“Super-Maverick” T-Mobile and Sprint merged company “intrigued” Deutsche Telekom chief

tim-hoettges-vorstandsvorsitzender-der-deutsche-telekom-ag

Re/code early this morning published an insightful exclusive report having recently spoken to Tim Hoettges, Deutsche Telekom’s CEO. He stated that although T-Mobile’s recent moment is great, it still needs “greater scale” to compete with AT&T and Verizon.

One way to do that would have been to merge with Sprint.

Speaking to Re/code outside the DLD Conference in Munich, Hoettges remarked that he was “intrigued by the idea of having a combination with Sprint and being the ‘super-maverick’ in the market.” And that he hoped “that the political environment will change at one point in time.”

For the entire first half of 2014, one story which provided a string of consistency in T-Mobile’s world was the rumor that it would merge with Sprint. Multiple reports and rumors from well-respected sources claimed that SoftBanks (Sprint’s Japanese parent company) was looking for ways in which it could buy out Deutsche Telekom’s controlling stake in T-Mobile US. The idea would be to buy the controlling share and then merge the company with its nearest competitor, Sprint.

For most T-Mobile fans, this was never welcome news. We watched as the Japanese carrier’s chief organized the finances and spoke with the regulatory bodies in the U.S. about the potential for a deal. Having not received any encouragement from the FCC or DoJ, SoftBank gave up on its attempt. There was no guarantee that the merger would go through, and it would be an expensive failure had they tried and not managed to push it over the finish line.

But there was one potential positive outcome: If T-Mobile kept its brand name, its energetic CEO (Legere) and its Un-carrier mentality, it could absolutely destroy the big two carriers.

One reality to come from this morning’s article is that although the Magenta carrier is adding more subscribers than anyone else, it doesn’t have the wealth and spectrum of the two biggest carriers. These are major obstacles. Without the cash and spectrum, the carrier can’t compete toe-to-toe on network size or quality.

Despite all this, T-Mobile has made impressive strides throughout 2014.

“We have done what we had to do,”Hoettges explained. “We had built an infrastructure and this infrastructure had to get utilized and we did that with very aggressive promotions.”

On a less positive note, Hoettges also stated that T-Mobile’s current approach isn’t sustainable in the long-term. Between $4B and $5B investment is needed each year to keep it up. Long story short: T-Mobile needs to return to profit, and Deutsche Telekom would be open to a merger with Sprint if the political landscape welcomed the deal.

Source: Re/code

Tags: , , , ,

  • GreatNews

    Not again please! Its much better seeing the 2 companies playing the racing game…

    • kimi thomas

      Anybody can get extra e@rning, I can highly recommend this genuine site. I’ve got 3O00 in 15 days… Before this i lost much on fake sites. But now its very easy & genuine. Just click this & make life happy-

      ►►►►►►► http://w.atch.me/6WFZiI

    • Marvin Lilmarv Bolden-Mitchell

      I’m I’m Memphis, tn and I use sprint and b25 are ok but when I’m connected to 1×800 is much better data and voice calls are great band 41 has start to deploy and in the areas that has it ……It’s super great when I travel down 61 south pass the casinos 1×800 coverage is great between tunica ms to the hwy 49 helena-west Helena, ark exit yes T-Mobile has made some moves but they need a lot more 700mhz a he’ll of a lot more than what they have now, but sprint the next 6mos are going to be very interesting………….

      • Hector Arteaga

        I’ve had Sprint and T-Mobile recently and T-Mobile has a much stronger network within the city (faster overall). However, I do agree that the 800 MHz spectrum is really helping Sprint on the highways and what not. Building penetration is pretty good. The B41 sites are blazing. T-Mobile is furiously converting their edge to LTE around here. I can drive to Jackson TN from Memphis and have LTE all the way except for a few spots.

        • Marvin Lilmarv Bolden-Mitchell

          Me to from Memphis to the Tennessee river and on to nashville I have 4g and it used to be one dead spot pass the river for about a half a mile but now it’s good it will fall back to 3g but it’s better I love it

  • Willie D

    Sorry but a combined Sprint/T-Mobile would still not have the coverage of the big two. In fact, T-Mobile is bigger in coverage than Sprint already based on Mosaik maps. The cost to covert Sprint CDMA to HSPA would be prohibitive, the cost of keeping it as CDMA would be more prohibitive and be counter productive to what needs to happen to make that network actually work properly. The spectrum Sprint holds is “Meh” as a vast chunk of their PCS is leased out to MVNO carriers and wholesale carriers, leaving T-Mobile with less to work with per MHz than MetroPCS had. 800esmr is a joke, the sliver 5mhz bandband block can’t compete against the penetration or capacity 10mhz of 700mhz has, and 2.5ghz costs too much to deploy for a company that already can’t deploy it as it stands, merging wouldnt suddenly change that. All this talk of wanting to spend money to buy a carrier to make the other better makes me truly believe the best thing is for each company to spend that money in investing into their networks. Why spend money to buy a dying network and its customers when you can spend less making your network work better and gain customers. Again, a bad idea that would take a dying company beyond the grave and walking along zombie-like, and the other which is doing decently would instantly suck.

    • Fraydog

      1. Sprint’s SMR deployment is 5×5, much like T-Mobile’s. It would be a play where SMR and 700 A could be aggregated to deliver faster speeds than the big 2 everywhere rural.
      2. Said merger is likely a spectrum play at this point. TMUS management could migrate Sprint’s sub base into their current tower base and kill off CDMA in a 2-3 year frame. Existing T-Mobile customers would continue to use the T-Mobile platform as normal. Neville already has a track record of migrating users off CDMA with MetroPCS. Sprint customers would be put on new devices.
      3. Most of the 8T8R equipment that is deployed would perfectly intertwine with the existing vendor setups in T-Mobile towers. Nokia, T-Mobile’s primary base station vendor, is also Sprint’s primary TD-LTE vendor.
      4. T-Mobile’s denser cell grid (65,000 compared to 40,000 Sprint) would make it a far better experince than Sprint could ever do. That would make T-Mobile the permanant network speed champion in the US. T-Mobile has already done an amazing job with 2100, why can’t they do great with 2600?

      If it’s a situation where TMUS management runs the show, I think they have earned our trust. What can’t survive is Sprint’s branding or culture. That has to be killed with fire.

      If Masa wants a combined company, he’s going to have to do it by John’s rules.

      • RiskyBidThis

        The ONLY thing making it seem like a good idea at all is Sprint’s oodles of 2600MHz and I’m still not convinced that’s enough to make it not be a suicidal mistake.

        Mergers usually work a lot better when companies have similar cultures and practices: Sprint is based out of Kansas City and T-Mobile is based out of Seattle. That’s a world apart, as are their practices and that’s ignoring the additional complicating factor of Sprint’s Japanese ownership.

        I could easily see the thing going down in a blaze of drama and infighting, much like the Sprint Nextel merger before it and for similar reasons.

        • Hector Arteaga

          And Sprint’s 800 MHz holdings… Which cover the nation wall to wall.

        • RiskyBidThis

          It’s 5MHz and it’s not usable everywhere even after all these years. It would be nice, but it wouldn’t be what you’d use to sell a merger to regulators.

        • Hector Arteaga

          True, but it would be used in addition to the 700 MHz holdings and current edge spectrum. Rural coverage would improve tremendously, where speed isn’t the priority.

        • ericdabbs

          Sprint’s 800 MHz LTE is deployed in many markets in the East Coast already. The main areas that Sprint has little or no 800 MHz LTE deployed are in the US border Canada/Mexico regions due to IBEZ since both countries to the north and south were using iDEN. In fact the US/Canada IBEZ issues have been resolved and Sprint is now free to start deploying 800 MHz LTE in the border markets like Seattle, Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, etc. On the other side, markets like San Diego, Tucson, El Paso still need to wait while the US/Mexico regions continue with their rebanding efforts which should wrap by end of 2015.

          Also Tmobile still has a long way to go with 700 MHz LTE deployment especially in those markets that have Ch. 51 interference which include the 3 major markets in the US: LA, NYC and Chicago all can’t be deployed until the 600 MHz auction is complete since those incumbent TV stations do not have any channels that they can relocate to. Bottom line is that Sprint and Tmobile still have their problems but they are making progress. I do hope that Tmobile in 2015 buys up the rest of the 700 MHz A-block licenses and build a pretty nice 700 MHz footprint nationwide minus the US Cellular and Cell South markets.

      • archerian

        “If Masa wants a combined company, he’s going to have to do it by John’s rules.” – really??? If.. IF it were to happen, I don’t think JL would have more clout than MS. JL was brought to do a hype, pump and dump, he’s burning through cash now.

        • RiskyBidThis

          John is answerable to the stockholders and DT is the controlling interest, so you’re right that he wouldn’t have more pull than Son, but that is the end of where I agree with you.

          TMUS is burning through cash on spectrum acquisitions, because ultimately they need to do so to remain competitive, but their plans this year don’t look like those of a company that is priming itself to sell.

        • calvin200

          I wouldn’t say ready to sell, maybe just prepared.

        • UMA_Fan

          Ok that’s a really silly perspective and requires will full ignorance on your part to not realize T-Mobile has been the number ONE carrier in the US for the past year right now. Not in total customers but in reality out there in the market place and where people spend their money.

        • archerian

          “T-Mobile has been the number ONE carrier in the US for the past year right now” – and who was talking about silly perspectives and ignorance?

          “Reality in the marketplace?”.. “T-mobile is where people spend their money?” Are you serious? I’m a long term T-mobile user and appreciate them just like any other loyal customer, but I’d be hard pressed to see anyone claim T-mobile is where the bulk of the US Wireless consumers spent their money on last year and that they are NUMBER ONE. Like someone else mentioned, laying it on a bit too thick eh?

          Just out of sheer curiosity, by what tangible metric are they number ONE on your list? Emotions and passions doesn’t count btw ;) Net adds don’t mean much in this day and age when loyalty is just $10 pm away, and other carriers launch cheaper MVNOs to counter, have larger war chests and spectrum holdings. The high worth customers are still with VzW and ATT.

        • RiskyBidThis

          Barring a huge quarter from AT&T or Verizon, T-Mobile will have had the most net adds in the industry last year. As a result they also likely led in revenue growth percentage (well, barring Tracfone).

