T-Mobile, Verizon and Dish among 70 companies allowed to bid at AWS-3 auction

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The FCC’s upcoming AWS-3 auction will be the biggest spectrum auction in the U.S. since 2008, and the list of companies qualified to bid has 70 names. The auction is set to begin on November 13th.

T-Mobile, Verizon and AT&T are all on the list, as is Dish Network. But perhaps the biggest absence is Sprint. Old Yeller decided to sit this one out. Alongside the major companies are a host of smaller carriers as well as a number of investment and private equity firms.

To make it clear, the AWS-3 auction isn’t the same as the low-frequency auctions coming next year. T-Mo is still trying to ensure that the TV Broadcast auction for 600MHz airwaves is subject to more competitive rules. And the FCC is still dealing with legal proceedings which will almost certainly delay that 600MHz auction until 2016.

This month’s auction is for higher frequency bands. As reported by Fierce Wireless:

  • One of the sub-bands consists of one unpaired 5 MHz block (1695-1700 MHz) and one unpaired 10 MHz block (1700-1710 MHz), licensed in Economic Area (EA) geographies.
  • The other sub-band consists of paired spectrum. It includes one 5×5 MHz block (1755-1760 and 2155-2160 MHz) licensed in Cellular Market Area (CMA) geographies, and two 5×5 MHz blocks (1760-1765 and 2160-2165 MHz, and then 1765-1770 and 2165-2170 MHz) licensed in EA geographies. And finally there is one 10×10 MHz block (1770-1780 and 2170-2180 MHz) licensed on an EA basis.

As the “Data Strong” carrier, T-Mobile is on a mission to build out the fastest nationwide LTE network in the U.S. Acquiring usable spectrum at auction is just one of the many ways it can improve.

Of course, we’ll be keeping you up to date on any spectrum purchases T-Mobile makes in a couple of weeks time.

Via: Fierce Wireless
Source: FCC

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  • Aurizen

    oh so theirs more than 1 auction happening? one this year and another next year?

    • zOMGLOLROFLMAOz

      Yep, this is set to go on the 13th of this month and 600mhz for 2016.

      • Aurizen

        I see, so T-Mobile getting this spectrum wont be anything major with building penetration?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Correct.

  • Justin Smith

    This spectrum doesn’t sound very compelling. There isn’t enough above 5 by 5 spectrum available in my opinion.

  • wazmo

    OK-what DBA is DIsh using in thsi list?

  • Durandal_1707

    The fact that Sprint is skipping this one to save money for the 600 MHz auction is a bad sign, since it means they’ll have the money stockpiled to outbid T-Mo for the reserve spectrum. Perhaps T-Mo should do the same. They already have quite a lot of AWS spectrum, and low-band spectrum is really important.

    • SouthernBlackNerd

      Sprint does not need this auction. This auction would only make sprint’s spectrum portfolio more complicated. I would definitely say it is not good for Tmobile that they need this spectrum, but if they want to continue to be Data Strong, then they need it more than anyone else. Sprint can rely on their Spark network/2.5Ghz spectrum to provide very fast speeds. Sprint just need more lower band spectrum to compete with the likes of Verizon or ATT.

      I think Tmobile just needs to hope that Sprint does not get its network together before they are able to get some of that 600Mhz spectrum launched, because that could end up being very bad.

      • Mr Paul

        I never would of thought that Sprint would be a threat to T-Mobile, but at the rate they’re building; if their strategy is successful, T-Mobile could be screwed. Spark does seem impressive (people underestimate the fact that it is a great idea, and if they really can rip out their old crap at a good pace and replace it with Spark that Sprint could be a good option in the somewhat near future), and if Sprint gets rid of the CDMA crap and gets the low frequencies, T-Mobile better hope their trash-talking CEO has more tricks up his sleeves; claiming networks that are far better than his in most areas are simply “not as fast” when outside of the metro areas he likes to brag about, T-Mobile get kicked into the ground by all competition where they haven’t completely finished building.

        • Austin Ferguson

          be on the watch then in the next 90 days and watch the deployment unfold. 90% of Samsung sites will be in 2.5 within this period. the other 2 companies will be 90-180 days, equipment shortage. Then there also actively turning on 800 LTE still, things will turn around pretty quick in the next 6 months.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Spark is not that impressive. Sprint has to get manufacturers to equipment the phones with the special radios. Sprint is building a incompatible network to the other 3 carriers which is bad because that would mean no lte roaming for them. They have to build out their own network.

