T-Mobile making minor adjustments to its credit requirements for EIP

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If you’ve listened in on any of T-Mobile’s earnings calls this year, a recurring theme is the quality of customers the carrier is attracting. At least it is during the Q&A section. For Wall Street to be confident in TMUS stock, it needs to be confident that the millions of customers signing up to join #TeamMagenta are generating income for the company. But it’s not just about Wall Street. T-Mobile doesn’t want to be signing up a load of customers that could potentially lead to a loss. Especially lower credit customers who don’t pay their EIP installments, or monthly plan charges.

We’ve been in touch with a couple of our sources, and they’re all singing from the same hymn sheet: T-Mobile is moving the goalposts. Customers in credit classes I and Y will no longer be able to sign up to pay for their devices via EIP, unless they’ve been with the company for 3 years. This applies to existing customers too. So, if you’re in one of those two credit classes, and you’ve only been a T-Mobile customer for a year or two and you have an EIP, you won’t be able to sign up for another one until your three years have passed.

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 16.31.49

In the past, these credit classes would have been labelled “lesser-qualified” customers and still been allowed to sign up for an installment plan, providing they coughed up some cash up front for the device. Deposit amounts varied depending on device. But now, they can’t sign up for an EIP at all. In fact, we got an email from a T-Mo customer saying that they were turned down for a new Equipment Installment Plan for those reasons.

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 16.53.46Like a lot of “lesser qualified” customers, subscribers in classes I and Y  will suddenly become “well qualified” as soon as they’ve been with T-Mo for three years. From that point, they’re pretty much free to any EIP. And the difference between being “well-qualified” and “lesser-qualified” is simple. The higher credit class subscribers typically are able to pay less up front ($0 down most of the time) and have higher monthly repayments. Lower credit classes are the opposite: Higher down payment, and lower monthly rate. It’s just a way to ensure T-Mobile gets the money back that it’s essentially loaning to customers at a 0% rate so that they can buy devices.

Now, it’s unlikely that a hugely significant amount of customers will be affected by this. After all, if too many were unable to sign up for an EIP, T-Mo wouldn’t be able to continue its impressive growth. It’s essentially a tactic to ensure that fewer of the really “low quality” customers sign up, and looking after the cashflow. The number of people assigned “I” or “Y” is low.

With this slight shift on T-Mobile’s behalf, and recent claims from T-Mobile executives that it’s only attracting high quality customers from Verizon and AT&T, it should certainly keep investors and analysts cheerful. It’s also a small change to ensure a return to profitability comes sooner rather than later.

 

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  • Willie D

    When is this supposed to take place, because I was told if I made on-time payments, did not ask for payment arrangements and paid in full every month, for 12 months I would qualify as $0 EIP Down. I am now 11 months into this scheme, and if I am unable to finance a new device with a lower EIP than 1/2 the device cost up front, I may rethink my tenure with T-Mobile and move all 4 of my lines to Sprint again. That’s the cost of doing business for me. Being loyal and paying on time, for the reward at the end, only to be told that the tenure I spent means nothing (while being an existing customer), really shows me that they could care less about brand loyalty, or keeping the customers who pay on time, that they want – and would rather become the AT&T and Verizon of the industry, and only give service to the highest paying customers. For the record my bill is $215 per month, with 2 EIP devices (one is only $3 per month) for 4 lines – quite a bit more than I paid on Sprint for the same service. So go figure.

    • Adrayven

      $215/mo? what did you do? get 10gb / mo on each phone? that math doesn’t add up..

      • Willie D

        $50 Line 1
        $10 Jump
        $20 Unlimited 4G
        $30 Line 2
        $20 Unlimited 4G
        $3.75 EIP
        $10 Line 3
        $10 Jump
        $10 3GB Data
        $15 EIP
        $10 Tablet Match Phone Data
        $190 Total plus another $15 in taxes majority coming from San Francisco Utilities $214.50 Total.
        On Sprint my plan would be $160 plus taxes ($172 total) for the phones themselves (all with unlimited high speed). I kinda feel shafted – I keep telling myself the only thing making it worth the cost is having LTE everywhere in the city, simultaneous voice and data (which when I do use it is slower than expected) and international roaming (which I use 2 days of a year anyway). I HATE Sprint, but the price is right and already have devices that work for them.

        • John

          What good is the cheaper price of Sprint if data is real slow or unusable in many areas due to their messed up network?

        • Willie D

          Principle – Doesn’t matter how logical it is. Principle of not paying more to be told 1 month prior, sorry you now have to complete 25 more months before we will offer anything to you…when you already successfully completed an EIP in 4 months, and banked the time and effort to have a perfect bill history. That is one. The other – the price. You want to charge me more – then give me a reason to stay, telling me to wait longer isnt a good reason.

        • TBN27

          Yeah that is messed up. I think they should look at it on an individual basis rather than a broad view and start restricting people based on their rating. It reminds me of when some customers had to put deposits on some plans. All this to please investors.

        • maximus1901

          They are looking at individual basis. They’re looking at your individual credit scores.

        • TBN27

          I give you a better breakdown of what I am saying. You and I have an I or Y credit rating. You pay your bills on time and in full but I don’t or I end up stop paying altogether. Within the year of you having a T-Mobile account, because you have good standing you shouldn’t be missing out on being able to get an EIP because i can’t pay my bill on time instead of saying all people with I or Y ratings can’t get EIP for 3 years.

        • maximus1901

          TMO is gaining customers and they can afford to be more conservative with their credit.

        • TBN27

          Understood but it is still unfair when the individual is a very good customer and they are held back by a broad policy from taking advantage of a payment option.

        • maximus1901

          Better than being a sprint customer who purchased i5 in 2012 and still has unusable data today :p

        • TBN27

          I agree. I would put up with what T-mobile is doing than dewp with sprint. But the broad credit rating policy dealing with eip is still messed up.

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’s not broad, it’s with respect to your credit rating.

        • TBN27

          Once again. We can have the same credit score but if I religiously pay my mobile bill on time and in full, I should not be penalized. Therefore it is broad for people with a similar credit rating but with different payment records. My opinion is its messed up and y should treat their paying phone subscribers on a case by case basis.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Your phone bill payments are not sent to the credit agencies. Your nonpayments would be.

          Fix your credit and there wouldn’t be an issue.

        • TBN27

          My credit is stellar. I was making a scenario which is pretty common. And they do look at your record with them as an existing customer this with a new customer from what I have been told.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Correct.

          So if they look at your credit then you should be fine.

          If you have decent credit there shouldn’t be an issue. If you don’t, well now they require a longer waiting period.

          I’m sure within three years, someone can work on their credit so that it meets a certain level and then have it reevaluated by T-Mobile

          T-Mobile is a business, people, not your rich uncle.

        • TBN27

          I understand now take someone like the person who started this conversation who has so so credit has been with them for a year. Now to Change up his scenario a bit, he paid off his phones as well as pays his bill to T-Mobile on time or early in full. He decides he wants to get a newer or better phone. It seems unfair that he shows the company that he is well capable of paying for the cell phone service but because his credit rating ain’t that swell he has to wait 3 years. This is my point that nobody is getting.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I understand, however life’s not fair. And to be honest, one year isn’t really long in the wireless world where two year contracts are the norm.