    • Cayden Griesbach

      All you would need to worry about is shutting down cdma no converting it. since LTE is the standard so it would be a lot easier to merge the two companies. Plus by the time they would actually merge both companies networks their network would cover their existing 2g and 3g networks by then.

    • Daniel Darnell

      800 Mhz ESMR is far from a joke, its deployed in my area and thanks to it I am now able to use Sprint in my house. It’s also given me the ability to use my phone inside buildings around here that before only Verizon and AT&T usually worked in.

    • franksmpc

      The problem is not just network incompatibility, but that there is not net gain in POPs. The combined carrier (S/Tmo) would be strongest where they are already strong, i.e. urban and sub-urban areas, and weak were they are presently weak, i.e. rural and open country areas. There are no worth while synergies, it’s just a blatant play to buy customers and reduce competition. A play that would be bound to fail as there would be a mass exodus (actually, a continuation of the mass exodus) from the new Sprint to other carriers.
      I am sure the reason we haven’t heard much Masa Son re: Sprints future is because he has realized, tooo late, that he jump on the wrong horse.

    • Marvin Lilmarv Bolden-Mitchell

      Um sir in the next 3 to 6 months all sprint FROM NOW ON phones will have band 12 700mhz thru the rural carrier agreements so oooooooK

  • BillSmitty

    Here we go again. Let’s face it, DT does not want to keep TMO long-term, so the sooner this $hit gets resolved the better. Dish, Sprint, whomever, just get this over with and move on. It’s going to happen at some point, so just rip off the band aid.

  • vrm

    He is taking a short term view of the situation while espousing “long-term” thinking.

    I can understand merging with at&t but merging with sprint only multiplies his problems ten fold. Sprint has no cash, their spectrum has no overlap, their network (cell sites) has too much overlap (not complementing each other) and has huge debt.

    Son’s reason for buying t-mobile was for “scale” to acquire special phones for spark ( as they are the only one with a weird combination of spectra). That even suggests that he has no interest in t-mobile’s un-carrier strategies (esp the phone subsidy).

    Many trolls espousing sprint’s cause claimed about the cash Son was to inherit from alibaba but they forget that Son already has billions in cash which he is won’t to spend even on softbank, much less sprint. Rich people do not get rich by spending THEIR money but by spending OTHER peoples’ money and taking a huge cut of the profits (losses don’t matter to them as it is not their money).

    In addition to the already huge debt they have and the debt incurred to buy t-mobile, integrating their networks would have been extremely costly and with their past history, probably taken decades to accomplish a project of this size. Even t-mobile is taking almost 3 years to merge metro PCS network into theirs and this is a tiny project in comparison.

    • Cayden Griesbach

      Softbank has plenty of money to deal with the debt though and it is going to happen sooner or later

      • vrm

        softbank has huge debt. ALL carriers have huge debt but some have better cash flows than others. T-mobile’s cash flow is small (but positive) and debt is also small so it can be serviced.

      • Jelly

        I agree it will happen with sprint, dish or whoever. I love my T-Mobile service but if things stay they way they are with little profit how will they maintain the network after expanding it? Sad truth is all this uncarrier was just a ploy to prep T-Mobile for sale and John was brought in to do just that. Once a merger happens, John is on to his next business venture. He’s not in this for the long term.

        • vrm

          unlimited data will have to go or survive in a different form than today.

          Network expenditures are nothing compared to spectrum acquisition (as AWS3 auction has shown) and luckily t-mobile already has plenty of it.

          Network expenditure cannot be avoided and if they merge with sprint, it will rise exponentially for many years before consolidation.

        • calvin200

          There is a form of unlimited data, throttling. It’s being done. .

        • franksmpc

          Until competition makes throttling a liability. Go Google/SpaceX!

        • franksmpc

          Unlimited is not just a good idea, it’s the future. Google/SpaceX will make Cell-Sat broadband ubiquitous. Anyone selling limited/throttled/capped broadband will go the way of AOL Dialup!

        • Mike

          I disagree. T-Mobile was being prepped for sale a few years ago when they were not investing in a network. Currently, they’re competing with the knowledge a sale is unlikely under the Obama administration.

    • Fraydog

      You do realize that AT&T took a huge writeoff of $10 billion Friday night and Verizon has a huge debt off the Vodafone separation, right? Most carriers have huge debts in a capital intensive business.

      If TMUS mamagement runs a combined company, they have earned my trust. They did climb out of a hole after the AT&T debacle.

  • sushimane

    I understand his point but they should just let tmobile use do what’s its doing. They added more customers then all three carriers made progress in every aspect starting to go forward with 700mhz,aws-3 auction even if it’s a little everything counts in my book. And next is 600mhz auction with every transaction of future 700 mhz purchase goes a long way for the future. Tmobile use has proven themselves in every way so give them couple years and they would be profitable not saying their not now.

    • maximus1901

      They’re not profitable.

      • sushimane

        Well unless their not in the negative like sprint. Their profit margin isn’t as high as the other carriers

    • Jonnie

      Adding customers don’t go for much If there’s little to no profit being generated. This was intended to be a pump and dump operation by using John for x amount of years. I’m sure they didn’t want to spend too much on the network in hopes that a merger would happen and the money spent would be returned via the merger. But the spending of 4-5 billion a year isn’t that on average for network upkeep per year?

      • RiskyBidThis

        $4-5 billion a year is hardly unsustainable on revenues of ~$30 billion a year, which is likely to be the bare minimum that T-Mobile winds up with next year barring an unforeseen loss of customers. For a point of comparison, their adjusted EBITDA in 2013 was $5.3 billion and that was with total revenues of $26.1 billion.

        Spectrum costs are likely to be their bigger concern going forward.

    • calvin200

      They can’t just keep doing what they are doing. That’s what unsustainable means. These things that are coming up all cost money. A lot of it.

      • sushimane

        Nothing is sustainable unless you maintain it and optimize it. But sometimes gotta go the extra mile to make customers happy lol unlimited data is one thing. But it’s up in the air but I can see tmobile do their thing if dt let them.

      • franksmpc

        Nothing is forever, either. With Google/SpaceX getting ready to bring Cheap broadband worldwide, expect the business models of not just ATT/Verizon to go end over end, but also the cable cos like Comcast, Charter, et al. Between Cell-Sat broadband, voip/msg apps and services like SlingTV, all of the established players will have their asses on the line in a few years.
        There are many options out there, but merging with the weakest player of the group, not to mention the worse reputation of the group, has got to be the dumbest idea going.

  • Jay J. Blanco

    Instead of merging DT need to buy U.S. Cellular, Alaska Communication, iwireless, and pump that 5 to 15 billion into tmobile that’s needed to buy all the 700mhz spectrum and expand the network and make it more reliable.

    • maximus1901

      DT won’t be pumping up anything into TMO because it wants to invest in it’s own market.

  • calvin200

    May have debt but Son (Softbank owner) is printing money with his Chinese internet venture. Daddy warbucks just needs to keep the money channel open.

    • vrm

      again, he will NOT invest any of that money in sprint or softbank. Son sees that as HIS money, to be stashed away in unnamed accounts for hedge funding.

      tell me, how much of his money is he spending on sprint ? Even for sprint’s capex, he is borrowing from the very suppliers (ericsson etall) !

      So stop parroting alibaba – it is out of play.

      • calvin200

        I was referring to the money Softbank has invested in China. Correct me if I’m wrong but they have a considerable interest in Alibaba. Am I incorrect?

    • Adrayven

      Son is NOT going to put his own money down.. He’s never done that with any venture he’s been in.. so why in the world would you “Assume” he would here? Thats silly..

      You know what they say about assumptions? :p

      • calvin200

        Correct me if I’m wrong, it’s Soft Bank’s money. I wasn’t saying his personal money. That was figurative speech. The money coming from the Mother/Father company of Sprint, which Son can basically call the shots on.

    • franksmpc

      Son made a huge error entering the US market via Sprint. Sprints biggest problem is not it’s debt, it’s crappy network, or it’s lousy customer service… Its biggest problem is it’s reputation. No amount of Chinese money will fix that!
      For the sake of the workers and contractors at Sprint, I do hope he does burn through a lot of Chinese money trying to turn Sprint around, but ultimately I see him taking a huge write-off on Sprint and auctioning off the spectrum or selling out to American Movil.

      • calvin200

        There are two options for him, OK 3. Buy another company and use their name. I would have no problem with that. Maybe he’ll make another go at T-Mobile. I don’t think there would be a problem under a different administration. 2. Sell off the company as you suggested. 3. Turn the network around, like TMobile did. T-Mobile isn’t even completely turned around yet and they are growing pretty fast so it’s possible.

        • franksmpc

          It’s hard to make predictions, especial about the future… but I really think Masa Son is kicking himself hard for the HUGE mistake of entering the US market via Sprint. In hindsight, a year and a half ago (or more), when all his planning started, Sprint may have looked like the stronger player, and he probably thought he might be able to pluck Tmo out of receivership after the failed ATT buyout.
          But… predictions… hard…

        • calvin200

          He probably would have been better off, but how would he have known. Then again the chunk of change T-Mobile got from ATT did not hurt TMobile’s current situation.

  • archerian

    “it could absolutely destroy the big two carriers.” – pandering to the base? I can see this in a comment but not in the actual article. The koolaid is strong in this one.

    • Mike

      This blog does not pretend to be objective. They’re unabashed T-Mobile fans. So take such comments for what they’re worth.

      • archerian

        true that, it used to be more objective when David was around. Granted its a pro-Tmobile site, but not even John Legere would bet on ABSOLUTELY DESTROYING the big two with himself, the brand and Uncarrier in his arsenal.

        • Mike

          They do lay it on a bit thick. But I enjoy this blog. Amazing how passionate people feel about a service.

        • calvin200

          Endearing even

  • analyzethis

    I’ve been saying for a long time T-Mobile wouldn’t be able to keep up their Uncarrier ways while maintaining and expanding their network, which includes buying new spectrum.

    If Dish doesn’t start a buyout this year some time soon I’ll be surprised. Ergen has shown no aversion to being in heavy debt and they have spectrum right now for T-Mobile. Sprint is a possibility only if a Republican is elected President in 2016. TMUS won’t/can’t wait that long.