        • SouthernBlackNerd

          Spark’s potential is very impressive. I do not believe you have been paying attention to it, if you do not believe it is special. Last year this time they demoed the full potential, and they were getting speeds above 1Gbps.

          2nd, Sprint equipment is not that special. They are using different bands, BUT those bands are just supersets of existing bands. If a company’s phone supports sprint’s band, then they will suppose both traditional 1900 and 850, which is great for future roaming on this two bands. 2.5Ghz is the only real special one, but that has synergy with Softbank and China Mobile.

          Sprint has been making deals with smaller carriers to get LTE roaming. Just a couple months ago they announced that they had 15 rural/regional carrier partners. I do not believe Tmobile has any LTE roaming partners yet.

          Sprint’s real problem is execution. They seem to suck at executing compared to Tmobile and others. They do not have VoLTE yet and their rollout seems to be much slower. If they get it together, they will be a force, but that is a big IF.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Those speeds theretical. They don’t have Cat6 phones. So it would take years to even try to reach 250mbps. S. Korea is reaching those speeds now because they are ahead.

          Spark is in limited markets and Sprint still has the slowest 4G Network out of the 4 carreirs.

          Tmobile has 1 roaming agreement with Alaska Communication.

          There is 1 cat6 phone headed to att.

        • SouthernBlackNerd

          S.Korea was showing off the potential of their network, not the phones. While those numbers are theoretical and it is not likely we will see that on phones for a long time, No other carrier can show even half those numbers. Also being about to provide those speeds also means huge capacity for their consumers.

          Spark is in limited markets, which is why I mentioned being able to convert that potential into an actual network, BUT that does not take away from the potential of that network.

        • Alex Zapata

          I’ve been saying this for quite a while. Sprint has the potential to blow everyone out of the water in places where they have gobs and gobs of spectrum. Their biggest problem has been execution but I wouldn’t count them out yet especially with Softbank trying to push forward.

        • Mirad77

          Don’t take this the wrong way, as you know a lot about Sprint’s network, equipments and deployments than a good Tmo fan should. This begs the question for why so? There is some interest of Sprint you have and show on this blog, why?

        • SouthernBlackNerd

          I do not throw allegiance to any company. I do research to find the career/company that provides me the best bang for my buck. That could be Tmobile today and Sprint tomorrow or it could be Att or Verizon, so I try to keep myself informed about all carriers, so I can make the best decision.

          Being a “good fan” is silly. What does that even mean. And why would anyone want to be a good fan for any major company. They do not care about you. I am also not here to convert people to another carrier, especially not sprint, because they have yet to prove they can turn potential to an actual network.

        • Mirad77

          What I mean by good fan is, just like you put it, “a carrier that that gives you the bang for your buck”. I am a fan of Tmo as they give ME the best for my money. In that retrospect, I’ll speak good of such carrier, making me a good fan.
          Good thing though for the research you do before making up your mind.

        • NYC33

          China Mobile runs in the TDD 2.5ghz band aka band 41.they have over 800 millions customers . It is the same band sprint runs us spark network. So do your homework before you talk fanboy. That is more scale than Verizon, att, tmobile combined.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Softball is Japanese not Chinese. Chinese tourism isn’t even that big in the United States. 4G isn’t catching on as fast as it has in the U.S. So banking on lte roaming agreements with China Mobile is a gamble. By the way. China Mobile is GSM. and most of sprint phone isn’t volte capable. So the networks is incompatible.

          They are only larger because they have no competition like everywhere esle has.
          CDMA is so inferior to GSM.

        • Mr Paul

          Spark and it’s compatibility requirements are no less impressive than T-Mobile’s lame attempt to try and using band 12. Good, and if you look at T-Mobile’s support forums, you’ll realize that everyone else is noticing the opposite, and are witnessing NO upgrades, not nearly the coverage T-Mobile’s exaggerated map claims, and nothing being done about it except lame, bs excuses and people being asked to wait 6-9 months.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          That’s lies complete lies 11 markets are being upgraded in my state alone at the same time. Also interstates. Tmobile is upgrading at a very fast pace.

          Band 12 hasn’t been deployed yet because of interference issues. But they will get the green light soon.