          T-Mobile is just protecting themselves as a business, as I’m sure you understand.

        • Allen Enriquez

          Well Said Fabian!

        • Fabian Cortez

          Or that iPhone leasing scam.

        • maximus1901

          Dave ramsey says leasing is fleecing

        • Andre Dionne

          Yeah, but say you’ve been a customer for 2 years. All payments on time, no issues at all. Suddenly you go to get a new phone and you can’t because your credit isn’t good enough? That’s just ridiculous.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Ideally, if the payments you make in your normal life mimic the payments you make with T-Mobile, your credit score should rise within the two years. So there should be no issue.

        • Andre Dionne

          This is not an ideal world, though your point is valid in most cases. For an industry that doesn’t even report to the credit bureaus, 3 years of good payment history seems too long as a requirement for showing good history. Especially with how much things have been changing, causing people to be jumping between carriers to find what suits them best.

          Then again, I suppose it’s not like other carriers are being more lenient, and there is always prepaid to consider for those with poor credit. So I can understand both sides of the situation.

        • Fabian Cortez

          I get what you’re saying. Yes, none of these industries report to credit bureaus, except if you owe them.

          What I meant is if you are as diligent with your other bills (credit card, student loans, car payments, if you have any of these) as you are with your T-Mobile one, your credit rating should definitely rise within a two year span, thus negating all of this.

        • Allen Enriquez

          Andre Good Point!

        • Allen Enriquez

          in a way that is so true TBN27, it’s to please investors, because their really the one’s paying upfront for a huge portion of our EIP, through their Stocks & Bonds investment thing.

        • Allen Enriquez

          Totally Agree Willie D!
          Definitely TMUS give us a reason to stay, like perks!

        • UMA_Fan

          Sprint’s current pricing is only temporary and then goes up $15/line more in 2016. Around which time you’ll qualify for $0 down on T-Mobile anyway.

          Also keep in mind you’re grandfathered into the old $20 unlimited data which you can essentially keep forever. If you leave T-Mobile and ever decide to come back you would have to pay the new customer price of $30 for unlimited (or whatever they price it at that point.)

        • Willie D

          The reality, when I signed up was that in 12 months Id be eligible for $0 down – now 11 months in, they want to change the terms of my extremely diligent upholding the terms on my part. Which kinda sucks. So why bother staying?

        • Fabian Cortez

          Well it’s not like the money isn’t going anywhere; it’s going toward the device.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Depending on what phone you have, using data while on a call (UMTS) usually cuts the data speed in half.

    • maximus1901

      Sprint just announced it tightened its own credit requirements. Good kuck.

    • maximus1901

      It’s not about highest paying customers it’s about paying your bills on time. That’s all they care about.

    • huskerbama81

      It’s already in place.I found out the hard way.

    • Barnassey

      I have to agree with you im almost at the same mark and its really angering me that they are pulling the rug. I may just end up going back to verizon.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Well enjoy a technologically inferior network and the lovely overages.

        FYI: 100 GB on Verizon costs $750, not including the $40 monthly line access fee.

        • Barnassey

          Im not worried about data costs since im not an average user. If i think ill go over ill simply cut off mobile data. I did it when i was on tmobile prepaid and when i was on sprint.

        • Romdude

          Ever heard of freedom pop? It’s a sprint mvno that provides free minutes, messages and data that technically won’t cost you a penny as long as you stay within their limits. It only works for occasional users and who don’t mind being on the sprint network and paying for a used handset.

        • Allen Enriquez

          Nice that’s really cheap! thanks Romdude! more options now! Cool!

        • Romdude

          I’m with tmobile but I pay for the rollover $3.95 at freedom pop so if I don’t use my 500gb of data, it adds to the next month. I have 2gb stored now which I keep for emergencies because even with unlimited data on tmobile, you only have 3gb of mobile hotspot to share with a tablet or laptop and I refuse to use illegal tethering.

    • JB

      Perhaps you’re in a credit class that would allow you to EIP after a year? From the looks in the article there’s a class for 1 year accounts. So your situation may not change at all. If you’re concerned, I’d call CS and see what’s up. I know I’d be livid if they told me one thing and then switch it up on me.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Do you really need to finance another device 12 months after financing the first?

      Come on people.

    • Allen Enriquez

      Absolutely, I seen the prices at sprint it’s competitive! Who ever is on the steering wheel in sprint they are doing better to make the most of what they can!

  • Most people that sign up that have credit class I & Y usually have more than enough money to pay for what they want anyway, so it’s not a big deal. However, the down payments raised for ALL less qualified people in general for all phones, which is a bit of a bummer.

    • Chris

      Down payments = less monthly anyways. Even if you are qualified on a $0 down, I’d suggest putting a down payment if you still get your prhones from T-mobile that is.

      • Willie D

        This is true. Even if I got $0 down, Id rather still put $100 down toward the device to take away payments – however, in the case of EIP offered or not at all, Id like to have that option, and if they change credit classes you essentially worked for that and wont get it just as you are about to change into that credit class.

    • jp

      I’ve worked in a T-Mobile store for about a year, and in my experience people who turn up as class I and Y have NO money, very bad or no credit. There are exceptions of course.

  • Shlomo Boukai

    How do I find out what credit class I am?

    • Jay Holm

      Uhh…call 611

    • Dean Smith

      Call your dear leader Obama and he will tell you everything, he is the all knowing, all caring, super god!

      • bob90210

        So that’s who answers 611.

  • Brian Perez

    This is interesting but, idk what to say because tmobile I thought was the underdog and wanted to change for the better so now.I see that was just so they can add customers but, now their acting like everyone else… Stock up… Im a customer since ñast November and me seeing something like this is kinda a let down because if someone wants service why would you make them feel like their not good enough. I think the policies they had were sufficient but, now theyve tighten them up..

    • realist

      tmobile isn’t profitable (despite massive growth), is spending an astronomical amount of money for customer acquisition by paying off ETFs and offering any phone for $0 down. its perfectly acceptable for them to make moves that will help ensure the risk they are taking will pay off for them, rather than bite them in the ass twice (paid off an etf on top of nor getting paid back for a phone given on eip). the contract buyout has strong potential for attracting customers who irresponsibly signed a contract they can’t afford with another carrier, have no loyalty or desire to join tmobile, and are just using tmobile as an escape. if the tmobile we know and love is going to succeed steps like this are essential to protect their viability.

      • Brian Perez

        But despite allof that people with lower credit qualifications lile my friend you pay a deposit your paying whatever they charhe for a phone so in reality their making tmobile revenue upfront vs a well qualified customers who might not even pay anything until a month later..Soo im just saying it seems a little unfair for the little guy to pick on the little guy

        • maestroalvarez

          It is a rule of business. If T-Mobile’s bottom line looked better at this time, they would not have moved on this decision. Shareholders are still the majority here, regardless of what the Chief Executive Officer’s desires are. Shareholders want to see more profit. After all, if the shareholders leave T-Mo hanging, Magenta will not have the resources to fund spectrum expansion, which is the worst complaint.

