Bloomberg: Dish chief interested in T-Mobile deal

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It’s nothing we haven’t heard before, however, Bloomberg has published a fresh report claiming that Dish’s chief Charlie Ergen has contacted Deutsche Telekom to communicate his interest in acquiring T-Mobile US. Ergen allegedly made the approach after Sprint and T-Mobile’s plans to merge fell apart, but is yet to make a formal offer for the company.

It is important that we don’t read too much in to this discussion. For two very good reasons. Firstly: As previously mentioned, it’s not a formal offer. Secondly: Ergen has had these conversations with Deutsche Telekom on more than one occasion in the past. That said, Bloomberg’s sources have indicated that the recent approach was made because of the Sprint deal not working out, and because the satellite TV provider doesn’t want any deal between T-Mobile and Iliad taking place before the year is up.

Dish, the second-largest U.S. satellite-TV provider, has told Deutsche Telekom, which owns about two-thirds of T-Mobile, that it may be interested in a deal after a November auction for wireless airwaves is completed, said the people. Dish hasn’t formally hired a bank to advise it on a T-Mobile takeover, and it’s still unclear if the Englewood, Colorado-based company is serious about a deal, the people said.

Combining with Dish might come as a more refreshing option compared with the Sprint or Iliad propositions. Dish adds the value of combining TV and mobile services under one roof, and likely won’t face any of the strong regulatory opposition which dissuaded Sprint from pursuing a merger.

What are your thoughts? Is Dish the best option available for T-Mo?

Source: Bloomberg

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  • Adrayven

    LORD NO! Dish has the worst customer service, a HORRIBLE contract bait and switch tactics..

    Dish, “OHOH we’ll give you 12 months of ‘ok’ pricing then another 12 months of STICK IT TO YOU CONTRACT!”

    Uncarrier is guaranteed dead if Dish gets T-Mobile.. say hello to contracts and data overage pricing!

    • Adrayven

      Iliad is by far a much better prospect since they would be very unlikely to kill Uncarrier… We wouldn’t gain much, but we certainly would loose much either.

      • Yes

        uncarrier is just a stupid marketing term anyway.

        Dish will combine TMO and Dish to expand broadband. Dish has tons of spectrum that they’re not using, just a few trials in the East.

        http://www.extremetech.com/electronics/177897-dish-secures-spectrum-for-150mbps-lte-to-rural-homes-in-the-us

      • Roger Sales

        I like the idea of Dish partnering with T-Mobile in resources, but certainly not an acquisition

      • Andy Leslie

        I want Dish Network to buy Tmobile USA. Iliad with it trying to go out of its way with trying to buy our Company in reality just wont work out well. Dish on the other hand believe it or not will do every in their power to keep the Uncarrier moves, just as long as John Legere remains top dog CEO of Tmobile, we just wont have worry about having such issues happen for our company as an whole here. Plus AT&T is pretty much doing the same exact same thing with DirectTV is buying them, using them as an Subsidary. So there you have it.

    • UMA_Fan

      What’s sucks is all cable tv and Internet providers in the US use the same tactics.

      Low initial pricing then gouging thereafter.

      Would be cool if Dish got rebranded as t-mobile satellite or something.

    • Bklynman

      Well if that happens,I will out the door,faster than anything. I will checkout Metro,The Gophone,Pure Talk,Straight Talk,or just might go back to the deathstar,turn in my highend phone,get the cheapest handset they have for jump,paid that off,off I go,
      maybe by then Sprint will have its act together. If this did happen,still would be at least a year before dish takes over.

      • turtle6988

        Ummmm you do realize T-Mobile owns MetroPCS

        • KlausWillSeeYouNow

          No, he doesn’t. Shows how well-informed these anti-Dish folks usually are.

        • Bklynman

          Yes I know who owns,Metro,Go Phone is own by the death star. Unless it was brought out by Straight Talk.

        • tem

          And TracFone owns Straight Talk.

        • Hehehe

          Um, T-Mobile owns MetroPCS, Go Phone and is an MVNO for Straight Talk. Come on over, seems like we get him no matter what.

        • Bklynman

          Mr.Inform,The Go Phone is own by At$t,not Straight Talk.

        • Bklynman

          Yes I do,but they operate on there own.

      • KlausWillSeeYouNow

        TechHog? Is that you?

        • Bklynman

          No it is not Tech Hog.

        • Trevnerdio

          I miss TechHog…

      • skittle

        I like what you said about JUMP. “Turn in my highend phone,get the cheapest handset they have for jump,paid that off,off I go,”.
        The way to get out of the $$$ payments is to JUMP to a cheap handset. I have thought of doing this sometimes if something bad happens like Tmobile being sold off.

        • Bklynman

          Also it is good way to get out of jump,then just paid off the lower price handset,then checkout, Ebay, Swappa
          etc. For a high end phone that’s 6 months, to 1 yr old,for half price,or even buy refurbished phone from Tmobile,u just have check what kind of sim card it takes,nano,micro, or mimi.