        • Mr Paul

          Lol, not in the NYC area and sure as hell not where there wasn’t coverage. They’re upgrading what they have NOT adding more coverage.

          Because the average LTE device sure does support band 12 *sarcasm*

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Band 12 will take care of all that pentration issues

        • Mr Paul

          Sure, I’ll go hunt down a GSM phone that has band 12 *sarcasm*. And no, I don’t feel like paying for a 600 dollar unlocked CDMA/GSM phone retail phone just to get a band not used by anyone else.

          Or I can continue using a REAL network like AT&T.

  • JaswinderSinghJammu

    If I was T Mobile I would save money for the 600 MHz auction. They just need to focus on the 2G to LTE conversion and implement the 700 MHz spectrum

    • Jay J. Blanco

      700mhz might not launch until 2015. espically in the market where relocation has to occur with the stations.

  • taron19119

    T-mobile needs spectrum very bad and for people that keep saying t-mobile should skip this auction and save the money for the 600MHZ auction don’t understand how bad t-mobile need all thy can get and Sprint is not bidding is because Sprint has a shit load of hight band spectrum and just need low band spectrum

  • Alex Zapata

    If any of this can supplement their current AWS holdings in markets that don’t have 20MHz of available spectrum for LTE then I say go for it.

    • Jay Holm

      Agree! More 20mhz markets are needed, the complete shut off of the MetroPCS network for that extra 5mhz is taking too long.

  • CPPCrispy

    I think that T-Mobile is going to bid for AWS-3 where it needs it and not get a nationwide chunk. For instance in Cincinnati, OH, T-Mobile has 10×10 PCS, 5×5 AWS and 700a. An extra 5×5 or 10×10 chuck of AWS-3 in Cincinnati would be vary helpful. This is why they deployed LTE on PCS. Even if they get low band (600 or 700) spectrum, they still need mid/high band spectrum to provide capacity (look at Verizon and why they deployed AWS to supplement their 700 network). Another such place is Miami FL where they have 15×15 PCS, 10×10 AWS, and 700a. Miami is better off then Cincinnati but it would not hurt to get some more.

    With all that said, I don’t think it would be the right move if T-Mobile goes for a nationwide chuck of AWS-3 but getting some more spectrum in strategic places is a good idea.

    • Durandal_1707

      According to sequence-omega at least, in Cincinnati T-Mobile has the AWS-1 B block, which is 20 MHz, the D block, which is 10 MHz, the E block, which is 10 MHz, and the F block, which is yet another 10 MHz, for a grand total of 50 MHz of AWS. Am I reading the map wrong or something?

  • Jay J. Blanco

    Tmobile definitely need more aws in West Virginia and the in the Dakotas

    • Bori

      And in Cincinnati it needs it period

      • John Brown

        Yeah, and quit screwing us in Clermont and Brown counties by skipping over H+ in a half assed attempt to copy Verizon’s LTE map. I bought a 4g phone last week and it still has EDGE because its not an LTE device. I’m about to jump ship to an at&t MVNO because I could actually have some form of high speed data without buying a new phone or driving to Milford or Union Twp.

  • Mr Paul

    T-Mobile better take a nice long look at the long list of complaints, primarily from the NYC area from Northern NJ, up towards Putnum and Dutchess counties, and all around upstate NY, PA, and a few areas in CT, and get as much spectrum as they can possibly buy for the areas where 4G is already a rarity let alone LTE barely even existing if any.

    While T-Mobile’s network IS good in certain areas, the amount of areas where AT&T and or Verizon and kicking T-Mobile’s ass is not even funny. Looking at Rootmetrics e.g., even SPRINT is starting to hurt T-Mobile in certain areas where they haven’t grown enough.

    • CPPCrispy

      This is all to do with low band spectrum. Verizon and AT&T both use their 700MHz spectrum to cover large areas. Sprint has their primary LTE in PCS spectrum but are building LTE in their 800MHz spectrum. Some of the problems with T-Mobiles coverage will be resolved when it deploys the 700a spectrum.

      • Mr Paul

        On band 12. Good luck with that! What, 1-2% of smartphones users have a capable phone?

    • Jay J. Blanco

      Tmobile has enough spectrum in NYC to launch wideband. Be patient geesh. They are still decommissioning the Metro Network.