    • maximus1901

      Well they’re gonna have to

    • franksmpc

      If T-Mobile Germany is adamant about selling, Dish is the buyer I would vote for. Bring one the sling TV

  • UMA_Fan

    It would have been great if Sprint had folded itself into T-Mobile. Legere implied countless times SoftBank was buying the T-Mobile brand and business and using Sprint’s spectrum and customer base to supercharge it.

    It would have been good for consumers in the long run because Verizon and At&t would have been forced to compete on price a lot quicker.

    • maximus1901

      The only reason tmobile is a maverick is because it had to be. Doubling up to the same size as vzw att would mean it has less incentive to be the uncarrier.
      Why can’t people see that? Tmobile does thibgs for its benefit first and everyone else’s second. It happened to be true that its well being is its customers’ for now. But as soon as it gets being enough, it’ll start being more un-uncarrier.
      #think

      • archerian

        I agree, if they could gouge customers and be a fat-cat like the others, they would have. They just can’t afford to right now, so they had to reinvent themselves as maverick uncarriers..

        • Dakota

          But they will in the future

      • Mr Paul

        They’ve already shown this upcoming “ReCarrier” with prepaid. Their prepaid deal is actually not even as good as Cricket. I can only imagine what T-Mobile will do with postpaid once they build more and get a bigger customer base, yikes.

        • franksmpc

          That is pure supposition. All we can really state for sure is what is happening right now. And right now, Tmo is shaking the industry to the core.
          The end of phone subsidies is huge, and will like result in not just less expensive service, but less expensive phones as well. The only reason an 8gb iPhone 5c cost a $450 while an extremely similar (only sans radio) 16gb iPod touch cost $200 is because buyers “think” they are getting it for “free”. I expect in the future, “flagship” phone pricing will look more like OnePlusOne (64gb 5.5″ for $350) rather then iPhone 6+ (64gb 5.5″ for $850).
          And who talks about “Night and Weekend” minutes anymore? Remember those ridiculous plans that had us buying “Talk” minutes? Really? Or how bout “messaging plans”? Seen any good ones lately? Or how bout exorbitant fees for teeny tiny internet “allowances” (gosh golly gee, thanks, Dad)? And then there’s the ludicrous and totally unjustifiable tethering prices? You’ve already paid for that teeny tiny sliver of internet, how can they justify charging you more depending on how you use it?
          Tmo isn’t perfect, and I won’t comment on what they might do in the future, but if past is prolog (and it usually is), it will mean more, for less, for everyone.

        • Mr Paul

          I believe we see eye to eye for many things. However, if T-Mobile was so data strong, they’d offer just an entry level plan and unlimited.

          Data Stash might now be here, but for the most part it is basically a way for people who clearly don’t use enough to build up data they don’t need, and for well over a year, T-Mobile played a data game with 1, 3, and 5GB and their only half-assed excuse is that they throttled instead of charged overages, and if you wanted usable speeds back for the 1 or 2 or however many weeks left until your bill cycle reset, you paid for a data pass almost equivalent to an overage charge.

          I do not disagree they’ve done a lot of shaking up, but there is still some sleaziness that I do not like and it’s very ironic. The now prepaid plans are a great example of how T-Mobile is loosing it’s ‘maverick’ touch. They didn’t even have the brains to offer 10GB instead of 5GB for 60 bucks like Cricket.

    • franksmpc

      A merger/tack-over/buyout by Sprint would have been an unmitigated disaster. Sprint had one good quarter at the end of last year only because of the new iPhone and their $50 dollar plan. That’s over now, and expect the exodus from Sprint to resume in this quarter. Especially once Sprint resumes it old tricks with the “terms” of the unlimited plans, and all those new iPhone customers realize what a horrible network they’ve anchored themselves to.

      • SeanB

        Ok get over it and stop complaining about a company your no longer with. Newsflash all of these cellular companies are sneaky in some way. If you think T-Mobile is not then you need to wake up.

        • franksmpc

          Again.. this is a comment section.. it’s for comments.. If you don’t like the comments, either don’t read them OR come up with a suitable rebuttal. Playing comment mommy is kinda silly.

        • gmo8492

          Stop recycling your comments especially if its on the same post noob.

        • 9to5Slavery

          Lame

        • franksmpc

          Hey, 9to5, you’re quite the piece of work coming on here with these little jabs but adding nothing to the conversation!
          How bout you got back to japan and choke on a chop stick.
          … maybe Masa’s chop stick! yeah… you’ld like that.

        • 9to5Slavery

          Lame

    • calvin200

      Still using that word folded rather than Softbank buying T-Mobile. Certain things don’t change. Who cares what they call themselves.

    • Wilfredo Martinez

      Please understand something. Less choices are NOT good for consumers. Never have been, never will be. It doesn’t matter how much they try to spin it as a good thing. “OH A SUPER MAVERICK” “OH WE PROMISE TO REDUCE PRICES”… Bull crap, once a company gets big (especially bases on mergers) they increase prices and only care about their shareholders. I rather T-Mobile grows fast by itself than a merger. At least if they grow fast by gaining customers we know they won’t increase prices once they become big.

      • UMA_Fan

        There’s a big difference here where a combined sprint and tmobile will STILL be far behind Verizon and at&t. You’re talking years before they smooth out consistencies with their network and handsets while maintaining the growth tmobile has now before they can even THINK of colluding.

        • Wilfredo Martinez

          Wrong. Let’s analyze this like smart intelligent beings would do. A company merges with its competitor… Right? The company has approximately 54 million customers and the competitor has 55. That would equate to a total of 99 million customers. The combined new company’s competitors have approximately 118 and the other one is at about 125. Now here is the question. Do YOU really think the new T-Sprint would give a crap about being 25 million customers behind? That they would continue UNCARRIER for that matter? Please… They would so become a Verizon and AT&T wanna-be and charge customers high prices. Yes they won’t do it at first but eventually within 1-2 years they would tweak their plans and increase them. T-Mobile is 71 million customers behind Verizon and 64 million customers behind AT&T. Now that is what I call “far behind” as you stated. Thank you!

        • 9to5Slavery

          109million*. “They will become…” That’s your own opinion. SoftBank is the owner, not some American con artist politician.

        • Wilfredo Martinez

          Also the sad truth of the matter is… A company needs to be the underdog in order for competition to be enforced. And unfortunately that underdog right now is T-Mobile. Unless they surpass Sprint of course. Then Sprint is the under dog.

        • 9to5Slavery

          They don’t need to be anything.

      • 9to5Slavery

        Lame

  • franksmpc

    Former customers of Sprint are legion, and they all speak with one voice: Sprint is bad news. It’s reputation is sh*t… smelly, stinky, gross sh*t. No one who is not a Sprint employee or contractor really wants to be part of Sprint.
    The only thing worse than Sprint buying T-Mobile would be American Movil buying it. That would be horrible.
    A Dish deal, however, would allow for a number of synergies, and possibly a package deal with SlingTV, like, SlingTV not counting towards your caps or free to tether on unlimited plans. Yeah… that would be good!

    • SeanB

      Ok get over it and stop complaining about a company your no longer with. Newsflash all of these cellular companies are sneaky in some way. If you think T-Mobile is not then you need to wake up!

      • franksmpc

        Ummm.. this is a comment section.. it’s for comments.. If you don’t like the comments, either don’t read them OR come up with a suitable rebuttal. Playing comment mommy is kinda silly.

        • 9to5Slavery

          Because of what you say, there needs someone to mommy you son.

    • armoderate

      I would have agreed with your assessment 6 months ago, but I can say now that I am impressed with Sprint’s significant turnaround in such a short period. I also think Sprint’s leadership change has put them in a much more competitive position.

      • franksmpc

        What Sprint turn around? They had one good quarter because of the new iPhone and the $50 everything plan. That’s all over. Let the exodus continue. They haven’t turned around their network, and I doubt they’ve done much with their customer service, and I seriously doubt they will long be able to afford all the $50 iPhone plans they just sold at a loss. Nor do I expect them to have any better luck at retaining them, just like the rest of their postpaid customers. The strongest parts of Sprint are Boost and Virgin Mobile.

        Turn Around? Well, maybe they an play that up for their one hope: Sprints only hope is to plead it’s case to Carlos Slim and hope for a sale to American Movil. Otherwise it’s the auction block

        • calvin200

          Or maybe T-Mobile can buy them? Ha ha ha ha ha ha

        • franksmpc

          you mean at the liquidation sale, right?

        • calvin200

          Considering it’s Soft Bank……. Ummmmm,..no

        • franksmpc

          I really doubt Softbank is holding Sprint very dear at the moment, and is as likely to walk away as sink to much more on a bad bet.

        • calvin200

          The whole reason Softbank did not go through with buying TMobile was because it was not going to be approved. If it comes to “sink” time such barriers would not exist.

        • Colin Yapp

          Softbank, is not giving up on Sprint. They are using their engineers to augment Sprints staff and they are also going to add Sprint to a Global 2.5ghz ring of high speed data. That same frequency is used in TD-LTE by China Mobile, Softbank JP and a few other carriers. There is talk to allow roaming across that frequency globally. Softbank, is in this for the long haul. T-mobile, will have a very capable competitor very shortly and so will Verizon an AT&T. Sprint, is not down for the count.

        • tony

          dont forget its $50+ 25 service fee, or discount phone fee as ghey call it

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Plus 28 for phone installment

      • Mr Paul

        Yes, and we also haven’t seen what building will be done under the new CEO. Sprint made a lot of progress in a ton of markets, and surpassed T-Mobile in mine, and we haven’t even seen Sprint’s new network team’s plans in action.

        • Bori

          Same here, Sprint went from terrible to great here in Cincinnati, unfortunately I can’t say the sane about T-Mobile. And Sprint is not even done yet, so this year is going to be interesting for Sprint and maybe T-Mobile lol.

        • Daniel Darnell

          Sprint has improved in a lot of markets, the very latest coverage and data speed tests have showed an huge improvement in Sprint. Heck due to 800 Mhz coverage now launched in my area Sprint is almost as good as Verizon here now. They have really made some huge leaps in the past year or so. Sprint deserves some credit for that.

        • Mr Paul

          I can’t wait to see what they’re going to do. I never thought I’d say that about Sprint, but with a new CEO and obvious results, like I said, we’re going to have to sit back and watch how things go this year.

