consumer usage! it’s based on the mass-consumer average and making sure the average user gets consistent and good service.

    nice work T-mobile.

    • Pengko

      and the majority average will be around 3gb giver or take to 5gb and skewed towards that spectrum since the majority will always be tiered data users. Unlimited data users will always be a minority and a target for slowdowns. A little unfair to base it on this.

    • MKashi

      so I guess if we’re using averages and restricting data for the top 3% then the top 3% should encourage everyone else to use more data!! :)

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      This difference is people don’t pay to drive on a road. If I paid $30 a month to have more access to a road than other people who used it for free, I wouldnt expect to be forced to stay in the slow lane

      • David Thoren

        You pay for fuel (or electricity if you drive an EV which are more range limited anyway) and maintenance. You want to use the road more, then you are going to be paying more in fuel and causing more wear on your vehicle. There are more reasons your reasoning fails, but I think that will cover it for now.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          That’s a horrendous analogy. Its true that using a road more will result in higher personal expenses for the user, the difference is that people who use the road the most aren’t banned from using it when its congested with light users.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          Just as how the expenses of services that use data (netflix/hulu, internet radio, etc.) are the users’ responsibility and are independent of their paid data plan, a persons’ expenses incurred from driving are their responsibility and are independent from any costs incurred for access to the road (tolls, local/state taxes etc.) Those factors cancel each other out and therefore are not relevant to this discussion. the comparison that is being drawn is that while people who use data the most are being deprioritized in favor of lighter users, people who drive on roads the most arent deprioritized or in anyway having their access to said roads restricted in favor or lighter users. Should the 3% of people who drive the most not be allowed on highways during rush hour?

        • David Thoren

          You can’t really separate the user expenses from the taxes since they are, in most cases, pretty strongly linked in the form of gas tax. But I get your meaning. Think of it this way then, you still get access to the roads and highways, but I’ve never seen a big rig (by far the greatest users of our highways) in the (generally faster) carpool lanes.

  • Nate33ju

    I applaud this.
    3% should not screw the rest of us..

    • MKashi

      it’s tricky when they come up with a number 3% … 3% of users across a cellsite or city or the whole network? measured across a month – that might not be easy to calculate as users typically have staggered billing cycles and get reset accordingly.

      • KingofPing

        Whole network. “97% of all customers”

        This is why it’s most likely not 30GB. It’s more like 300,

        • MKashi

          did Legere say it was calculated at the cellsite layer though?

        • KingofPing

          The about page clearly states “all customers”.

  • Agree

    I agree with this. It ticks me off when things come to a crawl because of users that inhale gigabytes of data screwing it up for the rest of us.

    • Jeff Timm

      Have you considered that people’s usage and access to the internet differ from yours? I rent a furnished room in a nice house. My landlord, who is ten years older than I (60ish) refuses to let me pay for or install wired broadband here because of past problems with her family members. I also have not been allowed to bring my TV from storage to my room. Tethering my PC to my phone is my only source for entertainment. Yes, I do YouTube. And USENET. And maybe a torrent every now and then. I’m on the top tier, don’t mind paying for it, but I wish they would give me 50 Gb. instead of 20 Gb. When Comasscast was capping families of four at 250Gb people screamed bloody murder. 20 Gb. is 1/12 of 250, not 1/4. Drop your home internet for a bit (just don’t use it) and tether for a month. See how much you have to give up to stay under the cap. Have a heart, there are many of us that are not as fortunate as you. @KingofPing:disqus – I’m not being a”dick”, just USING what I PAID FOR!

  • Willie D

    So since TMo is mainly in populated urban areas, only recently expanding rural network, the point you made is that, EVERY user will be in a high busy area. Hello!!!
    As for 20GB being “high”, I suggest you look at TMo stats more, while the average data user on other carriers will be 2-8GB of unlimited data, or tiered plan data, TMo boats at least 2x that with its customers on unlimited data plans, stated in Uncarrier events, and that unlimited customers account for about 20% of their data user base.
    My real issue is that if low-data usage customers aren’t using that much data to begin with, why should they be prioritized since clearly they aren’t using enough to even see what a speed experience is or can be. As if to them it makes any difference if THEY were 20mbps or 10mbps, they don’t use enough data to be a priority anyway.

    • MKashi

      true, even John Legere claimed he used over 50GB a month watching videos.. can’t imagine 20GB being the 3% mark. Also, is the 3% mark per cellsite, per city or across the whole network?

      • KingofPing

        Whole network. We’re talking about people downloading 100’s of GB a month.

        Do they have every right to? You bet.

        Does that mean their usage should negatively impact other users? No.

        (It’s the simple “don’t be a dick” policy every single person on the planet knows about, whether or not they choose to follow it)

      • brybry

        you can stream an hour of ESPN and it’ll be over a gig

        • gmo8492

          Streamed 3 movies on Netflix in a day which consumed around 5GBs. It’s really easy to go over 20GB within a few of weeks or even days.

      • Willie D

        John Legere is a little different, hes the CEO of the company, his account isn’t flagged for anything, so he can use what he wants. I doubt his usage even is combined into the system to average out.

    • Scoop003

      The reason the upper 3% are targeted, is because that’s a lot less customers to piss off as opposed to 97%. Losing 97% of your customers as opposed to 3% would be a huge problem. And I’m assuming Cam just pulled 20GB out of his ass. It very well could be more. He was clear in starting only the top 3%, so odds are, it doesn’t affect you.

      • Cam Bunton

        Yep. Like I said, there is not specific figure in terms of GBs. 20GB was the figure hit by the original poster on Reddit. So I used it as a simple, round number.

    • dtam

      think about it the other way….tmo knows they don’t use a lot, so they can get network priority and be done with whatever they are doing sooner. kind of makes perfect sense

      • Willie D

        I understand that point of view, but if they haven’t been doing much using of the data anyway, why would they need to get done sooner? Wouldn’t it make sense to let the data hog get done, and off the network sooner? Kinda like how Comcast has BLAST, for increased speeds to get through medium sized files to get people OFF the network downloading over and over, faster, so others can use it. Simple, increase the capacity, from one site to another. None of this would really matter if T-Mobile kept their HotSpot network, similarly to how AT&T has AT&T WiFi which would allow users to use that, unlimited, freely, till their hearts content, to download all they need to. By having their own WiFi network like before, which ironically was inclusive of T-Mobile Total Internet plans, users have the best of both, and the devices are already set to turn on and off WiFi and LTE based on the strength of the connection and data usage anyway…so it goes hand in hand. So instead of focusing on making LTE better than it already is, take at least 20% of that team to work on rekindling their WiFi, and competing against AT&T that way. Also helps to get calls OFF the network, saving bandwidth, and onto WiFi. A Win Win for us all.

        • dtam

          agree with a WiFi network.

          the data hog is probably streaming videos or something which means it’ll take them longer to get done. it makes more sense to help as many people as possible.

          if you were at a McDonalds and the person ahead of you ordered 50 sausage mcmuffins, and then you and 9 other people behind you ordered 1 mcmuffin, do you think McD’s would be better served to be solely concentrating on making those 50 for the first person or designate 1 of their workers to work on the first order and then 2 workers to fill the orders of the 10 people? would you rather have 1 pissed off customer or 10?

        • orlando duran

          The WiFi uses the same network. ..it’s all one network

  • Tim

    That’s BS. If I pay the same as everyone else for my data it shouldn’t matter how much I use compared to the rest. I only use 8GB a month and have encountered slow enough connection to where I can’t even load a website with full coverage.

    • Pengko

      the only way that will make it fair for all users is that tmobile slows down everyone during peak or heavy used network making speeds consistent and available for all users then release slowdown after peak hours. Otherwise, it will just target unlimited data users… we shouldnt get the boot and we paided for more data too. Meanwhile, tier data users wont ever have slowdowns.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        The policy they have in place is fine.

      • Chad Vincent

        They do slow down everyone. This doesn’t kick in until there’s no more speed to hand out. Then, as they slow down everyone, they slow down people who are in the top 3% more than the others.

    • Scoop003

      Don’t like it, switch to Verizon’s unlimited plan. Oh wait, they don’t have one. Ok, switch to AT&T. Oh, they don’t have one either. Fine. Ask yourself, how much more would you have paid to use 8GB on AT&T or Verizon. Now, either go fork over all that extra cash to them for the same service, or quit your bitching, and realize that you’re getting a great deal with T-Mobile.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Exactly.

        100 GB on Verizon is only $750 a month. And that’s without the $40 smartphone monthly access fee.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Sprint could be OK for some. They should consider them if it bothers them so much. It bothers me, but i realize it is going to be this way regardless of the carrier. This includes Sprint.

    • Jay J. Blanco

      You sound very selfish….So you feel that it’s okay to use 100GB degrading the speeds of everyone eale trying to access the tower. They pay their bills like you and deserve decent speeds.

      • Don Goyo

        “They pay their bills like you and deserve decent speeds.” This is something Tmobile should fix, not Tim. Tim (as any other customer) was offered an Unlimited service and he should be able to use it, and not being blamed for the slow speeds the (cheap) 1GB plan users are getting. You offer Unlimited, make sure you can provide it or improve the capacity.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Its to benefit all the customers not just one

          If you guys don’t like it leave

        • Don Goyo

          very clever…

        • Fabian Cortez

          I doubt customers will be seeing this prioritization in the long run.

          Prioritization is the effect, not the cause. The cause is insufficient back haul.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Did you not read what you signed?

  • benny

    Unlimited high speed data is false advertisement then. tmo has to disclose this hidden policy. I still hope tmo stop selling unlimited high speed data plan.

    • KingofPing

      Not really hidden if it is described in detail on their “about” page…

    • Chris

      Don’t think you understood how network prioritization works.

      You’re still getting your high speed data. It just depends on where you are in the network queue.

      Like the article says, you probably won’t even feel it for the most part.
      And I doubt 20 GB is on their top 3%. I’ve used 20 GB a month for the most part and still don’t feel that my data is de-prioritized.

      • benny

        Do you think you can simplify “Unlimited high speed but has to yield when congestion occurs if you are on top 3%” to “Unlimited high speed”?

        • Frankwhitess

          I can simplify it for you very well!!! ” switch to Verizon :)”

      • Fabian Cortez

        You’re still getting your high speed data. It just depends on where you are in the network queue.

        It also depends on the site as well. You could easily travel to the next cell site and be back to your regular high speed data.

    • dtam

      it’s disclosed in their docs

      • benny

        Yes. I saw that. But when was it on there? They should have put it in data plan description pages. I think tmo’s intention was to deceive customers by placing that important thing into separate non-relative information page so nobody or only few people would see.

        • dtam

          seriously? please feel free to move to a carrier that doesn’t do this, oh wait, most of them are even more extreme on their practices

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yeah, like $15 per GB overage that goes into effect once you go 1 kB over your bucket.

          Gotta love Verizon and American Thugs & Thieves. Oh yeah, and Sprint.

        • jay

          I haven’t ran into any issues with sprint throttling me. I mainly stream music all day and I have used 20gb in a month before without any issues. Verizon and att will destroy you

        • Fabian Cortez

          I haven’t ran into any issues with sprint throttling me. I mainly stream music all day and I have used 20gb in a month before without any issues. Verizon and att will destroy you

          Would you read the aticle? T-Mobile isn’t throttling anyone.

          Sprint prioritizes all the time. Go look at all of those EDGE-like speed tests all over the net. They’re usually on those congested Band 25 cell sites.

          Backhaul.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Sprint does prioritize very quickly, I know I experienced it heavily on Phoenix when I was there a few months ago.

        • jay

          Oh soo sorry i used the wrong word. I haven’t experienced any of these issues with the usage on my speed. Also I was talking about the overage and throttling comment I responded to.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Oh okay. Your comment makes sense now.

        • Frankwhitess

          Let’s go benny.. Send me your info… My goal is to get you off this network by 6pm… I want Verizon to show you the Value of life :) … What phone do you have?? Have a few friends that need a good phone..

    • Jay J. Blanco

      It’s not false advertising at all.

    • Frankwhitess

      Benny , do the world a favor and just switch.. Send me your zip code and I will reply to the nearest Verizon store… Your complaining is disturbing… If you don’t like t mobile,.. Stop crying and go pay triple the price… Don’t worry.. Verizon will take very Good Care of you ;) … And if your interested in selling your phone, feel free to reply back to me :)

  • Nicholas Igziabeher

    its crazy because i have only use about 5 g so far and i have only been with them for about 3 months so its not they have accurate descrition of y usage pattern,and my service has be trottled until i am having a bad time even opening up a page, yesterday and that area i alwayed get full bars, i know it wasn’t the phone i have had delayed texts and all that because of slow network. unlimited is misleading advertisement, they claim to be different but just like other carriers, as bad as verizon is at least i know what i am paying for

    • Cam Bunton

      Not all slow speeds are down to this policy. It could simply be that you’re in an area that’s either congested, or not very fast.

      • Anthony S Jennings

        True. As an example, during the first Obama inauguration, I was on T-Mobile prepaid paying by the day for access to data-voice-text. T-Mobile’s coverage on the Mall was jammed to over capacity. Everyone on T-Mobile experienced difficulty that day, but those who were on the most expensive post-paid plans had no problems at all with T-Mobile as they were prioritized over everyone else: prepaid monthly, roamers, pay-by-the-day.

        As I was on the last one there, I was only able to make calls. Data speeds for me dropped to next to nothing. For example, it took about 20 minutes for a picture I took to upload to twitpic. I wasn’t throttled (my speeds improved dramatically when I moved one block away from the crowds), but more importantly, I wasn’t capped/cut-off. I was de-prioritized based on the fact I was not paying as much as others for access to the service.

        It’s like a road that has free lanes and toll lanes. You have access to the entire road, you’re not being cut off because you don’t want to pay the toll. However, those who pay the toll can drive faster, say 65mph, since they’re paying for access. Free users are slowed to 45mph. You’re being managed ([de] prioritized), not throttled. Your car can still drive 65mph. The toll road didn’t change your car in any way because you chose not to pay.

      • Nicholas Igziabeher

        It’s been fine for the first 2 months so your statement doesn’t apply to my situation, all of a sudden my area got contested,

  • tB

    All these people who’ve never worked in the industry, and even worse never read the policies & procedures (or understand them for that matter) is erroneous! TMO is not at fault in any way.

    • orlando duran

      You are absolutely correct

    • Hector Arteaga

      I can roll with this.

  • Adam

    Duck test fail. Prioritization looks like throttling, swims like throttling, and quacks like throttling. This confirms what many assumed, that it is not profitable to provide truly unlimited data.

    • kevev

      Throttling is where your available bandwidth is limited/capped while ignoring the actual load on the tower. T-Mobile is actually performing network managing. Not sure how the new FCC rules would govern this.

      • Adam

        If any rules are broken it would be California Business and Professions Code, the strongest State truth in advertising law. The argument would be that the big two are injured because customer are tricked into moving to T-Mobile because the material terms are hidden in fine print, but I doubt such an argument would hold up in court.

        The only difference between what T-Mobile and AT&T did with limiting bandwidth is the T-Mobile model is more efficient. I assume this is simply the result of better technology, definitely not some type of moral high ground.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You’re sorely illinformed.

        • Adam

          Just basing my info on the internet.

      • Hector Arteaga

        But that’s not true at all, when VZW introduced throttling for unl users, they explained that it would only be done in congested sites. Which can be done.

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      There is a huge difference. Throttling is when you get limited to a specific bandwidth after using a specific amount of data with no variables. Network management lowers the bandwidth allocation of the top users (whose total usage is variable). Their throughput and whether or not they are even experiencing limited bandwidth allocation is entirely subject to network conditions, with throttling there are no additional factors. You are limited to a specific speed until your bill cycle hits.

      • Adam

        The effective difference between the T-Mobile and AT&T policies was the rate at which customers use less data. The reason for both policies was the same: get the least profitable customers to use less data so they return to profitability.

        • Fabian Cortez

          get the least profitable customers to use less data so they return to profitability.

          Except unlimited high speed data users are the most profitable for T-Mobile since they have zero overages.

          You need to do better than that.

        • Adam

          You cannot possibly believe that if every customer behaved like the top 3% T-Mobile could even be in business.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You cannot possibly believe that if every customer behaved like the top 3% T-Mobile could even be in business.

          They absolutely would and would be even more profitable.

          Every customer would be paying $80 versus the current tiered plans.

        • Adam

          What do you think satisfying this demand while maintain T-Mobiles current average speed would cost T-Mobiles?

      • Hector Arteaga

        Throttling can also be applied selectively, effectively accomplishing the same goal. De-prioritization could also be applied after a set amount, with no additional factors.

        • Stefan Naumowicz

          By definition, deprioritization means less available bandwidth is allocated to a user. If they are instead limited to a certain throughput without regard to other factors, then they are by definition not being deprioritized. They are being throttled.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I get the technical aspect of it, but they both can be applied with certain parameters only. Just the way att does it now after the FCC called them out. Read on it.

    • KingofPing

      Do you even know what a throttle is?

      …another one that doesn’t understand that there are many ways of “slowing people down”, among which both Throttling and Data-Prioritizaion are ways to do so. They are not, however, the same.

      Both are different both in implementation and effect on users. One of these things is most definitely not like the other.

      It carries two passengers like a Porsche, gets them from point A to point B in style like a Porsche, gets lots of envious looks cruising past traffic in Central Park like a Porsche.

      …too bad it’s a Horse-Driven Carriage.

      The Duck test is the pinnacle of BS.

      • Adam

        My online dictionary defines throttling as ‘to choke or suffocate in any way.’ In another words, what T-Mobile is doing.

        • TK – Indy

          No, these guys get to change the meaning of words to suit their own purpose. (See WiFi Calling)

        • KingofPing

          *laughing*

          Yes, yes…T-Mobile has it’s hands around your neck and is having a go at killing you. (At least, in the context of your online dictionary definition…same word – same meaning, right?)

          The fact you seem to ignore any difference between physical choking (throttling) and lowering a users maximum data-rate (throttling) when suits you doesn’t surprise me in the least.

          ….smh.

          Well, can’t argue reason with someone who refuses to be reasonable.

          Data throttling and Data Prioritization are two completely different methods of managing traffic. It’s as simple as that.

          You’ll ignore this, however, because you want to call it throttling. Go ahead. You have the right to play ignorant.

      • Hector Arteaga

        I hate to agree with Adam and keep in mind that I understand why tmo is doing this, but throttling can be applied on congested sites only. In short, they can both accomplish the exact same goal. It doesn’t matter how you kill a man, you still killed a man.

        • KingofPing

          “It doesn’t matter how you kill a man, you still killed a man.”

          Running with that analogy: He didn’t just say a man was killed. He said a man was killed with a specific weapon.

          I wasn’t arguing that the man was still alive. I was arguing that he had the weapon wrong.

  • TK – Indy

    I guess if a tower is beyond capacity, and there are no 3 percenters on it, everybody is slow. This is the far more likely scenario and points out the futility and ineffectiveness of trying to use this method. Somebody caught stupid and then spread the disease.

  • jay

    I have a dumb question, I understand that music freedom doesn’t count towards your data usage. But does it in the end have an effect on those 3%? Sorry if it’s a stupid question but I was wondering how they factor all that data in

    • No, it’s a good question.

      • protect yo net

        It’s only stupid in so far as this policy only really affects those streaming video or other data intensive applications. That said, music is generally not one of them and neither is voice. This policy only affects those losers without home internet and who don’t have a life and watch YouTube too much or other video streaming services.

        I’ve never had music streaming issues and I suspect I only would if I hit an area with no service / coverage (obviously).

        • jay

          Just because someone doesn’t have home internet doesn’t mean they are a loser. You realize that most people get smart phones or tablets with data plans so they don’t have to have home internet? Its cheaper with a data plan then to have home internet. Is someone a loser because they have a cell phone and not a house phone? Just sayin

        • protect yo net

          Get a basic phone and use what you save to get home internet. It’s basic economics. You are a loser if you can’t prioritize what’s important in life. For $14.99 you can get unlimited home internet. In any case, I’m not feeling sorry for anyone with first world problems. Nope, no way.

        • jay

          A basic phone? Home internet being important in life? $14.99 you can get unlimited home internet? LOL Hmmm is dial up available anymore? Why would anyone spend money to get internet for home when cell providers are so much faster? I get 25mbs Down with comcast, Tmobile gets 40mbs down. I’m just wondering what internet provider for $14.99 allows unlimited home internet? I’m just happy I have home internet, I wouldn’t want to be one of those losers you seem to keep talking about. First world problems huh

        • Hector Arteaga

          Dude, get home internet and stop comparing tmo to an ISP. You’re the reason why unl data will one day go away.

        • jay

          I have home internet. Do you have any idea why I was comparing home internet to ALL data plans? Because people who may not have home internet were called losers. I was explaining a fact that some people choose not to get home internet because of how fast cell phone companines are. Btw I only use on average 10gb a month. Secondly I’m not one of the people using 30 plus gigs downloading torrents and God knows what else. So instead of jumping on me read the reason I responded in the first place.

        • jay

          Oh and the reason Verizon and AT&T did away with unlimited data is because they are greedy. And I haven’t said once in any of my posts on this topic did I say what T-Mobile is doing was wrong. I agree with what they are doing. Yes unlimited is awesome but taking advantage of that is the issue. I don’t even know how someone could use 100 gbs or even 30 for that matter. The more apps that come out, the more Netflix is used, yes unlimited data may go away based on that alone, not that someone is going to make it go away. You also can’t tell someone here is unlimited data, but when your home make sure you use wifi to use your phone.

    • TK – Indy

      There are many concerns with this policy that seems to be written in a purposefully ambiguous manner. If you don’t know all the rules, you have to trust them to do the right thing.

    • Anthony S Jennings

      I would have to think it does count toward whether you’re in the 3%. It’s unlimited (and to a degree, free), but again, unlimited doesn’t mean unreasonable.

    • Stefan Naumowicz

      Yes. Data consumed from all sources is counted when calculating the top 3% of users. The music freedom only applies to those who have tiered data, who aren’t subject to data prioritization anyway.