      • Mr Paul

        Be patient?! Why should people with Sprint be getting more coverage/network upgrades and better coverage than me (I know from people in my area who use Sprint who have way more LTE, far before T-Mobile)?! I’m not in Wyoming or deep out in the woods; I’m the bloody TRI STATE area!

        I mean I’ll give T-Mobile credit where credit is due, where I did had coverage, the data connection was so much better than what I had with Verizon even just this year, but my switch to AT&T via Cricket has been the best move ever! Coverage everywhere (and I mean 4-5 bars of LTE everywhere or the worst in outlying areas, far from towers, so far has been 4-5 bars of HPSA+ and not for long before LTE comes right back) and everything I had plus 2GB more data for the same price. Just today a Verizon loyalist’s phone was dragging on 2-3 bars of dreaded CDMA 3G and I was impatient, took out my phone, and go the app up and did the same thing in less time than their phone took to load and could of done it twice more.

        And who cares about tethering, which I rarely need nor use; I can do that with an app like I’d have to do if I used Verizon like the majority of idiots who are dumb enough to use them do.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          All 3 carriers have low band spectrum
          AT&T – 850mhz, 700mhz
          Sprint 800mhz
          Verizon 85mhz, 700mhz

          This is why they have more lte coverage then tmobile.

          Tmobile has been making great progress.
          My State is in the mist of major upgrades, which is great. Tmobile has been doing great deploying really quickly. Refarm in etc.

          Tmobile has been purchasing 700mhz so they can have better coverage I’m the near future. And are still applying to buy Spectrum. Ex. Alaska

          It’s not like tmobile doesn’t know what issues they have. They are working on. You just can’t wave a magic wond. And boom 4G. It’s takes time.

          Tmobile wasn’t able to launch 3G until there Spectrum until 2007. When companies purchase spectrum they have to be vacated first. That 1 then equipment has to be installed and all that stuff.

          If anyone wants to expedite tmobile network ugrades. Buy shares.

    • Mjsun

      You are absolutely right! I was up in Ringwood, NJ near the border of NY last week and I had no signal at all. Thank goodness for Nokia Here maps I got around. Also this past summer I drove down to Fl from NJ and back using i95 the entire way and there were way too many spotty areas between VA and GA.

      I left T-Mo back in 2007 for AT&T and recently joined T-Mo again. They are better from what I remember but I think they could have done much more in that amount of time. I really hope T-Mo can succeed to be as good as the other competitor but i think they are moving just a bit slow.

      • vinnyjr

        T-Mobile is moving slow???? You are crazy, T-Mobile has added and refarmed more towers than any other Carrier by 3 times. My brother is a self-employed tower jockey who works for T-Mobile and other Carriers, T-Mobile is killing it. This time next year T-Mobiloe will be everywhere and fast as hell. I have never been happier and what I know there is plenty a coming. Thank You John Legere, Thank You T-Mobile.

        • Ashton3002

          “everywhere” is a bit of a stretch

        • RiskyBidThis

          Not much of one if they’re planning to cover 300M POPs with LTE by the end of next year.

        • Ashton3002

          No its kind of a stretch. Sprint says they cover 254 million and some more cause they added come cities recently but I know that’s BS. T-Mobile says I have perfect LTE coverage in my city all over however I can’t count the number of places I go and travel where its No service where its supposed to be excellent.

        • edfranco1

          I agree

        • Mr Paul

          I trust T-Mobile’s claims and maps as much as I do Sprint’s, and we all know the reputation Sprint has for covering people outside of Main St. in their town. T-Mobile isn’t covering 50% of Americans in civilization with LTE and I don’t need any BS maps to tell me or many others otherwise.

        • Jsun

          I can’t say that you are wrong but it was only this past two years that T-Mo sped things up thanks to John Legere. I know they are gonna be on the move from here on out but the years that I was away I only saw great improvement in speed but not so much in coverage and building penetration. If they moved have this fast seven years ago I’m pretty sure the competitors will be a lot more worried than they are now.

          Don’t get me wrong, I’m on the same boat as you with T-Mobile. I’m also happier with them and I too know there’s going to be plenty coming. I’m here now and I convinced 8 people to switch here this past 3 months. I’m rooting for T-Mobile and just expressing the experience that I saw.