        • Ray

          Yeah but you cannot accommodate everyone. That’s poor business practice. Your idea of fairness is setting the company towards bankruptcy. Btw, the people you listed are a minority.

    • maximus1901

      When you’re the CFO of TMO you can have ZERO credit qualifications.

  • VicRooLoo

    Well thats a pity. When I applied for the iPhone 6, I had to put a lot down to get it.
    Since then my credit score has grown higher but I’m a bit worried that it isn’t enough.

    • maestroalvarez

      You should likely be able to pull credit again, at the time when you want to upgrade. That is, they may not require it, but you may request it, in order to minimize the out-of-pocket amount. Also, remember that, when they were transitioning to the no-down payment promotion, they also had promotions of lower down payments, even on newer handsets.

  • Ryan Carnes Ofs

    This is not a minor change!

    • maestroalvarez

      While not a minor change, it will typically mean lower payments at the end of the day, which would benefit those who are at statistically at risk of defaulting.

  • trife

    I’m glad they don’t pull credit scores every time you want to buy a new device. Thankfully they must still use my score from when I got my own account 8 years ago, because my credit was reaaaaaal rough there for a minute lol. Much better now, but I remember always being surprised when I’d qualify for $0 down.

    • Allen Enriquez

      Congratulations Trife on the Zero Down!!

  • psychoace

    So if I’m currently on an EIP does that mean there is a chance I wont be able to acquire a new one when I want to switch phones if my credit isn’t up to there standards? I’ve only been on a post paid plan for a year now. I didn’t have great credit so I did have to put a $200 deposit on my phone a year ago. I just checked T-Mobiles website and it shows that I only need to put a $60 deposit down now. Still I would have to worry about the credit check they will do when I get the new phone correct?

    • Jason

      No, you only need to do a credit check once and that was when you set up service initially.

    • jp

      I think you’re mixing up the words DEPOSIT (refundable) and DOWN PAYMENT (nonrefundable). You don’t have to put down another $200 deposit, but if you want to upgrade you’ll still have to put a down payment on the device.

  • Mike

    Just because some on you paid for your eip and service like u should have imagine how many People financied a phone and stop making payments so I understand T-Mobile for this. I think T-Mobile should start leasing phones like Sprint does now

    • maestroalvarez

      Leasing the phones will still pose the same risk. The only thing that will reduce risk is imposing higher down payments to mitigate any losses as a result of any instances of non-payment .

  • Jay Holm

    Still waaaaiting on news about the AWS-3 auction. . . . .

    • monkeybutts

      The auction is still going on you can find some info on the FCC website under auction 97

      • Jay Holm

        It lasts more than one day? I want it to be over, se we can find out how much spectrum *T-Mobile* snagged up!

        • monkeybutts

          It keeps going till theres no more bids being placed.

        • Jay Holm

          Hmm…well then perhaps all the NON-T-Mobile bidders need to be…umm, done away with? Yeah!

  • Jay J. Blanco

    Thanks to all the ppl that had EIPs and didnt pay them Guess I gotta save 800 for a Note 4. Wtf. I have 13 months till I can get a EIP again. Then I was eligible for a jump upgrade since August ’14 they should at least honor my upgrade I mean I’m on 2 year contract. Geesh.

    • Jay Holm

      Just call Customer Service and ask what your credit rating is, when I saw this article I called and asked, I’m a B, so no worries.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        I know I’m in the lower class because I have to put a hefty down payment on phones. I would have had to put 400 down for a note 4 now the website doesn’t give me the option

        • Jay Holm

          Ohhh, dang! Regarding upgrading, I’m just holding steady with my S4 waiting for the S6 to come out, I’m ok with different, I just hope it isn’t too radically different. Looking forward to having a phone with 700 Band 12 and carrier aggregation support though!

        • Jay J. Blanco

          I’ve outgrown my S4. Time for new phone

        • Jay Holm

          How did you outgrow it? Anything perticular about it you aren’t happy about it anymore? I’m happy with mine.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          It doesn’t have enough built in memory and it over heats frequently. Battery life isn’t good enough

        • Jay Holm

          I’ve never encountered a problem with the internal memory, of course more is always better. Are there any smartphones that don’t overheat?

        • Jay J. Blanco

          I’m sure they all do but my s4 overheats after just 10mins of use.

        • Jay Holm

          Dang!

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Good news I called CS and I am qualified for eip. it’s because I a extension on my bill had to pay rent first lol. I figured that was a possiblity smh…

        • Jay Holm

          Yayyy!!!

        • Romdude

          Check the apps you are running, I installed solo launcher and made my phone overheat and drain quickly without even doing anything. Removed it and it went back to normal. I suggest using developer options and gsam battery app then look for active apps and which ones are causing the biggest drain.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Thanks

        • zOMGLOLROFLMAOz

          $400 is fucking ridiculous.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          Less monthly payments that’s how I look at it

    • Fabian Cortez

      Pay your bills.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        It was only a matter of time before a D.A. commented

        • Fabian Cortez

          It’s the truth.

          If you just paid your bills, you wouldn’t be online embarrassing yourself by complaining about how you need to put money down and/or save for something you don’t need.

          Maybe it’s a sign that you don’t need an $800 cellular phone. Who the hell does?!

        • Michael Perez

          The situation and lives of people change on a daily basis which you as an individual cannot account for. This is with layoffs, hardships due to medical reasons or that of a family member which could affect the purchasing power of any strong and independent individual. If life was so black and white then things would be as obvious as you make it out to be. They are not.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Exactly: things change on a daily basis. T-Mobile just made a change.

          C’mon, both sides of the coin.

        • It would be nice if they disregarded things like Medical bills and other hardships that people don’t always have control of. I remember when I was fighting my insurance company and during that time I had a $270,000 bill on my credit. Nobody would lend me money for a house.

        • Fabian Cortez

          Well, maybe if enough people make noise like they did when T-Mobile wanted to get rid of all employer discounts, some considerations may be made.

        • Allen Enriquez

          I know it’s not my business to get into your life’s challenges but if your opened to mind? have you tried to see if the hospital can be reduced the debt on the bill I had done this myself before when I got lead off pretty much, I hope that goes well for you.

        • The insurance company ended up paying after taking them to court, fortunately. But a couple years before this event I did get a $2000 bill for a blood test and I got a 95% discount so yes the hospital can give you a discount. Even if I had gotten a 95% discount on the $270,000 bill I would still have to pay nearly $14,000 within 24 months so I’m glad that I beat the insurance in court.

        • Verizonthunder

          Clap clap clap someone just made sense. I agree with you. Personally if you cannot afford a real nice high end device. Go for something more affordable the Zte Zmax is big, band 12 support, lte and very nice specs.

        • Jay J. Blanco

          D.A. #2 Im finanilly stable. I’m 22 and qualify for a mortgage I have better credit then my college counterparts. I work 50 hrs a week and manage 22 credit hrs. So u can go on with your rant. I’ve been buying my phone full retail since 2008

  • monkeybutts

    So if I’m assuming this right based on the info from the article BAN = time till you can have a new EIP?

    • Brad

      Billing Account Number tenure. In other words that’s how many years you have to have service with them to do EIP based on credit class.