      Source: T-Mobile customer service

      • orlando duran

        Data prioritization is automatically done…it’s cell technology

  • Fortunately, since TMUS customers use more data than those of other carriers, one who finds himself among the top 3% users would probably be among the top 1% in other carriers.

  • protect yo net

    I’m totally cool with T-Mobile’s policies. I have no problem. I’m glad they aren’t letting the data hogs ruin it for customers that want unlimited data… as in you won’t ever get screwed with overages again. Now if those losers would get home internet, then they wouldn’t be affected and everyone else wouldn’t be impacted when those jackasses stream anime, manga, or play online games, whatever these losers are viewing online non-stop these days.

    Again, thank you T-Mobile for being reasonable. Spectrum is a finite resource and you are doing an excellent job to make sure we can all use it when we need it and not just the data hogs.

    P.S. Is “explainers” a word?

    • thepanttherlady

      I use 90% of my data away from home so home internet does this “loser” no good.

      • dtam

        have you actually be deprioritized? how many gb did you use to get to that point?

        • thepanttherlady

          I posted on the original article but I’m either being throttled or deprioritized. Took some speed tests with two different phones (two different accounts bother have truly unlimited data):

          My phone: .21 Mbps down 1.15 Mbps up
          Other phone: 1.32 Mbps down 9.23 Mbps up

          My account was at 20 or 23GB when I ran the tests. The other phone was at 5GB (maybe less) at the time.

          ETA: Some of the previous speed tests I ran weren’t during what one would consider a “congestion” time. Unless where I live 3 a.m. is party time. LOL

        • dtam

          ok, good info to have

        • Fabian Cortez

          You’re being deprioritized on a congested cell site as evidenced by the 1.32 Mbps speed on the other line that was prioritized.

          These are the effects, not the cause.

          The cause is insufficient backhaul and there are hosts of reasons why it isn’t [seemingly] being addressed. Some are withing T-Mobile’s indirect control and some aren’t.

        • The cell site can handle just so many users. The way that UMTS and LTE work, an user is allocated as many sub-carriers as he needs to satisfy his data demand. As the number of sub-carriers is finite, even with plentiful backhaul bandwidth, it is possible that a tower hosting too many users will result in their experiencing slow service.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The cell site can handle just so many users. The way that UMTS and LTE work, an user is allocated as many sub-carriers as he needs to satisfy his data demand. As the number of sub-carriers is finite, even with plentiful backhaul bandwidth, it is possible that a tower hosting too many users will result in their experiencing slow service.

          More like you wouldn’t even be able to connect to that layer at all. T-Mobile’s network density throughout its network is setup so that doesn’t happen.

          Magically, known high traffic sites in the city that I live, where I am able to break 115 Mbps, do just fine during peak hours.

          Sites that experience prioritization during peak hours never seem to break 30 Mbps on off-peak hours.

          Congestion

        • John Wentworth

          It’s not likely backhaul, it’s likely spectrum.
          It’s a fixed reasource, they can’t just add it whenever they want to.
          it take years to get and deploy new spectrum.
          In congested markets reasonable network management will always be necessary.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’s not likely backhaul, it’s likely spectrum.

          It’s a fixed reasource, they can’t just add it whenever they want to.
          it take years to get and deploy new spectrum.
          In congested markets reasonable network management will always be necessary.

          Please don’t repeat talking points just to comment or state the obvious.

          Both T-Mobile and Verizon have 20×20 MHz networks and seem to be doing just fine. Guess what? Verizon has over 130 million subscribers and seems to be doing just fine except for the slew of congested sites. Due to… yes, you guessed it, underprovisioned backhaul.

        • Hector Arteaga

          To add to this, on my VZW line, I always drop back to 700 all over Memphis and pop in and out of 1700. With tmo, I stay on band 4 all the time. That suggests to me a tighter buildout. So that helps things stay fast for tmo here despite the 10×10 was.

        • fizdog

          I’ve been throttled many of times when I had 5 or 6gb to use..streaming just YouTube vids. When I bought my note 3 they upped me to unlimited everything and haven’t had a problem since

        • TK – Indy

          Your LTE Island in T-mobile Land must be heavily populated with happily streaming natives.

        • thepanttherlady

          Ones that never sleep!

      • protect yo net

        Oh come on. I bet that in that 90% of that time, maybe 20% is really data intensive, I’m talking video streaming, video or software pirating via Torrents, or anything generally abusive. Right? You’re not a loser and you know this.

        • thepanttherlady

          Wait. When did video streaming become “abusive”?

        • protect yo net

          When you do so much of it that it puts a strain on the data network. Come on, let’s not be so obtuse lady. Be reasonable. You don’t need abusive usage to be explained to you. Or do you?

        • thepanttherlady

          And at what point is it considered “abuse”? 10GB? 50GB? 100GB?

        • protect yo net

          When you’re trying to abuse the network at peak hours of network congestion. It’s network driven and not as simple as saying once you hit 50GB. Come on. Do I also need to explain why it’s virtually impossible to drive from West LA to East LA (or enter any major metropolis) in under 30 min during peak rush hour? When traffic is flowing and it’s NOT rush hour you can easily make that drive in 30 min… Please don’t have me explain why it possible smh :/

        • thepanttherlady

          3 a.m. is not a peak hour. I shouldn’t be deprioritized at the crack of dawn. According to the article, evening hours and weekends shouldn’t have this issue yet I do.

          I can go through past bills but am certain if I’ve even hit 50GB in a month it was a very, very rare instance.

        • TK – Indy

          Did you check to see that you were flagged? It could be a problem with equipment or something.

        • thepanttherlady

          I have not because before now I just chalked it up to them possibly working on the network in my area. Now that I have another device to test side by side I absolutely am going to call. Will update after I do. :)

        • Fabian Cortez

          Cam’s article is not verbatim.

          It is possible to be on a site that is congested (oversaturated backhaul) during times that seem to be irregular for congestion.

        • Hector Arteaga

          For what it’s worth, I just passed 20gb here in Memphis and I haven’t noticed any slow downs at any time.

        • thepanttherlady

          :(

        • 21stNow

          I agree that T-Mobile should define abuse. I would define using 50GB of mobile data in one month in 2015 as abuse, but I’m just a customer.

          On a side note, I can’t imagine using 50GB of data in one month on a phone. One month, I’m going to try to use as much data as possible on a phone. I’ve only hit as high as 3GB one time in my life. Most months, I’m under or at 1GB and I never turn Wi-Fi on on my phones that have SIM cards in them.

        • Bobs Burgers

          Do we even have any proof from the original reddit user’s of how much data they used, combined with other factors such as did they do any bittorrenting over their connection? Because it sounds like the writer of this article didn’t do much research on this, and just wants to stir up trouble.

        • Zach B.

          Sooo should we tax drivers for using roads more often than those who might venture out once a week for grocery shopping? Or start adding taxes to those who frequently get things delivered and limit when and where they can shop? Sure they already pay their taxes to build the roads for themselves and their community anyways, but its only reasonable to penalize them for using the service they already paid for… Right?…..

        • Anthony S Jennings

          Drivers who use roads more often than others are indeed paying more taxes. You catch it at the pump, where you’re filling up more often, paying out more dollars in taxes that go to transportation infrastructure (i.e. roads). You’re paying to access those roads as much as you do.

          Thankfully, T-Mobile doesn’t make you pay more to use what you actually use. You 50gigabiters, how would you like to pay per gig for that data you’re abusing? That would put a stop to that overuse overnight.

        • John Wentworth

          We do tax drivers using the roads more often in the most congested areas, AKA toll roads :)
          people frequently getting things delivered just doesn’t work as an analogy, they are paying for each delivery.

        • Ravoz

          My wife and I switched to T-Mobile for absolute freedom when using our phones. Either through Talk and Text, or audio and video streaming.

          If I were to go away on business for a week, it is nice to know that I have freedom to use my phone without having to worry about overages or having my data negatively impacted. Assuming an HD movie stream equals 4gb. If over the course of a week I enjoy my T-Mobile service and watch just 5 full length movies I will be at 20gb. And that doesn’t include any internet or audio streaming. I could then be in the top 3% and have my data negatively impacted.

          I’m sorry but no. What is the point of having “truly unlimited data” if you are meant to conform to small data usage, talk, text and the occasional YouTube video. Why have an unlimited tier if I’m only going to use 2gb or less of data a month, if that. That doesn’t make any sense. Why am I paying for “unlimited”?

          The only thing I see that is obtuse on here is protect yo net’s thinking.

        • protect yo net

          Given the hypothetical you described. I’m confident your service would NOT be impacted. You don’t have to take my word for it either. TRY just that. Trust me what you described does not sound abusive, your just being simple minded and being upset over something that has not affected you. It’s just affected those truly abusive network hogs (the 1 “percenters” or 3% what ever that number is) and those unlucky few who happen to be using a heavily congested cell network all at the same time. This in a more complex manner than your simple hypothetical.

        • I get deprioritized all of the time and there doesn’t seem to be any consistency as far as time of day goes. There does seem to be consistency as far as how it occurs though. At about 20 or so minutes into a video stream, it starts buffering badly no matter the quality of the stream. My speed tests show at these times data dropping to 500 kb/sec or less. My data usage is neither prohibited by the T&Cs nor excessive (15-75 gb per month, depending on whether I’ve downloaded HD videos, streamed sporting events via ESPN’s app, and / or downloaded games via Playstore). There doesn’t seem to be a magical number after which this occurs. When I switch cell sites by moving to a new location, everything is fine. It’s just annoying that I was sold on being able to actually use my expensive devices the way they were designed to be used and I too often can’t (LG G2, LG G3, and now Galaxy Note Edge).

          I’m patient though. Fabian Cortez has convinced me it’s due to technological limitations and that, with time, some of these things will be ironed out. I just wish my data wasn’t dropped through the floor but it was instead averaged out better (simultaneous use across several devices on the same network show me that I’m being significantly handicapped by comparison).

        • TK – Indy

          This sounds like QoS, not prioritization.

        • It might very well be, but why would three devices side-by-side give me radically different results? To be clear, I live in a sloped neighborhood and so in our residence, since we live in a weird location nearer the bottom, most of the towers do not provide reception with the exception of a 4G tower (non-LTE). In order to use it, we needed to even get a signal booster. Since our reception is mediated through the signal booster, I presume all of our devices are using the same cell site. If that’s true, how would this be explained away as a QoS issue when side-by-side use gives such different results? I’m not refuting your point but am sincerely asking.

        • Fabian Cortez

          He doesn’t know the answer. He’s just spouting out buzzwords.

          You are accurately experiencing prioritization. All carriers do it. Go ask any Sprint subscriber.

        • Timothy Poplaski

          Just wondering, but have you tried parking near the tower and playing a long video? I’m just curious whether the signal booster might be part of the problem, and that’d be one way to check.

        • Certainly possible and I can’t say I haven’t considered it.

          When we first purchased the signal booster, the outlet into which it was plugged had a short in it. As a result, we would sometimes see our connection suddenly stall. So when things started stalling on my device a few months ago, my first thought was, “The outlet must have shorted. Looks like I need to plug it back in.” You can imagine my surprise when it was still indicating it had power and a signal.

          The problem though is that when my wife upgraded to unlimited, her device hasn’t had the same issues. In addition to side-by-side use, I have asked her a handful of times while mine was stalling whether she was experiencing any issues, and she wasn’t. For example, she even watched an 80s horror b-film on YouTube the other day without a problem.

          If it were the signal booster, I would expect it to affect all four devices simultaneously in similar ways. That hasn’t been the case though. I have experienced similar stalling when I’ve been away from home although it usually isn’t common (most noticeable when live streaming a sporting event). Some locations have been worse than others, leading me to believe it’s related to congestion, whether it’s actually deprioritization or simply a maxed out site.

        • Timothy Poplaski

          Maybe. Depends on the frequencies being boosted. Signal boosters don’t boost them all, only specific ones.

          Sounds like it’d be worth testing outside, out of booster range, with a clear signal. And possibly swapping SIM chips between a device with issues and one isn’t.

          Sure, you could be getting deprioritized. But it’s very possible there’s another explanation. And THAT is a problem that T-Mobile should address.

          If they’d make it clear that you’re being slowed down, you could adjust your behavior around it. Or know that T-Mobile isn’t workable and switch. Or if it’s not deliberate, know to replace the phone, or that the tower needs an upgrade, or whatever.

          When there’s no clear explanation, they end up with more frustrated customers, who are more likely to share that frustration with others, and less likely to consider being customers in the future, when things might be working better. It’s just bad business to piss people off.

          I do think a lot of people blaming “throttling” have other causes.

          Me, I use about 10GB a month. My work takes me all over my big city metro area, and even to other cities. I notice differences in speed depending on location. Haven’t noticed any difference based on time. If I did, and there wasn’t a way to get it fixed with T-Mobile, I’d switch providers. It’s work, no service, no work, no pay which means no choice. If Verizon was the only one that worked reliable, Verizon is what I’d have to pay for.

        • I agree Timothy, especially on the issue of communication (T-mobile needs to work on this, which is strange to say because they already communicate much better by comparison) and the accusations of throttling.

        • steveb944

          You’re branded as the 3% by them then. I don’t think it’ll get any better because the network will improve, but then so will subscriber numbers.

          You’re going to need a hotspot device as a primary data source. Or it’s time to pay up for cable/fiber optic as mobile data still isn’t a viable option for heavy use.

        • I do have a hotspot device for home use. The “Match My Data” promo was too good to pass up and allowed me to use my laptop at home (10 gb total hotspot). I do very casual web browsing (no video) on my laptop – check e-mail, use message boards, read news, etc. 10 gb hotspot is more than enough for me.
          Beyond that, most of my use is away from home and on my device.

        • Timothy Poplaski

          You understand that you’d only be slowed down on a full tower right? That if your tower isn’t full, you could watch Netflix 24/7 without any problems?

          Given that it takes time and money to build new towers, and that T-Mobile IS building new towers and upgrading existing ones, how would you suggest they manage the problem of “tower is full” until they handle more use?

        • Ravoz

          As a consumer of a service that is offered, it is not our job to come up with the solutions. If the infrastructure is not in place to handle “truly unlimited” data service that provides usable speeds to the consumer when they want to use it, then that service should not be offered.

          We are seeing reports of people receiving .15mbps, at 20gb and up of data usage. That is not a usable service for the intended purpose, high speed data on a mobile device

          Ok, its based off of a percentage among users and not a hard cap. But I certainly do not consider 20gb of data usage to be a lot. Especially with the ever expanding capabilities of mobile phones. Such as watching movies, streaming music, downloading files, uploading files, texting pictures, downloading larger and larger apps and games and more.

          You say “you’d only be slowed down on a full tower”. Ok. I live in a highly dense area, the chances of this happening to me is higher. How would I suggest they manage full towers? Not my problem. Hey this might never effect me, like others have mentioned. But at the end of the day lets call it for what it is. And that is not truly unlimited 4g LTE data.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Data streaming is within the tos.

        • VicRooLoo

          I don’t follow. 90% of the time, 20% of usage is data intensive?

        • protect yo net

          Im not here to explain simple math. If you don’t know what 20% of 90% is, please get an (at the very least) a basic education.

  • VicRooLoo

    I used to spend 40+ GB’s a month consistently when I had my Nexus 5
    At no point did I ever feel like I was slowed down.

    A. I wasn’t in the top 3%
    or B. During peak hours I was at home and was using the WiFi

    *shrug*

  • TK – Indy

    It is disingenuous of T-mobile management to encourage customers to switch to T-mobile so that they can NetFlix, Hulu, YouTube and music stream all they want on the “Fastest LTE Network” and then penalize them for doing just that. #BaitNSwitch

    • VicRooLoo

      They can stream all they want. Only TMO and Sprint has unlimited data tiers.

      • TK – Indy

        Only T-mobile offers unlimited high-speed data to prepaid customers. This makes getting around policies and enforcement of TOS as easy as buying a new SIM.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Only T-mobile offers unlimited high-speed data to prepaid customers. This makes getting around policies and enforcement of TOS as easy as buying a new SIM.

          Oh sure. Because T-Mobile has no idea that this hypothetical abuser would be using the same device (IMEI).

        • TK – Indy

          Oh, sure. Because these guys have only one phone around.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Oh, sure. Because these guys have only one phone around.

          Oh sure, because TmoNews doesn’t know when the same troll makes multiple comments using different names.

    • orlando duran

      this is part of cell technology, not just tmobile. ..Educate yourself bud

      • Fabian Cortez

        We try not to feed/reply to him. :)

  • Justin Smith

    I use 100Gb a month but have never experienced this

    • protect yo net

      Simple, you’re probably not doing crazy data intensive shite when everyone is. It’s like driving 80 mph at 2am when the roads are pretty much clear.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Bingo!

      • Justin Smith

        Eh, I use a ton of data all the time. I guess there just isn’t a huge amount of users in my area. T-Mobile has wideband LTE and a dense urban network in my area so I’m probably not throttled because the speeds are already very fast.

  • A mobile service is not the village greens. A heavy user who uses the service that he contracted with a provider is doing nothing wrong. If, as a consequence, other customers are slowed down, the culprit is the service provider, for it is the one reneging on their contracts. Suggesting some sort of immoral behavior on the part of the heavy user is the immoral conclusion.

    • protect yo net

      Cool story Plato. Now only if you understood the terms of service (how to read them), you wouldn’t sound like some idiot philosopher. GTFOH with your talk of contracts an morality. Get home internet and stop abusing the network.

      • Fabian Cortez

        He’s our resident prepaid guru.

        • protect yo net

          On this, and only this, because I don’t know this person, he sounds like the village idiot. He doesn’t understand T-Mobile is living up to its end of the “contract” and he feels cheated… Come on.

        • Fabian Cortez

          He’s on prepaid so he really didn’t sign or agree to anything for the most part.

          That’s why I made the comment that I made.

        • John Wentworth

          Even prepaid agrees to a TOS and AUP, where it’s explained.
          It’s a shared medium, network management practices are necessary.
          Those who say otherwise don’t understand how cellular networks work at all and/or just want to whine regardless.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You forgot to add “and/or trolling.”

        • John Wentworth

          true I did forget trolling :)

      • Don Goyo

        Stop abusing the network? The Data Strong Network????

    • dtam

      it is in the policies though so it’s not the service provider reneging on their contract. yes, it is an ambiguous policy but a policy nonetheless.

      • Those who feel that they are being slowed down because someone is using the service that he contracted have a beef with TMUS, not with the heavy user. I understand that in order to comply with its service contract TMUS may deprioritize the heavy user. Yet, I don’t understand the outrage by some at him. Again, TMUS mobile service is merely a hired business, not the village greens. The amount of access to the service is determined by one’s contract with TMUS, not by any presumed right.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Those who feel that they are being slowed down because someone is using the service that he contracted have a beef with TMUS, not with the heavy user.

          Yes.

          People need to call in and complain to T-Mobile to receive their credits.

          T-Mobile will have to eventually get on this backhaul issue and/or start splitting cells or risk losing subs.

        • dtam

          quite honestly, because tmobile does take these actions to deprioritize these users, no one should really have a problem with these people since they aren’t really affecting your service anyways.

        • protect yo net

          Thank you sir. Or should I say Capt. Obvious? As a T-Mobile customer I have no problem with how T-Mobile protects the integrity of the network. Obviously the biggest loudmouths are those very data hogs and the few who imagine hypothetical situations where this rational network based technology might impact them. I don’t feel sorry for any data hog. Let the pigs squeal all they want.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Obviously the biggest loudmouths are those very data hogs and the few who imagine hypothetical situations where this rational network based technology might impact them.

          Or the Sprint trolls who don’t even use T-Mobile.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Well, Sprint prioritizes even worse than tmo, so that’s just an invalid argument from them.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sprint only appears to prioritize more simply due to the fact that their backhaul isn’t provisioned as high as T-Mobile’s.

          Remember, Sprint didn’t plan for high speed backhaul so a lot of their Band 25 LTE sites were still fed by T1.

        • TK – Indy

          Well, Sprint is certainly more tricky about it, in any case. Different plans have different caveats about usage and prioritization. I have personally never run into a throttle, though the most I have used is 50GB. I average around 20GB on Sprint. I have a Framily that I pay $43/mo for unlimited everything.

        • Bobs Burgers

          I’m shocked you could even average a gig on Sprint.

        • TK – Indy

          Sprint is at least 4 times faster than T-mobile in Indianapolis.

        • I don’t. A network without QoS grinds to a halt. I just object to the inane name calling against those affected by TMUS strategies to assure QoS.

  • Fabian Cortez

    The irony in the comments from the majority of those complaining is that they didn’t care to read the article. Just like T-Mobile’s policy they ignored when signing up.

    • Hector Arteaga

      The thing is, I’m not a big fan of it and I still believe it is bolgney when people try to make it like prioritization doesn’t achieve the same goal as throttling. In any case, it is in the tos and if it bothers you that much, then you can leave. They all must be warned, they all practice it. Including VZW unlimited. They might not throttle, but they prioritize.

      • wicketr

        I see “throttling” as simply a money grab by companies, where they are essentially pushing you to upgrade your account to a higher sized data bucket, since it has nothing to do with tower congestion.

        With “data prioritization”, the company is allowing you to do as you please, so long as you don’t affect the other customers. It’s not so much about money, as it is about ensuring a good service to the masses (And the top 3% are not the masses).

        • Adam

          Both techniques are about money. The normal method is to spread the pain of limit bandwidth evenly among all customers. With prioritization in place instead, the pain is mostly felt by the least profitable customer. The assumption that they will change their behavior to avoid further pain.

        • Fabian Cortez

          How is it about money when the perception is that the unlimited high speed subs. are being affected? Tiered data users are being prioritized first with higher speeds versus unlimited.

          So if you’re inferring that T-Mobile is hoping to push people off of unlimited, they would be losing money and not gaining.

        • Adam

          The most profitable customers are the ones that do not use all their data. We now know for unlimited using all your data means being in the top 3%. When a high data user reschedules their data download, T-Mobile can then sell that data to multiple low data paying customers. Think about it in this simplified form: 100x1G customers are more profitable than 1x100G customer.

