Fastest Mobile Networks 2014 is happening, get testing your T-Mo phones with Sensorly

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Every carrier likes to claim that it has the best network around. And John Legere likes to point out that most claims are based on old, paid-for “independent” testing, and that in real life use, T-Mobile has the fastest LTE network. Data from Ookla’s SpeedTest.net would suggest that Magenta users have it good, and it’s only going to get better.

But now’s your chance to contribute to an official survey to find out who really has the fastest network. In partnership with Sensorly, PhoneDog, TmoNews, PCMag and others are teaming up for this year’s Fastest Mobile Networks test. That means three test cars will be driving around the country, carrying several smartphones and performing tests using the Sensorly app. Cities including Chicago, Portland, and NYC will be visited. But for the first time, they’ll also be taking in to account real-user tests.

We know you guys are passionate about T-Mobile, and we know who really has the fastest network. So, let’s prove it. If you want to contribute, all you have to do is download the Sensorly app for iOS or Android, and get testing. Links to both apps are below.

Google Play: Sensorly
App Store: Sensorly

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  • milanyc

    Well, let’s get it going! http://i.imgur.com/hcAg2zW.jpg

    • http://www.volkswagen.de/ Quailallstar

      Dang! Are you sitting inside a TMO tower? LOL That’s awesome!!!! Atlanta’s speeds aren’t that quick unfortunately. The speeds I have in D.C. are as good as yours.

      • eneka

        I’m in LA county and I’ve gotten that speed in multiple places. When I first saw it I have to double check to make sure I wasn’t connected to someone’s WiFi! http://imgur.com/P4Zl7kd

      • TheVorlon

        Sensorly seems to show faster speeds than Speedtest or Root Metrics apps which makes me question their accuracy.

  • besweeet

    In addition, Android users should map their drives and areas with Sensorly to get a good idea of signal strengths and which types of data speeds are available in certain areas. That will be important when seeing which 2G areas have had HSPA+ or LTE tacked on.

    • Garblicks

      How do you do this

  • Avent468

    I’m a yellow cab driver in NYC and today on Madison ave. and E131 St ,I was surprised because when i run speedtest on my samsung galaxy note 3 I got 57.4 mgb down and 18.8 upload.
    That’s amaizing.

    • SEBA

      Keep running the tests!

      • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

        Or rather, don’t! T-mobile shouldn’t rest on any laurels and keep on working hard to provide the best service for the best price. Its coverage lacks in breadth and performance and this should shame them into remedying it.

        • Trevnerdio

          It’s just to prove to those others guys that we’re the fastest. T-Mobile can rest on speed for a moment, they’ve got that covered. If we stayed at these speeds for the next 2 years while they focused on coverage, I’d be ecstatic.

    • JosephLagalla

      That sounds like New York made it to 15+15 or 20+20. Any way you could check?

      • Trevnerdio

        *#0011#

        • JosephLagalla

          Moreso asking if avent could do it. I won’t be back in New York for some time.

        • Trevnerdio

          Ah, sorry about that.

  • bkin94

    where i live in dayton, Tmobile has their slowest LTE in all of ohio. I usually only get 5-10 Mbps. Where i go to school in mount vernon, I only get edge coverage outside (about 0.1Mbps if i get any data at all), and no coverage inside. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to contribute much to this test :-(. But when they do expand LTE coverage to where I am, you can count on me to map it ruthlessly!

    • scot509

      They just bought a ton of spectrum in Ohio…previously they owned very little! Look forward to faster speeds.

  • Cam Bunton

    Okay, so no one test unless you’re in Dallas. ;-)

    • Paul

      I’m on it, Cam.

  • Paul

    Y’all com’on down to Dallas and see what it’s all ’bout.
    I just downloaded the app and will be testing throughout the Dallas area.

  • stl user

    getting 24-33mb downloads and 8-15mb uploads in the st louis area

  • Austin

    I wish this would happen after the full 2G conversion. Cause it’s still EVERYWHERE.

  • Brian Bloom

    From inside my house (Portland, OR): 8.14 Mbps down, 0.83 Mbps up. Will have to try outside and see if it changes.

    • Trevnerdio

      Don’t you dare post that ;)

      • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

        Or rather, do, in order to shame T-mobile into fixing that.