  • nerdlust

    I guess I will be using my note 2 for the rest of my life! :(

    • I think you should sign up for a personal finances class. With these $0 down plans you still have to pay for the phone in payments. If you get an iPhone I think its $27 per month more on top of your normal bill.

      So technically you can save up $27 in your piggy bank every month ($6.75 per week- about what it costs for a Subway) and have enough for a brand new iPhone in two years. If you want one sooner then save up more or come up with enough money to cover your downpayment and get in with a year’s of saving $27 per month. Plus, if you do a downpayment your monthly bill will be a lot lower. Typically $8-$15 extra per month as opposed to $27.

    • MuthaFuckinStephen

      Swappa my dude.

    • gmo8492

      Save some money each month and buy the phone outright or get a used one off ebay. I’ve been doing that for years.

      • bitchplease

        don’t you get it? these people aren’t financially responsible. concepts like “save money” and “shop around” are foreign to them. their dead weight has affected tmobiles bottom line enough that they had to make these changes.

        • gmo8492

          I do, but it doesn’t hurt to through in some common sense around their way. I can get any phone I want for $0 down since I’ve been with T-mobile for 8 years and I have always paid my bills on time. Yet I like that I have a choice while “these” people just need to get a clue. It also doesn’t hurt to tell them how to get the things they want without much effort.

  • Austin Weir

    Wait, so I just called, and I was told I’m in credit class N. Does that mean I qualify for EIP still? Because the first photo shows that I’m eligible for EIP, while the second picture shows that I have to wait 2 more years…since I’ve been with T-mobile for 1 year now.

    • Cam Bunton

      The second picture is just showing who classes as “well qualified”. Lesser qualified customers can still get EIP, but with a deposit. Just not if they’re I or Y.. or the others shown in the first picture.

    • Your credit class N appears to be on the second category. First category can get the phone with $0 down. The second category have to put some money down but I don’t know how much down exactly.

    • derrrrr

      should have asked the person you were on the phone with

  • GinaDee

    Sounds like too many people are not paying their bills.

    Get lured in with zero down then they can’t afford the payments.

    Can’t say I blame T-Mobile here for trying to attract better customers. In reality if they expand their network to more places and get rid of 2G then better qualified customers will come naturally even without ETF pay-off’s.

    • Fabian Cortez

      Sure, we’ll just expand the network overnight.

    • mariahw

      These”better customers” will dump this joke of a company after they have to wait an hour and a half to get a customer service rep on the phone. Happened to me the two times in the past week that I had to contact tmobile.

      • Fabian Cortez

        Oh yeah, that’ll definitely be what makes these “‘better customers’ dump this joke of a company.”

        Anecdotal.

      • lolok

        really? Ive been working for a 3rd party retailer for over 2 years and call customer service – regular customer service, not retail support – around 10 times a day and have waited more than 5 minutes less than 5 times. you sure you don’t have tracfonea number accidenally?

  • fuego

    Not everyone wants to get a phone with EIP though. I am credit class B which is no down payments for smart phone and tablets for 5+ lines. But I just pay them off in full up front, no monthly payment. Its the smartest thing to do. The bill is super cheap once phones are paid off. My note 4 is paid off, my iPad, my brothers G3, but my mom owes on her galaxy s4 :( lol. Just waiting for the nexus 6 now

    • Fabian Cortez

      On the flip side: not everyone wants to pay up all that money at once, or they may not have that kind of money up front. This is why the scam known as two year contracts was so successful.

      But EIP isn’t so bad because it’s 0% financing.

      • fuego

        That is true, the higher down payment the better though. Yes it sucks to fork over a lot of cash up front but its worth it for a cheaper bill. These credit class changes have been made a few days ago and I’ve closed plenty of sales with high deposits and high down payments, with a bunch of accessories I might add as well. Tmobiles front line soldiers are the reps and managers they’re the ones that make sure T-Mobile strives a long with the great tools they give us

      • don’t be silly

        $20 eip plus $60 service = $80 a month total
        2 year contract no eip, $80 a month service = $80 a month total

        EIP at 0% apr, not a bad deal – phones are priced 20% higher than they would be otherwise, the interest is still there it’s just hidden in the device cost. just ask a sales rep about a discount if you pay cash for your phone instead of eip, guarantee the cash price is lower than the eip price :)

        oems charging less for their phones – companies like oneplusone are a long way away of cracking into the postpaid game – the best front for brand exposure – where samsung and apple rule. their market share consists of a few economical budget oriented consumers – not exactly a lucrative demographic. large, reputable companies like Motorola and HTC can’t effectively compete, budget companies with razor thin margins like one plus don’t stand a chance in the forseeable future.

        t mobile has done a great job painting a customer centric image, but in the end it’s just business as usual

    • this guy gets it

      that mindset is exactly why you have good credit. these people bitching they can’t get phones on eip don’t have the cash to buy phones outright, and are overreaching and unstable financially and think they somehow deserve a company taking a risk on them even though they have proven they aren’t worthy of them due to their credit score.

      • fuego

        My brother and I don’t mind paying full retail, were both contract free and are phones are unlocked by T-Mobile. We can walk whenever we want. Which is thinking ahead of the game. My mom is on my plan and she cannot afford to pay full retail for the galaxy S4, so committed to the EIP solution. She is financially stable but not enough to shell out $500 on a phone. It surprises me how many people walk into my store and say “wow, I have to pay for these phones? You know Verizon is just handing them out for $1″…*Facepalm

        • Allen Enriquez

          True Fuego!
          with $500.00 I can buy almost a used car on craigslist, realistically more like a $1,000.00!

    • Romdude

      I’m guessing you know they have zero percent interest and you just wanted to make sure that your phone was already fully paid anyway?

  • Joel

    Man this reallt sucks. I have horrible credit and k am on the negative “Z” class lol. But i have always paid my bills and i have paid off 3 decices, GS3 for wife, LG Optimus for me and another GS3 for me. Now shes on the S5 and im on the Note 3. So my 2 to her 1. But the point is we always pay our bill ever month and now wer r gonna get screwed. In February it will be our two years with Tmo. Now i cant get my note 4 edge. So freaking sad. Thanks u losers who ruined my life. Well ok maybe too dramatic with ghe whole life thing but u guya get the point.

    • Erik Papesh

      That depends, maybe if you have JUMP it will still work? no harm in trying.

      • 92

        jump 1 – can trade in for a new device every 6 months, and open a new eip with your trade in value credited towards your balance. zero benefit of not on eip.

        jump 2 – can trade anytime and have remaining eip balance wiped out. again, zero benefit if not on eip

        • (J²)

          According to T-Mobile Reps and an updated article on their website, Jump 2 was quietly tweaked.
          If you buy an Apple iPhone 6 – 64GB for $500 of $750, pay $8 for 12 months ($100). T-Mobile will credit you upon trade in after the EIP is satisifed. So if the trade in value is $400. You would receive a $250 credit towards your upgrade.
          Honestly, who’s dumb enough to trade in a device that will likely keep up to $500 of it’s value to wipe out $150? T-Mobile is aware of this, so they have tweaked jump because a consumer would just sell the device and do as they wish or even wose (JUMP to another carrier) lol

        • Allen Enriquez

          Thanks for the info j2, I was wondering what’s going to happen I just barely realized that it is point less to have jump I was able to sell my tablet to close to $400.00 and it was 2 years old! I think as i said above now TMUS has to come up with a Scheme to keep us, i know there is already Accessories eip and wearable smart devices eip but that’s not quite enough of an ideal scheme! At this point I am almost ready to jump ship.