        • Fabian Cortez

          The most profitable customers are the ones that do not use all their data.

          You don’t know what you’re talking about.

          The most profitable customers are those who spend the most. T-Mobile has zero overages so their unlimited users are their most profitable.

          When a high data user reschedules their data download, T-Mobile can then sell that data to multiple low data paying customers. Think about it in this simplified form: 100x1G customers are more profitable than 1x100G customer.

          I again maintain that you don’t know what you’re talking about.

          But please explain to us all how T-Mobile “can then sell that data to multiple low data paying customers?” You do realize that data is not a finite commodity like a gallon of milk or a dozen eggs, right?

        • Adam

          You are confusing profit with revenue. Profit is when you subtract expenses. Data (specifically Data/Time or bandwidth) does have costs.

        • TK – Indy

          Unlimited users cost them the most, as adding capacity and buying spectrum to support them is by far the most expensive thing that they do.

        • KOLIO

          There’s the kicker,many of us are throtlled into oblivion on a daily basis,I myself use less than 3GB/mo & yet,still see throttling during the evening hrs.
          I seriously doubt I’m in the top 3%,& no way to prove it.
          Call it what you will,it’s throttling,a lot less expensive than upgrading capacity……………..

        • lorddextro

          I know everyone wanted to hear my input… The way to know for certain (prioritization) is to leave the unlimited plan (of which you can get back onto with T-Mobile) and start a metered data plan.
          “Let the chips fall where they may” – said by someone (of whom I cannot Google for at this time).

    • Maximus

      T-Mobile’s policy has changed so much over time that you have no idea what you’re talking about! Obviously the terms and conditions are no longer the same as when I signed up 7 years ago!

  • Maximus

    I smell a class action suit coming!

    • Fabian Cortez

      I smell a class action suit coming!

      I’m not sure if you’re trolling or not so I’ll treat this as a legitimate comment.

      How will there be a class action [law]suit when everyone in this hypothetical “class” signed the dotted line that included this policy?

      • Maximus

        @fabiancortez:disqus trust me I’m not trolling! It is a legitimate comment. My problem with this new amended terms of “DATA PRIORITIZATION” is that if I pay $30 for unlimited and so do you, then why should I be punished for you being at 5GB half way into the month just because I’m at 24.6GB? I can understand true network congestion, but come on really!
        I live in the city over and as soon as i get into work I’m bumped down to 0.48-0.88 Down while everyone else surfs at 10+ Down I’m not asking for something unreasonable just keep my internet speeds enough to stream HD video during my lunch for 1HR! All my services are paid for. Netflix, Hulu, Rhapsody, Etc..

        My rant is that these new terms are being an unfair practice and I have enough evidence for these to sustain in court. Now, do I have the time to do these things? Well of course not! But I do have the time to rant and do as i please regarding this post when I pay T-Mobile close to $1000 dollars a month for a total of 16 Lines on 2 accounts.

        • wicketr

          “why should I be punished for you being at 5GB half way into the month just because I’m at 24.6GB?”.

          Because when you’re downloading that much data, you are punishing their network, and the bandwidth at a very small level of EVERYONE else on that tower. So, T-Mobile eventually punishes you back and gives everyone else a fair shot over your desires to consume more. Haven’t you ever heard of “sharing toys” as a kid?

          It’s like if everyone paid $10 for an all-you-can-eat buffet, and you immediately go in and eat 4 trays worth of food, if someone else comes in, they should be able to get ahead of you to get their first tray as opposed to you getting your 5th tray of food. Frankly you’ve had enough to eat. Give someone else priority.

          Really, T-Mobile would like to get rid of you as a customer and have nothing but the 1-3GB/month users so they can support more people. I doubt they are making much, if anything from a 20+GB user.

        • Maximus

          @wicketr:disqus Apparently you didn’t read the full message except what you wanted to read to have something to say. I’m not even asking to surf at the speeds of other users. All I simply want if for my HD vids to work during my lunch hour! Don’t offer unlimited and say you don’t throttle me when you have me at under 1Mbps Down!

          “Don’t offer me all you can eat buffet for $10 BECAUSE I will eat 5 plates! And its not cause I’m a phat azz, but because I’m fit and I can eat them!”

          And don’t talk to me about sharing cause I’m probably paying for your health care now too and I’m not complaining about that now am I!

          “Really, T-Mobile would like to get rid of you as a customer and have nothing but the 1-3GB/month users so they can support more people. I doubt they are making much, if anything from a 20+GB user.”

          Do you work for T-Mobile?…

        • Timothy Poplaski

          Their only doing it when the towers are maxed out. It’s a simple choice. Piss off some users, or piss off all users. So, they chose to piss off 3% of the users, and keep the other 97% happy. That just makes sense from a business standpoint. Sure, you pay $1,000 a month, but if you get to stream HD videos and it interferes with other customers use of the tower, they risk losing $33,000 worth of other business. (Obviously they’re increasing tower capacity when possible to try and keep everyone’s business.)

          That doesn’t take into account that some towers have more or less max capacity, some frequencies more or less capacity, some frequencies are more or less able to penetrate a building, and some phones more or fewer frequencies they can use. At least some of the complaints are other issues. I often get lower speeds in some buildings than I do in the parking lot. Because the building blocks most of the signal, not because I’m being deprioritized.

          More simply, if you aren’t happy with your service for whatever reason, you are always free to switch to a better carrier. It’s just cell phone service, not church.

        • Jay Holm

          The whole nature of a wireless network is that people don’t use all their data on the same exact tower all 30 days! There’s home, work, mall, supermarket, everywhere else in between. I may use 20-22gb’s/mo, but it isn’t all on the same tower.

        • Bobs Burgers

          That $1000 dollars could put you on a mobile share plan on Verizon and provide you with un-prioritized data!!

    • Hector Arteaga

      I’m not sure how a class action suit applies when it is disclosed in the tos. Simple as that.

    • mingkee

      It’s clearly written on Terms of Service when I added $20 unlimited data.

  • sikety

    Have NEVER had an issue with this. I have a Slingbox and use 20-30 gigs a month. I have streamed a football game while sitting in a sold out MLB stadium while the Sprint customer next to me couldn’t post a picture to Facebook.

    • Jason Crumbley

      I use half that to stream music (which isn’t supposed to count agains our limits, remember) and get hit every day, in the afternoon.

      • sikety

        I assume you are in Atlanta, I wonder what they are running there (5×5, 10×10 ext).. I am in Detroit and from what I have heard we have 20×20. I know that is supposed to help with capacity, hopefully they get an upgrade there soon so people aren’t getting slowed down.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    Define crazy downloads in GB’s? Is crazy defined as 500 GB’s or more like 30 GB’s.

    • Jay Holm

      I usually use 20-22GB’s/mo, I haven’t suffered from sluggish speeds, not yet anyway, I’ve been with T-mobile for just over two years, and live in Bridgeport, Ct.

      • JaswinderSinghJammu

        I normally use like 20-30 GB’s but this month I have used a little more with video streaming of ESPN cricket world cup and IPL league in India. Been with for over 2 years as well. We have 5 lines. 2 unlimited but the other other unlimited is usually under 10 GB. 2 lines with just 1 GB and tablet line 3 and that has 5 GB data plan. San Jose, CA. We do have WiFi at home but I don’t usually switch because my TMO is faster than WiFi

  • Tatdude806

    I have a feeling the FCC will feel differently about this once people complain to them.

    • TK – Indy

      Well, I am sure they would complain, if only they could access the internet ….

      • Bobs Burgers

        You have Sprint confused with T-Mobile (whom also *prioritizes their customer’s after 5GB’s used)

    • Fabian Cortez

      I have a feeling the FCC will feel differently about this once people complain to them.

      Please read the article before you comment.

      • Tatdude806

        I did smart guy, what did I miss?

        • Fabian Cortez

          I did smart guy, what did I miss?

          Apparently the whole thing.

          Carry on.

        • Jay Holm

          Apparently Fabian is a prick!

    • Timothy Poplaski

      No, they won’t.

      T-Mobile isn’t capping speeds 24/7 (throttling). T-Mobile is doing “network management” only when the towers are maxed out, and that’s specifically allowed by the FCC.

      T-Mobile choose to do the management by prioritizing more profitable customers over less profitable ones when forced to by capacity limits. When not forced, everyone gets the max possible speed. If you’re forced to piss people off, makes sense to minimize the damage.

      I wonder if people would feel differently if T-Mobile policy was more clear. Something like “After the first 5GB of data, pay per GB use has priority over unlimited use.” It’s a little easier to wrap your head around I think.

  • AussieB

    If your data is slow, people are going to get except regardless of what a lawyer or PR person calls it. As Tmobile gets more customers, this will become more and more of an issue. Thats why I never understand why people care that they beat Sprint or are #3 or #2. The more customers, the more congested the network, the worst it will be for you. Tmobile is a business. Its a publicly traded company. Its not your ‘friend’ – Its made the decisions its made so far because it has HAD to. If it were #1, it wouldn’t be doing them

    • Fabian Cortez

      Then please explain the slow speeds (EDGE-like speeds) experienced by the other three carriers.

      • Hector Arteaga

        Hell, VZW and ATT will prioritize shared data users too. It is on their policy.

        • Fabian Cortez

          So does Sprint.

          They clearly state that CYBIH plans will receive lower priority than those on other plans. Way to treat your new high quality customers like second class citizens.

          And you don’t hear the complaints because, well, people are used to the slow Sprint speeds.

  • Jimmy James

    Streaming Netflix or Hulu daily will send you over this “limit” pretty quickly. Can’t complain. No other provider has unlimited data with these fast speeds.

    • Mark G

      Depends on where you live….t-mobile isnt fast everywhere

    • Jason Crumbley

      I can complain because I’m being punished for using the data that I’ve paid for.

      • Sparky

        You really can’t complain because you’re getting exactly what you paid for. It’s nobody’s fault but your own that you didn’t read the terms when you signed up.

      • Mike

        Your still getting LTE at 10-15 mbps when the network is congested. When the network isn’t congested you go back to the 20+ mbps

        • TK – Indy

          People are reporting unusable speeds, not anything near 10-15 mbps.

        • Mike

          I tested my phone at 7pm and my speeds are 8-10mbps compared to 25 mbps when it’s less congested in Ohio. When I’m in Detroit it doesn’t drop at all because of the network upgrades they have probably I believes it’s 20×20.

        • Jay Holm

          You guys have 20×20 in Detroit? I wish the MetroPCS network shutdown would be complete so there would be more 20×20 markets. I live in Bridgeport, Ct, we’re still a 15mhz market.

        • Craig Foster

          .05 mbps. I would punch my mother in the face for 10 – 15 mbps when I was being throttled.

  • mingkee

    Usually I use 15-20GB a month due to downloading videos from my FTP server. I have thought I have been listed as high usage user but now I realized a lot of users used 3-4x more than I did.
    Generally I have no problem watching TV through simple.tv except in very congested area like Downtown Brooklyn.

  • Tmobile is a Business

    If you are truly concern or not, please write and submit your concern/issue to the FCC or Better Business Bureau. If not, enjoy your data… as someone said earlier, Tmobile is a Business, first and far most.

    • Jeremy

      Verizon got in hot water for their throttling of unlimited use subscribers for exactly this reason.

      • Mike

        Verizon customers were throttled to 2g speeds. With tmobile your still getting 10-15 mbps when the network is congested when it’s not you get normal speeds

        • KOLIO

          Speak for yourself.
          Just as Jason Crumbley,I get throttled every day,in the evening hrs,from about 6 PM to roughly midnight.
          I use home WI-FI internet,but,if I switch to mobile,it’s unusable during those hours.
          I’m w/JC on this one,call it what you will,it’s still throttling……………

        • Jeremy

          This doesn’t match my experience – I’ve been cut back to poor quality EDGE (2g) speeds, sub-100kbps. Though it seemed they only throttled download speeds, not upload. Regardless, it doesn’t matter the degree to which speeds are limited. Any governor on specific users is selective throttling.

        • Bobs Burgers

          How do you know you were cut back and that it’s not congestion?

        • Jeremy

          Other phones sitting next to me weren’t impacted. When one draws 20Mbps down and I’m running less than 1% of that…

        • Mike

          Are you sure you’re on the unlimited LTE $80 plan ?

  • Jason Crumbley

    No matter the name, a rose is still a rose.

    • Fabian Cortez

      No matter the name, a rose is still a rose.

      Thanks for the statement of fact.

      Prioritization is prioritization.

      • Jason Crumbley

        If it’s slowing down my speeds, it’s throttling.

        Reprioritization would increase ping times, but keep the same speed. This is not doing that. My pings are in the upper 40 millisecond area and my speeds are under 1 Mbps. Most time in the 2-300 Kbps range.

        So, again, it doesn’t matter what you call it, it’s still throttling.

        But, thanks for playing.

        • steveb944

          Welcome to the 3%.

        • Maximus

          The real trolls are the ones answering stupidity! If you have me under 1Mbps you are throttling me! I don’t have home internet because ATT has monopolized my area and is even more unethical than this “PRIORITIZATION” But that is why I pay for unlimited for 10 of my 16 Lines! So F.U.! The real trolls! I have no problem with sharing bandwidth, but don’t throttle me and say you’re not doing it when I’m under 1Mbps and the guy next to me has the same phone and plan and he’s doing 10+ There is enough bandwidth there!

        • steveb944

          Great job not reading your TOS. Maybe you should add another 10 lines then and use them as hotspots. And once again, it’s prioritization because that guy uses the network conservatively and not like a mad man.

          Take up your problems with the government that allows these policies and allowed that monopoloy. And if you don’t want to actually do something about it and just bitch and moan, then pay up.

        • Maximus

          steveb944 Like I don’t read my TOS…

          “4G (LTE) network: typical download speeds of 6-20 Mbps and upload speeds of 2 – 5 Mbps.

          4G (HSPA+ Dual Carrier/42 UMTS) network: typical download speeds of 4-11 Mbps and upload speeds of 500-1800 Kbps.

          4G (HSPA+ 21 UMTS) network: typical download speeds of 2 – 6 Mbps and upload speeds of 500– 1800 Kbps.

          3G (HSPA UMTS) network: typical download speeds of 400 – 700 Kbps and upload speeds of 100 – 250 Kbps.

          2G network: typical download speeds of 40Kbps-200Kbps and upload speeds of 20-80 Kbps.”

          http://www.t-mobile.com/Company/CompanyInfo.aspx?tp=Abt_Tab_ConsumerInfo&tsp=Abt_Sub_InternetServices

          HELP YOURSELF OUT AND STFU! MY SPEEDS ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE PER “TOS”
          UNDER 1Mbps ARE NOT LTE SPEEDS! EVEN UNDER PRIORITIZATION “TOS”

          I’M SURE EVEN MR CEO J.L. WOULD AGREE!

        • Bobs Burgers

          Cool, well if you have such a problem with T-Mobile and AT&T then sounds like you need to choose a different carrier because in the TOS you initially accepted back in 2007, you would have seen it is subject to change at any time and you accept those new changes as they are made. They are available to you anytime, you have to continue to read them and if you don’t agree you can go elsewhere. And if you don’t have home internet, then is it possible you are violating their TOS as well and not saying anything and tethering over what’s provided in your monthly plan?

        • Fabian Cortez

          No one is playing.

          You’re just incapable of understanding what’s going on so you automatically equate it to throttling.

          Thanks for showing everyone that you equated two different things as the same thing.

          In your case, Cam wasted his time writing this article as well as you did to state that two things are the same.

        • Jeremy

          Throttling is the deliberate limiting of selected users’ bandwidth. Whether or not their justification behind their decision to do so is acceptable to any given group of users is irrelevant – it is still throttling.

        • THAT GUY AGAIN

          I have no problem with people data being reprioritization. If you are a part of the 3% then you need to STOP BEING CHEAP AND GET A HOME WIFI. Period !!!
          There no excuses/reason why the rest of people should suffer due to your lazyness.

        • fizdog

          Not that I use a lot of data but t-mobile is faster than my home WiFi lol

        • fhritp

          why? I pay for wifi and I pay for unlimited data. My data is faster than my wifi. You’d be an idiot if you can’t figure out which you’d rather be on for your phone. Regardless if I use 100gb a month or 100mb, I paid for a sevice that I’m going to use how I want to use it. what you just said is like telling someone to take an alternative, slower route home from work so that you can enjoy the freeway all to yourself. By the way, if I get throttled then so be it, I understand the concept and can agree with it. it’s not lazy either, t-mobile is the data strong network either so for the majority of people in metro areas it will be faster than home wifi, has nothing to do with being lazy.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Get over it. It’s not throttling.

        • TK – Indy

          You get over it, it is.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You are nothing but a troll who doesn’t even have T-Mobile and who couldn’t even bother to read Cam’s article.

        • TK – Indy

          I have T-mobile, two accounts. I promise.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I have T-mobile, two accounts. I promise.

          Which begs the question: Why?

        • TK – Indy

          It is worth it to me to laugh at their service. Call it an entertainment expense.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It is worth it to me to laugh at their service. Call it an entertainment expense.

          Then I award you the “Terrible Father of the Year” award.

          T-Mobile must be so bad that you have two lines that you pay for, to laugh at, all while your two daughters are paying the [emotional] price of being on said horrible and laughable service.

          Why would anyone take you seriously again?

        • TK – Indy

          As lines open up in my Framily (Sprint), I will move them over. Nobody is leaving my Framily and it is maxed out.

        • Fabian Cortez

          As lines open up in my Framily (Sprint), I will move them over. Nobody is leaving my Framily and it is maxed out.

          Ah, because Sprint isn’t leading in prepaid or the MVNO whore of the industry.

          Q1 2015 results:

          * Prepaid net additions of 546,000 led the industry for second consecutive quarter

          * Wholesale net additions of 492,000 increased from 212,000 in the prior year quarter

          Again, why would anyone take you seriously?

    • KingofPing

      “a rose is still a rose”

      Both a lily and a daisy are flowers, but only a complete moron would think they are the same.

      Data Prioritization: Setting your priority lower than others. While this may possibly lower your data speeds in certain circumstances, it, by itself, does not set any limit on throughput.

      Data Throttling: Lowering a users maximum data-rate or throughput.

      The difference is obvious. As such, it is not an inability to see the difference, but rather a choice to remain purposefully ignorant.

      • Jason Crumbley

        Thank you for showing us that you don’t know what your name means.

        If my priority is lower than others, that would mean that I am last in line to connect to the network. That would be reflected in longer ping times, as I wait.
        My ping times are not increasing. My ping times are staying at aprox. 49 milliseconds.

        My data speeds are being slowed down to under 1 Mbps.

        I am being throttled.

        • KingofPing

          *laughs*

          Just because you either do not understand (or are choosing to misrepresent) how congestion, throttling, or data prioritization affects bandwidth, throughput, or latency (or even the difference between the three) doesn’t mean you’re right.

          Limiting throughput via prioritization doesn’t affect bandwidth or latency. Congestion, however, affects throughput and latency both.

          If you are being prioritized to a lower level in a congested area, your increased latency is more likely due to the congestion – not any limitation of throughput or bandwidth.

          I could be in the same area as you, with a higher priority and while I could likely download a greater amount of total data faster than you, my latency would most likely be the same as yours.

    • VicRooLoo

      10 gigs does not put you into the 3% that are being deprioritized.

      Or at least it should not. The 3% is determined by towers and that is determined by location. If you are in a rural area, 10 gigs may put you in the top 3%. But for me in Dallas, Texas. I run 40+ gigs a month and I’ve never felt deprioritization.

  • steveb944

    Wow a lot of complainers on here, seemingly a lot of trolls.

    Either way, it’s a good policy IMHO. There’s no reason that users who conservatively use a service should be penalized by extremely heavy data users. People should read terms once in a while.

    When at home I use my WiFi, and try to as much as I can when I’m out and about in order to have others around me have a better experience when they need to use the network. Guess I’m just too nice.

    Your alternative is paying for cable/fiber optic, getting a mobile hotspot, or paying up to an alternate carrier that has no unlimited OR a worse network for speed, features, price, etc.

    • TK – Indy

      So, if your $80 unlimited account gets pushed aside for my kids $30 prepaid, you are cool with that?

      • steveb944

        Prepaid already has less priority as is.

        And I’m pretty sure you have Sprint. Don’t you have something better to do than troll the competition?

        • TK – Indy

          I have 3 carriers – you should concern yourself with your own business.

        • steveb944

          I was, until you replied to me. If you’re a carrier whore I’m not sure how you fit into the argument. You’re already getting dismantled by two other carriers already, prioritization is the least of your worries.

        • Fabian Cortez

          prioritization is the least of your worries.

          Or the most.

          Sprint is notorious for EDGE-like speeds. They’re the cause/reason for the national speed average in this country being so low versus other countries.

        • IceMan

          It took T-Mobile more than 5 years to rollout 3G (somewhat), and they never finished. I’d rather have a Sprint signal than no signal when I travel.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It took T-Mobile more than 5 years to rollout 3G (somewhat), and they never finished.

          5 years huh? Oh and please let’s not bring up “never finished.” Do the letters “N” and “V” ring a bell?

          Those in glass houses…

          I’d rather have a Sprint signal than no signal when I travel.

          You mean an in-market and out-of-market Verizon roaming signal, right?

          *sigh*

        • IceMan

          Sprint covers highways and rural not as good as Verizon, but better than T-Mobile. Sprint also has a signal inside buildings.

          In the areas where neither Sprint nor T-Mobile have network, it is nice being able to roam on Verizon without it costing any extra.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sprint covers highways and rural not as good as Verizon, but better than T-Mobile.

          Subjective response. T-Mobile has more coverage than Sprint.

          Your anecdotal experience is due to roaming.

          Sprint also has a signal inside buildings.

          All buildings huh? Do you have any more blanket statements, Mr. cellular enthusiast? Is your car also faster than mine?

          In the areas where neither Sprint nor T-Mobile have network, it is nice being able to roam on Verizon without it costing any extra.

          No it’s not. That’s a fallacy that has plagued Sprint users and fanboys for years. As long as you’re comfortable with it and Sprint is comfortable with it, then Sprint will do nothing about their network and still collect the high Verizon-like prices (Sprint may be cheaper now).