        • Bori

          Couldn’t agree more!

        • Jay J. Blanco

          When Sprint has volte then you can talk. Sprint calls goes back to 2G. WTF.

        • TK – Indy

          Most T-mobile customers are turning VoLTE off on their phones, because it doesn’t work.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Even if it doesn’t work, I’ve seen it work before We have vohspa in most cases. Sprint has no plan for volte at all. which is sad

        • Bori

          What’s the use in having Volte if it doesn’t even work half of the time here. So I can careless if sprint calls are on 2G, as soon as I’m done I have very good LTE speeds. Something that T-mobile does not have.

        • Colin Yapp

          I agree, Houston, has really good service. Sprint, has definitely done a lot of improvement and I am sick of people trashing them that have not experienced them lately.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Try browsing the Web and talking on the phone at the same time then mention back and tell me how it’s goes. Sprint has no Volte.. while the other big 3 does

        • Colin Yapp

          Tmobile has very spotty VOLTE right now, Sprint has the HD voice but is planning on getting out VOLTE during mid-year, Verizon already has it. This not the end all in determining how good a carrier is for an individual, T-mobile. still struggles to get consistency in LTE across it’s network much less VOLTE. Not being able to browse the web and speak simultaneously has not stopped Verizon from becoming the largest mobile provider so I think that example is completely overblown.

        • TMoNewsAsAm

          Now with Google introducing the Hangouts Dialer, lack of simultaneous Voice and Data on Sprint is no longer an issue. I have used it without issues to surf the web while being on a phone call at the same time.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          haha you have to use a hangouts. While t-mobile customers just have to dial out regularly

        • TK – Indy

          Sprint is tied for #2 spot on Rootmetrics overall ranking here in Indianapolis – they rock in Indy.

        • Mr Paul

          Sprint was always #3 in my market, but T-Mobile went to #3 briefly 2014 1H, and Sprint shot right back to #3. This is considering Sprint hasn’t given us any Spark or full LTE yet! Even where Sprint is still #4, they’ve jumped considerably in most markets.

          Where just last year they were 50-60%, most places they are now at least 85-90% and some even 93-95%. Despite data still improving, they’ve made massive improvements in call and text performance on the market tests, and they have under 1% blocked calls almost everywhere over 2-5% a couple years ago. I think the only market where they seemed to decrease was in Hawaii for whatever reason.

          I can’t wait to see how they’ll do in the next to market tests.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        6 Quarters isn’t short period. The new ceo obviously hasn’t looked at t-mobile free cash flow chart

      • tony

        sprint is ripping off new customers with its bogus surcharges and fees.

        • calvin200

          Why you CRAMMING that into the conversation?

        • tony

          they been doing that forever? shit does verizon or at&t or t mobile ever charge an extra month on your first bill? you tell me.

    • monkeybutts

      Dish is coming out with $20 a month online TV service this year for cord cutters would be awesome to get that free on T-mobile.

      • franksmpc

        … and truly Un-Carrier like!

        • calvin200

          That CEO ego contest will be amazing.

        • franksmpc

          They would probably have to come to terms like “MySide/YourSide, MySide/YourSide” (Farscape reference, for the younger people out there). It might even last a whole year.
          But seriously, Dish has spectrum it needs to put into play, soon, or it gets returned to the FCC at a huge loss. Signing up with T-Mobile to market that spectrum for home broadband would be the easiest way for them to go.

        • calvin200

          With what is being done with both T-Mobile and Sprint, honestly which carrier do you think they would partner with?

        • franksmpc

          Obviously, Tmo/Dish would be a good combo, particularly with the home broadband possibility (even before cell-sat). There would be minor overlap in customers, as most urban/suburban Tmo customers would have cable/telco tv/internet, not satellite, and most rural satellite customers would likely not have Tmo. The deal would likely be better for Dish than Tmo, but could be good for both.
          Sprint and America Movil is a no brainer: Virgin and Boost Mobile, along side TracFone, Net10, Staight Talk, et al… a match made in hell. But hey, beggars can’t be choosers. And you give the credit challenged crowd one stop shopping!

        • calvin200

          I was hoping for some insight. Pros and cons of both. Forget I asked.

        • franksmpc

          forget what?

        • calvin200

          Exactly.

        • Garry

          That may be true but I live in the city of Dallas and just about every town home and condo I look at has a dish on the roof or balcony. Dishes may be bigger in Southern cities than people think.

      • UMA_Fan

        Would be interesting to see T-Mobile make cord cutter’s tv package for video available on not only mobile but for Xbox, Apple TV, PS3 etc.

        • Allen Enriquez

          Yes finally someone like you UMA_Fan agrees with me I’ve been saying that with all my family friends that have TMUS!

  • thinker

    You need more than 3 players for a competitive market. See: Canada. Three major players and it’s totally non competitive.

    The US was right to have signaled the blocking of a proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger.

    • calvin200

      I use to disagree with you, but I love the fact that TMobile, and now Sprint, are now shaking things up and driving down costs. I admit I was wrong, three is not enough. Now we just need to figure a way that coverage is nationwide with all carriers.

    • 9to5Slavery

      Canada and US are not the same.

  • Andrewjones189

    I had sprint and the service was iffy but the customer service sacked. I went in to do the (at next sprint version) and they told me we don’t offer that anymore ( this was a year ago) and they said I would have to pay 200 instead of tax only. I was so mad and they did not even let customers know when it was cancelled

  • UMA_Fan

    But really, what a stupid thing for the CEO of DT to say to the press. Do they not WANT T-Mobile US to succeed?

    Maybe they are a little bitter because right now the US branch is the most successful part of DT.

    • calvin200

      They want the best for their shareholders. Another example of them wanting out?

    • philyew

      Likely as not they are preparing the way for the Q4 2014 announcement, where TM didn’t overtake Sprint for #3 as anticipated and where they likely haven’t improved their margins as much as the market would like, despite continuing to add scale.

      Legere talks to the customers, Hoettges talks to the market. Since each audience has contradictory expectations, it’s not really possible for one person to talk convincingly to both.

  • maximus1901

    Vzw increased their prepaid plan to 1.5gb for $45 with autopay, no 8mbps limit
    Once reason goes all lte, phones will be muuhch cheaper the uncarrier will rethink their ridiculous $40 simply prepaid plan.

    • Irfan

      what so good in Verizon …did u ever called customer services , did u ever test its data network which is sucks , no unlimited , higher rate plans , only cdma low frequency thats it …they r done…crapy Verizon

      • maximus1901

        1) I’ve had verizon. When you call cust service it’s always someone speaking English. Always.
        2) their data network almost always wins the rootmetrics tests.
        3) they have 10×10 700mhz lte and at least 10×10 AWS lte.
        4) learn English.

        • Irfan

          easy boss , i love to take english classes from u if u agree , Verizon is awesome thats why u moved to t mobile ..

        • maximus1901

          If I were a millionaire id use verizon and have lte everywhere. But I’m not. So I make do with tmobile and bear with clenched teeth not having data at all when: I go inside some buildings, I visit my aunt (10 mins from dtw airport), when I leave the city limits.

      • Fraydog

        Look at RootMetrics, VZW is not sitting back and doing nothing. They have 20×20 AWS over large parts of the US and are deploying it everywhere. Urban and rural. Sure you can argue you don’t need data coverage in Fargo, ND, but what do you say when T-Mobile builds out LTE there and increases your bill? What do you say when you do go to the sticks and fall back on EDGE? Simple, you want T-Mo to increase their rural build.

        Key point: you have to pay the piper sooner or later.

  • TK – Indy

    Hoettges: ” Not sustainable long term.”

    Legere: “We can do it on our own.”

    Somebody is full of BS.

    • CommonSenseGuy

      Hoettges. He just doesn’t undersand that these subscriber additions are growth, while this growth will be cash, while this cash will be scale, and the scale will “allow them to compete” which apparently them adding 8.5 million subscribers in 2014 is not “competing”.

      Hehe.

      • TK – Indy

        “We had built an infrastructure and this infrastructure had to get utilized and we did that with very aggressive promotions.”

        Implication is that they are fresh out of inventory.

        • franksmpc

          I don’t think so…. and they are going to be expanding their infrastructure with new POPs, as well as new spectrum (700 MHz) and upgrading 2g to 4g/lte all year. I think they’ll be good for sometime to come.

  • Mirad77

    Tmo is a publicly traded company, DT should let capitalism play it’s fate with Tmo. The idea of coming up every often with the sell out doesn’t do good to Tmo’s stocks. If they really want out, all they should look for is green not who is buying. Heck sell bit at a time.

  • gojoe

    Let’s be realistic as Legere will make a boatload of cash when it sells..

    • Joe

      Way to be real bro because JL is already making a boatload of cash. Pretty edgy prediction. When the sun rises tomorrow, is the sun going to be bright?

  • franksmpc

    Sprint is toast..
    Tmo + Dish = UnCarrier X.0 ….. unTV by Sling – Free to Stream on all Plans!!
    Hey John, Tim? You guys listening?

    • TK – Indy

      You’re not getting it. They are at the more money for less stuff stage now, not the less money for more stuff.

      • franksmpc

        I’m not getting it? You realize of course this is a Tmo fan site, and not “the Precious Dour Princess Feels a Pea” site.

        • Colin Yapp

          Tmobile is bleeding cash and future profits to buy the subscribers that are coming on board. Sprint, may not be adding at the rate of Tmobile but they are on a more sustainable path. Their rate of churn is dropping and they are also improving profitability and stabilizing their revenue. Finally, Softbank, is in this for the long haul, Deutsche, is not.

        • maximus1901

          What has softbank done for sprint recently?
          Sprint is adding subs at a negative rate while losing money. Not sure how sustainable that is.
          You’ve got me on soft vs dt

        • Colin Yapp

          Softbank has committed 16B in investments for two years after they closed the deal. It has been a little over a year and they are still upgrading Sprint’s infrastructure. Sprint, is not losing subscribers at the rate they did before and they are not spending nowhere near what Tmobile is spending to gain customers. Softbank, is well aware that this is going to be for the long haul and did not expect a quick turn around.