        • Mr Paul

          Good, try using T-Mobile in Northern/Northeastern NJ and countless areas around PA and North of Westchester/Rockland in NY and tell me T-Mobile is moving fast. Try getting a signal half the time. It’s so bad in certain areas even Sprint is twice as good. And Sprint being better is a horrible insult.

  • Ashton3002

    im sorry but I honestly believe AT&T is going to be the one that bids the most. they are the ones that really need it the most.
    verizon has enough (Xlte)
    sprint has 2.5 spectrum (spark)
    T-mobile has plenty (Wideband and just period)
    AT&T – nothing…..

    • superg05

      Lol in what universe does AT&T have nothing and of course the big two will spend the most

    • Evan Lam

      If I remember correctly, AT&T and Verizon had a lot of extra spectrum that they didn’t use and were both just holding onto it so that Sprint and T-Mobile wouldn’t be able to get it. I doubt that the situation has changed enough that AT&T now no longer has enough spectrum for any sort of wideband lte (or whatever they plan on calling it), especially since I don’t remember the last time that AT&T has made any announcements about major improvements to their network, not just releasing or reworking new plans.

      • Ashton3002

        you just contradicted yourself when you said “especially since I don’t remember the last time that AT&T has made any announcements about major improvements to their network” EXACTLY. they haven’t because they most likley dont have enough spectrum to deploy it nationwide like Verizon did. Also last time i checked AT&T has congestion issues in many places because they have plenty of low band spectrum NOT high band therefore they are having congestion issues. and back to you saying they are holding on to spectrum, if they are then they have enough spectrum to add capacity so why not use it? Answer : They dont have enough to do what T-mobile is doing. therefore they need more high band and AWS spectrum to compete on the same level as sprint and T-mobile. you know because high band spectrum lets carriers have more capacity and higher data speeds.

        • Ali

          Doesn’t AT&T have 2.3ghz spectrum nationwide? Why can’t they use that for capacity in spectrum constricted areas?

        • Ashton3002

          The 2.3 Ghz spectrum they wanted to acquire from sprint? and while were on that subject of 2.3 spectrum what about that 2.5 from sprint you said couldn’t penetrate a paper bag? why would AT&T use it if it cant penetrate anything?

        • jeremyvbk

          They are actually deploying equipment capable all sites here are now capable, just need an RRU, carrier card, and a few tech visits to fire it up per site. But it is now just up to them on when to fire it up.

        • Evan Lam

          My point was that they had a bunch of spectrum back then, they haven’t done anything with it, so where did it all go? However, as Ali stated, AT&T does have 2.3Ghz nationwide, and does have what seems to be a decent amount of AWS spectrum through Cricket, which I wouldn’t be surprised if AT&T used that spectrum for their own LTE, just like T-Mobile did with the spectrum they gain by acquiring Metro PCS

        • Ashton3002

          there is a frequency difference and maintaining cost difference between the two. and just like S.Ali said that spectrum that high cant penetrate a paper bag so why would AT&T use it if AWS has better penetration ability? that makes no sense.

    • macman37

      No, Sprint needs it the most due to not having any; the lack of having any is what prevents subscribers of other carriers from switching to Sprint. They have to repurchase the same device. They are the only 1 of the Big 4 that doesn’t have any AWS.

      • Ashton3002

        No, they dont and it doesn’t matter anyway with sprint your going to have to get a new device regardless if there is or isnt any AWS because sprint locks them down to their network and they dont use any bands that are compatible with any other network network.

      • jeremyvbk

        What keeps devices from being added is due to MEIDs of cdma/Wcdma/ LTE devices not being in the system. And it takes a bit of work to add them in. Much safer way of allowing only approved devices that wont hurt the network on it.

    • Kidney_Thief

      AT&T need it the most? They have more spectrum, on average, than any other carrier, and probably the most unused spectrum as well. If anything, they need it the least.

      • Ashton3002

        Actuay its sprint. They have the mosre spectrum than anybody else. And AWS helps with capacity and according to Tmobile They(T-Mobile) has more of that than AT&T and Verizon.

        • Kidney_Thief

          AT&T has, on average, 160 MHz of spectrum. No other carrier can beat that, not even Sprint.