    • Andy Leslie

      Oh LORD YES. SOOOO MUCH BETTER SUIT FOR OUR COMPANY THAN ILIAD. FRENCH PLEASE LEAVE US ALONE. THANK YOU.

  • UMA_Fan

    With most of dish’s customer base being in rural areas there doesn’t seem to be much of an opportunity for customers to bundle tv and cell phone for it to be worth it.

    Like the rumored Sprint deal it would be worth it if the tmobile brand thrived and was in control.

    Also in some ways isn’t tmobile US a bigger company than Dish?

    A Dish wireless brand would make me throw up.

    • yes

      Rural broadband . .. ! :)

  • Whiskers

    F-Dish and their satellite dish they rode in on !
    They would screw up a two car funeral .

  • Mike Palomba

    I see the cons in the comments like bad customer service from dish and the uncarrier initiative being gone but dish does have A LOT of spectrum that could really help tmobile. If they remained separate brands just owned by the same company I think it would be great. John Legere runs the T-Mobile show and Dish’s CEO runs what he does now. They can offer bundles and things of that nature but as long as they stay relatively separate in terms of the way they’re run there shouldnt be any issue and tmobile would get access to Dish’s goldmine of spectrum.

    • Whiskers

      Sounds like a nice dream , but once Dish has full control they will change the no-contract uncarrier plans .
      Dish loves holding their customers on contracts.

      • Mike Palomba

        I have directv so I wouldn’t know but T-Mobile could be a goldmine for dish if they play It right. If they stayed consumer friendly then people would still flock to tmobile like they do not and the added spectrum would draw more people. If they become the opposite of an uncarrier then it’s going to be a loss for them because most customers would leave becuSe of that. Hopefully if the deal goes through dish is smart about it and we keep our uncarrier

    • DirkDigg1er

      If you research companies whom Dish purchased and compare it to the Uncarrier philosophy, you may be alarmed too!

    • Not all spectrum is alike. While the quantity of bandwidth is high, the quality is not. It’s above 2 GHz, practical mostly in dense urban areas, and some if it is one-way only, from the tower to the user. It may fit a wireless cable service, but not mobile telephony.

      • Mike Palomba

        I read in an article that Dish has enough of a certain type of spectrum (I don’t remember which type) to cover every square inch of the us. So that spectrum should be able to be used in cell phones without a problem

        • Yes, that’s the useless one-way spectrum that it won in an auction competing with other companies than mobile carriers, which had no interest in it. While this spectrum makes sense for a cable operator, it makes little sense for a mobile carrier.

        • Mike Palomba

          So that spectrum would most likely go toward the service dish wants to start, a type of mobile TV service, rather then helping T-Mobile increase its coverage? Does Dish have any spectrum that would help T-Mobile?

        • Yes, but insignificant to change T-Mobile footprint. Then again, Dish has signed up for the auctions of the AWS3 and 600 MHz spectrums, which are valuable to mobile carriers and therefore quite expensive, hinting at its determination to enter the mobile market. Certainly it would make sense for Dish to acquire T-Mobile, but it’s a raw deal for consumers. T-Mobile is what it is because it’s a subsidiary of a German company, that’s why it’s unlike the other carriers. I’d much rather welcome Iliad than yet another American corporation which serves its own interests first and the consumers’, last.

        • After some more careful research, Dish widespread license in block E in the lower SMH band at 700 MHz is adjacent to the downlink of the T-Mobile widespread license in block A, doubling its bandwidth. So, technically, such merger could improve the performance where each one’s licenses in the lower SMH band overlap. But the problem is the corporate culture clash and how this would affect us, customers. Being a T-Mobile customer is nothing like being a Dish customer.

        • Mike Palomba

          Wow everyone here really hates dish. Are they really that bad?

        • Whiskers

          Yes !
          My wife worked for them and believe me , they don’t care about anything but making profit for them .
          They treat their own employees like dirt and screw them out of their bonus pay while raking in the sales profits their employees made them .
          Once they have you on contract it’s bend over time.

        • Mike Palomba

          Wow thats bad. If they do by tmobile they better not do that because the T-Mobile customers will be leaving in boat loads

        • Nearmsp

          to go where? AT&T, Verizon?

        • Mike Palomba

          Probably maybe sprint too, even if T-Mobiles coverage improves significantly, dish sounds like more of a nightmere then all of the other 3. Hopefully if anything does go thought dish will be smart

        • 21stNow

          Most definitely.

    • tem

      Why would they need to own T-Mobile to do that. Nothing’s stopping a partnership from taking place.

      • Mike Palomba

        Well T-Mobile isn’t looking for a partnership they’re looking for a buyer.

      • calvin200

        Dish’s choice for a partnership is Sprint. “While you have to have a lot of respect for what T-Mobile’s done…I think Sprint is capable of much, much more,” Mr. Ergen said.

  • BillSmitty

    I just wish someone would buy TMO, the constant offers, rumors, etc are annoying as hell. DT wants out, so someone make a damn deal that closes already.

  • TechHog

    Ugh. I don’t really want Dish, but after hearing a rumor about Comcast, I can live with this. Literally anything would be better than Comcast.