        • maximus1901

          That 16B is coming from the cash that SPRINT has and the debt that SPRINT is accumulating. Except for the infusion if cash after the deal was consummated -$5bil – there had been no additional cash from softbank itself.

        • Colin Yapp

          Yes but Softbank is still on the hook for Sprints debts and liabilities so it is theoretically coming from Softbank.

        • maximus1901

          Softy is definitely not on the hook for sprint corp debts. If sprint files bankruptcy, softbank assets are safe.

          You’re probably right that capital markets give sprint benefit of the doubt because of softy

        • calvin200

          Lately, financing equipment, allegedly in talks with Radio Shack for more locations, sending Japanese experts over here, going to outbid the heck out of TMobile at the auction…….

        • maximus1901

          1) sprint finances it and even if it is softbank, the only cost is paying a few percent interest
          2) sprint is in talk with radio shack not softy
          3) sending jap experts – how much did that cost softy? A few million in salary and living expenses
          4) GOING TO bid … I asked what softy is doing or has done for sprint not what you HOPE they’re gonna do.
          Softy hasn’t even announced they’re gonna pump more money for any venture that sprint undertakes.
          So again, what has softy done or said it’s gonna do for sprint?

        • calvin200

          Trying to buy TMobile. How many Billion was that?

        • maximus1901

          Yes that would’ve helped sprint. +1
          What else?

        • calvin200

          I think buying a whole company would have been game set and match. Keep in mind it wasn’t stopped willingly through either parties involved. Sprint just has to keep getting their act together until the auction.

        • tony

          sprint has volte? wifi calling? free international roaming? can surf and talk on spark network? free music freedom? so tell me what has sprint got besides drop calls, slow 4 g lte and other stuff?

        • tony

          does sprint have deployed any 700 aws spectrum? can sprint reach 100 mg download like wideband network can?

        • calvin200

          No ASS. No 100 in life that I know of. Give me a decent speeding in more places and I’m fine.

        • IceMan

          Actually, with sufficient backhaul, Sprint could out-perform T-Mobile because they have A LOT more spectrum than T-Mobile does.

        • calvin200

          No. mg? no

        • Marvin Lilmarv Bolden-Mitchell

          Amen ^

        • calvin200

          Oh and now Google is going to use Sprint to provide cell service, TMobile too although it’s not announced yet. Son played an important part in this.

        • tony

          how many postpaid does sprint have q4? enough said.

        • Mr Paul

          Oops, I forgot Sprint got their new CEO, money and management 2 and a half years ago like T-Mobile. Oh yeah, actually it was more like they got their fully new management in place and operating the new Sprint for like 6 months. Legere didn’t start most of the Uncarrier movement until he was appointed for almost year, save for he ended contracts and changed plans 6 months in. T-Mobile didn’t go crazy building until nearly a year and a half after Legere was appointed and they didn’t acquire 700MHz and get serious about it until almost 2 years after. Knowing all of this and using dates, it would be unethical to judge Sprint until at least Late 2015

        • franksmpc

          Really, what are you doing here trying to convince Tmo fans that there is some benefit to be acquired by Softbank via Sprint? Why? If Sprint and Softbank are so great, and have such deep pockets, why do they so desperately want tiny, struggling, show boating T-Mobile? It seems to me that if they are so fracking great, so fracking rich, and have so fracking much valuable spectrum, that they would be belittling themselves with such a petty conquest.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          T-mobile is stealing Verizon customers high paying post paid customers. Sprint is adding more preaid this quarter. And with rollover data t-mobile is bound to make profit soon moch my words.

        • Mr Paul

          Rollover data is not nearly as impressive as it sounds. The only way it will even sell worth a damn is the 10GB starter.

          If you really needed data, you’d used unlimited. Also, look at it from a business perspective, not an “everything Legere does is right, suck the big pink wang” perspective; once most people eat through their 10GB, they’re going to realize 1, 3 or most likely 5GB is not enough, and upgrade to Unlimited. A person like me uses 3-3.2GB of my 3GB; 3GB and throttled for a day or two. Basically, I’d never accumulate data. It’s basically a way to get people to T-Mobile paying less at first; a marketing ploy, and that’s EXACTLY why it doesn’t apply to 1GB, otherwise people who don’t use much would have 5-7 GB by the end of the year.

          Half of the Uncarriers are worth something, they others are sheer Verizon-style big-mouthing about nothing. Like Wi-Fi unleashed? They did NOTING but advertise what they’ve already had for years.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Thanks for proving my point. People will upgrade plans and t-mobile makes more money.

          And it seems like you didn’t look into WiFi unleashed because the whole thing about it was if your in a different country you can switch the wifi on and save on roaming charges all around the world sir

        • Mr Paul

          Wi-Fi is not a tower, you are a product of advertising.

          “On October 9, 2013, T-Mobile introduced their third phase of the “Un-carrier”, which was the introduction of basically free international roaming.”

          Even if they didn’t allow Wi-Fi calling outside of the US, Wi-Fi calling and International Roaming were both not new features.

        • maximus1901

          Part of advertising is getting the gullible to believe you’re selling something new even if it’s repackaged. Got one! Lol

        • Mr Paul

          That is the basis of the Uncarrier movement. Yes, T-Mobile has shaken things up a bit, but they also need to reel people in by exaggerating times 1000x what they have, and make it look 10x better than it really is.

        • franksmpc

          That’s marketing. It’s what all businesses do to attract customers, especially in a saturated market. It’s necessary to overcome peoples inherent resistance to change. It’s what Sprint did with the $50 iPhone deal.
          But, at the end of the day, it’s not how many people you get in door, it’s how many stay. Last year, Tmo had over 8 million people stay. So, how many more people stayed with Sprint last year?

        • franksmpc

          International calling is still a mess for US travelers, unless they use Tmo. You know what international travel is, right? That’s when you climb the stairs (usually carrying a conveyance that holds some small amount of clothes and personal items), kiss your Mom goodbye, go out the door and make your way to a Port of Entry where you board a transport vehicle that will take you to a place that is not this place. Passports are required, but you knew that, right?
          Or are we still at the part about climbing the stairs? You should probably google that. I first did that so long ago I would probably fail at describing it to a novice.

        • Mr Paul

          So everyone should use T-Mobile to get better coverage in other countries, but lackluster or non-existent coverage at home. Solution: If you’re the small minority who travels to other countries for their career or living, get T-Mobile on a second line. You act like this feature is of importance to the majority of Americans or a good reason alone to switch to T-Mobile, when it is not.

          So, again, I need 3G coverage in OTHER countries for free (and if you use LTE, you get hammered by T-Mobile; fun fact) to justify me using a carrier that doesn’t cover me well in my own country and especially area?!

        • Terry

          You too sir need to get your facts straight. Wi-Fi calling on Airplanes was not part of the agreement with GOGO. You can only get data and Text.

        • Mr Paul

          I didn’t state phone calling, I said Wi-Fi calling. How is this done Through the Praise John Legere our Lord and Savior app? It’s done through Wi-Fi calling, and several T-Mobile phones were updated to allow Wi-Fi calling in airplane mode for this reason.

        • Terry

          You’re still saying Wi-Fi calling. Wi-Fi calling is the act of making a phone call via a Wi-Fi connection. So you in fact did state phone calling. If you are trying to say that you can connect to the internet via Wi-Fi on your phone, if you have the phone in Airplane mode, then that would be a correct statement.

        • Mr Paul

          No, Wi-Fi calling is using cellphone features through Wi-Fi instead of a cellular network. It doesn’t have to mean calls. It can mean texts or voicemail. I’m not going to call it Wi-Fi unleashed.

        • Erin Burns

          The data rollover isn’t useless for everyone, though I’ll admit it’s likely a marginal niche. My husband had the 5GB plan, because that was what used to be required to tether. When data rollover popped up I checked his past year’s data usage and he ranged from under a GB to a bit over 5 GB per month. Since I’m anal about monitoring anyway, I dropped him down to the 3 GB plan. He gets the 10 GB extra which he’ll probably use up by March due to the requirements for his diff eq class, April is a historically low use month, so it will rollover in time for high use May. From there we’ll see, but based on past use I’m thinking I can probably bump to 5 for a 3.5 month and then back down and keep the rest of the data for subsequent months, repeating as needed. Overall, it’s going to save us about 60-70 bucks per year for about 15 minutes of my time adjusting things while listening to my husband bitch. But I’ll grant we’re not your average plan users.

        • Colin Yapp

          So as you add these high cost acquisitions, which is how Tmobile is getting subscribers from the big two, you also have to beef up your network. Where is all this money coming from when the capital markets sees that they do not have a clear profitable path with their current course of business. They probably can borrow at higher interests costs but it will eat into future earnings. DT does not want to invest, especially now that they see Sprint is gaining traction and the other two majors are starting to match Tmobile in terms of pricing. The squeeze is on. I want to see Tmobile do well because we need a balance to Verizon and AT&T but they need to stop selling out their future for immediate gratification, it may haunt them in the future.

        • This Guy

          Stealing? High paying post paid? Any stats or info to back up your opinion?

        • Jay J. Blanco

          if you go to page 2 and read the preliminary report. Porting ratios with Verizon is 1.4 to 1.0 AT 1.8 and Sprint 2.2 to 1.0

        • Mr Paul

          Very true. No one knows exactly what Deutsche is going to do with T-Mobile. Sprint, on the other hand, has money, and is led by a team that is 100% not joking about making serious improvements in the future. Sprints internals and modus operandi have changed so much, I tell people they ought to be under a different name. People who still think Sprint is the same as under Hesse are sorely, sadly mistaken.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          I hope yall realize that because of Roll Over Data customers will jump to at least 3GB plans. And with tablet user they’ll jump to 1GB plans to get rollover data Making t-mobile profit. They know exactly what they are doing. T-Mobile is getting the most lucrative customers Verizon and post paid. T-Mobile added more postpaid customers then Sprint in the last 6 Quarters. Sprint is watching t-mobile win while they lose

        • Mr Paul

          Sprint is not loosing, they are just not winning yet. They had a looser CEO that got them a looser reputation, and that has clearly been proven a previous chapter to never look back at, as they are building full-speed. The biggest disadvantage of Sprint is they didn’t get their new CEO and Softbank money a couple years earlier, so now we can’t convince you people it is not the same company anymore.