          Sprint is slowly wising up by finally using their 800 MHz and employing/pushing Wi-Fi calling.

        • IceMan

          Subjective response. T-Mobile has more coverage than Sprint.

          Your anecdotal experience is due to roaming.

          Yeah, T-Mobile covers more…right. IIRC, Sprint announced they covered 280M pops now, and T-Mobile’s on schedule to cover 280 by mid year. How can a larger native footprint cover less?

          All buildings huh? Do you have any more blanket statements, Mr. cellular enthusiast? Is your car also faster than mine?

          You’re often quick to bash Sprint’s high-end spectrum, but ignore the flaws of T-Mobiles. Yes, I am saying lower band spectrum penetrates walls better and Sprint has a lot more of it than T-Mobile, even considering the IBEZ issues.

          No it’s not. That’s a fallacy that has plagued Sprint users and fanboys for years. As long as you’re comfortable with it and Sprint is comfortable with it, then Sprint will do nothing about their network and still collect the high Verizon-like prices (Sprint may be cheaper now).

          I can’t believe you’re arguing how you’d rather have no signal than to roam…LOL

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yeah, T-Mobile covers more…right. IIRC, Sprint announced they covered 280M pops now, and T-Mobile’s on schedule to cover 280 by mid year. How can a larger native footprint cover less?

          Please be specific about your coverage metrics if you want to be taken seriously. Sprint has not expanded their native network. So as it stands, T-Mobile’s network covers more of the U.S. than Sprint’s.

          You’re often quick to bash Sprint’s high-end spectrum, but ignore the flaws of T-Mobiles. Yes, I am saying lower band spectrum penetrates walls better and Sprint has a lot more of it than T-Mobile, even considering the IBEZ issues.

          You made a blanket statement that you still refuse to elaborate on. Your claim is that Sprint’s 800 MHz provides their users with signal within buildings. I refute that claim due to personal experience and cell site locations. Your comment also alludes to T-Mobile not having any in-building signal, which is patently false. Again, the more you comment, the more uneducated you come across about the industry, Mr. “cellular enthusiast.”

          I can’t believe you’re arguing how you’d rather have no signal than to roam…LOL

          No. I rather have native signal from the carrier that I pay every month. Accepting in-market roaming is a ridiculous notion that no one that pays for service should accept. If there’s Wi-Fi, I’ll enable Wi-Fi calling.

          I have never found myself in a situation where I had no signal in a building with T-Mobile that I needed to switch carriers or hope for roaming.

        • IceMan

          Please be specific about your coverage metrics if you want to be taken seriously. Sprint has not expanded their native network. So as it stands, T-Mobile’s network covers more of the U.S. than Sprint’s.

          As of both carrier’s Q1 reports,
          T-Mobile – Covers 275M Pops
          Sprint – Covers 280M Pops
          If you say T-Mobile covers more in LTE, then why do they cover 5 million less?

          You made a blanket statement that you still refuse to elaborate on. Your claim is that Sprint’s 800 MHz provides their users with signal within buildings. I refute that claim due to personal experience and cell site locations. Your comment also alludes to T-Mobile not having any in-building signal, which is patently false. Again, the more you comment, the more uneducated you come across about the industry, Mr. “cellular enthusiast.”

          T-Mobile doesn’t have signal in a lot of buildings…my school campus is one of them (Remember, I did a Test Drive awhile back…) Sprint has B26 live and I pull 7Mbps indoors, whereas T-Mobile has no signal and relies on WiFi. Of course, this is just one experience but T-Mobile and Sprint both broadcast from the same site there so it’s a fair comparison.

          No. I rather have native signal from the carrier that I pay every month. Accepting in-market roaming is a ridiculous notion that no one that pays for service should accept. If there’s Wi-Fi, I’ll enable Wi-Fi calling.

          This argument was in context that we were in a no signal area from Sprint or T-Mobile. Even you said Verizon doesn’t cover 100% of the US. Roaming helps. Yes, I do prefer native coverage, but roaming is nice so I’ll stay connected. Sprint also has WiFi calling, for the areas that neither cover.

        • Fabian Cortez

          As of both carrier’s Q1 reports,T-Mobile – Covers 275M Pops
          Sprint – Covers 280M Pops
          If you say T-Mobile covers more in LTE, then why do they cover 5 million less?

          Be specific and learn to read/comprehend. Your comment was vague and mentioned coverage. As far as coverage goes, T-Mobile’s native network is larger. As far as LTE coverage goes, Sprint is currently ahead.

          Please keep up.

          T-Mobile doesn’t have signal in a lot of buildings…my school campus is one of them (Remember, I did a Test Drive awhile back…) Sprint has B26 live and I pull 7Mbps indoors, whereas T-Mobile has no signal and relies on WiFi. Of course, this is just one experience but T-Mobile and Sprint both broadcast from the same site there so it’s a fair comparison.

          I counter your personal experience with my own where all four carriers broadcast from the same site and deep within a brick building, only T-Mobile has service, albeit one bar, but there’s service. The other three don’t provide service in this room.

          T-Mobile doesn’t rely on Wi-Fi calling. That’s just a false statement. Wi-Fi calling is there to supplement the network, not replace it.

          This argument was in context that we were in a no signal area from Sprint or T-Mobile. Even you said Verizon doesn’t cover 100% of the US. Roaming helps. Yes, I do prefer native coverage, but roaming is nice so I’ll stay connected.

          I still do not agree with in-market roaming. Especially when the top four carriers have low band spectrum

          Sprint also has WiFi calling, for the areas that neither cover.

          Ah, so now Wi-Fi calling is okay to be relied on?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yes he has Sprint and still sees it fit to troll nonfactual and incomplete information.

        • TK – Indy

          Not less than deprioritized, and the $80 could be prepaid, as well.

    • Adam

      I personally don’t have a problem with the policy. Especially since contracts were killed off, you can leave once you realize how the policy effects you. I do have a problem with T-Mobile constantly saying they are not throttling.

      • steveb944

        It’s not throttling per se, the network just can’t handle so many users at once and has to make choices.

        We’ll never know the true effect of prioritization because 1. It’s just people giving analogies 2. No one posts visual proof of use or limitations set with time frames 3. No blog/news site will report on a common practice for I’m sure not only mobile carriers, but any major telecommunications company or service provider.

        You do have unlimited high speed data, but because of continued high use the speed is limited in order to allow a majority of users preference on connecting especially since they have lower use overall and aren’t as data hungry.

        There’s no true unlimited carrier that will deliver blazing speeds at all times. As a whole the networks in the US suck, and that’s not changing anytime soon.

  • Android_God

    These ass clowns are using it as their home internet.

    • TK – Indy

      Ever try to obtain a legacy Verizon unlimited data account? People pay upwards of $500 to get one, just so that they can use it as their home internet. Moral of the story – it you have unlimited lines, some people will see no need to buy more from Comcast/Uverse/etc.

    • Rocket Scientist

      Yeah, and your point is?

      I’m paying for my connection. How and where I choose to use it is as much your business, as whether or not I will have cheerios for breakfast tomorrow. You are politely invited to bugger off.

      • NorCalOffspring

        This is why we can’t have nice things…

      • camguy1975

        Personally, if you want to use it as your home connection, go right ahead. That said, the moment your usage event remotely impacts a single other customer who consumes a normal amount of data, they should be prioritized over you. I think you have the right to do as you see fit, but folks like you should be dead last in terms of prioritization.

        • Rocket Scientist

          I don’t disagree with you about that – While I may use a large amount of data, I don’t stream any TV or movies. I use XM while at the gym or travelling, that is the limit of my streaming. Basic web browsing (just using a computer instead of the phone) is my daily use during the day, and IF I need to download something like a torrent or itunes updates or a program – if it will be more than a hundred meg or so, I will wait until after 11pm to do it.

          FYI: I have never been “prioritized” that I am aware of.

        • Rocket Scientist

          I don’t disagree with you about that – Heavy streaming users and anyone that has already gotten a large amount of data should be placed at a lower priority than someone that doesn’t use a lot – the reality is that the lesser user will probably be done and gone from the tower in a much shorter time than the heavy user.

          While I may use a large amount of data, I don’t stream any TV or movies. I use XM while at the gym or travelling, that is the limit of my streaming. Basic web browsing (just using a computer instead of the phone) is my daily use during the day, and IF I need to download something like a torrent or itunes updates or a program – if it will be more than a hundred meg or so, I will wait until after 11pm to do it.

          FYI: I have never been “prioritized” that I am aware of. I HAVE however experienced the actual throttling when an account limit was reached before I switched to the unlimited. Contrary to their marketing claims, the throttled connections are fully and completely unusable. Every connection attempt would time out, and IF a regular web page managed to load, half the elements on it would also time out.

          I will take a momentary or short-duration ‘deprioritization’ of my connection any day, versus 15 days of a completely unusable signal until the next billing cycle.

      • Android_God

        read your contract and eat whatever the f*** you want for breakfast

    • Mike

      These clowns using 50gb or more while using 3rd party tethering apps and also using p2p software and they wanna complain. T-Mobile unlimited data is not to be abused and used as a primary home connection for high data users, go get some real home internet and shut up

  • BadBatz

    A big chunk of the European population (pretty much regardless of the country they live in) use ONLY mobile internet on their laptops and, of course, on their smartphones without any throttling within their plans. Perhaps there is “data de-prioritization” but I have never experienced it. (I had cellular data “dongles” for my laptop in Poland, something called “blueconnect” and in Germany, as my sole internet connection for a year or so.)

    Why not us..? Perhaps ‘cuz our networks are too crappy, too underbuilt. US cell providers also seem to be averse to micro and pico cells that can immensely improve local reception. I won’t even get into the country-wide coverage issue, after all we are much bugger geographically than any country in Europe but in Europe I had data connection pretty much everywhere, all the time, even all over Albania and in the Ukraine to name just two rather poor nations. Ah, but the Europeans did settle on GSM from the get go and the US government left the technology to the marketplace hence the hodgepodge of incompatible networks, technology, frequencies, etc. with limited bandwidth and coverage that force the telecoms to “throttle” and/or “de-prioritize.”
    As for T-Mobile, I’ve been a subscriber since before it was T-Mobile (t’was VoiceStream) but I’m getting tired of their mumbo-jumbo and empty words. Instead of CEO stunts, how about building up a good NATIONWIDE network, eh?

    • Baxter DeBerry

      Thing is Europe is different, each carrier here has there own set of spectrum that they do not share, T-Mobile is focusing on a nation wide network they have to have low band to achieve it, that was the reason why Deutsch Telekom gave up it was to costly to build and compete with the bigger 3 at the time.. And they lacked the lower band spectrum.. Now T-Mobile has some not much but it does cover quite a few states and it will help substantially but T-Mobile has a long way to go but it can do it

  • Account Specialist

    PLEASE, CAM, DELETE THIS STUPID ARTICLE!

    I’VE HAD MORE CUSTOMERS BIT** AT ME TODAY THAN EVER BEFORE BECAUSE THEY ARE WORRIED THEY ARE BEING THROTTLED ON UNLIMITED PLANS!!

    T-Mobile does not throttle unlimited users. If the network becomes congested in a particular area, the entire tower prioritises traffic based upon usage and it prioritizes everyone, so that ALL customers can experience fast speeds at the SAME rate.

    • camguy1975

      I hope you’re wrong. I’m not a big data user, but I’d be ticked if my experience as slowed as a result of them. Targeting the data hogs is the way to go.

      • Account Specialist

        You are not being slowed because others are using the network. T-Mobile prioritises traffic based upon how many customers are on the same tower and usage.

        For instance, you may get 50+ Mbps during off peek times and 10-15 Mbps during the day or during heavy usage (as an example). The tower prioritises traffic to everyone based upon the need and demand of the traffic being sent and received to each customer.

        Only those customers who are violating the TOS are being targeted and “de-prioritized”

        • IceMan

          T-Mobile’s Customer Relations department never cease to amaze me. They decide to word it as “De-Prioritization.” But, fact is, your speeds a limited to 0.15mbps during this period. That’s throttling, not de-prioritization.

          EDIT: Seems like using data on the Data Strong network is a violation of TOS. Lol

        • Account Specialist

          If you are using your account as intended and are not violating the TOS, please reach out to TForce and ask that JB look into your account.

          I will investigate your claim. It may be that the network is congested in the area and I can work with our engineering and network management teams to get this expedited.

        • Android_God

          Use the TForce,Iceman!

        • Fabian Cortez

          It seems expecting the latest technology, fast speeds, consistent LTE without dropping to “3G” (1x on Sprint devices), no contracts, no overages, a healthy company with subscriber growth in 2015 is a violation of Sprint’s ToS.

        • IceMan

          If you think you’re on T-Mobile without a contract, you’re delusional. There’s a thing called phone financing which is essentially the same thing. I can buy my phones on any carrier off contract and have the same plan. I prefer the contract though for subsidized pricing because I’m not going anywhere soon.

        • Fabian Cortez

          If you think you’re on T-Mobile without a contract, you’re delusional.

          I’m not delusional. I buy my phones outright or used. And if I did finance one, it’d be at 0% interest with the ability to pay it off at any time without any time of penalty of restriction.

          There’s a thing called phone financing which is essentially the same thing. I can buy my phones on any carrier off contract and have the same plan.

          Ah, another lost service contract soul.

          Device contracts != service contracts. You can never, ever, ever, go to AT&T, Sprint, and/or Verizon and give them a bunch of money and ask them to lower your monthly payment or reduce the number of monthly payments on your opaque service contract. Service contracts with device subsidies only serve one interest, and that’s the carriers’.

          Notice how each carrier blames the migration from service contracts with subsidies to EIP as the number one reason for their drop in revenue.

          I prefer the contract though for subsidized pricing because I’m not going anywhere soon.

          And if you’re content with your phone for years 3 and 4, you have then paid for the price of that phone twice over. But hey, the more power to you if you enjoy being screwed even though you think you’re not.

        • IceMan

          I’m not delusional. I buy my phones outright or used. And if I did finance one, it’d be at 0% interest with the ability to pay it off at any time without any type of penalty or restriction.

          T-Mobile isn’t just going to let you keep their phone at 0% interest forever…You’ll owe them.

          Device contracts != service contracts. You can never, ever, ever, go to AT&T, Sprint, and/or Verizon and give them a bunch of money and ask them to lower your monthly payment or reduce the number of monthly payments on your opaque service contract. Service contracts with device subsidies only serve one interest, and that’s the carriers’.

          When you leave T-Mobile without paying off your phone, do you still owe them money? Yes. They’re tricking you again through deceptive advertising. They bind you to T-Mobile by locking you into a device finance. Besides, I prefer contracts for another reason. They don’t have the right to change your plan mid-way. T-Mobile is already saying your price will likely increase after 2 years from now.

          And if you’re content with your phone for years 3 and 4, you have then paid for the price of that phone twice over. But hey, the more power to you if you enjoy being screwed even though you think you’re not.

          I don’t understand this logic in the context it’s been given. I pay less than you do, with device subsidy. Even if I keep my current phone for 3 or 4 years, I’ll still be saving more money than you. Besides, how often do people actually keep their phone for 3 or 4 years?

        • Fabian Cortez

          T-Mobile isn’t just going to let you keep their phone at 0% interest forever…You’ll owe them.

          What? Do you not understand buying (not leasing) something at 0% interest?

          When you leave T-Mobile without paying off your phone, do you still owe them money? Yes. They’re tricking you again through deceptive advertising. They bind you to T-Mobile by locking you into a device finance. Besides, I prefer contracts for another reason. They don’t have the right to change your plan mid-way.

          Of course I would owe them money. I’m leaving with a piece of hardware that I agreed to pay for. There’s no trickery. It’s very clear and transparent. Two-year contracts are not transparent at all.

          T-Mobile isn’t changing people’s plans and have in fact let people lock in their promotional plans that were set to expire.

          T-Mobile is already saying your price will likely increase after 2 years from now.

          That’s not true. Legere said he would never increase rate plans, except for unlimited, within the next two years.

          What that means is that new subs. signing up for unlimited will not be able to purchase it at the current $30 price point. It does not mean existing customers will have their rates go up. There’s something called being grandfathered in, just like many of us $20 unlimited subs.

          I don’t understand this logic in the context it’s been given. I pay less than you do, with device subsidy.

          You are but one person. And you have no idea what I pay for my service.

          Even if I keep my current phone for 3 or 4 years, I’ll still be saving more money than you. Besides, how often do people actually keep their phone for 3 or 4 years?

          Ah, and that’s where there’s a lack of transparency. Sprint and the other service contract carriers love uninformed people like you. Likewise, there are plenty of people who aren’t in their 20s, in college anymore, and vote that tend to keep their phones.

          It costs Sprint x amount of money to purchase that phone at wholesale. They then “sell” it to you at MSRP but only collect ~$199 from you. The rest is hidden within your monthly service payments for the next two years. If you leave, you get hit with the $350 ETF so that they aren’t out of their money. Side bar, ever wonder why Sprint raised their ETF just before we knew they were getting the iPhone?

          The idea is that after your two years are up, everything is paid for, right? Well wrong. The carrier expects you to discard that “old” phone and put down another ~$199 and get yourself into another two-year contract.

          Now what if you liked your phone and didn’t want to put another ~$199 down? So you decide to keep your phone and plan for another two years. Well guess what? You have just paid for that phone twice over, with the same four year old phone to show for it. Meanwhile, that phone has been well paid for years ago and the carriers still collect money from you as the device has been secretly integrated into your service plan price.

          And at no point during that service contract can you go to your carrier and give them a bunch a money as say “I want my bill lowered, here’s the remaining price of the phone.” At least on 0% EIP, you can pay the phone off or make extra payments, which will eventually lower your total bill.

          But keep trying to make the case that two-year service contracts are better than EIP because you don’t understand the difference and because you prefer one over the other.

        • Android_God

          I think we have all agreed that T-Mobile throttles, John! Just go and turn off the throttle machine!

    • Android_God

      Stop throttling!!!!!

      • Account Specialist

        T-Mobile DOES NOT throttle unlimited users unless you are violating the TOS (bypassing HotSpot functionality past your allotment, torrents, etc)

        • Android_God

          Suuuuuuure, PAL!

    • Craig Foster

      I was throttled everyday at work. .05 mbps is a throttle. And throttling me because I hit some magical unknown number makes it even worse.

      • Account Specialist

        You are not being throttled. The network may be congested in your area and is the only reason why you would get these speeds. Try forcing your phone onto HSPA and see if that helps if your LTE connection is not as fast, or restart your phone and try again with a fresh connection.

        T-Mobile DOES NOT throttle users who use the service as intended. Those using Fox-Fi or other means to bypass HotSpot Tethering past your allotment are being targeted and throttled and “de-prioritized”

        • Craig Foster

          You just accused me of doing something I am not doing. I have rarely used my tethering and I don’t torrent. Customer service lied to me for three weeks about my terrible speed. Only when I confronted them about the throttling did they admit it. I just want to know what my cap is on my unlimited plan so I can stay under it.

        • Account Specialist

          I am not accusing you of anything. I simply stated your connection may be slow if you are in a congested area OR if you are using the service in violation of the TOS.

          I can look into this for you if you like. Please reach out to TForce and in your correspondence, please ask that JB look into your account and I can provide you with more details and an explanation on what is going on with your account.

          Please try re-starting your phone and connecting to the HSPA network and see if you notice a difference.

        • Android_God

          Sounds like you’re criticizing where he lives!

        • dtam

          It sounds like he’s going to try to get the network management team to improve the area (though I wouldn’t hold my breath)

        • Craig Foster

          I’ve talked to t-force, they just send me a link telling me about the throttling. I did force my phone down to HSPA and the speeds were definitely better. You’ve definitely made me adjust my usage though. Now I’m terrified to use my phone because I have this imaginary cap I’m trying to stay under so my phone doesn’t become useless again. I watched an hour of YouTube Monday and was really upset when I saw it used 1 GB of data. That had to push me in the top 3% because my account reset Monday.

        • Account Specialist

          If you don’t mind me asking, what plan do you currently have? $20 or $30 Unlimited Nationwide 4G or an older Preferred Web plan? Do you ever tether your device past what is included in your plan or other violations in the TOS? On average, how much data to you use per day on your device as well as the most data you have used in a month.

          I work for T-Mobile and use close to 150GB per month without issue. I do not violate the TOS and just watch HD movies and listen to music.

        • Craig Foster

          I have the new 2 for $100 unlimited family plan. I have literally tethered a total of about 2 minutes in the past 6 months and that was the other day at a deli. I usually stay around 15 GB a month but I became obsessed with cinemasins YouTube channel last month and watched a lot of YouTube. I was at 31 GB when the month ended. At about 930 am at work it would go down to .05 mbps and stay there until I left. But if I went to lunch and traveled down the road a few miles I would be back to blazing speed.

        • Account Specialist

          It sounds like the tower close to your work is congested. In your correspondence, please let me know the zip code of your work and I’ll get our network management team on it!

          Also, in the interim, try connecting to HSPA at work until the issue is resolved. I would only worry if your usage was a terabyte or more.

        • Craig Foster

          I didn’t know I was being throttled until someone from t-force told me I was being throttled. It stopped after my month reset but I just did a speed test and it is still slow at 1.5 mbps but that’s a lot better than .05 mbps. I’ll wait until you get back to me on Twitter and then I’ll give you addresses.

        • Craig Foster

          I got a DM back and they said they don’t know who JB is. How do I contact you?

        • Account Specialist

          I’ll be back to work on Monday from my mini stay-cation and I’ll look for your response. My guess is that the person who responded to you didn’t want to do the research about those who use the unlimited plan as intended and those who use the data against the TOS.

          T-Mobile is only targeting those customers who are deliberately going against the TOS. Most customers have nothing to worry about and this article only creates hysteria and confusion.

          Can I have the zip code of where you are experiencing issues? If that’s too public here, I understand.

        • Craig Foster

          I’ll be waiting patiently.

        • Craig Foster

          I sent a DM to t-force asking for JB.