    • Bklynman

      TechHog,people are asking for you,below.

  • KlausWillSeeYouNow

    I’ve been sold on this for what feels like years now. Bring it on!

  • dblock

    I’ve been wanting for this this is the best choice dish owns a lot of spectrum, this could definitely help boost tmobile

  • randian

    What does Dish get out of buying TMO? Does Dish have significant spectrum holdings that would go well when added to TMO’s?

    • It has a bunch of stupid spectrum that no mobile company cared to bid for, including one-way spectrum, which makes no sense at all for carriers.

      • randian

        In that case I’m not seeing any synergy between Dish and TMO.

        • RLB63

          It could easily be used to stream users dish dvr shows. Dish already has some of the best dvr and live viewing out there. Add it to the data that doesn’t count against you, and you have a big winner.

          You can now much more easily cross sell Sat tv and cell phones. You have reduced a major pain point for consumers. Hence it fits in with the uncarrier push tmo is making.

      • Magenta Man

        I thought they have coast to coast 700mhz in the D or E block?

        • ATT owns block D, adjacent to its widespread block C. Dish has widespread license of block E. Though both block D and E are one-way, the former is useful to ATT because it can be paired with its block C licenses, but the latter could be paired with the downlink of block A, doubling its bandwidth. Hmmm…

        • UMA_Fan

          But would block E require all new handsets again?

          Also I didn’t know Dish had low band spectrum how widespread is it?

        • Any new spectrum that opens up as more analog spectrum is refarmed requires new devices. This is true for the 700 MHz band as for the 600 MHz and AWS3 band whose auctions are coming up.

          Dish license covers a widespread area, but I’m not sure how much it overlaps with T-Mobile license, area wise.

        • UMA_Fan

          What I’m asking is do existing tmobile devices cover e block. Nearly all existing tmobile LTE devices cover 700mhz just not their recently acquired a block. Does this apply to e block as well?

        • DirkDigg1er

          Only device that supports 700mhz E block is AT&T LG G3.

        • Digital radio receivers are quite discriminating. They can’t tune to a carrier even 1 MHz off the expected frequency. Since supporting a certain block requires expensive field tests, the addition of a block requires new equipment. That’s the case with devices that support band 17. Though block A is right beside its blocks B and C, band 17 devices cannot tune to the extra block in band 12.

        • Kidney_Thief

          It covers the entire country, except the San Francisco and LA areas, and parts of the Northeast.

        • DirkDigg1er

          It’s nationwide (with the exception of California and NY tri-state being owned by ATT) and on a single channel of 6mhz spectrum.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        That spectrum is going to be used for fixed broadband

        • The block E in the lower SMH band cannot be used for Internet broadband because it’s one-way only, from the tower to the user equipment. I don’t know what signal it can be used for, but if the FCC allows LTE in it, it could be used as a second downlink carrier complementing the downlink in block A in the lower SMH band. Of its own, though, due to its unidirectional restrictions, it’s of little use for internet or mobile broadband.

        • DirkDigg1er

          Since it’s a single channel it could be used for TDD LTE

        • Not unless the FCC changes its current designation as a downlink only block.

  • Brook Marin

    Wasn’t illiad courting potential partners to go in with them on their tmo purchase? What if dish is one of those partners but wants to see the results of the auction first? That would prove interesting and would be the best of both worlds! Illiad would fight to keep the uncarrier momentum but use dish for content and improve offerings (read tmo tv)!

  • Iliad is the French T-Mobile. Dish is yet another American cartel. Nothing good could come from combining T-Mobile with such a backwards, anti-consumer operation like a cable company.

    • monkeybutts

      Satellite company* :P

      • Paul

        *satellite cable company

        • 21stNow

          monkeybutts is correct. Satellite and cable are two different things, so unless a company uses both forms of transmission there is no such thing as a satellite cable company. Dish is a satellite television service provider. They do not transmit their signals via cable wires like Comcast, Charter and other land-based television service providers do.

        • Paul

          Cable as in came television, as opposed to over the air.

          Edit for 21stNow: “Came” should be “cable”

        • 21stNow

          I’m not sure what came television is, but if you want to refer to subscription television, you can just call it subscription television. Cable is a method of transmission while satellite is an alternate method of transmission.

        • Paul

          Aahh, I accidently put “came” instead of “cable” in my response. My mistake and I’ve corrected it just for you. I’m sure you knew exactly what I was saying.

          While you are correct that “cable television” is defined as television signals broadcasted via a cable, it is also a term used to describe television programming that is not available via radio waves. To help you out here is are some examples:
          – Comedy Central
          – TLC
          – SyFy
          – The Travel Chanel
          – Food Network
          I think you can tell what I’m trying to say. It’s like saying “basic cable” and “paid cable.” These don’t follow the definition you presented either, but are very common terms.

          In fact, I bet you will try to respond with how this isn’t that case since the I, myself, evenagreed to your definition. Yes, I did do that. My point is strengthened by the fact that even individuals on the television, John Stewart even used the phrase last week, use the term “cable television” to refer to, as you put it, “subscription television.”