    • Fabian Cortez

      You can get any phone you want. Just make sure you have the money.

    • I feel ya

      Yeah, but apparently enough people like you (in tmobiles view – based mainly on credit score) defaulted enough between years 1 and 3 that they felt it necessary to increase their restrictions on your particular class. it’s a number game on every level

    • Red5

      Your post is full of inconsistencies… If you always paid your bills, how did you end up as a ‘Z class’. That’s the class that are under this little thing called a BANKRUPTCY. don’t post if you’re going to be an idiot.

  • I’m on the line with CS now. Found out I am a Class H (NEWS TO ME). Thank you T-Mobile and JL!

  • Chad Dalton

    no problem for me i planned on putting a bigger down payment anyways…

  • Luke Gray

    I think it’s stupid that some of us (like me) have bad credit but have been trying to rebuild our credit get shutdown like this it’s saying hey we only want u if u got a plus credit if not screw u it’s a slap in the face I was looking to hop on tmobile this is a shame not everyone with bad credit won’t pay there bill

    • You could always save up and pay it up front. If you’re not sure you can do that then no credit company will take you in anyway.

      • Luke Gray

        I got boost mobile for now

        • you’re worthless bro

          you are the exact customer tmobile doesn’t need. you couldn’t get tmobile postpaid, so you go for boost mobile even though tmobile offers prepaid. let me guess, walmarts cheapest phone that day was a boost phone so that’s how you ended up with them?

        • ari79

          No dumbshit its because Boost has the incredible Sharp Aquos Crystal for $149. Check Engadgets review. And 50 to 60mbps download compared to turdmobile 4 to 5mbps. Dumbass..

    • What’s stupid is you on here mad at their reasons to protect themselves as a company, because you have bad credit. It’s not their fault you’ve got bad credit, and this is not the only place that doesn’t deal with people that have bad credit. Go fix your credit, and get what you qualify for. I think it’s funny you are mad at something you did to yourself. Go prepaid or pay in full.

      A lot of times people with bad credit still continue to not take care of their bills, then create more. So while this does not apply to me, I’m glad they are doing it.

      • Luke Gray

        ok how with no money and the cost of living getting higher and higher

        • Nearmsp

          It is simple. Balance your expense to match your revenue. It is a question of balancing needs and wants. Any income level, one can live within one’s means. One can earn a million bucks a year and spend 1.1 million and then have “bad” credit.

        • Allen Enriquez

          Nice Nearmsp, true that too! I have to adjust, I attempt that, but this is temp. until I get low income housing.

        • hahahh

          lol, you openy admit you have no money and that you can barely afford to live and then wonder why tmobile doesn’t want to loan you a $700 phone or 2

        • Allen Enriquez

          Luke I agree with you cost of living thing, I was renting $400.00 total now $500.00 that increase of $100.00 just made me not afford a large down payment upfront!

      • omg

        “Go prepaid or pay in full” agreed, but the vibe I’m getting from all these complainers is that they are financially irresponsible and unstable (which is why their credit sucks) and don’t have the cash to buy in full, but for some reason think it’s unfair a company doesn’t have complete faith in them keeping their financial commitments

    • MuthaFuckinStephen

      I have bad cedit too. Its my fault for being irresponsible. I don’t blame T-Mobile for asking me to deposit $83 for an Apple device. You should learn to take responsibility for your shitty credit. Dont blame others but yourself.

      • Tyde

        Bad credit and TMo only wants $83 for a deposit on iPhone?
        Doesn’t add up, trolling or lying?

        • Romdude

          It means he screwed up but his credit isn’t all that bad. His credit score is probably around 600s.

        • Lying is Fun

          Are you his boyfriend? OP clearly states I HAVE bad credit…. If he said he HAD bad credit then yeah….
          600 for a credit score isn’t going to get just a $83 deposit for a $600+ apple product either…

        • Romdude

          I’m a banker and did a seminar on credit scores, my idea of bad credit isn’t as bad as what other people think is bad. Maybe it is the same for him too because with only a relatively low down payments, he definitely doesn’t have a bad credit as he thinks he does. “Are you his boyfriend?” Really? Don’t get so emotional, we can have discuss something maturely without having to resort to trolling language.

    • learn how the world works

      “not everyone with bad credit won’t pay their bill” true, but people that do have bad credit have a higher tendency not to. if you have a way of being able to differentiate between those that will and those who won’t, I’m sure tmobile and countless other financial companies are interested in buying the formula. you say it’s unfair they want more from people with bad credit? for one, “trying to rebuild your credit” is the same as having bad credit. you have a history of poor financial management and you now need to prove yourself before any company will trust you with a loan, stating that your trying is worth nothing. “it’s saying hey we only want u if u got a plus credit” did they tell you they do not want you as a customer? no, they said they aren’t willing to give you a loan on equipment because you have proven to be a poor financial decision maker. so you could be a customer, but would have to purchase your devices up front. and you can’t. just an fyi, people that do have good credit and get approved for things like 0 down on eip could afford to outright buy what they are getting into, because part of fiscal responsibility is knowing to never get your self into anything you can’t afford to pay off that day.

    • gmo8492

      It just means if you don’t have the money to pay more or full price for the phone then you don’t. That’s just reality, and people have to understand what they can afford. So they don’t spend more of what they don’t currently have. T-Mobile has every right to look out for itself.

      • Romdude

        They could also buy a Moto G, pretty good phone for “cheap”.

  • Orion

    I was at tmobile last Monday and asked about the Nexus 6. So I did a credit check and they told me I have to put a down payment of $140 for basically a $700 phone. Which isn’t as bad as I thought. If I have to put a little more….I’m not worried. I know people that has to put more down.

    • and?

      what’s the point of this post?

      • Orion

        You’re seriously asking this question? *Facepalm*

  • Jason Crumbley

    But what do the classes mean? Who is a part of what credit class?

    • nss

      there’s like 30 different cred it classes, credit score is the biggest factor and other factors include things such as job history income previous defaults etc etc

  • StankyChikin

    $30 plan + pay full for device up front ftw!!

  • Spencer Henderson

    It only sucks if you are trying to take full advantage of the jump program where you would want to put 0 down and only pay as little as possible for the device so you don’t end up being out a good chunk of change when you decide to upgrade. and for me who is grandfathered into jump 1.0 where i don’t have to have 1/2 the phone paid off, just 6 months into it. 3 years just seems like a long time. I mean, if someone pays on time for a full year and never misses any payments, they should receive some benefit for that.

  • Brian Perez

    Tmobile has started a revolution… Everyone will eventually move into this typwof servicing Verizon att and sprint have all adapted their share of paying up front and tmobile has accelerated it and now its tighten its credits requirements.. U cant expect freebies for ever now its unsustainable

    • Verizonthunder

      Just pay your bill I tell it to everyone. It’s not hard just have some common sense with money ohhh I forgot if people were good with money there would be no more money advice shows, news paper or e ink articles on better management between life and money.