  • First, it’s difficult to square away how deprioritization works on paper with how it’s working in the real world for most of us. From a first-person point of view (my own as well as reports from other users), the lowered speeds seem to occur with no apparent consistency with respect to time of day and day of week, happening even during unexpected hours. In addition, the lowered speeds are far lower than usable, often too low to even perform a speed test. We find download speeds (and sometimes but not always upload speeds) obliterated. When it occurs on my end, the only way to explain it is that it feels like I’m getting “paused,” but it happens so much that it makes something as simple as watching a video a frustrating experience. The funny thing is, had I not been deprioritized, I would’ve finished my video far sooner and been off of the network. Instead, it buffers every two minutes, making a simple 40 minute video last 70 minutes. While some services, like Playstore, will let you download videos that you’ve purchased, many services do not allow a download option. When possible, I do download videos and this makes a difference, but with live sporting events, for example, this isn’t a possibility. (NB: Before anyone says “Git dat dare interwebz at homes rabble rabble rabble,” realize that that response (a) misses the point and (b) doesn’t always apply such as when one is away from home; see TLDR for a review of the point).

    Second, I hate what appears to me to be an inconsistent message from the carrier. Either unlimited data is a sustainable idea or it’s not. If it isn’t, then why offer unlimited music streaming? Why offer data stash and promise people they can watch videos if they save up their data for some other time? Why offer ridiculously cheap tablet plans (“Match My Data” offer was absurdly inexpensive for 5gb LTE)? Why offer tethering with the data plans? Why advertise on the premise that you are finally free to use your devices the way they were intended, to stream videos and watch YouTube? All of that seems like snake oil in light of this issue. Please don’t bring up the T&Cs for signing up either because (a) it isn’t relevant to the argument here (which is about the contradiction between the brand image and the practice) and (b) a lot of us signed up for T-Mobile a lonnngggggg time ago.

    Third, there are better alternatives here. For one, instead of dropped 3%ers to unusable speed, split up the data evenly among all accessing the cell site. Either a 3%er will be able to continue doing what they’re doing and get done with it or it will have the same result as being deprioritized. At least in the latter case, it is reasonable in the sense that there really is no way for it to be otherwise. In the former case, however, it is arbitrary and punitive. Two, I would much rather see unlimited plans eliminated and generous data buckets offered. I would easily pay what I am paying now for 25 gb / month with no deprioritization than unlimited with deprioritization. Offer plans of 25, 50, 100, and 300 gb, priced appropriately. That would help resolve this issue, make more money for the company, help eliminate violations of T&Cs like tethering workarounds, and help eliminate home ISP replacements.

    Four, the shared resource argument is a bad one. For one, it works if it were the case that there were no other alternatives, but there are. Alternatives include but are not limited to: (a) eliminating unlimited data plans, (b) socializing wireless service, (c) upgrading technology, (d) requiring phone manufacturers to cap speeds somehow, (e) I’m sure there are others but don’t feel like putting a lot of time into this already lengthy post. For two, it misplaces the blame on the users; you would be better off complaining about the practice of offering unlimited plans in the first place. It’s nonsensical to tell people to take what they want with the condition of not taking too much lest they be penalized. The simplest solution is to simply stop telling people to take what they want in the first place.

    TLDR:

    (1) Is there a difference between the explanation of deprioritization and the exercise of it? First-hand accounts seem to suggest that the rule is sub-1mbps speed rather than the occasional exception.

    (2) Why advertise on the image of being able to do things if they are ultimately not possible? Furthermore, why encourage even more data consumption with promos and free services if the network is already struggling to support the influx of users and subscribers in many areas?

    (3) There are better alternatives to deprioritization. Would be nice if they were pursued instead unless there is a long-term technological solution to this.

    (4) Stop blaming heavy data users. That’s confusing the symptom for the disease.

    Concluding Thoughts: I’ll deal with it for now and am curious to see how it plays out long-term (5+ years). Either the technology will adapt to the demand, the company will have to flip flop on its policies, or the company will have to get more punitive on data consumption (which is a different way to flip flop on its policies). Count me as cautiously optimistic at the moment. I’m not going to pretend to be a spectrum expert or pretend to understand the theoretical limitations of wireless technology. I’m also not going to point to Verizon and AT&T as examples because they’re far more concerned with maximizing profit and monopolizing the industry than pursuing what’s best for customers. Several tech articles have argued that AT&T / Verizon are more than capable of beefing up their infrastructure to support their networks but prefer to purchase lower-frequency spectrum because (a) it’s temporarily more cost-effective because of its reach and (b) it handicaps smaller competitors.

    • VicRooLoo

      1. Throttling slows you down permanently for the month. De-prioritization kicks in at peak usage and when usage goes down you get your speed back

      2. Because the network isn’t struggling. The top 3% are penalized but the other 97% experience no such slow downs. At least ones not severe enough to be noticed.

      3. What kind of alternatives? There’s just 3 that I can think of: throttle aka slow down, cut off, or charge more

      4. The data heavy users are the disease. This isn’t a ‘symptom’ of a poor network. If it was a poor network, they would have to penalize a lot more than just 3% for the good of 97%. Network isn’t a magical Mary Poppins bag of infinite capabilities. It has limits and those limits are always being lifted but that doesn’t mean it is always ahead of demand.

      • 1. Doesn’t address the question.

        2. Doesn’t address the question.

        3. Alternatives given above but those are acceptable too.

        4. Misses the point and is incorrect unless you’re equivocating with your use of network. Congestion is an infrastructure problem and deprioritization occurs during site congestion. Furthermore, in no way has it been suggested by T-Mobile or even the article above that the intent behind prioritization implementation is punitive in nature. I agree as much about limits though, even having taken the time to mention that in my initial post.

        I’ll deal with it for now and am curious to see how it plays out long-term (5+ years). Either the technology will adapt to the demand, the company will have to flip flop on its policies, or the company will have to get more punitive on data consumption (which is a different way to flip flop on its policies).

        The implication above is that technology in its current state is not keeping up with demand and that if there are limits, it will need addressed in other ways.

        The unlimited data isn’t even really the problem here and so eliminating those plans will only decrease the probability of this happening but will not fix it. The problem is excessive bandwidth use at any given point in time, which occurs regardless of whether one is unlimited or not and depends wholly on the nature of the consumption. On a 5gb plan, I’ve watched videos and that consumes just as much bandwidth for that duration of time as anyone else watching a video. The rationale here seems to be, “You’ve got to watch 20 videos, even though that’s what you purchased unlimited for in the first place, and so we’re going to let this guy watch his one video.” Slow us both down equally (which some suggest *is* what’s supposed to be done). This is why the freeway and buffet analogies here are terrible and misleading. In this case, speed and size are proportionate to one another, such that the faster you’re “driving”, the more room you’re taking up. Deprioritization is like taking a shrink ray and temporarily shrinking the bigger vehicles, except they seem to be targeting specifically the regulars. Think of it this way: If there were four of us trying to squeeze through a door, one solution is to shrink all of us equally to the size of halflings while another is to shrink just one of us to the size of a coin letting the others go through at normal size. Deprioritization seems to be the latter in practice.

        The solution isn’t eliminating unlimited data then, it’s capping data speeds, but that has other drawbacks, such as costing the possibility for the world’s fastest network reputation, accusation of actual throttling, complaints about not being able to use high-end devices as intended, not being able to stream in high quality, etc.

        From that perspective, deprioritization is acceptable provided that the problem can eventually be technologically addressed in other ways. If it can’t, then these other options need to be adopted, sooner rather than later. Early reports of 20×20 are generally positive.

  • Jay Holm

    Carrier aggregation sure would help!

  • that guy

    sounds like they need to make the effects of this data prioritization less extreme. I’m sure the system was designed with good intent but like most need tweaking once results are seen

    • VicRooLoo

      Making the effects less severe or extreme defeats its purpose…

    • maestroalvarez

      I agree. 0.01Mbps is UNACCEPTABLE. Lower me to 3-5Mbps if peak performance is 20-30Mbps in nearby areas. Cutting usage of 3% cannot possibly affect the network experience of 97%

  • IceMan

    So, since T-Mobile is growing at such a rapid pace, they’re resorting to throttling instead of just increasing capacity? Whatever happened to having the “Data Strong Network”?

    • VicRooLoo

      Implying that they aren’t increasing capacity as well.

      • IceMan

        If they can’t back up their claims of having the most capacity per person on their network, then yes. They deserve to be pointed out for their false claims.

        Throttling ‘Truly Unlimited’ users to 0.15mbps is NOT okay. I don’t understand how you can justify it.

        • Fabian Cortez

          You know very well that this isn’t a spectrum capacity issue and are attempting to brush off the very same issue that plagues AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon.

        • IceMan

          They’ve done it to themselves, by attracting data-heavy users and advertising that they can watch live streams and netflix all they want without consequences.

        • Fabian Cortez

          They’ve always attracted data-heavy users.

          Just people a bunch of whiners come to the internet and proclaim issues on a few [cell] sites doesn’t mean these slowdowns are occurring nationwide on every site.

          I’d imagine that the sites that are awaiting the backhaul increase are currently pending with the backhaul provider.

          Sites where I break 115 Mbps in heavily-congested areas tend to do just fine. The sites that experience prioritization (slow speeds during congestion) barely hit 30 Mbps when they’re uncongested. And I’m in a 20×20 MHz 4×2 MIMO market.

      • maestroalvarez

        The point is, stop selling seats if the bus is already full. Increase capacity, then open up unlimited data plans.

        • Short bus for maestro

          The bus isn’t full, menso. But I wouldn’t expect a teacher to get this since the teacher is a teacher for a reason to begin with. If you had read the article or if you read but lacked the minimum reading comprehension you would understand that “bus” can only go so fast when traffic is slow do to congestion. There’s room in the bus, Mr I can’t understand what I read, but a certain times traffic is bad. Now traffic isn’t bad always but sometimes.

        • dtam

          Err…the business of cell phones (and landline phones before that) is you only build up enough capacity for a percentage of your users. And this is usually fine because of diversity (not everyone is using it at the same time)

      • Fabian Cortez

        Or at least trying to.

        They are at the mercy of the backhaul providers.

        • IceMan

          Now just a moment ago you were bashing Sprint for having backhaul issues, then you use that same argument in defense of T-Mobile. Oh, the irony.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Now just a moment ago you were bashing Sprint for having backhaul issues, then you use that same argument in defense of T-Mobile. Oh, the irony.

          Troll me harder.

          There are many different pillars related to backhaul. Pay close attention, because I’ll only say this once.

          1. Carrier being lazy/lackadaisical (behind the times, lack of foresight, etc.) and/or cheap: i.e. Sprint)

          2. Carrier ordering backhaul but backhaul not being fulfilled
          a. Backhaul provider dragging their feet/resistance
          b. Backhaul provider encountering issues beyond their own control (weather, permits, equipment, etc.)

        • IceMan

          All I got from that is.
          T-Mobile suffers from Backhaul issues – It’s ok.
          Sprint suffers from Backhaul issues – OMG END OF THE WORLD. BURN SPRINT BURN.

        • Fabian Cortez

          All I got from that is.T-Mobile suffers from Backhaul issues – It’s ok.
          Sprint suffers from Backhaul issues – OMG END OF THE WORLD. BURN SPRINT BURN.

          I guess that’s what happens when one is incapable of accepting the facts.

    • blakedunc235

      I use about 40-60GB a month on T-Mobile and either I have never been deprioritized or I have never noticed it happening. Either way, it’s not too bad seeing as I’m usually streaming HD music or videos from my phone. If a person is using more than say 80gb then I mean come on, what do you expect if you’re using it as a home network. I got 62GB this past month and that was kind of me trying to do that just to see if they would deprioritize me. Id honestly say that the data capacity that I get is much better than what my wife gets on Verizon. We live in Atlanta and I’m usually getting around 50-100Mbps download speeds with my nexus 6 and with my wife’s lg g3 the fastest I’ve seen her get is about 50-70Mbps.

      • IceMan

        You’re conveniently in an area where T-Mobile isn’t burdened by a high amount of users. It’ll only get worse when there’s 1 million subscribers being added each quarter.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yet somehow Sprint won’t suffer the same fate if they somehow ever manage to add 1 million subs. per quarter for eight straight quarters in a row.

        • IceMan

          This article is about T-Mobile on a T-Mobile based website. Please try to stay on topic.

        • Fabian Cortez

          This article is about T-Mobile on a T-Mobile based website. Please try to stay on topic.

          Because trolling when you don’t have or use T-Mobile on a T-Mobile fan site is staying on topic?

          Makes a lot of sense.

        • IceMan

          I am a cellular network enthusiast. There is no rule that says I have to have an active T-Mobile line to visit this site, or comment on it.

        • TMO Dave

          Non T-Mobile Customers, please limit your stupidity layden trolling to a minimum. Cellular network enthusiasts wouldn’t be on Sprint even if they had half a brain. That’s like suggesting you are a professional football player and for that reason you play pro football in Canada – bc Canadian football is where its at. That’s like saying, you’re a rocket scientists, and chose to work at Radio Shack because of how “cutting edge” the work is there. Being a Sprint customer and claiming you’re a network enthusiast, yeah right. If you were a car enthusiast you’d realize you are driving a Yugo while checking out and reading about all the cool BMWs, Mercedes, and VWs (T-Mobile). Man you hit your dumb comment quota. Please STFU or I will deprioritize your tomfoolery.

        • IceMan

          Seeing as T-Mobile’s defense is to bring Sprint down, I’ll play along. Sprint, for me works. Simple as that. Why would I double my bill for a network that will de-prioritize me? Think long and hard. Most T-Mobile customers are a product of advertising and will blindly follow King Legere anywhere.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Sprint, for me works. Simple as that. Why would I double my bill for a network that will de-prioritize me? Think long and hard. Most T-Mobile customers are a product of advertising and will blindly follow King Legere anywhere.

          For the last time, all carriers practice prioritization. They just don’t have the gonads to come out and be public about it.

          Here’s some history: All of those slow speed tests from Sprint users, the same speeds that has created the exodus from Sprint, are due to prioritization due to their insufficient T1 backhaul.

          And an FYI: That’s only one part of Sprint’s problem.

        • IceMan

          Now wait a second, if I’m getting good service from Sprint, both CS and Network-wise, I’m contributing to their quarterly losses. Wasn’t that what you said the other day?

          P.S. I looked at T-Mobile’s maps and found numerous dead zones where I frequent so I opted to stick with Sprint. Besides, Sprint just added a new tower near me which covered the only zone where I dropped to 3G so that issue is no longer present.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Now wait a second, if I’m getting good service from Sprint, both CS and Network, I’m contributing to their quarterly losses. Wasn’t that what you said the other day?

          I said you’re contributing to their quarterly loss by sticking around and receiving benefits that they cannot afford. Sprint ate up a near 1 billion in cash last quarter.

          P.S. I looked at T-Mobile’s maps and found numerous dead zones where I frequent so I opted to stick with Sprint.

          Actual T-Mobile users in Jacksonville beg to differ. T-Mobile offers a true, free, risk-free trial. But you rather rely on coverage maps, anecdotal evidence, and your bias toward T-Mobile.

          Besides, Sprint just added a new tower near me which covered the only zone where I dropped to 3G so that issue is no longer present.

          That’s funny how that tower popped up in the span 12 hours to cover your admittedly “I may drop down to 3G often” comment.

          Spare us all.

        • IceMan

          I said you’re contributing to their quarterly loss by sticking around and receiving benefits that they cannot afford. Sprint ate up a near 1 billion in cash last quarter.

          That 1 billion in cash is mainly a result from Sprint’s marketing and attracting customers from the CYBIH promo. Customer retention is something all carriers have to consider.

          Actual T-Mobile users in Jacksonville beg to differ. T-Mobile offers a true, free, risk-free trial. But you rather rely on coverage maps, anecdotal evidence, and your bias toward T-Mobile.

          If T-Mobile claims that they have coverage in areas they don’t, then I’m definitely not going to chance areas that they say they don’t cover.

          That’s funny how that tower popped up in the span 12 hours to cover your admittedly “I may drop down to 3G often” comment.

          occasionally*. Every carrier has weak spots, even Verizon. It’d be foolish to say you’ve never been on EDGE on T-Mobile. I’m referencing the quote you were referencing when I was talking about signal in Jacksonville awhile back. But, you’ll dismiss this saying how Sprint’s lied to me and I should expect better of them.

        • Fabian Cortez

          That 1 billion in cash is mainly a result from Sprint’s marketing and attracting customers from the CYBIH promo. Customer retention is something all carriers have to consider.

          So now we’re making excuses? That’s a lot of money to still lose 201,000 valuable postpaid phone subs.

          If T-Mobile claims that they have coverage in areas they don’t, then I’m definitely not going to chance areas that they say they don’t cover.

          I could say the same for Sprint. Along with the hundreds of thousands that are leaving.

          occasionally*. Every carrier has weak spots, even Verizon. It’d be foolish to say you’ve never been on EDGE on T-Mobile. I’m referencing the quote you were referencing when I was talking about signal in Jacksonville awhile back. But, you’ll dismiss this saying how Sprint’s lied to me and I should expect better of them.

          Oh now it’s “occasionally?”

          I haven’t been on EDGE in well over a year. And I routinely travel between two market areas and up and down I95. My phone is permanently locked to LTE (benefits of VoLTE :)).

        • Fabian Cortez

          I am a cellular network enthusiast.

          Now that’s an oxymoron. Sprint user + network enthusiast.

          You live in a good T-Mobile market and have even commented about how on Sprint, you often drop down to “3G.” Yet you still cling to that carrier and pay them every month. Maybe you’re just a blind and/or stubborn “cellular enthusiast.”

          There is no rule that says I have to have an active T-Mobile line to visit this site, or comment on it.

          There’s a difference between “comment” and your blatant trolling. You know, with a comment like the following: So, since T-Mobile is growing at such a rapid pace, they’re resorting to throttling instead of just increasing capacity? Whatever happened to having the “Data Strong Network”?

        • IceMan

          How am I trolling? T-Mobile is throttling users in congested areas. I’m saying it how it is. You’re the one that brought Sprint into this and made it a Sprint vs T-Mobile argument.

        • Fabian Cortez

          How am I trolling? T-Mobile is throttling users in congested areas. I’m saying it how it is. You’re the one that brought Sprint into this and made it a Sprint vs T-Mobile argument.

          You’re trolling because you don’t have T-Mobile as your service provider and you are on here asking rhetorical questions in an effort to stir the pot.

          You know exactly what you’re doing Ascertion from S4GRU.

        • IceMan

          What is this, witch hunt hour? I wouldn’t expect anything less from Fabian.

        • Fabian Cortez

          What is this, witch hunt hour? I wouldn’t expect anything less from Fabian.

          You’re out of steam so now you’re derailing.

          Your February 2015 account here under a different name only supports mine and everyone else’s assertion that you’re nothing but a troll.

          It’s a shame that the tactics employed by you and your crew cast so much negative light on what Robert and AJ try/tried to achieve.

          T4GRU seems much more tame and mature in retrospect.

        • IceMan

          I did not come in to represent S4GRU, nor did I even mention anything of it. You have too much time on your hands if you’re going from site to site figuring out everyone’s aliases. You’ve done the derailing since you can’t refute nearly any of my points. All you do is bring up how I’m a Sprint consumer/a member of another site, without any logical reasoning or explanations to your points.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I did not come in to represent S4GRU, nor did I even mention anything of it. You have too much time on your hands if you’re going from site to site figuring out everyone’s aliases.

          I was well-informed by someone as to what your true alias is. If you cannot back your comments with a consistent name, then why would and should anyone take you seriously?

          You’ve done the derailing since you can’t refute nearly any of my points. All you do is bring up how I’m a Sprint consumer/a member of another site, without any logical reasoning or explanations to your points.

          More delusion.

          I have countered your points quite well. So much so that you have resorted to unnecessary derailment. I have also exposed the reason for your posting on this website.

        • Dave

          Who would your informants be, troll? Me, myself and I?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Who would your informants be, troll? Me, myself and I?

          Says the troll who comes out of the woodwork with this fantastically-insightful comment.

        • Dave

          It wasn’t an invitation for a personal attack, but I guess that shows what kind of person you are…

        • Fabian Cortez

          It wasn’t an invitation for a personal attack, but I guess that shows what kind of person you are…

          Take a hard look at your original comment to me.

        • Dave

          Yes… So who is your wonderfully informative informant again?

        • IceMan

          I was well-informed by someone as to what your true alias is. If you cannot back your comments with a consistent name, then why would and should anyone take you seriously?

          So, supposedly there’s a lot of discussion about me behind the scenes. Hmmm…

          P.S. If you want credibility, you should unhide your previous comments. Not much to stand behind.

          More delusion.

          I have countered your points quite well. So much so that you have resorted to unnecessary derailment. I have also exposed the reason for your posting on this website.

          I’ve made many T-Mobile friendly posts throughout FireceWireless, S4GRU, and even TmoNews. This post, however, stands out because people clearly know they’re being throttled whereas the practice is much more rare on Sprint.

        • Fabian Cortez

          So, supposedly there’s a lot of discussion about me behind the scenes. Hmmm…

          No.

          P.S. If you want credibility, you should unhide your previous comments. Not much to stand behind.

          Says the person with the new account under a different name with the same private profile.

          I locked my profile a long time ago to make you trolls work harder.

          I’ve made many T-Mobile friendly posts throughout FireceWireless, S4GRU, and even TmoNews. This post, however, stands out because people clearly know they’re being throttled whereas the practice is much more rare on Sprint.

          I don’t care how many nice things you say about T-Mobile. I really don’t. They don’t pay me; I pay them [for service].

          You’ve made many posts on this article in an effort to incite some sort of uprising with disinformation when the article was rather clear.

          So please read the article and understand the difference between “throttling” and “prioritization” if you intend on donning the “cellular enthusiast” crown.