        • Ashton3002

          So your saying T-mobile is false advertising. and actually
          Sprint has 203MHZ on average
          AT&T has 129MHZ
          Verizon has 104MHZ
          T-mobile has 71MHZ and that was in early 2014 and we all know T-mobile bought more spectrum since then. Also AT&T and Verizon both have alot of Lower band spectrum that doesn’t do well with capacity, the majority sprints spectrum is high band spectrum as well as T-mobile which gives them capacity Verizon and AT&T dont have. therefore the reason AT&T needs AWS to compete on a level of capacity and speeds as T-mobile and even Sprint in some places.

        • Mike Palomba

          If sprint has all that spectrum why are they not using it?

        • Ashton3002

          How are they not using it? i guess they are pulling the spectrum for spark out their ass?

        • Mike Palomba

          I had sprint for 4 years and had a spark phone for the last few months I had them and their so called “spark” was slower then their 3G, and their 3G was like edge speeds. I live in the city too so thats sad. Now with T-Mobile I have blazing fast speeds and I actually see LTE rather then 3G

        • Ashton3002

          Which city is that? i travel for quite often through my job and i had sprint with a M8

        • Mike Palomba

          Mostly in staten island and sometimes Brooklyn, both had painfully slow speeds

        • Ashton3002

          Funny cause rootmetrics says that sprint actually has better reliability than t-mobile all through out NY as of current rootmetrics report

        • Mike Palomba

          Well I never experienced that reliability

        • edfranco1

          LMAO

        • edfranco1

          I do know that Sprint has the most spectrum of ALL carriers but I am not sure T-Mo has more then At&t & Verizon. That just doesn’t sound right.

        • Ashton3002

          They have more AWS than anybody else

  • macman37

    Well, at least we have a pretty good idea on what Letter Grade that Sprint’s new CEO should be receiving – a “low D- or an F”if he doesn’t see the value in AWS spectrum. Even if the Board convinced him like they convinced Dan Hesse not to buy MetroPCS’s CDMA-AWS spectrum, it is a dumb manuver by both him and the Board of Directors to not see that AWS frequencies/spectrum is needed for interoperability and to prevent any prospective customers who may churn from other carriers in buying the same device twice or more. Not being able to acquire some due to being outbidded is one; to choose not to participate in this auction shows how dumb Sprint is and that they should start looking for a storage space for their current retail locations. The next thing we may end up reading is that they may try to acquire T-Mobile once again for the spectrum that their dumbnesses chose not to buy.

    • Ashton3002

      This post shows how dumb you are! 2.5 ghz is high enough. what would be the point of buying more higher band spectrum when sprint has more of that than EVERY carrier currently. i mean sprint could buy some, outbid T-mobile, and hold it captive but what good would that do? and then if they did that you would complain about it. you could never run a business they way you think.

      • Art Faucett

        S T F U

      • macman37

        No moron! Since Sprint decided not to participate in the 700Mhz auction in 2008 as well as acquire MetroPCS CDMA-AWS spectrum, they are in a very bad position where no subscriber from another carrier would want to switch to them. Does the term “interoperability” ring any bells? Cuz’ if it doesn’t, then you’re 1 extravagant fool who doesn’t mind buying the same device more than once.

        Also with Sprint not being a participant at the 2008 700Mhz auction, they are able to lock their 4G LTE devices to their carrier. The carriers that did participate have to have their 4G LTE devices unlocked. How AT&T got away with locking their devices takes a lot of reading. Sprint can have their share of 3 or 4 different LTE Bands (2, 25, 26, & 41), but too bad those non-congested bands can save them from their poor choices of coverage and bad decisions like not going for spectrum that would give them interoperability. Funny how they are screwing themselves over for a 3rd time: 1) 2008 700Mhz auction; 2) MetroPCS AWS; & 3) and now not seeing the value in AWS spectrum by not participating in the upcoming auction. I wouldn’t be surprised if Sprint tries to acquire T-Mobile again.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Sprint is still contemplating to buy tmobile I’ve been reading a couple of article last week. They just need to drop it

        • Mike Palomba

          Are they really? Would you mind posting a link? Just don’t include the dots because then it won’t post.

        • Paul

          “Contemplating” and “dreaming” are very different things. Ha ha ha, I hope they aren’t actually still thinking about it.