        • franksmpc

          “Sprint is not loosing, they are just not winning yet” HA!!
          That’s like the French Army saying “We are not running away, we are just strategically retreating after having dropped our riffles!!”

        • 9to5Slavery

          Well that also goes with T-Mobile bleeding cash as well. “not losing yet”

        • franksmpc

          It would seem the folks on Wall Street have a different opinion then you on the matter. You should call the people at the investment houses and inform them that they are making a grave error! Hurry, quick…. go now before too much money is lost!

        • 9to5Slavery

          You mean investment firm?

        • franksmpc

          No. I meant what I said. Either term would work.

        • tony

          hahaha sprint the last place network lol. they charge you an extra month as new customer which no other carrier does. and lol scam new customers with half off promotion. they got their moeny from scamming customers.

        • Mr Paul

          No other carrier charges a service fee or charge (postpaid)? Admittedly, only T-Mobile doesn’t. AT&T and Verizon both also charge service fees. AT&T marks their low-mid data down to quite excellent rates, save their rip-off 300MB option, but that is of course before you add the service charge. Without it, AT&T would be the best deal on the market for <10GB of data. Verizon viciously overcharges for data, then slaps a service charge. This is because they have barely enough towers and capacity they should have for their size; they are essentially an oversized Sprint with a far bigger LTE footprint. Then with Verizon, it looks like their individual prices still bakes an additional 15-20 dollars in, and who knows what other 10 things Verizon will charge you for.

          A good example of Verizon pricing is a loyalist that I know. They have been with them for over 6 years, spent hours on the phone, and the best they can do without them switching to EDGE is 2GB of data, 700 minutes, and Unlimited text, and it costs them like 106 bucks a month after taxes WITH an 18% company discount. They also have ZERO tethering, and they only have visual voicemail because they have an iPhone, or that would be another monthly charge as well. A lot of people also pay these rates. Literally double what one should be paying, TOPS. This person would pay 91 after taxes if they changed plans and gave up the company discount like they obviously should for the same 2GB of data. 3GB of data for one person costs like 78 bucks from AT&T AFTER taxes in NYS; only 4-5 bucks more expensive a month than T-Mobile postpaid.

          To knowledge Sprint does the same, but the service charge is 15 instead of 25 for AT&T (Mobile Share Value) and 40 for Verizon (More Everything)

        • tony

          lol read sprint facdebook, customers are leaving you even the new customers that got scamemd out of half off bill event.

        • tony

          i help recruit those postpaid customers of sprint to t mobiel simple choice plans. family plans those are big profit for t mobile from sprint facebook each week.

        • franksmpc

          Sprint is a mess… There new team is… not much different from the old team… top officers shuffled a bit… not much more then that…
          What you really got at Sprint is a bunch of people scared as hell at the prospect of going under and finding themselves tossed out into lousy job market. That kind of motivation frays peoples nerves and causes them to make mistakes.

        • franksmpc

          I guess the Sprint Trolls come out at night… Anywho… “bleeding cash” would imply operating at a loss… they are not.
          Sprint is not only not gaining customers at the rate of Tmo, they are not gaining customers, AT ALL!! Period. They had one good quarter, due entirely to the iPhone $50 everything promo, and that rush is over… Even during that time, the rate of churn was huge, and what we really saw was that they barely gained more then they lost, even while practically giving away the store!!!.
          And good luck, Sprint, trying to retain those new iPhone customers, once they realize the network hell they’re in… all they need to do is pay off the phone, pop in a new sim, and they’re free.
          Time is not on Softbank’s side. Sprint will not be allowed to merge with Tmo… ever. And DT has much more qualified suitors for Tmo if they really want to sell.

        • Colin Yapp

          Bleeding cash does not always mean operating at a loss, it means that their ARPU and margins have been steadily falling. Investors, have a certain level or return that they expect and when those numbers aren’t met, it means a “miss”. Also, Softbank, has stated they are willing to subsidize some of their losses with their Japanese profits in order to turn around Sprint. Finally, who are you speaking of the are considered qualified suitors, not Dish nor any other US telco’s. The Cell Market in the US is so fortress like and now that Sprint is gaining traction, it will make it even more difficult to squeeze out desired profits, especially when Tmobile is expanding with razor sharp margins. It is not as rosy as you see it.

        • franksmpc

          Then let the investors worry about that. From the looks of things, they are not too concerned about your concerns, with a consensus buy rating for a stock that has increased six fold over the last five years, added 8 million customers last year, and is sitting on $4 billion in cash.
          As for what customers worry about, that would be the pariah Sprint coming anywhere near Tmo.
          As for Dish, Dish is going to make a deal with someone in wireless, be it ATT, Tmo or Sprint. All the content people are. Wireless is the future. Wired networks are too expensive to roll out and maintain, let alone upgrade. How many upgrades cycles has cellular gone through in the last 20 years vs cable and telcos?
          Their are many, many, players out their. Sprint just happens to be the least desirable. Hell, they are utterly undesirable

        • Colin Yapp

          Sprint is sitting on more cash than Tmobile. Tmobile is stil enjoying the momentum from their “uncarrier” campaign but other carriers are matching them so that will ultimately not carry as much weight. I am not saying I dislike Tmobile but it makes no sense for all this Sprint bashing when they are also gaining some traction and have made huge improvements to their network. They are still investing a lot into their business and will make further improvements this year. They are just not leveraging the farm for a few occupants, Tmobile, is risking it’s future for the subscribers it is currently bringing on. Also, I predict their churn rates will start to ramp up unless they build out enough to accommodate all these new subscribers. I know of a few people that aren’t terribly impressed with their coverage and some of those people, from Verizon and AT&T, are now regretting that they moved. They need lots of Spectrum, network equipment and CAPITAL. It is going to be quite a challenge to fulfill those needs with a parent that is not fully in.

        • franksmpc

          So they have more cash. Are they using it more effectively? Apparently not. If their network is improving, as you say, why don’t their users think so. Last year they lost customers at a rate greater then what they gained.
          Other carriers are not so much matching Tmo as they are doing the minimum necessary to stem loses. Yes, the market will stabilize at some point. Tmo can’t add customers at a rate of 8 million year for long without seriously bulking up at some point. But are we at that point now? No.
          Tmo has only begun converting their 2g assets to LTE. They have only begun to deploy 700 MHz, and they have not even completed their LTE expansion. They have more then enough capacity to continue expanding for the foreseeable future. If the market stabilizes with Tmo at around 60M customers, then they probably don’t need any more spectrum at all. Any serious attempt at a 100M customers would require a major flight of customers from ATT/Verizon, not likely, or the complete collapse of Sprint, also not likely, mostly due to their MVNO’s and Softbanks money.
          So, this great need for spectrum is mostly about an expansion strategy that is really pie in the sky. A healthy, No. 3 Tmo is fine where they are at, and they will probably be at a realistic customer ceiling in the near future.

      • 9to5Slavery

        He’s definitely not getting it *

        • franksmpc

          Well, we can all pretty much guess your getting it… or, more appropriately for you, where you’re taking it

    • Mr Paul

      T-Mobile and Dish? Both offer lame service. It would go well; they should merge. Then I’ll keep AT&T and get DirecTV. Two great services.

  • Wilfredo Martinez

    I am so sick of this.

  • Wilfredo Martinez

    Stupid DT…. IF YOU WANT TO GET RID OF T-MOBILE OPERATIONS SO BADLY.. WHY DON’T YOU SPIN THEM OFF BY THEMSELVES! I AM SURE T-MOBILE WOULD BE FINE WITHOUT YOU!

    • maximus1901

      Because they want a premium to their 67% holding of tmus. That’s the only reason they don’t sell tmus stock right now.

      • Wilfredo Martinez

        Well they aren’t getting one. Too bad.. They need to move on… On to the next one now!

  • Irfan

    usa is the biggest country , need big investment in mobile industry to cover the nation plus highly price spectrum , one fcc lower the bit of spectrum price and easiest the policy ..i guarantee many companies will jump in

    • maximus1901

      You obviously don’t know how spectrum auctions work

      • 9to5Slavery

        He doesn’t speak well English lol

  • Mike

    Oh boy here we go again… TMOUS has made significant progress over the last 18 months and seems to be on track to over take Sprint for the number 3 spot. . It would appear that DT is cash strapped and perhaps sees TMOUS as the source of the cash to sure up DT operations in Europe. Why not just let TMOUS be and support (not with cash) its growth, DT?

    • Rose Yvette Mosher

      That’s about what I was thinking

      • maximus1901

        How does tmus growing subs but not returning dividends or share buybacks good for DT? It’s a worthless paper gain.

        • 9to5Slavery

          Thank you, some of these supporters have no clue what a business mentality is and what it is happening in reality. They love their fantasy life of cheer leading for a company but not their own life.

  • Next Generation

    Can someone say bankruptcy? Good luck T-Mobile & Sprint!

    • franksmpc

      Wow, where does one get that idea. Tmo is doing fine, and is in the black. That, and the fact that there is a line of suitors, cash in hand, lined up outside it’s door, I think Tmo is doing just fine without your backhanded luck wish.
      Sprint on the other hand…

      • 9to5Slavery

        Do some DD before you start giving your opinion. Mr. “I think”

        • franksmpc

          Well, apparently you’re a big fan of Dungeons and Dragons, but IRL, rolling the dice is usually contra-indicated for a healthy bottom line.

        • 9to5Slavery

          You have no idea what I’m saying do you. Just stop, you’re so embarrassing.

        • franksmpc

          Ohhh, you meant… Due Diligence… duh… Dungeons and Dragons just seam more appropriate.

  • Bittersweet

    JL, if you actually owned T-Mobile, you would know where DT is coming from.

  • Fritz

    I think hes saying a merger would be ideal, which is true, But its only ideal if Tmobile is doing the buying. TMO & US cellular doesnt sound so bad.