        • IceMan

          Lol. The guy that says Edge is a better network experience. The guy that says no signal is better than roaming. The guy that apparently discovered my alias on another site in order to get “dirt” on them. The guy that things T-Mobile has better in building coverage than Sprint. The guy that thinks when T-Mobile slows their speed to 0.15mbps, it’s not throttling. The guy that refutes my facts because I’m a Sprint subscriber. Supposedly, you’ve won the internet today. Have a cookie.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Lol. The guy that says Edge is a better network experience. The guy that says no signal is better than roaming. The guy that apparently discovered my alias on another site in order to get “dirt” on them. The guy that things T-Mobile has better in building coverage than Sprint. The guy that thinks when T-Mobile slows their speed to 0.15mbps, it’s not throttling. The guy that refutes my facts because I’m a Sprint subscriber. Supposedly, you’ve won the internet today. Have a cookie.

          More delusion and deflection. That’s definitely a good way to be taken seriously, “cellular enthusiast.”

        • Johnny

          T4GRU is owned by the same exact, unbiased person..

        • Fabian Cortez

          T4GRU is owned by the same exact, unbiased person..

          Read my comment again.

        • Johnny

          Yes, please read my comment again.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yes, please read my comment again.

          I’d appreciate it you didn’t reply to me if you’re going to essentially repeat what I said.

          If you don’t understand my original comment then that’s on you.

        • TK – Indy

          “You know exactly what you’re doing Ascertion from S4GRU.”

          Wow, his secret identity revealed? If true, he sounds important.

        • blakedunc235

          Actually there is proof that sprint does throttle often. I’ve seen it on bgr Engadget and reddita couple of times. Like I said before, I used 62GB this past month and never once did I get throttled on my unlimited plan. AND I live in Atlanta which is probably more congested than most other areas. If there was a place and a reason that a person would get throttled for I would probably be him

        • IceMan

          Supposedly I’ve seen more discussion and proof of throttling on T-Mobile taking place in the last week than I have of Sprint since they released LTE. I don’t doubt it happens, it’s in their ToS, but T-Mobile’s is obviously noticed on a higher scale, hence the amount of publicity they’re getting for it.

        • blakedunc235

          I’m not saying that T-Mobile isn’t doing it, in just saying that if they are, they are either doing it to where it’s hardly noticeable on an unlimited plan or the threshold for when they start to throttle is higher than most carriers. Either way I haven’t noticed it and I use more data than like 3 families combined. The key here is this, is the proof you’re finding of people being throttled of people on their truly unlimited plans and what speeds are they bring throttled to. Also where are they

        • CNET BudgetDude

          Technically it’s not an oxymoron. IceMan’s claim, that he is a cellular network enthusiast, however, makes him a living contradiction. He may just be very dumb if being an enthusiast means he follows the major networks, understands them well (or at least he seems to think so), but willfully gets service from the worst of the 4 major carriers, Sprint. Independent research clearly shows Sprint’s data network, in general, is absolutely the slowest. Anecdotally, I was shocked and dismayed to discover that Sprints Spark data rates are almost as good as T-Mobile’s 3G. Yes that’s not a typo, from anecdotal test I’ve personally run, Sprint’s advanced 4G data rates tend to be slower than T-Mobiles 3G data rates.

          A little about myself:
          – primary line AT&T with a smartphone (on average I use less than 2GB of data) on a deeply discounted family value share account with employer discount
          – mobile data LTE hotspot from T-Mobile 5GB plan with Unlimited 2G speeds on a friends matching data plan (maxed at 5GB because he has unlimited data)
          – FREE RingPlus feature phone (Sprint MVNO). I’ve had this for more than 2 years. I use it mostly for voice roaming on Verizon @ inexpensive rates. Sprints is not entirely useless it’s a great back-up phone or emergency line and comes in handy when dealing with random vendors (think Craigslist, food delivery, etc.). Plus with RingPlus or even Ting at more than $6 per month great way to get Verizon voice roaming on that rarer occasion.

          My total cost per month has averaged under $32 (Including 3 top ups to use RingPlus voice roaming on Verizon). Sure I don’t get subsidized phones, but I pay less (total cost) per device on AT&T with 0% financing.

          On a side note, I use the T-Mobile LTE hotspot all the time. I don’t care what speeds are on the network – whatever I want to do, stream video, surf websites, or stream music – IT JUST WORKS. On occasion the kids watch Netflix on long drives no problem. I always use up my allocated 5GB data bucket. Other than random dead spot where even my AT&T line losses service on occasion, coverage has never been an issue. The best part is I never pay for overage on AT&T and I get high speed unlimited music streaming for just $10 all thanks to T-Mobile. When I go passed my 5GB bucket I still use the T-Mobile hotspot for everything except streaming video. It’s very usable and probably faster than Sprint’s 3G. Yes my throttled speeds when I surpass my high speed 5GB bucket probably outperform 3G on Sprint most of the time lol. I don’t claim to be a network enthusiast, I’m just an informed and frugal consumer.

        • IceMan

          Lol, a living contradiction. Well, whatever floats your boat. Sure glad you’re under the impression T-Mobile is the best with those dead zones.

        • protect yo net

          The guy never said T-Mobile is the best, in fact he uses AT&T as his primary service. Also, you forgot to add you are not only a contradiction but not very bright – if in fact you understand the 4 national carriers – and still use Sprint as your primary service. The Now Network is the worst data network, that’s a general truth and such has been the case in recent history 3-5 years at least. The independent research is tough to refute.

          @CNET BudgetDude, does the HotSpot also get free unlimited international roaming? You have a cool set up. You may not be a “cellular network enthusiast” but your set up seems smarter than this Sprint Tool that claims to be following the industry. If he’s paying anywhere near $45 for service on Sprint he needs to get a life/ friend and Run to T-Mobile Stat!

        • Fabian Cortez

          I believe it comes with international data roaming.

          That’d actually be a neat way to get free calls overseas while being mobile.

          Set the tablet to hotspot and connect the phone and use Wi-Fi calling.

        • IceMan

          I’ve never said Sprint was the best. You’re putting words into my mouth. You can continue to make this personal, but I’m not stooping to your level. Everything I’ve said to Fabian is what is true – no bias, whereas everything the “crew” says has been nothing short of typical insults and bashing. Good Bye.

        • Guest

          IceMan, your points are valid and respectfully delivered. There’s no point in wasting any more time. This site gives them the freedom to act obscenely with no consequences, and they take full advantage.

          There’s only so much entertaining people who call your every post “trolling, delusional, nonsensical, misinformation, disinformation, derailing, deflective, sickening, disturbing, shameful”, and so on.

        • IceMan

          I know, I had a lot of fun with Fabian. Lol, him and his crew can’t defend themselves or T-Mobile so they just derail the logical.

        • protect yo net

          I never said you said, Sprint was the best, idiot. I said the guy you tried to make fun of didn’t say T-Mobile was the best. His primary line is on AT&T, so you have be pretty boneheaded to interpret that as an endorsement of T-Mobile. You’re the one putting words in people’s mouth. Reread his post and apologize for your lies.

          Nothing personal. Your dumb posts no matter how respectfully delivered are still dumb. I don’t know you well enough to make this personal, but based on the sample of posts you make you’re either ill informed or a pretty dumb person. Your own words betray you. You have no one to blame but yourselves for giving the impression that you are a stupid person. Sorry nothing personal, I’m just going on what you give me to work with.

        • IceMan

          Nothing personal, yet everything you posted was personal. Lol I’m going to ignore your posts from now.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Dude, no need to call people idiot or make this personal. Relax.

        • Hector Arteaga

          Sorry you feel that way. I’m totally not against you commenting and having a good discussion with us. I want to hear what your Sprint experience is like, but try to remain objective.

        • blakedunc235

          You can easily root your phone and get international free roaming

        • blakedunc235

          Dude for real if it’s been a while that you’ve used T-Mobile uyou should try itagain with a good phone. I don’t have any dead spots or anything and on my drive from Atalanta to Columbus I will have LTE the whole time going through the rural areas even when my wife’s phone drops down to 3g on Verizon. But seriously as a person who has had T-Mobile since the sidekick 2, they have changed for the better.

        • Hector Arteaga

          I’ve had both and I’m not really sure why you think Tmo is inferior to Sprint. I can honestly say I’ve had a much better experience with tmo. Perhaps if you live in Cincinatti I would understand, but so far I love it here in Memphis (the service anyway lol).

        • Fabian Cortez

          I believe that once you go over that bucket, you still stream music at high speed under music freedom.

          I really wouldn’t know because I’m on an unlimited plan and I rarely stream music.

        • blakedunc235

          That is correct, streaming music is always 4g unless he has a grandfathered plan

        • Hector Arteaga

          Fabian, come on man. I disagree with what he’s been saying, but why can’t you be a Sprint user and be a network enthusiast?

        • blakedunc235

          Maybe so. However when I’m in Columbus ga which is a lot smaller and not nearly as dense I’m still able to get speeds around 20-40Mbps without any I’ll effects from my data usage

        • blakedunc235

          Wait a second, did you just say that Atlanta isn’t burdened by a high amount of subscribers for T-Mobile? Are you kidding me dude or are you just retarded. Atlanta alone has a higher population than the state of Alabama… That’s right… The entire state. I’m pretty sure that there is a huge subscriber base, which is the reason that we get most of the network updates in the first wave of cities.

        • IceMan

          I’m referring to the location(s) he frequents, which isn’t congested like other areas.

        • blakedunc235

          That was me that posted it.. I’m saying that I live in Atlanta and I don’t frequent Columbus go there maybe once every 2 months for work. If anything I would be throttled in Atlanta yet I’ve never experienced it

        • Hector Arteaga

          IceMan, I’ve had both tmo and Sprint within the last few months. When I was in Phoenix, I experienced heavy de-prioritization on my then LG G3, while my wife was still hitting 10Mbps on her Note 3. The bad thing is that I was at 7gb for the month and she was at 3gb. So, it’s pretty safe to say that they both have similar issues in this regard (I admit, from my experience).

        • IceMan

          I’ve visited Phoenix and I will agree with you that T-Mobile is superior there. Sprint’s pending B26 rollout due to IBEZ and their site density isn’t as good as T-Mobile in Phoenix.

      • Ozgur Sen

        This sounds like a propaganda to me to sway people away from T-mobile.

        Because I never experienced it and no one posted pictures or evidence of de-prioritization I just can’t believe peoples words on the comments section.

        • blakedunc235

          Idk if it’s propaganda but T-Mobile probably had a higher tolerance for the amount of data that you have to use before they throttle you. Sprint has been known to throttle you once you go over 5GB. that would be almost day one for me.

        • Ozgur Sen

          I have been using on average 30 gb a month since I upgraded my line from 3gb to unlimited. As I said I need evidence not peoples claims. I’m going to try to get de prioitized this month by constantly downloading torrents and large files. If t mobile slows me down then I’ll believe these claims. I will also post pictures of speed tests and total data used. I read an article on XDA developers and this guy used 2 TB and did not get throttled.

        • blakedunc235

          I’m right here with you. I would like to know an exact number to get to before they throttle you. Even if that is like 80-100 GB we are still getting way more than what we pay for. I just don’t see how someone could use 2TB that’s incredible. Good luck man

    • Fabian Cortez

      So, since T-Mobile is growing at such a rapid pace, they’re resorting to throttling instead of just increasing capacity? Whatever happened to having the “Data Strong Network”?

      As a Sprint user and S4GRU premier sponsor, you should know better than anyone else about the difficulties and constraints related to increasing backhaul.

      • IceMan

        I may drop down to 3G occasionally, but at least it’s a CLEAR sign of what speeds I should expect. T-Mobile shouldn’t advertise unlimited data with the motto of “Fastest LTE Network”, if they’re slowing people down to sub-1mbps.

        • Fabian Cortez

          All four major carriers practice prioritization.

          Sprint was and still is notorious for it since a lot of their sites are still fed by T1. Let’s take issue with that.

        • IceMan

          I think it’s funny you’re emphasizing that a lot of Sprint’s sites are fed by T1 lines when T-Mobile still covers millions of people with a 2G technology.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I think it’s funny that your counter argument is T-Mobile’s 2G technology when Sprint covers millions of people with 3G and 4G technology at 2G speeds.

          At least T-Mobile is maximizing their limited tech. But let’s casually forget about the 2G-to-LTE upgrade path.

          Oh and I see you’re ignoring my ascertion about your premiere sponsorship. Good to know.

        • IceMan

          Comparing Edge to EvDo is…stupid. You, as a network enthusiast like myself, know that EvDo is capable of higher speed throughput than Edge. I tend to find myself arguing with you with the same points you make about Sprint all the time.

          It’s 1 month away from mid-year 2015 and there’s still a lot of Edge present. Also that EOY2015 map will not happen, it’s impossible.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Comparing Edge to EvDo is…stupid. You, as a network enthusiast like myself, know that EvDo is capable of higher speed throughput than Edge.

          Not on Sprint with their speeds. I’ve used EV-DO Rev. A on Verizon and Sprint and let me tell you that there’s a world of a difference. Go ask anyone that jumped to Sprint when they got the iPhone 4 (CDMA-only version). Especially those subs. that came from Verizon. Sprint even has the nerve to label 1x as “3G” on their phones.

          I tend to find myself arguing with you with the same points you make about Sprint all the time.

          Yet you’re here, trolling on a T-Mobile fan site, on an article about T-Mobile, and bringing up Sprint.

          It’s 1 month away from mid-year 2015 and there’s still a lot of Edge present.

          Yet at their Q1 earnings, they said they were on track for 280 million POPs of LTE by mid-2015. You also have to define mid-2015.

          So now who to believe? A company that has added 1 million+ subs. per quarter for that last 8 quarters in a row? The same company that has met and/or exceeded their network goals. Or a serial Sprint troll who refuses to see the writing on the wall and somehow believes that Sprint is competing?

          *pause*

          Also that EOY2015 map will not happen, it’s impossible.

          Of course it’s impossible when you’ve been constantly overpromised and underdelivered for years by Sprint. How’s that 4G fee/tax? I’m sure the millions of subs. that didn’t get WiMAX just love and believe in Sprint’s possibilities.

          As far as reaching 300 million POPs, you don’t really believe that once mid-2015 comes around, that they’ll just start expanding and only have 6 months? I am very confident that as a healthy and smart business, they’ve been working on this expansion for quite some time now (2014).

        • IceMan

          Not on Sprint with their speeds. I’ve used EV-DO Rev. A on Verizon and Sprint and let me tell you that there’s a world of a difference. Go ask anyone that jumped to Sprint when they got the iPhone 4 (CDMA-only version). Especially those subs. that came from Verizon. Sprint even has the nerve to label 1x as “3G” on their phones.

          No, the maximum performance on EvDo RevA is up to 3mbps. Edge doesn’t even break 500kbps. Your experience with it does not represent factual data.

          Yet you’re here, trolling on a T-Mobile fan site, on an article about T-Mobile, and bringing up Sprint.

          I actually didn’t mention Sprint at all until you did.

          Yet at their Q1 earnings, they said they were on track for 280 million POPs of LTE by mid-2015. You also have to define mid-2015.

          So now who to believe? A company that has added 1 million+ subs. per quarter for that last 8 quarters in a row? The same company that has met and/or exceeded their network goals. Or a serial Sprint troll who refuses to see the writing on the wall and somehow believes that Sprint is competing?

          Saying/doing is not the same, as you like to point out often.

          Of course it’s impossible when you’ve been constantly overpromised and underdelivered for years by Sprint. How’s that 4G fee/tax? I’m sure the millions of subs. that didn’t get WiMAX just love and believe in Sprint’s possibilities.

          I’d like to see T-Mobile expand to that level of coverage within 6 months. It’ll either be a crappy job, by placing 1 additional site in to cover 44 miles each, or it won’t be done at all. Verizon didn’t even reach that level of coverage that fast.

          By the way, I pay an average of $45/line. And that include device subsidy. I can get that on T-Mobile, if I wanted to be throttled after 1GB.

          As far as reaching 300 million POPs, you don’t really believe that once mid-2015 comes around, that they’ll just start expanding and only have 6 months? I am very confident that as a healthy and smart business, they’ve been working on this expansion for quite some time now (2014).

          Right, according to the last few months, it seems T-Mobile will just paint their map pink with bogus claims that a customer verified a connection in an area that’s no signal.

        • Fabian Cortez

          No, the maximum performance on EvDo RevA is up to 3mbps. Edge doesn’t even break 500kbps. Your experience with it does not represent factual data.

          It’s 3.1 Mbps but I was clearly talking about the data speeds experienced by a true EV-DO Rev. A network versus a sorry excuse of one.

          Saying/doing is not the same, as you like to point out often.

          I’m not going to debate T-Mobile’s vs. Sprint’s history. We all know that Sprint sucks with deadlines. Is it really that hard to set the bar low so that you can exceed it?

          I’d like to see T-Mobile expand to that level of coverage within 6 months.

          Again, if you think they’re waiting until 6 months to expand to 300 million POPs then I am absolutely done conversing with you. Here’s an adequate place for you to work then: careers.sprint{dot}com

          It’ll either be a crappy job, by placing 1 additional site in to cover 44 miles each, or it won’t be done at all. Verizon didn’t even reach that level of coverage that fast.

          You have zero evidence that it’ll be “a crappy job.” There isn’t even a record of T-Mobile deploying their network in the piss poor fashion like Sprint.

          Again, you come across as an uneducated “cellular enthusiast” who has been jaded by Sprint’s terrible network over the years.

          By the way, I pay an average of $45/line. And that include device subsidy. I can get that on T-Mobile, if I wanted to be throttled after 1GB.

          I don’t care. You don’t have nearly have the same value that’s included with T-Mobile and you still continue on with that subsidy nonsense.

          Right, according to the last few months, it seems T-Mobile will just paint their map pink with bogus claims that a customer verified a connection in an area that’s no signal.

          Again, you have zero evidence of this.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Yeah, I ascert that you are one.

  • Android_God

    It’s a real shame that T-Mobile throttles!

    • Fabian Cortez

      T-Mobile has reiterated a number of times that it doesn’t “throttle” customers. And, as much as this might feel like being throttled to the high users in congested areas, it isn’t.

      RTA

  • Chris

    I was iniitially blaming my problems on deprioritization due to our total family use of data, roughly 140GB per month. But I use under 20GB a month and my speeds in some places have been unusable for the last month. It’s just capacity problems now. T-Mobile needs to do better.

    • 1ceTr0n

      Back to Verizon with you

  • 1ceTr0n

    It’s the asshats who are bittorrenting huge files using cell planes for their damn wifi hotspotting for their friends

  • Greg Victor

    In Brooklyn, NY I routinely use about 20GB per month. And my download speeds average about 25Mbps. To my knowledge, I have never been throttled or de-prioritized.

    • Adam

      From what I have seen in this thread, the problem is mainly in medium sized towns. These are towns where there are enough customers to overload the network, but not large enough to justify network upgrades.

  • John Legere himself encouraged T-Mobile customers to #bingewatch using T-Mobile unlimited data. Anyone who took his advice will be stuck in the top 3% slow-lane.

    • Fabian Cortez

      T-Mobile has reiterated a number of times that it doesn’t “throttle” customers. And, as much as this might feel like being throttled to the high users in congested areas, it isn’t.

      RTA

    • Jaymes Poudrier

      Except that #bingeon uses significantly less data. The common theme with throttled users is that it seems to be the people downloading torrents (aka video files likely in the 4-5gb range for 720p rips) versus the bingeon qualifying content which has been optimized. You could probably watch 2-4 movies with the same data usage as someone who just downloaded the one very large file. Meaning it will take 4x as much watching to get into that 3%. They also aren’t throttling users who use over a certain amount. They are deprioritizing them so rather than 10-20mbps they will get 5-8mbps the bingeon content streams at roughly 1-2mbps meaning even if the prioritization takes place unless the tower is completely at capacity you won’t ever even notice the difference.

  • I just posted an article summarizing the throttling / congestion management policies of all the carriers: http://www.rvmobileinternet.com/unlimited-data-update-att-eases-off-throttle-t-mobile-slows-the-top-3/

  • TK – Indy

    Anybody think we can break 1000 comments with this? Here is some more fodder: I wonder if the T-zones and PAU guys are seeing depriorithrottleization? Maybe only certain kinds of accounts get flagged.

    • IceMan

      I’m sure it’s mostly the accounts that replace their home ISPs with T-Mobile, but I’m sure there’s some that stream video on their personal devices that are getting slammed with the “de-prioritization.”

      • TK – Indy

        Well, T-zones/PAU is T-mobile’s version of Medicaid, all the old timers are on it, they pay very little for it, and have very expensive upkeep. The rest of us have to pay more because of them.

        • IceMan

          Exactly. The people that have those discounts are hurting everyone.

          You can’t just replace your ISP with a wireless carrier, it’s shared bandwidth, no matter the capacity.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Hmm, a troll convention.

      Is there not an underside of a bridge somewhere that you all can discuss this?

      S4GRU{dot}com

    • 21stNow

      I thought that all of the T-Zones accounts were migrated to newer accounts.

      • TK – Indy

        They stopped at like 85% of them because there was no way to match their current plan at anywhere near the same cost. This was complicated by a badly-planned move that included a postcard mailed to the impacted customers promising to offer the same services within a dollar or what they were currently paying. Couldn’t be done.

  • Crucifixion Cruxi

    So throttling right? That’s against title 2 correct?

    • TK – Indy

      A valid question, but unanswerable at this point. According to Title 2 you can’t create a class of service that gets a different priority from others, but the FCC has said that this part of the rules would be interpreted differently for data. Basically, if you can justify it as reasonable and necessary standard network management, you can get away with it.

    • Timothy Poplaski

      Deprioritization is not throttling. One is 24/7 (Throttling) however busy the network is. They restrict you to 2g speeds or whatever. The other, deprioritization, only kicks in when the tower is maxed out. That is specifically allowed. In fact AT&T just agreed to work the same way. Their “unlimited” users will no longer be throttled, just deprioritized when the network is maxed out.

      There might be some debate about who’s getting deprioritized. But based on the posts in this thread, I’m starting to wonder if it’s just large file transfers that are getting hit, and not regular web browsing. That’s clearly permitted. Deprioritizing based on profit level, that’s more questionable.