        • Juan Pablo Darquea

          I agree with you also think why other companies can’t compete with att or verizon cause they have a bunch of spectrum for any emergency now tmobile network is fast but lately with so many people coming is getting kinda slow

        • Ashton3002

          your a dumbass if you think that sprint needed 700Mhz. They have 800mhz and more than T-mobile has of 700mhz and last time i checked you still have to buy a new device going to a different carrier if you dont choose sprint anyway if the phone isnt unlocked. ever heard of having to unlock a device? the average consumer doesn’t care because They trade the old device in and buy a new phone. By the way please tell me what they would need AWS AND 2.5ghz for? Id love to know. Break it down to me?

        • Mike Palomba

          You only need a new device if you’re switching to a CDMA carrier (Verizon and Sprint). And you can take any device except a sprint device to att or T-Mobile. Sprint uses odd bands and won’t unlock devices making their service and device lineup very unattractive.

        • Ashton3002

          okay so why cant i use my T-mobile Note 3 on AT&T? both T-mobile and AT&T told me i cant and i paid for the phone outright.

        • Mike Palomba

          You can… as long as you’ve had it activated on T-Mobile for at least 60 days. Thats the unlocking policy. Then call, get it unlocked, and you can use it on any carrier like AT&T. Sprint does not unlock devices period, no if ands or buts about it

        • Paul

          Mike is right. I even unlocked a Note 2 and Galaxy S4 that both ended up in the hands of AT&T users. They work perfect on AT&T’s network.

          The phone makers have made it easier to jump around to other carriers. Sprint hasn’t been keen on letting customers move around so they prefer not to unlock a device. This isn’t the first time some of us have heard about Sprint’s refusal to unlock a device.

          Instead of calling other forums members “dumbass” or state that Cam’s post shows how stupid he is, you could have just brought up the subject as a friendly inquiry. Then we’d all have an informative discussion.

        • Ashton3002

          Shoulda coulda woulda…You are dumb on the subject if you think that sprint needs 700mhz. They don’t

        • Paul

          I never mentioned my agreement or disagreement about the 700MHz block. I said that you can unlock a Note 2 and a Galaxy S4 to be used on AT&T’s network, which lends strength to the point that you can unlock a Note 3 and use it on AT&T’s network. If you reread my post you’ll see I never mentioned the 700MHz block at all.

          It’s hard to take your comments seriously when you post with poor grammar and incorrectly use punctuation. Your feeble attempts to start an argument with your lackluster name calling, like calling me dumb for a reason that isn’t even related to me, are failing. The only success you’re getting is in making yourself look like a fool. Which is pretty sad considering most of us are trying to have a legitimate adult conversation on the subject you’ve brought up more than once in this thread, spectrum ownership and use.

        • Ashton3002

          Not you talking about earlier when you said I was calling people dumbass that started from that comment. Not what you said.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          You absolutely right they don’t but they need Spark everywhere beca use 5x5mhz is not good for capacity just coverage

        • monkeybutts

          iPhone 6 and 6+ could be used on Verizon now cause of VoLTE they won’t activate them but you can use them if you have a Verizon SIM. The reason you can’t activate them is they aren’t whitelisted on Verizons IMEI database.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          It’s only 5x5mhz that can buckle anytime if overcrowded tower. Sprint needs to deploy Spark everywhere on their network

      • Mr Paul

        Lol yeah. Everyone thinks they know the entire business because of T-Mobile’s trash talking executives and their bogus explanations for why they think T-Mo is so great. Anyone who has T-Mobile in an area with elevation and obstacles like mountains and woods knows that AWS is complete garbage and T-Mobile’s high frequency is worse than Sprint’s if any. T-Mobile need to bargain for more low frequency; they don’t need to build an oversized WiFi network that only works in Florida and flat areas where they actually also have enough towers.

    • Marcus Christopher McFann

      Sprint needs the 600 MHz stuff, my friend. I doubt TMobile even buys much of this AWS3. They have an entire network of it, and its not very good for their LTE.

      • monkeybutts

        T-mobile probably should secure 20×20 in all the major markets and upgrade any 5×5 or less areas.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        Aws is good for capacity tmobile need capacity Sprint has plenty spectrum for capacity. Let Tmobile do they thing

        • Marcus Christopher McFann

          Uh, they have TONS of capacity! They need lower frequency bandwidth for building penetration. TMobile has a large block on continuous AWS, more than any other carrier. Its just not suitable for LTE in densely populated areas or buildings.

  • vincent

    we love T-Mobile

  • superg05

    i wonder how many are shell companies for the big 2