    • Jay J. Blanco

      Sprint is about to ditch subsidies they are folowing tmobile needs

    • seeinrightthroughu

      the policies have always been there, just in a different form – with contracts, people have to put down a variable deposit depending on credit score. that deposit can be anywhere from 0 – $500. $500 + the cost of the subsidized phone will equal or even exceed the cost of just buying the phone straight up – which is exactly what people on tmobile with poor credit have to do, buy the phone straight up

  • Verizonthunder

    Really are people bitching about the credit adjustment? It’s been a potential problem and I was not alone in the discussion weather those who have bad credit can get there priority straighten out. T-mobile is here to help everyone but it takes just a few bad business deals with customers and they will see red. While some will complain this is to help maintain a fair business relationship between corporate and the consumers.

  • TMCraver

    Fact is I worked hard for my credit, and alot of people I know say they don’t care and leave other companies and not pay their etfs or let everything go to collections. If you are one of these people you deserve the class you get. Take responsibility for what you spend and how you deal with finances. I know things happen like hard times but at least people on hard times have a bit of an excuse as compared to the ones who don’t care about their credit what so ever.

  • Philip Ruiz

    My eip went away. Now everything is full price. Weird. It would be nice if they refreshed the credit report every once in a while. I’m going off my credit from over a year ago. Since then my score has gone up substantially.

    • guy

      they probably will if you ask them to

  • Philip Ruiz

    Zte zmax. I’m so happy with this $200 phone. Its a good option for those low on cash.

    • donaldtrumpinthisbitch

      $200 to burn on a phone? you and I have vastly different definitionso of being “low on cash”

      • Philip Ruiz

        Were talking about $1000 phones here so by comparison $200 isn’t bad. Some people don’t want to even spend $200 like your saying but to me its worth it because my life is on a phone. Heck, some people are still good with a flip phone they keep in the glove box for emergencies lol

        • jsu

          I hear ya, but where I’m from being low on cash means a $200 phone isn’t happening for a bit lol

        • Verizonthunder

          The Zte Zmax also supports band 12 so coverage indoors is not a issue. We need more phones like the Zte Zmax.

  • darealist

    universal response to every post on this thread:

    1 – companies that write loans (this includes cell carriers – their loan to you is the device you get at a discount or on EIP) classify customers according to credit class.

    2 – companies periodically evaluate each credit class of customers to pinpoint where they are losing and gaining money, and adjust their policies for each of these classes accordingly.

    3 – t-mobile customers with a credit classes of I and Y defaulted enough to lose tmobile money, so tmobile responded like any other company and adjusted their policy towards these classes to lower their financial risk.

    4 – customers in this group are complaining because they no longer can get EIP and can’t afford a phone outright. guess what? the people with great credit who get approved for everything have the money to buy what they are loaning, because they are fiscally responsible and never commit to anything they can’t get out of. the fact that you rely on eip for your devices means you are not financially stable, and enough of people similar to you have defaulted to the point that t-mobile had to do something about it.

    lesson – don’t blame anyone but yourself for having bad credit, and if your complaint on the matter is that now you can’t afford a phone because you don’t have the money to buy it outright YOU SHOULDNT BE APPLYING FOR THE FUCKING EIP ANYWAY.

    fyi, I have mediocre credit and buy all my phones at retail so I can have my sweet $30 plan. most recently was a galaxy s5 for 650. if you think it’s stupid to buy phones at retail because of price, do some quick math to compare how much I pay compared to you ‘between device and service cost over a 2 year period. guaranteed win for me. if you have poor credit and simply don’t have 650 to buy a phone, you don’t deserve an eip to begin with. your most likely living paycheck to paycheck, and if you lost your job tomorrow your phone bill would be one of the first things you abandon and tmobile knows that

    rant over

    • (J²)

      T-Mobile is also a company trying to sell service, otherwise you arguement would be valid. While I believe it is fair for carriers to have the option to offer programs similar to loans, I do believe T-Mobile has taken it too far here. What’s next, cable companies selling Set Top Boxes and DVR’s for fixed prices (instead of lease charges) The line has to be drawn somewhere. Unfortunately, credit classes shouldn’t be determined by T-Mobile’s history with financial loss. Credit classes should be determined based on risk of loss. Unfortunately, not everyone has established a good credit history. It seems that you would either have to have good credit OR be a T-Mobile customer for 3+ years to be “Well Qualified”. I’m not sure if people who are commenting are aware that this impacts far more than customers with bad credit. I actually have have average credit but I have been screwed because T-Mobile (not any of the other 3 major carriers) is unable to retrieve suffient information from Transunion. It seems that T-Mobile is doing this to churn a profit rather than lower the rate of losses due to customers not paying their bill or EIP.

      • Risk of loss is always determined statistically with historical data. If certain classes are becoming more risky because the historical data says so, then T-Mobile is right to adjust.

        • (J²)

          Listen to what you are sayin…
          You are basically saying all companies operating like T-Mobile should inflate cost to customers with no credit, insufficent credit information or bad credit. T-Mobile is a wireless operator, not a bank or insurnace company. There’s no problem with credit classes being implemented but T-Mobile is in a business where subscriber count matters.

        • Red5

          The cost isn’t increasing. The phones are the exact same price for everyone.

        • Actually, you’re wrong. T-Mobile is now effectively a bank, too. Equipment installment plans are 0% interest loans, which means that they have all the requirements for loan issuance, too. Did you even read the terms and conditions of EIP? It’s essentially the same type of program that a car dealership would sell you on to buy expensive cars.

          T-Mobile is also getting into the mobile money business (which involves supporting many banking operations), which means that it also operates as a payment processor, too.

          T-Mobile is trying to get sustainable growth here, and they’ve been largely successful by tightening credit requirements, selling trade-ins in the wholesale market to offset costs of ETF payments (which will be recognized in the 2015 quarterly earnings), and so on.

        • Get_at_Me

          Preach Conan!

        • Allen Enriquez

          I thought I was the only one noticing it, good catch Conan Kudo! Now just like any dealership, TMUS has to offer a range of low end devices, unforchantly they did this to fast for not having enough low cost device on shelves and/or online for sale I believe this should satisfied for now.

        • notpoliticalyet

          Subscriber count matters and subscribers that don’t pay their bill matters more. Insurance companies implement credit checks and they are not a bank. Jobs also conduct credit checks on individuals due to the possibility of theft at the job.

        • ojdidit84

          I’m partially affected by these changes too. I’m not in the I or Y credit classes but my down payment amount went from about 30% to roughly 55%. Am I a little miffed about it? Yes. Am I going to make a fuss about it? No. I’m still getting the best service for my money with TMo over any other carrier.

          Also, you think that handing out service to customers with bad, limited or no credit history is beneficial for them? Ask Sprint how that worked out for them with customers with bad credit getting service with low deposits that were $250 at the most and that was with just incredibly terrible credit whereas they’d have been paying $1000-$1500 with Verizon or ATT and those same customers are the ones that screwed them over. Their profits got raped royally. They only things that saved them was the fact that VZW & ATT drastically dropped their requirements and pricing for deposits.