          It is a common term that I’m sure you use as well but you already knew that.

        • 21stNow

          Do you really think that I would bring this up if I referred to all subscription television as cable television? I call Comcast’s offering cable TV and DirecTV’s offering satellite television. I refer to them collectively as subscription television.

          I’m aware of many examples of cable networks. Many of those networks got their starts before satellite television was prevalent. Today, those networks have far more cable subscribers than satellite subscribers, so more of their revenue comes from cable than satellite and they are therefore primarily cable networks.

          I really didn’t understand what you were saying when you used the word “came” instead of “cable”. If you ever read my comments, you find that I say what I mean and mean what I say.

        • Paul

          I have read your comments before and I have found it hard to take them seriously. This includes the one I’m replying to here.

        • 21stNow

          If you find it hard to take them seriously, why are you responding to them?

        • Paul

          Responding to a post and taking it seriously are not the same thing.

        • 21stNow

          I never said that they are the same thing. You still didn’t answer the question.

        • Paul

          I did answer your inquiry. My reasons for responding have nothing to do with whether or not I take your post seriously. That in fact the answer to your question. It may not be what you were expecting or wanting, but it is the answer to your question.

        • 21stNow

          No, you still didn’t list any reasons for responding and at this point, I don’t care what they are.

          Your correction of another poster who used the term “satellite company” correctly was what started this chain of responses. The discussion continued as you attempted to defend misusing words. I stand by there being no such thing as a “satellite cable company”. You can continue to argue this, but I am done now.

        • Paul

          You asked “If you find it hard to take them seriously, why are you responding to them?” You did not ask why I was responding but included that “If you find it hard to take them seriously…” So I did answer your question but you don’t like the answer because it doesn’t perpetuate your argumentative air.

          It appears you took a sarcastic post I made, in reference to naming a type of television broadcasting technology, quite literally. You then proceeded to begin an argument, attempting to correct me, and I have no reason to argue your interpretation of the use of a term. Nor do I care what you think of my use of a term.
          Regardless, ba-bye.

    • tmoalways

      Agreed, Dish Networks operations are a joke, they outsource customer service to Philippines and squeeze blood from a turnip if they could.

  • notyourbusiness

    Eh. Dislike!

  • Next Generation

    Dish buying T-mo is the best that can happen for consumers. T-mo surge is temp only. T-mo CEO knows it and he will keep his job. They need to diversify there company as well as Dish. How you think Verizon and ATT expanded? They offer more than one service. Dish will not take away the Un-carrier. If you actually do your research, Dish has a no contract service too, It’s called FlexTV. Like T-mo you need to purchase the phones in full without contracts, Dish you need to purchase the receiver boxes in full or even prepaid smartcards. The spectrum Dish owns will expand T-mo coverage and offer online TV service which Dish will start before the end of the year. Dish is also fighting to get control of bankrupt Lightsquared, more spectrum! ;)

    • UMA_Fan

      I don’t think the T-Mobile resurgence is temporary as long as they keep up with their edge to 4G conversion as promised.

      Just think about it T-Mobile US spends the LEAST on marketing and yet is able to add the most amount of customers. This has to be attributed to positive word of mouth. I would think the vast majority of people switching are getting a good experience and telling their friends. That kind of momentum won’t die down anytime soon.

      • Next Generation

        T-mo is a high yield company and needs additional firepower to grow. It is only a matter of time sprint gets there act together and sprint customers stop flocking over to T-mo. Dish will help stop that from happening and the ongoing price wars.

      • Next Generation

        Additionally, If T-mo surge is not temp, then why would owner DT want to sell itself? They know T-mo can’t go in it alone. DT saying they want out of the US market is the excuse.

        • xmiro

          DT wants to sell because it’s needs cash for its European operations, spectrum, network upgrades, and to buy and merge with other European carriers

        • UMA_Fan

          Well it takes a lot of money they have to reinvest into the business to keep the network competitive.

          I doubt DT is in a ‘rush’ to sell or it would have happened already. They’ll sell for the right price it sounds like… Just like any business really.

        • Next Generation

          Your right, I don’t think DT in a rush to sell itself. They are waiting for the company that will have more cash to offer and have less regulatory obstacles.

    • The Jason

      All of that dish technology is 100% irrelevant in the way the future is going. Satellites and tv packavez mean a grand total of nothing. It is as simple as this, wireless providers are wireless IP networks and that is all. Eveything is built on top of that separately as services on a data stream. Be it voice like VOLTE or video like netflix. There are only two questions, can Dish provide money for spectrum or spectrum they bring on their own. All those meaningless satellite TV technologies mean nothig.

      • Next Generation

        Why does ATT need Direct TV then if it’s meaningless? Dish is the first company that will provide a live TV streaming service with Disney ESPN and AMC networks soon for smart phones without getting sat TV. As a former Sprint customer and a current T-mo customer, the next generation looks better! Move over Big Red and Big Blue!