    • franksmpc

      No… he said he was “intrigued”… that’s the kind of word you use when, say, a well connected, but utterly undesirable woman, shows an interest in you. In polite company, one cannot be dismissive, but one will not… not ever… Not on a freaking bet!!!!
      During much of the period between 200-2010, the dollar value plunged vs the euro, which would have made ANY US investment look bad from over there. Combine that with the fact TmoUS was poorly managed and moving sideways, at best, in that same period, and one can understand the angst of the Germans over their US investment.
      The situation has done a 180 since then. The euro is falling vis-a-vie the dollar, and Tmo is much better managed and growing. The Germans are more happy about their US investment. Now their angst is directed at their investments closer to home as the Eurozone struggles with collapse.
      What he’s really saying is that the euro is tanking and he needs cash to beef up investment closer to home, but… as to Sprint… well… you know… intrigued, really… but, you know… It’s me, not you… but, ahh… you know, thanks for the interest, really… Umm, I’m gonna go stand over there now…

  • notyourbusiness

    Are you kidding me? The merger with Sprint would have been disastrous in more ways than one.

    • 9to5Slavery

      To someone who doesn’t know business but the perception of a fanboy yes it would be “disastrous”

  • FCC Spectrum Auction

    Wonder how much spectrum Tmo walking with after the FCC auction? Maybe nothin? Is that DT problem? Did DT underestimate it’s competitors? What is JL smoking on? I hope it’s something good cause this trash talkin, promises bout being number 3 is a bunch of BS!

    • franksmpc

      One more time, in English please?

      • 9to5Slavery

        Wonder how much spectrum Tmo walking with after the FCC auction? Maybe nothin? Is that DT problem? Did DT underestimate it’s competitors? What is JL smoking on? I hope it’s something good cause this trash talkin, promises bout being number 3 is a bunch of BS!

      • FCC Spectrum Auction

        Why reply? Sounds like you understand me just fine.

        • Omar Boyer

          I agree thats dumb he replied back with an ansewer like that, im sure he understood u just fine just like i did and the other people that gave u thumbs up.

      • 9to5Slavery

        You’re incompetent

        • franksmpc

          Chop sticks

      • FCC Spectrum Auction

        :-)

      • Austin

        That’s pretty easy to understand. He wants to know how much spectrum T-Mobile won at the AWS-3 auction, they might have won nothing, wants to know if it is Deutsche Telecom’s problem, did Deustche Telecom not think enough of it’s competitors, what drug is John Legere on and complains about T-Mobile not passing Sprint.

    • #Truth

      T-Mobile will be the number 3 wireless provider in the United States by the end of Q1 2015 in terms of subscribers. Sprint will have to do way more than just cut prices if they want to stay relevant by the end of 2015. From what Sprint has said about it’s Q4 2014 they basically only added prepaid customers. T-Mobile just announced that they are going to cut the pricing of their prepaid products across the board with T-Mobile prepaid, Univision Mobile, and Go Smart Mobile. Unless Sprint gets the boost from Soft Bank they keep talking about it’s hard to see a scenario where they remain number 3. T-Mobile has built a brand being image edgy and cool and the opposite of any thing you hate about your current carrier. Any time I think of Sprint its horrible coverage mixed with contracts and confusing plans with overages. You might as well go with AT&T or Verizon and get good coverage if you want that.

    • franksmpc

      Doesn’t matter. In the first AWS auction (2006), Tmo was the ONLY carrier to walk out with NATIONWIDE AWS LICENCES [http://www.phonescoop.com/articles/article.php?a=99&p=1495]. They also walked out a boat load of metro and regional licences, which they have augmented over the years with additional license purchases, and the Metro PCS purchase. Verizon and ATT bid big in this auction because they had to. At that first AWS auction, they literally half-assed it (look at the maps at the above link).
      The spectrum Tmo really needs is lowband spectrum. But that’s a problem everyone has, even Sprint.

      EDIT:
      Don’t forget the AWS licenses ATT forfeited after the failed merger!

    • franksmpc

      Doesn’t matter. In the first AWS auction (2006), Tmo was the ONLY carrier to walk out with NATIONWIDE AWS LICENCES [ phonescoop.com/articles/article.php?a=99&p=1495]. They also walked out a boat load of metro and regional licences, which they have augmented over the years with additional license purchases, and the Metro PCS purchase. Verizon and ATT bid big in this auction because they had to. At that first AWS auction, they literally half-assed it (look at the maps at the above link).
      The spectrum Tmo really needs is lowband spectrum. But that’s a problem everyone has, even Sprint.
      Also, Don’t forget the AWS licenses ATT forfeited after the failed merger!

      why is this being held up for approval?

  • Bryck

    T-Mobile will be sold, or the company will merge. To me it’s been set in stone for a long tine now, It’s just not the right time yet. I only hope is that if they do find a buyer, Vodafone will be the purchaser.

    • JimInChicago

      BrycK: I agree with your take on Vodaphone and think it’s not too far fetched a possibility. Thanks for your post.

    • KlausWillSeeYouNow

      Why do you feel Vodafone is the best suitor? Just curious.

  • franksmpc

    Waking up this morning, I opened my laptop to find that, overnight, Sprint trolls have festered in the comments, apparently trying to bludgeon Tmo fans into accepting the ‘fact’ that they need to be ‘saved’ by Softbank via Sprint. Why?
    If Sprint and Softbank are so great, and have such deep pockets, why do they so desperately want tiny, struggling, show boating T-Mobile? It seems to me that if they are so fracking great, so fracking rich, and have so fracking much valuable spectrum, that they would be belittling themselves with such a petty conquest. Why not just march off on their own to conquer the mobile world.
    Who really needs saving here. Sprints customers are fleeing, management is inexperienced, network is a mess, customer service is legendary for all the wrong reasons, and reputation couldn’t possibly get worse.
    As for Softbank, they bungled the whole US market entry when they went with Sprint first. They should have pounced on Tmo right after the ATT deal fell through, but they didn’t. No they went with Sprint. Then they forced Sprint to buy out Clear and their useless WiMax spectrum. Really, what good did that spectrum do for Clear? Ever talk to a former Clear Customer? You can go on Youtube. IF you were line of site with a clear tower, i.e., you could physically see the tower, you could get ok speeds… ok being 10 mbps, so, not great, just good. UNTIL it started raining, at which point you may as well go to Starbucks to use their wifi.
    Softbank/Sprint needs the saving. They’ve bungled this thing from the get go.Sprint trolls go back under your rocks.
    As for Tmo, it’s fine, healthy, and if it does need bulking up, there are better, smarter choices at hand for a merger.

    • Fraydog

      Have you looked at the balance sheets of TMUS and S?

      Not a great deal of difference. Cite some numbers. Otherwise, it’s just hot air.

      I don’t want a merger any more than you do. I would prefer TMUS continue to Maverick it up. But at some point, people have to pay the piper.

    • calvin200

      You are misrepresenting the views of many people. Most Sprint supporters don’t think of TMobile as a little small boat. They see T-Mobile as a greatly improved. They just get tired of hearing so many BS statements. We are not saying Sprint is or has been amazing, it was rated the worst carrier in the US last year for a reason. We are just tired of hearing a mountain of amazingness made out of the good things TMobile does. TMobile is catching up on customers and is causing a price war. That’s amazing. We love that it and we get it. Saying things like “useless WiMax spectrum”——there are at least two things wrong with that statement. This is my impresson of what’s going on.

      • franksmpc

        Why are you here then? Sprint has had a looooong history of screwing with it’s customers. All the Carrier sites are bound to be filled with Sprint refugees who will have nothing but horror stories re: their time with Sprint.
        If you stayed at Sprint fan Sites, you wouldn’t have to hear about how happy Tmo customers are with their current service. For my self, I never go to Sprint Fansites (are there any?) to trash Sprint, or to tell Sprint fans they are wrong, misguided, or anything. I DO NOT FRACKING CARE ABOUT SPRINT! PERIOD!
        What chaps my hide is when people go on about Tmo NEEDING to be taken over by Sprint. My last comments on this site was months ago when this issue last reared it’s ugly. This topic just really touches a nerve….
        I was right when I said Tmo didn’t need ATT, and I won’t mind being right again when Softbank pulls out of Sprint the same way the Japanese banks pulled out of US real estate in the early 90’s. They didn’t understand the markets and they made HUGE costly mistakes, and went home with their tails between their legs. I gonna be de javu all over again.

        • calvin200

          Because I can.

        • franksmpc

          yeah, it’s still a marginal free country. It just demonstrates your a bore, and your arguments are more desperation then rational.

        • calvin200

          Bored, yes. Not rational? I think I’m pretty even keeled. How can I be saying Sprint is so amazing when i can easily it was the worst carrier? Regardless , have a good day.

  • franksmpc

    Why is this even being discussed. Why this hell bent desire to convince people that Tmo would be better off being taken over by Sprint? What would be the benefit to Three Big Carriers versus Four Carriers? Has any body considered all the people who would lose their jobs as a result? All the stores that would be closed, the canceled leases, the employees out on the street? The reduction in marketing dollars? The closing of one of the headquarters, with the incumbent layoffs? Why?

    So one rich guy can fulfill his fantasy of coming to America and challenging the big boys toe to toe. Really? We’ve seen enough market consolidation already. It’s about as necessary as more tax cuts for the rich, and about as useful. Consolidation leads to more competition in the same way as tax cuts for the rich leads to more jobs, i.e., it doesn’t.
    And this spasm over Tmo doom as it runs out of spectrum. Tmo has only begun converting their 2g assets to LTE. They have only begun to deploy 700 MHz, and they have not even completed their LTE expansion. They have more then enough capacity to continue expanding for the foreseeable future. If the market stabilizes with Tmo at around 60M customers, then they probably don’t need any more spectrum at all.
    Any serious attempt at a 100M customers would require a major flight of customers from ATT/Verizon, not likely, or the complete collapse of Sprint, also not likely, mostly due to their MVNO’s and Softbanks money. So, this great need for spectrum is mostly about an expansion strategy that is really pie in the sky. A healthy, No. 3 Tmo is fine where they are at, and they will probably be at a realistic customer ceiling in the near future.
    Much beyond the next couple of years, changing technologies could make todays cell phone look like yesterdays CB radio’s.

    • 9to5Slavery

      Lame

      • franksmpc

        choke on a chop stick

    • KlausWillSeeYouNow

      Downvoted because you’re trying to connect dots that don’t exist with the tax cut jab.

      • This Guy

        Like anyone cares if you downvote
        Your like in the Top 3 for trolling here

        • 9to5Slavery

          frankabc doesn’t know anything but the common knowledge.