          Yeah, this sucks but they also need to protect themselves now that they have a large majority of the customers that Sprint once had that drove their profits through the ground.

        • donnad

          Net profit after tax is what matters wanker.

    • Mike

      There are plenty of fiscally responsible people who take advantage of or “rely” on financing a purchase whatever it maybe simply not to tie up all their money. That argument assumes everyone with a credit card is acting unresponsibly. In my opinion T-mo should view an existing customers payment history as what they base their policy on and 2 yrs is enough to predict how someone will act if u pay one device off the chance is you’ll do the same with the next.

    • Get_at_Me

      Pretty much

  • (J²)

    Unfortunately, this also impacts customers with no credit history or customers with credit history but Transunion doesn’t have suffient information to report to T-Mobile.
    Also, to set the record straight. credit classes I and Y were not the only classes impacted. I’m noticing that my credit class that previously forced me to pay roughly 55 percent of the full retail cost, has spiked to roughly 70 percent.
    An EIP (or Installment Plan) is no different from 2 year contract. If customers decide to stop paying their service or their device, it will be reported to the credit bureau.
    I completely agree, T-Mobile is a business but as I stated this is confirmed to negatively impact consumers with fair credit, no credit or insuffient credit information from Transunion. T-Mobile has always been the low cost/prepaid carrier. What’s odd, is this is T-Mobile’s core consumer base and it seems as if T-Mobile has turned its back on them. T-Mobile now offers the lowest plans and the highest EIP downpayments.
    A $500 iPhone is enough to turn anyone away.
    T-Mobile will have losses one way or another. Seriously… No one is going to join T-Mobile or upgrade their device frequently with such a high upfront cost.
    What’s worse, Android phones (amoung others) are pricy at launch but do not hold their value well. So customers will be at a significant loss when it comes time to upgrade. When you spend $500 for a device (of $750) pay $100 in EIP charges over 12 months. That’s $600 and your trade in value will probably be less than $200 and since you did not pay full retail. Towards your next purchase, you will have about $100. (and that’s being generous considering some Android phones value plummets to $1.)

    • Red5

      I’m going to sound like an ass hole so take it for what you will. As a business you don’t want lower credit class customers as much, and frankly working in customer care; They’re a pain in the ass having to call in with “financial” problems more often and also being far more likely to be sent to collections. Not only that they’re more likely to be dishonest about exchange processes with phones sent out to them “disappearing” This is the average and does not speak to everyone. If it wasn’t a problem, t-mobile wouldn’t have made the change.

      • preso

        Your customer service and network pretty much suck. So you get losers with crappy credit that can’t go to a real phone company. That’s the reality.

        • StarveBox_One

          Dude all these carriers attract the same amount of low end customers bro, stop being a tool lol.

    • Red5

      And you’re wrong about the trade in. That’s the whole reason we have Jump!.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        I paid 600 for my phone and t-mobile is offering 250 and it’s goes down 14 dollar a month. Smh

    • Fabian Cortez

      Duh, it’s a financing contract at 0% interested. It’s not your rich uncle giving you a phone.

      No one is forcing you to sign a contract for service. The service is contract-free.

      If you do not want to sign a device contract, then go out onto the market place, like you would when buying a TV, and purchase yourself a cellular phone.

    • idisestablish

      I get 18 year olds with no credit history all the time. They typically don’t have to pay a deposit and pay 55% down for the first year then 10% down until they hit 3 years. Customers with fair credit typically start out with 10% down payments. If you have to pay more than that, it’s because of bad credit, not a lack of credit and certainly not fair credit. People have different ideas about how “average” their credit score is, and they’re usually wrong. The vast majority of customers I see pay no more than 55% down, some of these are people that tell me their credit score is in the 500s. If you have to pay more than that, you have very poor credit that is way below average. Obviously, they realize that many people are not going to pay the high down payment. That’s kind of what they’re going for. That’s because based on those people’s history of repayment, they’re more than likely not going to pay the phone off, and they would find not having them as a customer preferable to the risk.

  • R8

    This just goes to show that when T-Mobile gives and gives that when they make a change people get mad about the change. Everything will work out for the better for everyone.

    • marke

      Idiot. Better for the shareholders. Period.

  • that math though

    everyone’s argument is backwards. Lower credit class customers become profitable quicker than the “zero down” customers. These customers used to typically put down 50%-80% of the device “cost”. Plus a deposit for the service and a sim started kit. They also typically get higher rate plans. These are the customers who pay extra for JUMP. A feature that doesn’t benefit them as much as a $0 down customer.
    This is T-Mobile giving into the pressure of wall street to look good on a spreadsheet.

    • guy

      but the fact that they are more likely to default cancels out those benefits

      • Jay J. Blanco

        It’s true but with 0 down Vs 80%. 80% sounds like a better deal. And that’s a person like me. I have average credit and had to put a deposit on my 2nd line and pay 80%. My bill on average is 180 plus I’m on a two year contract. I pay my bill regardless if I’m employed or not. And I’m a college student. I make sure my bill is paid at all cost.

    • Philz

      8 months ago I’m one of those customers that paid 100.00 security deposit , 30 % down , & 10.00 on original Jump plan.
      Not a great deal but not bad everyone wins.

      Yesterday I checked my Jump finding old device pay off = 278.00 , New device at full cost. If I upgrade without Jump add 2nd device I pay 80% down.

      Such changes have pulled me back from future device upgrade anytime soon & Jump will be canceled.
      I’m sure that will be the case for most seeing Tmob attracted not so great credit customers once upon a time with 0% down fine print.

      • Philz

        Typo:
        I put 40% down on device

    • Get_at_Me

      I agree with most of what you said but….less qualified customers dont generate a profit faster than well qualified and heres why. Less qualified customers pay more upfront for a phone, but tmo isnt really profiting on the phone. More like breaking even once its paid off. Well qualified and less qualified customers are paying the same amount for equipment over a 2yr period….WQ customers are more likely to be long term customers (sustained, reliable revenue for tmo). These customers can be trusted with a low upfront cost bc theyre credit history deems them responsible with long term agreements. LQ customers are required to “invest” more upfront bc 1) credit history proves theyre unreliable/irresponsible with long term agreements 2) the more they “invest” upfront, the less likely theyll be to leave soon after starting service. 3) if the customer does leave shortly after starting service, tmo has already been “reimbursed” a big chunk of the phones cost, so equipment losses are minimal. Time = plan revenue/profits here. They want LQ customers to pay 3yrs worth of service before theyll give them a lower out of pocket cost on a device. Its almost like paying higher interest if you think about it…. If i finance a new car for 5yrs with 10% interest and a required $2k down payment, pay it off (with good payment history) …then try to finance another car, i may be approved with 5% apr and $0 down. Same principle with tmo.

      • I’ve been with metropcs on a fully prepaid data for three years. Would that apply to me? I’ve only been a day late a few times and usually because I forgot to pay it.

        • Get_at_Me

          I doubt your metro tenure would carry over. Even internal tmobile acct migrations may not carry over credit class tenure.

        • Singleweird

          No.