        • The Jason

          Don’t mean jack squat. That is not the way of the the future or of current business models. It is apps, video on demand, and products utilization of a pervasive always on data IP wireless network. A content reseller of tv channel packages is like 80s technology and business. It means nothig. Networks are increasingly streaming on their own sites, customers have YouTube, Netflix etc etc. Virtually nobody signs up for these online tv channel packages you are talkijg about. Dish is worthless if thats your angle. They are worth if 1) THey bring a boatload of money to buy spectrum, or 2) they come with spectrum we can utilize. Thats all

        • Football Fan

          Hey The Jason, get your head out of your @$$ u might just think a little more straight! Haven’t u heard why Dish wants TMO moron? To bring Dish’s spectrum holdings, synergies, and to expand TMO coverage! Next time read the fine print!

        • The Jason

          Excuse me? Learn to read. Did I dispute any of what you said in what I said? I said if that’s the idea, that’s all well and good. But it has nothing to do with Dish’s core product base. That is next to worthless in the new business models. Try to grasp the gist of my full comments befire spouting off next time.

        • Football Fan

          If Dish acquires TMO u don’t need to get Dish service. Just get TMO and shut the trap!

    • POLITICS
  • Tem

    I’d rather have Iliad. At least they’d lower prices.

    • dtam

      but we want better coverage too. don’t think Iliad will bring that. Not sure if Dish would either…

      • DirkDigg1er

        Some people could care less if tmo goes out of business as long as they get their last discount.

        • dtam

          I think you’re right and those people are very short sighted

  • The Jason

    The other question really is what kind of spectrum is Dish sitting on? Most of it is just amazingly worthless non conforming spectrum. You can say what you want about Tmo but they brilliantly engineered their Lte band selections over time. Their AWS LTE is actively used by Verizon. Their PCS LTE conversion where needed is right in line wih the other carriers and supported by all phones. They even managed to move hell and earth on what was once thought of as useless 700 A band spectrum. They got the FCC to unify the lower 700 band and made Band 12 an AT&T band as well thus guaranteeing full hardware support. They are now sitting on LTE Bands 4, 2, and 12, some of the most common bands among the big carriers. What does Dish have? They have some worthless 5Mhz of PCS H block. I mean 5 Mhz of PCS is beyond tiny. They have some one way only 700 Mhz. What’s the point of that? Unpaired and only 6 Mhz. And hten they have maybe somewhat valuable some AWS spectrum. Well what they call AWS but was rebadged that. And no Band 4 doesnt support it. They have worthles spectrum. They are hopig to somehow combine their one way 700 band with the AWS as a fownlink to create an entirely new band just for them. Which no phone suports. Even Tmobile an established provider with towers would have trouble usig that spectrum. Its just bad bad bad.

    • Football Fan

      If sprint and TMO would have merged that would have been a problem combining sprints CDMA network and TMOs GSM network. TMO has enough engineering to put DISH spectrum holdings to good use. How is a french phone company who is much smaller then TMO thinks they can pull it off? They have no resources in the US market. It’s a Damn joke! They were denied once by TMO and it will happen again.

      • The Jason

        Its not a matter of engineering, the bands don’t currently exist to support Dish’s spectrum. You can’t ‘engineer’ that problem. You need to get a better technical understanding of how it works. Can they get new LTE bands created just for Dish’s “unique” spectrum? Sure they can but it would be the most niche of North American LTE bands in that nobody else supports it. Economies of scale alone would mean a grwatly reduced device selection for that band. It is low value spectrum at this point

      • NYC

        I agree, even Verizon is interested in Dish wireless spectrum goldmine. Especially when it’s worth between 20 and 30 billion.

        • The Jason

          Its not worth 30 billion. Its not worth half of 30 billion. TMobiles spectrum for all of the reasons listed above is 10 times more valuable than Dishs spectrum which is in small mhz blocks and TMobile as a whole isnt at 30B in market cap. Dish network is barely at 30B as an entire company in market cap. How can the spectrum be worth as much as the whole company? Those are bogus valuations from vey optimistic analysts.

        • NYC

          Get back to me in the November auctions

        • The Jason

          Oh nobodys told you little kid? If your refferring to the AWS 3 auction and Dishs attempted temper tantrum to get its AWD 4 incorporated into the new unified Aws 1-3 combines band, diah was sent hone crying with its worthless spectrum that it cant even sneak into a new band being created. World of hurt as far as spectrum they are in. Bad spectrum, bad deployment. No wireeless professionals there we can see. Buncha Colorado satellite bumpkins.

        • DirkDigg1er

          Not to mention they have a year and a half to deploy 40% nationwide.

        • Football Fan

          Have you checked TMO’s ARPU? They won’t survive. You can’t keep buying out contracts without someone backing up your ass. If TMO is really worth that much then they need to expand there coverage outside metro areas damn it!

        • UMA_Fan

          Arpu is meaningless. Even Verizon wants to move away from that metric because the more lines people add to their account the less money they pay per user. They are slowly moving to average revenue per account.

          Also tmobile knew their arpu would take a hit when switching to 100 percent no contract but it’s more than made up for since they don’t have to subsidize devices anymore.