  • Crucifixion Cruxi

    So my billing cycled renewed and this is what I get at my house http://i.imgur.com/AUpmx8A.jpg I’ve only used 3 gigs so far since it started a new cycle April 28th

  • RIP Dave, wherever you may be

    What a poorly written article, I have serious doubts Cam understands this technology or what is actually happening (specifically with respect to the subject of this hastily pieced together “work”). This article is great troll material though, good job Cam – if misinforming was your internet, good effort.
    I sure miss the quality of editorial Dave use to provide. He seemed to have a strong grasp of technology and how it impacts T-Mobile customers. I’m starting to think this blog went from being a great resource to something more like “The Bleacher” report for all things T-Mobile.
    Cam, please focus on this site more thoroughly or have them replace you with more capable hands and with someone who actually has a T-Mobile service /account and therefore skin in the game,. The apple fan site you run needs more work, so you can focus on that in order to get some semblance of enthusiastic following there. It’s pretty sad nobody gets engaged at all with most if not all the articles on TiP. It’s sad. Focus on that and put TMO news in more capable hands – PLEASE.

  • jordany argueta

    I didn’t use my Note 4 this whole morning and I ran a speed test on LTE. Boom 16Mbps download.

    Then I played a youtube video, then ran a speed test again. 1Mbps download. How’s that even possible.

    So I switched to 4G and ran a speed test 12Mbps. Even after playing youtube the downloads speeds stay around 10Mbps.

    I now have to use my phone on 4G because LTE is just a snail.

    Don’t give me the “Ohh you in a congested area” because it’s happening all the time. TMobile has an issue somewhere and they won’t admit it or don’t know. I’ve been their customer for more than 10 years and I’ve never experienced anything like this.

    • Fabian Cortez

      By your own admission, the LTE layer of the network is being congested. Do you not understand that LTE is the default network layer and what adding 1+ million per quarter with LTE devices does to a network that doesn’t receive the necessary backhaul in time?

      Call and complain and get your credit.

      Either they’ll get on their backhaul providers or lose customers.

      • Ozgur Sen

        I think the automatic network management system and software also needs to be updated

        • Jose Mendoza

          Yes, there is an area where they limit the LTE speed for all to 16 to 17 mbits per second and if you go up north where the rural areas are where I live, you get 30-34 on LTE. Both are using PCs LTE 5×5.

      • Jose Mendoza

        I think that T-Mobile’s problem is that it needs more towers in rural areas, aws/pcs lte that is at least 10×10 because most providers have at least 10×10 everywhere, and more backhaul, even if they have to use microwave from certain towers. But you can’t complain about the good speed they get compared to others in the metro areas. I think that they should also deploy hspa+ in the rural areas with edge along with Pcs LTE because where I live, as you get farther from the tower it starts at PCS LTE, then goes to aws hspa, then to edge where it is barely usable at the cell edge. I think that the reason why they did not deploy their aws LTE nationwide is because they have to get permits for each tower from the government and pay more for tower lease each month.

    • metro Customer

      You can still stream videos at 1MBps dummy. Do you not know this? What an empty complaint. Complain when you can’t do something dumbass, not when your speed is slower than what you would like. Viewing a YouTube video at 100 Mbps or 1 Mbps is the same quality. The cat videos you probably get off to don’t get magically better when the network can handle higher speeds. Of course in your 10 years you never experienced this. 10 years ago your data connection was rated 2G at best. Duh!

      • JBrowne1012

        You can still have a connection at any given speed even edge doesn’t mean its a good experience. there is a difference in quality when it comes to streaming experience and faster speeds i.e. Buffering and at 1mbps there is going to be a lot of it.s

        • metro Customer

          Your full of it, because 1mbps is fast enough for most video streaming, obviously not UHD or 4K. And no one is talking just any connection dummy, like edge. We are talking LTE and 3G speeds. You couldn’t have provided a dumber retort. Read and Think before you post. You’re obviously clueless for not understanding at minimum what is being discussed.

        • Ozgur Sen

          I never had de-prioritization issue.I watch Youtube, Hulu, Netflix, and sometimes torrent movies and I still get 30 down 25 up. when I’m torrenting small size movies my download speed slows to 320 kb and that’s normal because T-mobile doesn’t want people to torrent at high speeds and congest the towers what I’m guessing.

        • JBrowne1012

          You are clueless and try to pass off what you hear as true of which is undoubtedly sad. Given that majority of videos recently are in HD 1mbps isn’t going to cut it. I bet you think you could use less than 200mbs of data a month streaming video and music purely only on the network T-Mobile has. You must believe everything don’t you?

      • jordany argueta

        Im going to assume you are the Bastard child brought into the family. Who makes a comment yet doesn’t understand the situation. Your statement “Viewing a YouTube video at 100 Mbps or 1 Mbps is the same quality.” how can you view a HD video on a 1Mbps network? Your poor knowledge doesn’t impress anyone.

        • metro Customer

          To clarify, because your pea brain is incapable of reading in context. The word quality is in reference to content. If you watch Fast and Furious 8 @ 3 Mbps or 1 Gbps (that’s 1,000 Mbps), for example, the quality of the movie isn’t enhanced. A shitty / stupid movie does not become a theatrical masterpiece when viewed on a super fast network connection – it remains dumb movie. Now do you understand the word “quality”? I did not mean resolution. But to that point, Netflix requires 500 Kbps, at 1 Mbps that’s twice as fast (I did the math for you in case your math skills are as deficient as your reading comprehension).

          In any case, you can stream videos with 1 Mbps, now tell us what else YOU think this speed is incapable of handling? I want you to entertain us with some further cluelessness – it’s very impressive.

          Btw, your 1 data point “test” is hilarious. You’re pretty dumb if you think it’s conclusive to stream a video for a little then stop and run a speed. You clearly don’t get how depriortizatioan works and how data hogs get flagged. Please tell me you don’t work in anything that requires critical thinking or science lol.

        • jordany argueta

          You ninja typing skill are so fast that I stopped reading after “If you watch Fast and Furious 8” is not even out yet! ROFLMFAO

        • metro Customer

          Cool story. You stopped reading, because you realized how clueless you were made to look and because reading hurts your head. Buahahaha, lol, or what ever other dumb closing you slow kids understand as internet mocking.

          p.s. I know you read the previous post in its entirety.

    • Tom Sly

      I feel exactly the same pain. LTE is craaap and now HSPA+ sucks donkey balls too. Wtf is going on. Ive logged two official complaints and gotten no where with them. TMo wouldn’t admit it was their error but did tell me the area is due for some upgrades. I’ve been a Tmo customer for 12 years. On the verge of switching.

  • TK – Indy

    Read the article, great job! No opinionated garbage, just the facts.

  • Critic4U

    Any kind of throttling no matter how you word it if you slow them down your throttling. ..

    • protect yo net

      Stupid people, no matter how different their stupid cluelessness to what is actually happening are still stupid people. Thanks for illustrating that with your ignorant comment. Did you read the article? It’s not a great discussion but at minimum it does an okay job of explains the distinction. It’s a technical issue and not semantics – but now I’m using words you probably don’t understand lol. T-Mobile is not throttling. And if this de-priotization affects you, quit being a cheap arse and get home internet.

      • IceMan

        What I gathered from the article is that they’re slowing speeds down in certain circumstances. This is OK. What’s not okay is that they deny it’s throttling. They’re wording it differently to appeal more to the issue, but it’s still the same thing – throttling.

        • protect yo net

          Wow, first I thought you were going to no longer reply to comments. Something about me too thoroughly putting you in your place. 2nd as a “cellular network enthusiast” you really don’t understand the difference between throttleling and depriortizatioan? I mean you’re either really dumb or you just this minute became an “enthusiast” and your next steps are to learn the basics of carriers networks and then a lot more.

          Throttleling and depriortizatioan are not the same thing. The distinction is technical and not semantics like you seem to stubbornly, and may I add ignorantly seem think. Perhaps you should consider donning the cellular network “dunce crown” perhaps – at least then it spot on describes you.

        • IceMan

          I’ll say it again. Slowing speeds down is, no matter the reason is throttling. That’s the definition of it. T-Mobile’s customer relations team can call it whatever they want — it’s still throttling.

        • protect yo net

          No matter how many times you repeat that, you still sound dumb as rock for thinking this is the same thing. When you hit a congested section of highway or a heavy traffic intersection are you slowing down because there’s traffic or are you slowing down for no reason whatsoever? Only an idiot ignores that there is heavy traffic and that traffic conditions are the cause of the slower speeds. Throttling to use the same analogy is artificially slow speeds similar to speed limits near schools. You’re slowing down as a matter of policy stupid. Not because there’s traffic. Here you are being “throttled” you dunce. There are speed limits slowing you down irrespective of traffic conditions.

          I have no problem with T-Mobile de-prioritizing the data hogs at congested or heavily traffic single points of the network or towers. If they were just throttling these pigs, as you ignorantly claim, these data hogs would experience slow internet speeds at all points of the network. If T-Mobile was doing that it’s as if all streets, even those without schools, had artificially low speed limits – anyone with half a brain can understand that, except you of course. Lol, I’m starting to think you are easily the dumbest poster on any cellular network enthusiast blog. You are incapable of grasping simple concepts. It’s no mystery why you are on Sprint. It makes sense in the context of your lack of mental prowess. What is heartwarming is how proudly you don that “cellular network enthusiast dunce cap.” You should change your handle to Simple Jack.

        • Alex Zapata

          Then I guess all those users on the same tower as you are “throttling” ya ;-)

      • DStudio

        Apparently you don’t know the definition of “throttle.” Probably don’t know how your car works.

        • DStudio

          It would appear that protect yo net’s reply to me was so insulting and abusive that it was immediately deleted. It was certainly worse than any comments I see on here right now. In any case, he didn’t seem to grasp the situation.

          De-prioritization is simply a different way of deciding when, and by how much, a subscriber is throttled. Whether the numbers used are constants or variables, it’s still throttling.

          I sure hope they aren’t doing this on plans where customers pay per GB! That would be utterly wrong. The people who need it the most – and are willing to pay for it – shouldn’t be throttled, no matter what new label you give to the practice. Saying “it’s not all the time, and it’s not by that much” doesn’t really cut it. And a blanket prejudice that the top 3% are wasteful is wrong too. That would be as wise as excluding the most intelligent 3% of people from public office – oh wait, that already happens! ;)

          For that matter, consumer and business requirements can be different – I hope they’re making a distinction here.

        • protect yo net

          Spoken like a true data hog. If you’re using T-Mobile as your ISP, be reasonable and get an ISP line. If it’s for work, be a real professional and get a home or business ISP. Blanket 3%, why not? Who else should they target, BUT poeple who place great strain on the network? Or should they use some completely irrelevant measure like, if the person is black or white, straight or gay, age? Targeting the worst 3% makes total sense, how else do you suggest they manage the network? Should they depriortize users on the least congested cell site? Lol, you somehow really don’t understand why the worst abusers should be depriortized?

          Man you’re comments are clueless. Obviously they target the unlimited users. How is someone with a 1GB, 3GB, or 5GB plan abusing the network? Do you realize how nonsensical your claim is? These guys do get throttled and that automatically minimizes and strain on the network. How is that not obvious? It’s almost like your idea that a “cars” throttle is the best way to slow a fast moving car.

      • jon

        Dude the end result is slowing your speed down I don’t care what you call it, or how you get there the end result is the same…throttling.

      • JH5637

        Since you are so into the meaning of words, please define the word “unlimited”. Now please tell me how “unlimited high speed data” somehow includes slowing down your speeds at certain times and depending on where you are located at that time? If they only allow truly “unlimited high speed data” for 23GB, then sell it as such. No need to paint a white stripe on a black cat and call it a skunk!

  • Fabian Cortez

    Hopefully you read the article.

    That cell site is congested and prioritization is in effect.

    There’s no throttling since you’re on a new cycle.

    • Crucifixion Cruxi

      Ok so it’s like this everyday. For the last several months….

      • Fabian Cortez

        Call in and complain and get your credits.

        Understand that backhaul is only in a carrier’s control of they don’t order it.

        Once they order it, it is out of their control and their are ultimately at the mercy of the backhaul provider. In some instances, the provider is a direct competitor to T-Mobile.

        The fact that we lag behind as a nation in Internet speeds is rearing its ugly head.

  • Samk

    I didn’t sign up for this. They throttled me right after 10gb. I’m going to take my business to cricket. At least they are cheaper $60/10gb.

    • Jose Mendoza

      They throttle high speed Data to 8mbits on lte, 4 mbits on hspa+, and then after using all you high speed data, it is 128 kbps.

      • Jeremy t

        That’s not true. I have the unlimited plan from metro i easily blow through 50gb per month and my speed is anywhere from 40 to 89mbps all month long on lte . I’ve never had need for hspa besides calling i guess.

        • Jose Mendoza

          Sorry about that. I was meaning this to the above post that I just replied to. Cricket throttles their users. MetroPCS customers get full speed off the tower.

    • walt

      try switching to metroPCS. they are affiliated with t-mobile but they have the same unlimited plan as t mobile but for $60 including all taxes

    • thatbram
  • Hector Arteaga

    Both of you! I read your argument, but arguing the speed of Sprint 3g vs Edge, is like arguing about the speed of a large turtle on land vs a snail. They both are really slow.

  • Alex Zapata

    While this is anecdotal, I’m easily within that top 3%, if not in a more data hungry demographic and the only times I’ve noticed an appreciable dehydration degradation in network performance is during peak hours on a crowded tower. Other than that I chew through 20, 30, even up to 100GB without any real issues. Maybe that’s just me though.

    • Mike

      I use at least 20gigs a month. If not, more. Never have any problems. My speed test is usually between 25mbps and 40mbps. Thats good Enough for me. Lol.

  • mary5652

    [>/

  • iandy

    Had been with T-Mobile for 6 years and a heavy data user since day one.
    Call it throttling or de-prioritization the end result is more or less the same.

    Had been following Tmonews for a long time and always had seen the comments on the articles as an additional resourse of information on the subject.
    It is really sad to witness the quality of this site degraded with the recent
    posts of just plain personal insults.

  • Jose Hernandez

    This is crazy, my usage right now is 23.08gb, all of the sudden my phone is no longer connecting to the lte network and tech support just told me that I’m being slowed down because I’m using too much data. I have used more than 60gb before and never had a problem. This is crazy

    • iCrap

      seriously, how are you using that much data? did you get rid of your home internet connection?

      • lsuisme69 .

        Dude not everyone has home Internet. The whole reason I came to tmobile me personally was to have this data. No one comes or offers home Internet.

      • JH5637

        You’re missing the point. Who cares what he’s using his cellular data for? He’s paying for this upgrade, is he not?

  • Chris

    There is something bigger going on and they are using this deprioritization thing as an excuse now. For 6 weeks over 2 billing cycles I have had sub 1Mbps speeds in Fort Mill, SC. Next billing cycle starts on Tuesday, I’m sure after using less than 100MB I will still see horrible speeds in Fort Mill.
    T-Mobile has everyone arguing over semantics between throttling and deprioritization instead of having people question their “data strong” network that has slowed to less than a crawl for a lot of users.

  • Kenny Brandon

    I’m being deprioritizated. The HE’LL it isn’t throttling. It’s actually worse than throttling. Already when you’re throttled you know your going to get at least 4g speeds. When you’re deprioritized your connconnection gets cut and “deprioritized” then as you reconnect your data speed has to build back up from zero. I’ve done numerous tests on OOKLA and I regularly get less than 1Mbps. During FTPing content to my client I see the speeds fluctuate from a compete stop of data flow, then I watch the speed rise slowly sometimes up to 5Mbps or 7Mbps (NEVER MORE THAN 7Mbps) then, I get depriortized and my speeds drop down to .026Mbps or less then, it reconnects and they process starts over again. When your constantly being kicked off the network and reconnecting you get ridiculously slow transfers, SLOWER than if I was just being throttled. Already when you’re throttled you get consistent speeds. This is an outrage and a complete disregard for the law. TMOBILE found a way to rename throttling because they changed the process on how they throttle customers. Throttling hasn’t stopped. They just put a new ribbon on it and threw it back on the shelf. Shame on you tmobile!

    • JH5637

      Hell, at least you got to run a speedtest. My OOKLA speedtest app would not even run when I got throttled (IDGAF how you want to change the definition of “unlimited”, it’s throttling). My Google apps would not even work. No email. Couldn’t even add a Google account. Ridiculous.

  • Fabian Cortez

    So now we’re using opinionated facts to represent ourselves? You even confirmed that EvDo is faster…Yet, you also denied it in the same sentence.

    EV-DO Rev. A is indeed faster than EDGE on paper. In Sprint’s implementation (lack of backhaul and over capacity), they’re close in speeds.

    We’ll see. I don’t imagine them tripling their current coverage to 2.6M Sq ft with their current coverage by the end of the year.

    They’re not tripling their coverage. It’s a 2.67x increase from 0.6 million square miles to 1.6 million square miles.

    If there’s one thing you’ve noticed about T-Mobile yet is that they’re extremely proficient in project management. There is no reason to doubt that they will reach their EOY 2015 goal.

    Even I know what’s possible and not possible in the realm of wireless networks.

    So what’s possible and what’s not possible?

    Sprint tried GMO and pretty much failed at it. After that, the GMO was considered crap. T-Mobile tries the GMO and seems to excel at it, even with those old PCS antennas.

    You tell me to go with a carrier that works for me, then say I’m not getting value because I’m not on T-Mobile. How biased can you get?

    There’s not bias. T-Mobile provides more value than Sprint at their current price points. If you feel that less value works for you, then you are indeed going with the carrier that works for you.

    If you want evidence, read the comments here.

    *tmonews link*

    There are a myriad of reasons why one would not get LTE in an area that’s been verified coverage. Having the proper device that supports that correct bands is one of them. Painting the maps is one thing (AT&T, Sprint, Verizon), but having verified user data is another and is backed up.

    People are complaining about the painted map versus a “VERIFIED by customer data” data point.

    There is a difference between the two and they are not synonymous.

    • IceMan

      EV-DO Rev. A is indeed faster than EDGE on paper. In Sprint’s implementation (lack of backhaul and over capacity), they’re close in speeds.

      As you posted in another reply your experience with this != others. On paper, it’s faster, therefore it is faster. In some areas, EvDo can even be faster than T-Mobile’s LTE, if we include capacity/backhaul issues into the equation.

      They’re not tripling their coverage. It’s a 2.67x increase from 0.6 million square miles to 1.6 million square miles.

      If there’s one thing you’ve noticed about T-Mobile yet is that they’re extremely proficient in project management. There is no reason to doubt that they will reach their EOY 2015 goal.

      Typo, I meant 1.6M and I just rounded up. I know now that they’re relying on some roaming partners so now I do think it’s possible. My original stance was that it wasn’t possible to do it entirely native.

      There’s not bias. T-Mobile provides more value than Sprint at their current price points. If you feel that less value works for you, then you are indeed going with the carrier that works for you.

      I’ll use your own argument against you. You can’t possibly know what others are paying for their bills, nor do you know where I frequent. There’s T-Mobile dead zones near me (cousins house, and another friend’s home are an example.) Sure, I can use WiFi calling in these areas, but Sprint also offers that.

      People are complaining about the painted map versus a “VERIFIED by customer data” data point.

      I’ve agreed that all maps are incorrect, but it’s on another level when it says verified data in areas that T-Mobile obviously has no service. I was on the Tmo Test Drive not too long ago and my friend’s house I visited during that week had no signal outside or inside, yet it shows on the map customer verified. This was in a market where B12 does not exist.

      • Fabian Cortez

        As you posted in another reply your experience with this != others. On paper, it’s faster, therefore it is faster. In some areas, EvDo can even be faster than T-Mobile’s LTE, if we include capacity/backhaul issues into the equation.

        That doesn’t change the sentiment that’s offers the same speed as EDGE. Go ask anyone with an iPhone 4 on Sprint and even the loaded Sprint towers of today.

        Typo, I meant 1.6M and I just rounded up. I know now that they’re relying on some roaming partners so now I do think it’s possible. My original stance was that it wasn’t possible to do it entirely native.

        There is zero evidence that they are relying on roaming partners to get to their 300 million native POPs of LTE. Especially when their EOY 2015 map shows a clear distinction between native LTE and partner coverage.

        The leased spectrum to iWireless is shown as gray (partner coverage) and is not magenta for native LTE. So no, you don’t know they’re relying on roaming partners.

        I’ll use your own argument against you. You can’t possibly know what others are paying for their bills,

        I don’t know what others are paying nor did I assume to know. What I do know is that carriers offer you a lower monthly service payment if you opt to purchase a phone outright or enter into their EIPs versus the more expensive two-year contract..

        nor do you know where I frequent. There’s T-Mobile dead zones near me (cousins house, and another friend’s home are an example.) Sure, I can use WiFi calling in these areas, but Sprint also offers that.

        I don’t know or care. If there’s a deadzone, then there’s a deadzone. As far as Wi-Fi calling is concerned, Sprint’s implementation of Wi-Fi calling is severely crippled and half-baked. It’s a shame as they’ll likely be setting the standard for how Wi-Fi calling should not work and give it a bad name.

        I’ve agreed that all maps are incorrect, but it’s on another level when it says verified data in areas that T-Mobile obviously has no service. I was on the Tmo Test Drive not too long ago and my friend’s house I visited during that week had no signal outside or inside, yet it shows on the map customer verified. This was in a market where B12 does not exist.

        Define “not too long ago.”

        • IceMan

          That doesn’t change the sentiment that’s offers the same speed as EDGE. Go ask anyone with an iPhone 4 on Sprint and even the loaded Sprint towers of today.

          I was on EvDo all day yesterday driving from class to home (~22 miles.) I started streaming when I left class which is why I was dropped to 3G. I streamed 320kbps live internet radio the entire trip with no hiccups at all. I’m a Sprint customer, and I can say, in my experience EvDo is much better than Edge.

          I don’t know what others are paying nor did I assume to know. What I do know is that carriers offer you a lower monthly service payment if you opt to purchase a phone outright or enter into their EIPs versus the more expensive two-year contract..