      • that math though

        looking at the people who are taking advantage of EIP and jump.
        JUMP1: If a less qualified customer puts half down on brand new phone.
        then pays their EIP for 6 months. Then trades their phone in for another one and puts another 50% down. T-Mobile has made a TON of extra money on this lower credit customer.
        On a $500 phone. T-Mobile has recovered $312 and got the phone back.
        Well qualified. This drops to $125 recovered and the trade in.
        In this scenario… everyone pays their bill on time. This is just a break down of the EIP. The plan and features are the same in both scenarios.
        Jump 2 tries to level the playing field. But the higher down payment still lowers the risk to T-Mobile.

  • notpoliticalyet

    If you have good credit then no worries. Sometimes unfortunate things happen to folks and sometimes it is poor management of life in general. T-Mobile needs to make sure that the lower end people don’t bale put on the deal and cause negative revenue. There are scumbags no matter where you go.

    • Philz

      So true.
      Lower end customers that have been on 6 months aka Jump upgrade worthy with no late payments should of got pass on new credit requirement changes.
      After all they gave Tmobile a major boost when needed.
      Life moves on

      • amva55

        should have

        • notpoliticalyet

          Thank you English Professor..lol

    • amva55

      bail

  • NinoBr0wn

    I have no idea what all the letters mean anyway, but I know I’m not I or Y.

  • Marcusj3000

    I have bad credit myself but with my phone service I just pay the full cost of what i want when I want it. I don’t believe in the EIP crap from the carriers. So not all bad credit folks can’t pay for the phone as you have one here that can and prefer to pay full price.

    • Singleweird

      Free, 2-year financing is definitely not crap. Most people cannot produce $7, 8, 9 hundred dollars to buy a cellphone.

      • Krali

        If you’re paying $700+ for a cellphone, you’re getting ripped off mate.

        • Singleweird

          Welcome to America? I don’t know what to tell you.

        • tandrews93

          Buy a galaxy avant or a zmax

          Plenty of power comparable to my note 3 …. Not on paper but in person I think so

  • justmee002

    So, existing/longtime customers are required to go through credit check? This sounds like a big rip-off!

    • Mike Palomba

      Only if you want to start a new EIP and if you’ve been with T-Mobile for less then 3 years

    • idisestablish

      No, only new customers have to do a credit check. If you’ve been with T-Mobile less than 3 years, the information from your original credit check is used, and if it’s 3+ years, you’re well qualified.

  • dayaram

    I have 7 lines. 2 lines with jump. No additional data on any lines.

    3 iphone 6 with $0 down. 2 iphone 5s with $0 down.

    My bill is about $330 and they are still offering me 3 additional lines and more phones for $0.

    What credit class am I in?

    • john

      it seems like you are an A class

      • YoureUgly

        Lol rite

  • Allen Enriquez

    I was looking how I can save on the short, down payment and long run, so far I made a long research with Xfinity-Verizon, so far I can get zero down on the devices expect cost of start off which it rounds off to $38.00!

    I was shocked I didn’t know it was that worth Bundling!
    I have internet of blast which is 105 MB a second, 230 channels, phone for $155.00 now adding both X-V it’s $325 with the Edge Program, that’s not all comcast is offering $350.00 Visa card to ditch TMUS and Verizon is offering me $300.00 on bill credit, that’s not all there offering $150.00 for my Lg g2! that a total of $700.00 exploding Dollars! it’s tempting! At this point I am asking T-Mobile US what are you offering me to stay!?

  • I’ve been with metropcs on a fully prepaid data for three years. Would that apply?

    • atown7475

      Nope still run as two separate companies

  • preso

    Hardly, Wanker. Your crappy credit tmobile customer would be required to pay a $1000 deposit on Verizon. They prefer that the losers go to tmobile.

    • Shawn

      Dude shut the hell up and stop upvoting yourself lol.

    • Shawn

      I’m sure you’re rich Lmao

  • superg05

    mine says i can add 7 lines but when i asked today in store they said i was a C :(

  • Jesus Soto

    I called T-Mobile a couple of days ago they told me that this only applied to new customers. I don’t have credit at all so I’m in the n class so they told me that I would have to put down 40% which was fine because that’s what I had to put down when I first opened my account. So this morning I went to jump and surprise I had to pay for the full retail value of the phone. So T-Mobile lied when they said it only applies to new customers only. I won’t pay for a full retail value of a phone I paid $10 a month for jump and I’ve never used it. Now I lost out on being able to jump and they won’t reinpurse me for the months that I paid for jump. Total ripoff. I’m think of canceling all my line and jumping ship to AT&T!!

    • Brian Perez

      Wao that sucks you should have called tmobile and asked them what credit class you are im credit class n

  • Peter C

    I paid full price for Nexus 6 with jump program and im happy but in a year when I want to upgrade, am I going to have to trade back the phone I fully paid for and just accept whatever tmobile offers me and that goes towards my new phone ? Thats pretty shady because I have been a customer for a little over a year not yet meeting the 3 year mark.

    • tandrews93

      U don’t have to return your phone if its paid offu simply start a new iep

  • Gregory Keith

    Here is the issue with this because unfortunately I am in there lesser credit class because I was a victim of fraud I got declined after fully paying off my S4, I bought a S5 CASH but want the note 4 and was told NOPE cough up all but $50 bucks of it or wait 3 years!! Total BS!! People who pay there bills on time every time should not fall victim to this crap! I asked them to RERUN credit, the dude says well cancel the account move your phone to prepaid status wait 30 days and we will recheck but that does not Guarantee we can extend device credit to you! But i can buy a WATCH!!! or any accessory up to $800 bucks worth of credit and pay half!! total bullshit! now if my phone dies I have to cough up a fortune up front!! No way!

  • tandrews93

    You have to have a SUPER SUPER bad score to be denied I have 446 and I get half down only been with T-Mobile 7months

    • Jared Flores

      i never had credit card before but will i be eligible for their offer?

  • Rodney Davis

    The problem here is everyone must check their credit before trying to get a new phone. if you have negative items on your credit card you must pay them off 1st and then ask for help to remove them from a credit expert. This will help you save time going and asking if you qualify for a new phone anywhere.

    • thepanttherlady

      While it is indeed important to know what is on your credit reports, a “credit
      expert” cannot do anything for your credit that you cannot do for
      yourself.

      There are methods to try to have negative accounts removed from your credit report but there is absolutely no obligation for the CA (collection agency) or OC (original creditor) to remove them. Paid or not, they can legally be reported for 7 years plus 180 days from the date of first delinquency in which the account never fully recovered.

      Please also keep in mind that removal of negatives alone will not necessarily qualify someone for a new phone. What positive trade lines are posting? How old are they? There are many factors that go into ones credit score. Credit repair/building is not easy nor is it fast. It takes time and lots of patience. To suggest otherwise is irresponsible.

  • Jesse Wilson

    Not really I had no credit when I signed up, look at me now. They raised my credit class, so now I qualify for 0 down. I have been with T-Mobile for 8 months paying on time.

    • Jared Flores

      is this for real? i also dont have credits but i would like to sign up for tmobile on iphone 6S plus.

    • Jesse Wilson

      T-Mobile update: Still a customer, and they got a lot better since I last posted here. I have since switched to a IPhone 6s.