        • Football Fan

          Of course Verizon doesn’t care about its ARPU, they can crush TMO with a left hook. Verizon won’t take a hit. They have enough deep pockets to squash the little guys.

        • UMA_Fan

          You missed the point completely.

          Verizon doesn’t like the arpu metric because it will go down the more lines you have per account. This is why they want everyone to go by arpa

        • Football Fan

          I didn’t miss any point at all. I was just giving you a reality check.

        • DirkDigg1er

          Don’t believe the hype that’s just free advertisement to shop for a buyer. If Dish paid $7B for spectrum how is it now worth $28-30b? Earlier this year, Directv valued Dish and it’s assets at $30b.

        • NYC

          It’s downlink spectrum. Downlink spectrum is worth more the uplink spectrum. Dish can convert there spectrum to there liking unlike the old legacy two-way cell phone towers companies use right now. The company itself is worth around 30b. That doesn’t include the spectrum portfolio they carry cause it’s not in use until the buy a network to put it to good use.

        • DirkDigg1er

          I sent you the bloomberg link of Dish’s value in the AT&T Directv triangle. The spectrum is worthless due to lack of support and compatibility. As for DISH’s current spectrum holdings – 40 MHz at 2000-2020 MHz (uplink) and 2180-2200 MHz (downlink) – are adjacent to the downlink PCS H Block. The juxtaposition of uplink next to downlink creates a risk of harmful interference and the FCC’s current rules limiting interference into PCS effectively require DISH to dedicate up to 5 MHz of their uplink spectrum as a guard band for PCS H Block

        • NYC

          There were informal talks months ago Verizon was holding with Dish’s spectrum worth near 20b.

        • DirkDigg1er
      • The Jason

        And by the way nothing I said has anything to do with Iliad since you keep trying to interject it into unrelated conversations. Iliad was never serious and never had the 35-40 a share they would need, so thats neither here nor there.

      • DirkDigg1er

        There is no problem with CDMA vs GSM anymore. Everyone is rolling out LTE. Both Sprint and T-mobile has PCS spectrum that would have been deployed on towers.

    • DirkDigg1er

      Lol. What is the obsession with common bands? Qualcomm and Co. radios support all wireless bands thus far, even band 12. Snapple fact: 2.5ghz spectrum has global support while 700mhz spectrum is US only. *I agree that Dish spectrum is worthless due to them not fixing compatibility issues with AWS-4/ PCS H block. The 700 E could be used as TDD lte but again not worth a squirrels fart.

  • Hopper Joey

    Dish going to Hop on the sexy pink carrier! Woohoo!

  • Anonymous
  • The Jason

    How bad is Dish’s crappy spectrum holdigs? Just this months they were begging the FVV to include heir janked up AWS 4 which is not even really 4 with an uplink they dont even want to use and have another band they want to pair with it. This is the desperation of Dish trying to do something with its marginal spectrum. Both at&t and verizon knocked that amateur hour proposal off the FCC list in a second and went back on working on a proper aws 1 2 3 unified band that everyone includijg tmo will benefit. J

  • Anonymous

    No one talking bout bankrupt companies TerraStar and DBSB Dish acquired in 08 and 2011. Both companies tried to offer satellite and land based cell phone service. Now Mr. Ergen owns the swath of spectrum.

    • Anonymous

      It is for this same reason why Mr Ergen hasn’t fold his cards. He playin his cards right. After the November auctions it appears he will know how much his spectrum is worth, Royal Flush. Tmobile will be bought out

  • Jay Holm

    If there’s anyone here in Ct, I spotted 15×15 Wideband LTE in Stratford Connecticut, getting speeds of between 50-57mbps, not bad at all, look forward to finding out if 15×15 has also been deployed where I live in Bridgeport also, and later Sunday afternoon I will be in New Haven, so I’ll check there also. I’m using the S4 by the way.

    • Bryck

      Got 79.65 Mbps download and 21.67 Mbps upload in Westport, Ct this past Friday.

      • Jay Holm

        Dang! Nearly 80mbps! You don’t happen to know if that is a 15×15 or 20×20 configuration, do you? I really hope this spreads fast, no Wideband LTE in the South end of Bridgeport or downtown New Haven as of yet.

        • Bryck

          I’m not sure. But I do know that northern, and central ct needs a whole lot of work, except Hartford.

        • Jay Holm

          I haven’t been to either of these places recently, but I read that both Torrington and Willimantic got upgraded to LTE. That’s definitely something. Anyway, how you check to see if your LTE DL Bandwidth is 15mhz or 20mhz is by dialing *#0011# on your phone it will take you to Service Mode, there you can find out.

        • Bryck

          Thanks for the info.

  • Anonymous

    T-Mobile US, Inc. (NYSE:TMUS) Monday announced an agreements to purchase certain 700 MHz A-Block spectrum licenses from Verizon Wireless (NYSE: VZ) for $2.365 billion in cash and the transfer of certain AWS and PCS spectrum licenses, which have an aggregate estimated value of approximately $950 million. The transactions, combined with T-Mobile’s existing A-Block holdings in Boston, will result in T-Mobile having important low-band spectrum in 9 of the top 10 and 21 of the top 30 markets across the United States.