        • franksmpc

          choke on chop stick ahole

        • KlausWillSeeYouNow

          You’re the newly-hatched troll, dude. I’ve been a productive member of these forums long before you showed up. So don’t yell troll and cover, guest Disqus account.

      • franksmpc

        this ain’t the Drudge report, take your 1% Oligarch politics elsewhere

  • NotAgain

    How dam*ed depressing.

  • Rick Rudge

    On the surface the merger looked like a good idea to me too, until I looked at Sprint’s coverage map compared to T-Mobile’s. We had pretty much the same territory that Sprint had. What was that going to buy anybody? As far as having money to expand better, you usually don’t get that in a merger. Instead everyone is trying to pay off the company debt from the merger. What I do see as a plus for Her Hoettges and Deutsche Telekom is them making some money on the deal.

    • eAbyss

      It’s all about the spectrum.

  • Danny Lewis

    “Oh, doom and gloom!” Whatever. T-Mobile has more customers than ever, they are expanding their LTE at an astonishing rate (my home state has LTE in places I never thought it would get). DT is just butthurt it couldn’t sell off T-Mobile to Sprint. I want four carriers, more competition is good!

    • 9to5Slavery

      There would be competition with 3 as well. You’re just assuming that there won’t be.

      • Danny Lewis

        When did I say there wouldn’t be competition with 3 carriers? Nevertheless, more competition means more choice for consumers.

      • RiskyBidThis

        Unless they decide to collude with each other. The fewer competitors that there are to break ranks the higher the chances of collusion become because the less they have to worry about someone breaking ranks.

        It has happened with RAM, Flash memory, TV panels, hard drives, and ebooks at a bare minimum and that’s ignoring the elephant in that is the entire financial sector both prior to (mortgage underwriting fraud) and after 2008 (commodities, forex).

        You evidently have far more faith in the inherent goodness of business than I do. In fact, I’d call it a near-delusional optimism or ignorance.

  • Rob H.

    It seems like anytime T-Mobile and merger are used in the same sentence Tim Hoettges gets too excited. Sprint/Softbank would have destroyed T-Mobile if that was allowed to happen. Same results if the AT&T/T-Mobile merger was to have happened. Tim Hoettges does NOT seem to understand that the US government has already made it clear it WANTS 4 national carriers. It would be ideal to merge with a regional carrier if they were at least used GSM technology. Otherwise it’s cost prohibitive. I seriously believe Tim Hoettges is just out of touch with the situation. IMHO, Iliad was the best option for a external US buyer.

    Vodafone just got a crap-ton of cash from VZW, maybe they would be interested in T-Mobile? Makes more sense than US carrier A, B, or C failing to get regulatory approval.

    • 9to5Slavery

      Good prediction on Vodafone, although Tim Hoettges knows the company more than we do and their financial situation/operation.

      • Rob H.

        T-Mobile will want a buyer that will invest in making them a toe-to-toe competitor to VZW and AT&T.

        • 9to5Slavery

          I bet Vodafone will loved selling VZ on edge and get TMUS for cheap then resell for independence.

        • k

          Vodafone or America Movil!

    • franksmpc

      IF, and that’s a big IF, then, well, better than Sprint, that’s for sure.

  • Josh

    If DT wants out of US market why don’t they just spin off T-Mobile…

    • k

      DT has overvalued TMUS according to the market. So a spin off wouldn’t work. Technically, they have “spun them off”, when they bought MetroPCS, they did a reverse buyout.
      Problem really comes down to, I think, DT wants all the money for TMUS upfront. They want out. Very few folks out there that can match a $35 Billion asking price for TMUS, let alone the approx. $25 billion market cap they have now. And then there’s the regulators…

    • Nearmsp

      when you sell a majority stake one gets approximately 50% premium to the market close prior to the offer. So if they “spin off”, means selling their stocks for current market price.

  • Jason P

    The single greatest feat of the Obama administration is the no-BS antitrust policy. T-Mobile exists today solely because of this administration. The price competition war recently exists solely because of this administration. Im not in any way a Democrat or a liberal but even I am in admiration of the ideological guts they have. They stand by positions.

    • franksmpc

      Take your oligarch politics elsewhere… this is a Tmo fansite, Not Drugde Report

    • Nearmsp

      Well, the Democrat on the FCC (black female – Mignon Clyburn) said she was fine for AT&T buying up T-mobile even before AT&T sent in their formal application. Her dad Jim Clyburn is the 3rd ranking Democratic representative!. AT&T filled his election fund with lots of donations. So much for crediting the Democrats. Both parties have their snouts in the same trough. Get real!

  • calvin200

    TMobile is stuck somewhere between “I want” and “won’t happen”. Must be painful.

    • franksmpc

      Why, as an admitted Sprint fan, do care… Tell it to the Sprint fan base.

  • Ricky Thomas

    I just took a trip from Springfield, MO on I-44 NE to St.Louis and I had nothing but Edge or no service from T-Mobile. My co-worker has Sprint and stayed connected to LTE and every now and then 3G all the way. So as far as I am concerned T-Mobile has a long way to go to make itself a wireless option for a vast majority of consumers. Sprint use to not have service all the way up I-44 a year or so ago so WOW!!! I am seeing much faster improvement with Sprint. I think T-Mobile is a marketing hype that is doing everything it can to make it appear a greater option but once you get in, yikes!!! you start to realize the lack of service you should get. Also I realized my friend is only paying $68 a month unlimited everything on the iPhone for life plan and includes the phone payment each month. I pay $107 per month with T-Mobile!!!! really read and investigate for yourself, do not take the commercial hype for the final product.

    • Mr Paul

      Yeah, not uncommon. The marketing is viciously exaggerated and hyped up, Verizon-style. Take the EDGE and service partners out of their coverage map, and it makes T-Mobile look like a fly on Sprint’s ass, and Sprint is not taking breaks or screwing up this time. All the hype would make you think T-Mobile is so fantastic, but really it’s just a bunch of cities and random suburbs. Otherwise, T-Mobile doesn’t cover squat compared to Sprint. You’re only the 100th person to point out the massive difference in T-Mobile vs Sprint coverage. And, when I did go to Florida from Tampa to Ft. Myers, I had LTE all the way, but only twice did I see about 5 down and 1 up; the speeds were garbage, and the latency was useless. Then I naturally went to try H+, and I couldn’t even get EV-DO speeds. What a joke; not trying T-Mobile again for quite a while.

      • xmiro

        lol wut? My HSPA+ is 10/2.5 used to be 16/2 until last year. T-Mobile has more LTE pops than Sprint per http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/t-mobile-passes-sprint-230m-lte-pops-while-verizon-dominates-306m-lte-pops/2014-07-01 and going to 300 million by end 2015

        TMUS native 2G network is close to Sprint’s, just look at CellMaps app.And d in 5 months all of that will be LTE with 700Mhz is already live in many parts of Florida.

        Deployment and upgrade schedules are on time and on track, unlike your awesome Sprint which has been late and can’t get it’s shit in order for how many years now?

        Atlanta/Athens …Sites Complete = 70%; LTE Launched = July 15, 2012 …Original Scheduled Completion = December 2012; Current Production Rate Completion = October 2013

        https://community.sprint.com/baw/message/564346

        and the list goes on

        • Mr Paul

          http://broadbandnow.com/Mobile

          11 months later, I’d be extremely surprised to see T-Mobile any higher in pops covered overall than Sprint.

    • franksmpc

      Is this another Sprint troll… tell me, do a lot of Tmo fans go to Sprint sites and stir up sh*t?

  • franksmpc

    All thee blather about the AWS auction is fud. Tmo may or may not have walked away with much this time, but it really doesn’t matter. In the first AWS auction (2006), Tmo was the ONLY carrier to walk out with NATIONWIDE AWS LICENCES [http://www.phonescoop.com/articles/article.php?a=99&p=1495]. They also walked out a boat load of metro and regional licences, which they have augmented over the years with additional license purchases, and the Metro PCS purchase, then the AWS licenses ATT forfeited after the failed merger! Verizon and ATT bid big in this auction because they had to. At that first AWS auction, they literally half-arsed it (look at the maps at the above link). Tmo likely as not just filled in the blanks in som metro areas.
    The spectrum Tmo really needs is lowband spectrum. But that’s a problem everyone has.

  • Nearmsp

    It is a fallacy to think you can make money only if you are the biggest in the Industry. You can be competitive as a small business and make money. For too long the US corporations have felt that the only way to grow is by gobbling up the competition. The only way to have low churn is by binding customers in 2 year contracts. Even Comcast and does it. Earlier on Dish and Direct TV did it. I do hope T-mobile, European owned does not morph in to a typical US corporation where organic growth is the last priority and take overs are the main game. Look at Microsoft. Google is fast becoming a Microsoft.

    • Stinger Bee

      Apples and oranges. Scale matters in Wireless. It doesn’t in software.

  • Reallytmo

    From 2005 to 2013 Tmobile built very few if any new stew in the entire USA. I know this for a fact. What tmobile did do was start adding HSPA+ followed by LTE. Recently tmobile has started adding 700 MHz to existing sites but there 700 mhz territories are pitiful in size and scope and will only provide in building coverage in big cities or improve in building coverage. When I see john Legere say come test drive our network I crack up laughing. Tmobile has done a terrible job getting the handover a to work between all the technologies which is the reason for the multitude of dropped calls you have riding around. Get your heads out of your arse and see the truth. John Legere is a smoke and mirror parade that has put Tmobile in a position where they owe more than they are worth! Legere wants Tmobile sold period where he can cash in his 43 million in stock options. He is adding customers with his hip cussing and long hair but at the end of the day they are still loosing money! I saw on LinkedIn the other day a Tmobile exec saying he improved the bottom line by extending payments making the customer think they had a perceived value. Look it up yourself. If Tmobile doesn’t sell soon can they make a profit and substa in it? I don’t think so. Make Legere tell you how many New sites they built in the 5 years up to 13 or better yet have Nevile Ray do it if you don’t belive me. When I say new site I mean one that covered an area not covers before by ANY of tmobiles technologies. Em wake up people.

    • Mr Paul

      Excellent rant! Make an account. The internet needs more people like you, for all topics. You’re the type of person I like: Honest, sees reality, and doesn’t have their head up their ass or someone else’s like all the T-Sheep in here.