          I pay $45/month per line on my account, and that includes taxes/subsidy. I don’t think anyone on T-Mobile has the same pricing, given that they have to constantly pay an extra $25/month PER phone PER line for new phones. I get phones on contract all the time for $0. So far, all I’ve noticed from the removal of subsidies is a price increase, everywhere.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I was on EvDo all day yesterday driving from class to home (~22 miles.) I started streaming when I left class which is why I was dropped to 3G. I streamed 320kbps live internet radio the entire trip with no hiccups at all. I’m a Sprint customer, and I can say, in my experience EvDo is much better than Edge.

          Congratulations. You were in an area where EV-DO Rev. A on Sprint operates the way it was supposed to. Meanwhile, there are plenty of other areas where users wouldn’t agree with you.

          Also, thanks for pointing out that you were not connected to LTE. So yeah, $45 a month for EV-DO Rev. A in 2015 isn’t too bad I guess.

          I pay $45/month per line on my account, and that includes taxes/subsidy.

          I’m not sure where you’re getting your pricing from but you must be on some older plan (SERO? Framily?), which is the only reason the cheap Sprint faithful stick around.

          Their iPhone (latest model) contract plans are definitely not $0 down and they definitely do have some trickery. Such as their “instant savings” of $450 if you sign the two-year service contract at $85 per month before taxes, fees, and Sprint surcharges. Yeah, plenty of transparency there.

          Yet somehow, when I opt to buy the iPhone outright or through their EIP, the total price comes down to $77.09 per month before taxes, fees, and Sprint surcharges and then $50 a month after the 24th payment or when I pay the phone off before that. Then there’s the silly lease that is $7.09 cheaper, before taxes, fees, and Sprint surcharges, but one never owns the phone that they keep paying for.

          So no, your single accounting of how you feel service contracts are better is not valid as I just showed you using Sprint’s own numbers.

          I don’t think anyone on T-Mobile has the same pricing, given that they have to constantly pay an extra $25/month PER phone PER line for new phones. I get phones on contract all the time for $0.

          No one has to constantly pay an “$25/month PER phone PER line for new phones.” You can pay your phone off early or bring your own device. And T-Mobile does have similar pricing, if not more expensive. But the extra that you pay for comes with plenty of extras that Sprint can only dream to offer and/or match. The network experience alone is worth the extra money.

          So far, all I’ve noticed from the removal of subsidies is a price increase, everywhere.

          And that’s the idea behind transparency!

          Everyone thought they were getting super phones for only $199 when that simply wasn’t the case. Bill shock will be the number one factor that will predominantly force these OEMs to drop their phone prices. That or the influx of affordable Chinese super phones that are starting to flood the market.

          The days of two-year contracts are coming to an end. As witnessed by T-Mobile in March 2013, EIP programs adopted by the other national carriers, AT&T getting rid of contracts soon due to EIP adoption, etc.

          Sprint will once again be the dinosaur clinging onto old ideas.

        • IceMan

          Congratulations. You were in an area where EV-DO Rev. A on Sprint operates the way it was supposed to. Meanwhile, there are plenty of other areas where users wouldn’t agree with you.

          Also, thanks for pointing out that you were not connected to LTE. So yeah, $45 a month for EV-DO Rev. A in 2015 isn’t too bad I guess.

          Of course, instead of arguing the point, you resort to your typical Sprint bashing. Yes, I dropped to 3G because I started streaming as soon as I left class, it’s a campus of buildings with 1 foot-thick walls. T-Mobile users don’t even get signal inside, at least Sprint can. But, that aside. I provided a point from a Sprint customer that your scenarios are incorrect. I’ve already told you that capacity can play a factor and it can affect any network of any level. Saying Edge is comparable to Evdo is ignorant and downright incorrect.

          So no, your single accounting of how you feel service contracts are better is not valid as I just showed you using Sprint’s own numbers.

          I’m on an older ED1500 Sprint plan. But even so, on certain plans, Sprint’s still cheaper than T-Mobile (Framily, their iPhone for life plan, etc.) My point is that I’m getting value whereas if I go to T-Mobile, my price jumps up, even if I don’t get a new phone.

          No one has to constantly pay an “$25/month PER phone PER line for new phones.” You can pay your phone off early or bring your own device. And T-Mobile does have similar pricing, if not more expensive. But the extra that you pay for comes with plenty of extras that Sprint can only dream to offer and/or match. The network experience alone is worth the extra money.

          Sure, somebody on a plan that’s non-contractual would have that mindset. “Better save money, don’t get the new phone.” Whereas you’re likely to stick with that same carrier anyways. With the contracts, you can keep your same price per month for service for a relatively low upfront cost. Some Sprint plans are more money than T-Mobile, and some T-Mobile plans are more money than Sprint. The point I’m making is that there’s a lot of people grandfathered into their older plans and with Sprint honoring that, I have no reason to leave.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Of course, instead of arguing the point, you resort to your typical Sprint bashing. Yes, I dropped to 3G because I started streaming as soon as I left class, it’s a campus of buildings with 1 foot-thick walls. T-Mobile users don’t even get signal inside, at least Sprint can. But, that aside. I provided a point from a Sprint customer that your scenarios are incorrect. I’ve already told you that capacity can play a factor and it can affect any network of any level. Saying Edge is comparable to Evdo is ignorant and downright incorrect.

          You didn’t prove anything as I didn’t make a blanket statement. I said Sprint EV-DO Rev. A operates at EDGE speeds on Sprint in many markets. You single outlier is just that, an outlier.

          I’m on an older ED1500 Sprint plan. But even so, on certain plans, Sprint’s still cheaper than T-Mobile (Framily, their iPhone for life plan, etc.) My point is that I’m getting value whereas if I go to T-Mobile, my price jumps up, even if I don’t get a new phone.

          That doesn’t change anything. You are once again an outlier in this situation. You are the exception to the rule, not the rule. Framily isn’t offered anymore either and I have said that Sprint is cheaper yet doesn’t offer as much value.

          But since you feel you are “getting value,” please elaborate on said value when in comparison to T-Mobile. And I truly want you to list everything you think is valuable.

          Sure, somebody on a plan that’s non-contractual would have that mindset. “Better save money, don’t get the new phone.”

          I can find new phones anywhere I want. Either I take up the carrier’s offer of 0% (!) interest financing or a buy my phone outright (whether it costs $650 or $199).

          I, and millions upon millions of other people (see both AT&T and T-Mobile subs.), refuse to be locked into two-year service agreements where the price of the phone is hidden within the contract and I can never pay off that contract before the 24 months is up. Nor could I ever have my bill lowered.

          Whereas you’re likely to stick with that same carrier anyways.

          That’s a blanket statement that’s biting you in the a$$ as evidenced by T-Mobile’s recent trend in growth and the other carrier’s losses. Please don’t be so shortsighted.

          With the contracts, you can keep your same price per month for service and get a new phone for a relatively low upfront cost. Some Sprint plans are more money than T-Mobile, and some T-Mobile plans are more money than Sprint. The point I’m making is that there’s a lot of people grandfathered into their older plans and with Sprint honoring that, I have no reason to leave.

          No one is asking you to leave. But the point remains that your plan has never dropped in price and will never drop in price no matter how much money you give Sprint. Also, whether you want to believe it or not, you are still paying for the original phone, that your purchased when you initially signed that contract, over and over ad infinitum until you get off of that plan.

  • Sprint CC

    Data prioritization is set between 17gb to 20gb and you will be throttled. Its says through peak times though customers will see it even during early mornings or evening. At home or work does not matter. If you want a change then let john ledgre know by tweets to get his attention. So dont believe the hype its everyone.

  • Popo Signs

    submit it to FCC and watch the fireworks begin

  • Funky

    After 15 years of Service (back in the days of Ariel b4 Voicestream) I have been deprioritizated. Couldn’t get no data to work for several hours today. Called 611 and it was brought to my attention. So no tethering (which is a feature I pay for) or anything?

    Also found out that I was being charged for two Note Edge devices when I only have one. The rep was apologetic and supposedly took care of it but who really knows until next bill.

    T-Horrorible is sinking quick and it may be about time to drop the raft and head for the mainland.

    • JH5637

      I agree. I was not told this when I was sold the “unlimited” service and I couldn’t even get emails or get any Google services to work because my data was “de-prioritized”. Again…I call BS!

  • D l

    This is an Example of why we need and now have Net Neutrality. T-Mobile advertises this as a Completely unlimited plan and this counts as a Limit to it therefore making it not unlimited. This isn’t reasonable network Management either. Reasonable would be if the tower is overloaded u throttle everyone. Anyone over say 8Mb gets throttled back to that speed for down and up. This would be reasonable as everyone is throttled back but the service is still completely useable for all and everyone gets a decent experience during peak times.

    Also the best thing to do for the Network is take those heavy users and prioritize their Download so it gets done much faster (For Video it would be fully buffered) and in turn will free up those resources faster. Get the heavier task (Video, Downloads, Torrents (Legal uses), Gaming etc.)done as fast as possible so you can focus on the Weaker task (Basic Browsing, Email, maybe a small video, etc.).

    T-MOBILE could also say actually add more capacity and Towers to the Network (They should do this anyway) or Implement Wi-Fi Hand off for those in range of a Hot spot to relieve the towers for those on the go or at home. All Carriers should do this anyway as it’s good for everyone.

    • Imagillucination

      I don’t think you’re comprehending the point. The heavy users are using more data more often. They get done with one thing and generally move on to the next heavy usage activity. Prioritizing them would not work as you think.

      “Also the best thing to do for the Network is take those heavy users and prioritize their Download so it gets done much faster (For Video it would be fully buffered) and in turn will free up those resources faster.”

      • JH5637

        So what you’re saying is, the solution to heavy network congestion is to limit those users who depend more on their data instead of using some of those billions of dollars in revenue to expand and improve their network and reliability? A spade is a spade, no matter what you try to call it.

  • jon

    When I bought my iPhone, I was told I had unlimited data, no throttling, so I used it as unlimited, I watched a lot of YouTube, Netflix etc. all of a sudden my data go from 44mbps down to .66 Mbps!? And this is not throttling? I would not have used so much if I was told about this de-prioritization process that they have. They should tell people upfront. This is bullshit.

  • Cvs5778

    I agree with all the feedback against de prioritizing. I was sold unlimited lte. As has been confirmed since this article was published, the limit is 20 GB and that simply is not right. Especially if you live in a large metro city.

  • Concerned Consumer

    Net neutrality Laws made throttling and “paid prioritization” illegal. If you have an Unlimited LTE plan from TMobile the next time they de-prioritize/throttle you (Throttle – to slow or retard the flow of a resource.) Give a call to there support and I bet that you can buy a addon LTE data plan to regain high-speed access for up to whatever extra GB you buy. I.E. Paid Prioritization.

    By the way the top 3% of the customers thing only works if they base off of unlimited high-speed customers only. Not all TMobile customers. If most customers don’t buy an Unlimited LTE plan then of course the unlimited users will end up using more data then the regular non-unlimited plans and in turn be de-prioritized/throttled. There are many other ways to combat congested towers (i.e. overall load balancing).

    . As it stands at this time if you are de-prioritized/throttled it renders even basic web surfing/emailing near impossible unless you wait 3mins to send an email that is insane.

  • Lester Baptiste

    Absolutely agreed, and shouldn’t the practice be opposite?! The 3% actually need the speed!!! Whatever you call it, I’m not getting what I paid for!!!

  • NardVa

    De-priotozation makes youtube videos unwatchable and web browsing comes to a crawl. T-Mobile is basically shutting your internet off once you are flagged.

  • Michael

    Did you ever wonder what the top 3% actually is? Well I called Tmobile customer service and they said the last few months have been 50-70gigs of 4G LTE data are the top users. Also this slowing down only happens on towers that have high network traffic. This will affect only the truly extreme users and it isn’t all that bad.

  • NardVa

    The unlimited plan is really a 21GB plan. After you hit 21GB, anything involving video will be unusable until the middle of the night. T-Mobile says it’s only certain towers, but I did speed test in 3 different cities, and how convenient I was de-prioritized in all 3 during regular hours when everybody is up. T-Mobile has it set up where the de-priotozation starts in the morning and it’s shut off in the late evening. It doesn’t matter what is going on with the tower. You are basically throttled automatically between certain hours.

  • Joe Ginther

    I was just told by a rep it kicks in at 7 gb!

  • Mike Vance

    Gah. Most of you geniuses aren’t understanding, if you have the UNLIMITED HIGH SPEED DATA plan (not the shit cheap ass $50 unlimited plan where your data slows down after 1gb) it WILL NOT affect your speed. I’ve used 167gb last month and my speeds were never slowed down. This is just another thing for the people who are too damn cheap to buy the actual unlimited high speed data plan to bitch about. Good day.

    • thepanttherlady

      So because you’ve never experienced this it must not be happening, right? SMH

      I’ve had unlimited high speed data since day one and have had this happen to me as have many others.

      • Mike Vance

        Post a screenshot of your plan or I don’t believe you. Every single person I’ve talked to about this topic (and I’m part of an android forum by the way) has not been throttled or had their speeds slowed WHILE ON THE UNLIMITED HIGH SPEED PLAN. All of the people I’ve met that have complained about this were on the $50-$70 plans that weren’t unlimited high speed. While it was still unlimited data, it says plain as day that you will be throttled after a certain amount..

        • thepanttherlady
        • Cam Fas

          I have the same plan. They don’t throttle per say but they do deprioritize you if your on a congested tower. Someone’s in a major city when I go over 23 gigs at my local airport I get slowed under a Meg. But when I leave the airport my speeds jump back up into the 50-120mbs range. But it’s only when I go over the deprioritzation of 23 gigs. Last cycle I used almost 30 gigs in one week watching Netflix before binge. Just off one short season

        • Chris

          lol u got quiet real quick

    • JH5637

      I just had this happen to me and I spent over an hour on the phone w/over 5 Tmobile reps (ranging from customer care to tier 3 technical support) and I was basically told that since I had reached 23GB of data that my account was now flagged as “high speed de-prioritized”. Mind you, they tried to give me some BS jargon before I politely explained that I have worked over 13 years in the telco/isp/networking industry and while my area of expertise may not be in the cellular communications arena, I’m not a total noob either. After I made valid points to every one of their excuses and “explanations”, they finally ended up transferring me to a tier 3 tech support who actually gave me that value of 23GB.

      That is the magic number before you get “de-prioritized”, which, if you ask me and have any common sense at all, you will quickly realize that you are indeed being throttled at various times of the day depending how congested the traffic to the specific tower you are connected to at that time is. One rep even stated, and I quote “If you live in rural areas, you won’t run into this issue as often as if you live in a big city”. To which I responded, “So what you’re telling me that even though I am paying for unlimited high speed data, it is actually only truly unlimited up until the 23GB mark, at which point my speeds will be randomly “de-prioritized” at times of so-called high congestion and that will totally depend on what tower I’m connected to at that particular time?”

      After about 1 min. of silence, he stated that was accurate and tried to give me some stupid analogy of me being on a highway and there being congestion on the road. All the 18 wheelers carrying large loads would have to wait on the smaller cars to pass by before they have access to the same road.

      Here’s why I was truly pissed off though. I upgraded to the “unlimited” w/14GB of hotspot in the middle of my billing cycle. I was told (incorrectly) that since they were upgrading it on their end that my data usage would reset to 0 and I would have my new data package to use for the remainder of my billing cycle. Here’s what they failed to mention at any point in time and what I ended up finding out though. The total amount of data used automatically counts towards those magical 23GB, REGARDLESS of what speed tier you are paying for. In my case, I had already used 12GB when I was on my 3GB High Speed plan, so essentially I only had 9GB left on my 23GB limit for my “unlimited” plan. So there’s no way I could have even gotten to use even the whole 23GB for the rest of my billing cycle.

      I came up w/the analogy of selling him a small soft drink and told him that he could upgrade to a drink w/unlimited refills for $10 more. You gladly pay for the upgrade since you finished your small drink. I give you your mega sized drink but it’s only half way full. You say, “Hey, where’s the rest of my drink?” To which I respond, “Sorry, You already drank the rest of your 40oz limit.” He just laughed and said, “That’s a good analogy.”

      Long story short, I got a credit for that part of my billing cycle since I’m not actually getting to use what I paid for. It seems that all the major carriers have gotten together and put “de-prioritized” flags on accounts that reach their pre-determined limits. What most people fail to understand, and what I have the biggest problem with, is that they are marketing these plans as “unlimited high speed data”. Let’s take a look at the actual definition of the word unlimited:

      un·lim·it·ed
      ˌənˈlimidəd/
      adjective
      not limited or restricted in terms of number, quantity, or extent.

      So by its very definition, these plans are NOT actually “unlimited”. You have access to truly high speed data UP UNTIL you reach the limit of 23GB, at which point you will take a back seat to other data traffic requests on the network depending on the amount of traffic to the particular tower that you are connecting to at that exact moment.

      So why don’t they just be honest and advertise it and sell it as just that? True high speed 4G LTE speeds up to 23GB, with sporadic “de-prioritization” depending on congestion in your area.

      Here’s the catch for me though. I live in Houston, TX. One of the biggest cities in the US. When the hell is there NOT going to be congestion for me? Again, I call BS. I’m trying to figure out if it’s just more convenient to get one of those “hot-spot” devices and just leave my phone on Wi-Fi. This is BS IMO. The only way I see this changing is if we all get together and make a stand!

      • I think a better analogy is like a health club. You can go all you like, but if you go at peak times and the machines are full you may have to wait a little. That doesn’t mean the club is limiting you right? You’re just waiting your turn. That’s not their fault, and if it’s a problem for you, you can always go to another health club or another carrier.

    • Huh? The soft cap ONLY applies to the “Unlimited” plan. Think about it, no other user would ever get to 22Gb anyway. You’re just in a lucky area. ;)

    • thepanttherlady

      I have unlimited HIGH SPEED data and have had this happen. More than once.

  • Juan Zuniga

    switch your phone to 4g it will not buffer, you are paying for data not frequencies, so the lte is congested try another band this works for me I go up to 80GB once deprioritized and have no buffering issues after that

    • I was wondering that. So it’s the LTE spectrum not the backhaul that’s congested? Weird because LTE is supposed to be so much more efficient.

  • Allen

    It was interesting to read the comments. I would like to offer my analogy.

    Think of T-Mobile as Disneyland. You can buy an annual pass with 365 days access equivalent to Unlimited Data. Then underneath that you can buy passes with restriction like to weekends or holidays.

    So a hard cap would be one of those lesser plan. Let’s say your pass restricted weekend, then you can’t go to the park on weekend. Period.

    Suppose a soft cap (which Disneyland doesn’t offer) would allow you to still enter the park but you can’t access their premium attractions.

    With de-prioritization, you are still truly unlimited, you get to go the park and day of the year. On busy days the park will be congested, but don’t worry Disneyland gives you 21 line passes so that you can cut in line on busy days. But once you used all that up, then you have to get in line like everyone else and other people that haven’t use their pass get to use theirs.

    So don’t think of it as T-Mobile taking anything away from you. They are just giving you 21 line passes. You are welcome to use the attractions that are not congested. You can still go on the congested attractions given you’re willing to wait depending on how congested.

  • Frances

    I have been deprioritized on TMobile. I live in a rural area and we do not have access to high speed data besides satellite (Hughs, Excede, not worth the $$$). We had been using our phones as a hotspot with 40g through ATT. I signed up with Tmobile for the hotspot only- specifically for the Bing On feature. Well, like a fat kid in a candy shop, we BINGED big time on Netflix and eventually was deprioritized after 82g of data. 82 GIGS! My fiance was pissed off, but i had to interject some reality to the situation- its basically magic that streaming even works.. we used 82g of data (insane!) watching netflix. If it ever deprioritizes again, its time to get off the couch and go for a run.
    Sidenote- If we turned it off and came back in a couple days or in the evening, the speed was fine.

  • Hawk

    BS!!! THEY DO THROTTLE!!

    I have an older phone which uses throttle flag files. When I went over my hidden limit, they throttled me! I have full root access to my phone, so I deleted the flag file, locked down the throttle directory to prevent them from accessing it, and I was back up and going at full speed. So I know for a FACT they throttle!!

    • Glenn Gifford

      Yes in fact they do throttle the speed. Was In this argument with Boost Mobile when. My speeds were dropped to .16mbs I got to a supervisor and asked for the msl code which by law they must give and with in mins my speeds jumped to over 100+ MBs here in Orlando which is way past the normal 8-16mbps cause they knew I was going in through my phone with that code and going to break there throttle (which is legal BTW) so they gave me my speeds back. However this month I get a text stating I’m being de prioritized and I juat paid the bill today so it starting over is a load of shit. Of you think for one sec that they do not do this I am sorry to say your sadly mistaken. I will gladly give my email to anyone who would like to challenge this and I can show you my speed base and then after the call and then now.

  • Llawen Corwynt

    Call it whatever you want, deprioritizing or throttling. You are intentionally slowing speeds. It’s the same as arguing tamato or tamato. I call bullshit. Even more it does not reset each month. I am constantly being throttled. Even when the data resets. I could have data reset and only be 2 days into new month, in high usage times I will test speeds, 1-3mbs. At 2 in the morning I will get 40-50mbs. So, bullshit. More corporate lies. I can do a you tube video and prove this. I can show less than a gig of data usage. Then on VIDEO, prove these facts. When the data speeds are that slow the phone is useless. It may take 2-5 minutes to load a page on google.
    Yes, you are throttling.

  • Llawen Corwynt

    Moreover, may plan is “unlimited HIGH SPEED’ that’s what the plan says. I get unlimited but it’s not high speed. A court of law would say they are not giving what is labeled as sold.

    • Chris

      But what could be slow to you could be fast to someone else. Kinda like the harassment policy in the workplace environment. I’m just saying, they could hit you with a pretty legit loophole if you seriously denied that they are giving you high speed.

  • spiderman

    I was paying for 25 GB hotspot plus unlimited data, and started receiving txts that after 28gb per month I would be ‘deprioritized’. what kind of crap is that when I’m paying for high speed LTE in specific amounts?? I can understand if I was using just my phone for 28GB, but I’m paying specifically for extra data. Now I cancelled 15GB so TMo is out some money bc of their retardation. Mind you, they were throttling me on my phone AND hotspot… UNREAL