    Commenting on the deal, analyst Jennifer M. Fritzsche said the price was good for Verzon. The deal is also good news for Dish (Nasdaq: DISH).

    “Today’s spectrum sale illustrates the continued increase in spectrum values. In particular, the $1.74 MHz/Pop for AWS/PCS reinforces our belief that there is significant present and future value in DISH’s AWS4 spectrum holdings,” said Fritzsche.

    “Using today’s price, DISH’s AWS4 spectrum would be worth $21.4B. Applying today’s $1.72 price to DISH’s 40MHz of nationwide AWS4 spectrum holdings gives us a ~$21.4B valuation (or $32/share aftertax) versus our current $14.9B (or $25/share aftertax). Further, we believe this estimate could be conservative as it assumes a symmetrical uplink/downlink band, while DISH has the flexibility to convert its 20MHz of uplink spectrum to more valuable downlink spectrum,” she added.

    • Anonymous

      Complete and utter bs evaluation and I will tell you why. All of the spectrum sales you mention are all tightly wrapped up in current LTE bands or already proposed band arrangements by the 3GPP. The lower 700 block was neatly arranged in Band 12. AWS already exists. The AWS 4 you mention from Dish is so poorly planned, it was purposely left out from the unified AWS 1-3 bands being finalized now. That means even the upcoming November AWS 3 bands are accounted for but not Dishs AWS 4. Its ticky tack spectrum with no support currently. And their 700 is one way and only 6 Mhz. And the PCS H block is so tiny at 5 Mhz it can serve minor purpose at best. Yeah its worth some billions, but nowhere near what those estimated say. I would guess 10 billion if companies are feeling generous and want to put in the time commitment to standardize AWS 4.

      • Anonymous II

        The only reason Dish participated in the PCS H block early this year cause it was used as a bargaining chip towards the FCC to extend and convert its existing ambitions and buy out a carrier since there is a time frame to put it’s existing spectrum to use. Dish never wanted to bid for the PCS H block.

        • Anonymous

          Exactly. So what did they get? They got a meager 5 Mhz PCS that they were forced to buy to get an extension to build out their AWS 4 which NOBODY supports. Theres not enough time in eternity for a non wireless company who has no nationwide tower network to deploy on same new LtE band that doesn’t even exist and with ZERO support from equipment manufacturers. It is like totally amateur hour over at Dish. I mean what do they expect to do with the time extention? Do they think time will magically create a robust equipment selection for them kn a brand new non existing LTE band? Do they think towers will magically start popping up to support it? Theyre going to have to spend billions in building out a new network, creating a new band, and then creating devices for that band which would be largely proprietary. They realkze the equipment problem and thats why they tried to shoehorn AWS 4 into the unified AWS 1-3 band and failed. Ideally this spectrum does belong in a wireless providers hands because Dish is incapable of understanding how to standardize or use the spectrum but it sure isnt worth anywhere near that estimate.

        • Anonymous II

          They got the spectrum for fixed nationwide broadband service in and out of your home!

        • Anonymous I

          They got it for fixed broadband and the unlocking of valuation in the upcoming November auctions. Once Dish has a price, they will use it for T-MOBILE takeover.

        • Anonymous

          That AWS 3 auction has absolutely jack squat to do with Dishs AWS 4 valuation. AWS 3 is already unified into the combined 1-3 AWS Band being finalized by the 3GPP. You know, the standadd Dish tried and failed to shoehorn AWS 4 into? Its a rollout ready spectrum . That valuation nonsense is coming from Dishs PR to try to attach some price to its spectrum it cant roll out.

        • Mayhem ♤♢♧

          DISH can’t roll out its spectrum cause they don’t have a network to do it with. That’s why T-MOBILE a target.

          Why you so worried T-MOBILE being bought out from Dish? If you have the service or not go somewhere else. It’s called competition IDIOT!

        • DirkDigg1er

          In 2012, Dish was offered network hosting deals from both T-mobile and Sprint. Dish held out because they wanted more leverage.

        • Anonymous

          They got jack squat. Yeah they got some unbanded un equipment supported spectrum. What are they gonna do with it? They have no devices, they have no towers, they have no network. All of these require billions in infrastructure. Even if fully built out, if it was them on their own sitting on a new LTE Band just for AWS 4, theyd have measely equipment selection due to economies of scale. And Im telling you they dont have the user base or the network to go out on a band by themselves. So is there spectrum valuable? Yes, but to a wireless provider who can, you know, ACTUALLY STANDARDIZE THE BAND AND ROLL IT OUT. And thats why that evaluation is bogus.

        • itguy08

          You forget one thing – Dish rolls its own hardware. They are Echostar which manufacturers (or at least designs) all their STB’s. They know how to do RF. They know how to manufacturer (or contract it), so using a “new band” is not that hard for them as they already have vast experience in RF from the satellite side.

        • Next Generation

          I conquer! Dish has DishNET and HughesNET. Echostar (owned by Dish) leads the industry in award winning STB’S. They know how RF works. Check out Dish’s CES 2014 in Las Vegas.

        • anonymous III

          I’m glad someone paying attention to the details. Bunch of anti-Dish haters! Stock holders run the show here, not a bunch of spectrum uneducated talkers.

      • DirkDigg1er

        That’s one of the reasons we’ve heard no plans of deployment in the last 2 years. Outside of fixed broadband, AWS 4 may be is very limited. 700 E block could be used for TDD LTE roaming 6mhz could aggregate well with Sprint’s EBS/BRS spectrum. H block 5×5 slice is further limited because it has no guard band between Sprint’s G block.

    • DirkDigg1er

      What an analyst ‘believes’ doesn’t turn $hit to sugar. She values AWS 4 = AWS 1 which is definitely a REACH.

      • Anonymous

        Why would Verizon be interested in Dish’s spectrum if it’s worth $!ht?

  • Mike Palomba

    I have a question not about dish buying tmobile but about the uncarrier event. I don’t live any where near there but I want to watch it. Do they do any type of live stream where people can watch it?

    • sushimane

      Theres always a link for anybody that wanna watch it.

      • Mike Palomba

        Where can I find it?

        • sushimane

          Its gonna be posted on the website just comeback on the 10.

  • Anonymous III

    Verizon Wireless is very interested in buying Dish Network’s spectrum, The Post has learned.

    A top Verizon executive told a group of insiders in the last few weeks that the country’s No. 1 wireless carrier was eyeing the lucrative spectrum owned by Charlie Ergen’s satellite-TV company, a banker with direct knowledge of the conversation said.

    Analysts have estimated Dish’s spectrum could be worth as much as $17 billion.

    A second source close to the companies said the two companies have held informal, early talks about the spectrum.

    Verizon’s appetite comes only weeks after it tried to quiet deal rumors.

    CEO Lowell McAdam on May 20 said during an investor conference that Verizon was not interested in buying the $27 billion Dish.

    “I don’t think owning a satellite company is something I’m interested in at this point,” McAdam said.

    The CEO did not address Dish’s valuable spectrum.

    Acquiring the bandwidths would help Verizon better stream videos in urban areas.

    Plus, much of Dish’s spectrum is complementary to spectrum Verizon presently owns, a source said.

    Much of Dish’s spectrum is important for short-range Wi-Fi communications.

    The pressure may be building for Verizon to act soon.

    The Federal Communications Commission last month set guidelines for selling government-owned spectrum and imposed rules that would make it harder — and more expensive — for the New York telecom to compete in those fall auctions.

    “I would try like hell to skip those auctions,” a telecom expert said.

    Buying Ergen’s spectrum would be a way to avoid that process.

    Verizon might also be pushed to act sooner rather than later because, according to a recent analyst report, Dish soon might make a bid for T-Mobile, taking its spectrum off the market.

    JPMorgan analyst Philip Cusick this week put forward the possibility that Dish might buy T-Mobile.

    Ergen too might be motivated.

    If he sold his spectrum for $17 billion, Dish’s shares could rise from $59.81, their closing price on Thursday, to roughly $70 a share, a source said.

    Also, Ergen has until spring 2017 to connect 40 percent of his spectrum, or will need to return it to Washington.

    It would cost Dish more than $10 billion to activate all of its spectrum.

  • Pinky&Brain

    Mr Ergen betting his downlink spectrum will be worth his gamble after November auctions. He will sell it or use it for borrowed money as a takeover bid for TMO.

  • Jen_Ballard

    Nooo! Not Dish!

  • Anonymous III

    LightSquared (“LS”) owns 51MHz of frequency spectrum, the majority ranging from 1525 MHz – 1559 MHz. A significant portion of their spectrum has been largely rendered useless due to widespread interference with existing GPS signals.

    Recent plans to emerge from bankruptcy focus on a FCC waiver application for 20MHz of spectrum (same as that granted to DISH) and approval to allow sharing of an additional 5 MHz of contiguous spectrum with the Federal Government, in conjunction with a $3 billion restructuring.

    Although this creates a spectrum footprint sufficient to operate a network (20MHz uplink, 10MHz downlink), albeit lopsided – up/downlink proportions, we question the LS “stand alone” plan’s viability due to extensive capex requirements, lack of telecom expertise and their ability to comply with regulatory-imposed minimum coverage threshold timelines to build out the network.

    The situation is further complicated by separate but connect litigation that asserts DISH’s Ergen improperly acquired distressed debt of LS while simultaneously negotiating to buy the company. DISH would likely be able to use 20 MHz of LS’s spectrum as uplink-only as paired with DISH’s 40 MHz of converted MSS spectrum to create an AWS-like 60 MHz paired block that would more than double to present value of the 2 GHz spectrum as it is now positioned.

    DISH has since abandoned its bid for LS and now intends to acquire 15 MHz of unpaired AWS spectrum in the upcoming AWS-3 auctions to be help later in 2014. DISH also now owns 10 MHz of PCS spectrum,it recently acquired in an FCC auction, which is positioned adjacent the MSS spectrum it already owns,