        I have zero commitment to T-mobile and expect full commitment to me, the paying customer. Why would I invert our positions and pay for it?

  • Alex Di Giacomo

    And as always, Windows Phone gets ignored.

    • Not one of three

      I’m sure all three of you are really out out by this. :)

      • Alex Di Giacomo

        Such a comment reveals a degree of misinformation and “fanboyism” that is not even worth addressing further. If one doesn’t have something intelligent and useful to contribute, one should always refrain from making comments that are more aligned with the behavior of a forum troll. That’s the basic rule of being respectful in a public forum and sadly, it is very frequently overlooked.

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          Well said. Now, repeat it before a mirror.

  • Alex Zapata

    Good thing I’m on Windows Phone…..

    • Jason

      If it makes you feel better there isn’t a blackberry app…lol jk

      • Alex Zapata

        Not sure if your comment or this glass of wine is comforting me. B-)

        • sahib102 .

          blame it on the juice !

      • Startswithaj

        There might not be an actual Blackberry app but those with 10.2.1 can still get the Android version of the app. I just downloaded it to my Q10 via Snap.

    • sahib102 .

      +810 I was thinking the same thing :)

  • SEBA

    Tmobile will be number 1. Att customers can’t afford over 50MB of limited data to run speed test

    • Trevnerdio

      Seriously though…I run through 70MB just doing one test. Glad I have unlimited.

  • Marcoshay

    I live in a city that has edge. Yuma, AZ. Probably don’t want to post my result.

  • FILA

    42Mbps down in Lancaster PA. or 32 down in Bel-Air MD. This shit is faster then my comcast at home

  • dm33

    There’s great coverage in my city…. except at my house where I get edge if any signal at all.

  • TubaMan

    I’ll make sure to post plenty of my edge only speeds here. Gotta be fair!

  • D Nice

    I have a question. I currently reside in Greensboro NC and the coverage here is pretty good. I only average between 2- 6mbps on the LTE side. When i’m in Jamestown or any other surrounding towns which may be on the HSPA+ network I may get anywhere from 13-20mbps. I run speed test and sensorly on a regular basis and it has been the same since I have had TMO service going back into July of last year. I have even tested this between three devices, GS3, GS4, and the Nexus 5. I have called TMO customer service several times to no avail. Is anyone experiencing anything similar?

    • Singleweird

      tmobile customer service is not a room full of engineers. those people have no idea what is going on with coverage, and they shouldn’t. bandwidth is controlled based on congestion, which is affected by users’ phones preferences and ability between hspa+ and LTE. theres nothing wrong with the network – its giving you the best speeds it can.

      • D Nice

        I’m very familiar with the role of a CSR and I know they are not engineers. However it is a department called tech support where those same reps that are not engineers very well could look into any given area right down to the cell site to see if a problem is prevalent. That is the whole reason I called in the first place. I understand the whole bandwidth is based on congestion aspect. Let’s remember this Carrier says they have the fastest LTE, 2-6 Mbps please I was getting these speeds on Verizon’s 3g network yes I was expecting a little more. Also I don’t exactly live in a bustling city where congestion could be a problem, in fact I’m a night owl I have been up and 2-3 am before and would do a random speed test just to test the speed to root out congestion same 2-6 Mbps. I don’t know I’m not bashing TMO here just wishing them the best I just wish my speeds would be a little faster that’s all.

        • TB

          First and foremost, you were not getting more that 3 down on verizon 3G, heck I’ve only seen 2.9 down on the networks of those kind (CDMA 3G Rev. A). Secondly, He hasn’t used sprint 1900 LTE yet has he? Whole 1900 LTE network is 5×5 and delivers that on a good day peak in some areas. Now Sprint Spark is a beast (giving credit where it’s due). Verizon LTE AWS layer is blazing (but all new networks are ‘blazing’). AT&T still is a kind for the 700 deployment though every at&t phone I’ve used still camps on their AWS and uses it most.
          Here in florida t-mob’s pushing DC-HSDPA over to a 1900 10mhz and leaving just 5 mhz on the AWS 1700/2100 band for the hold outs who never upgrade (yes they’re unknowingly slowing network advancement, *cough cough Cincinnati*). This [cannibalization] is allowing wide band (15mhz to 20mhz channels) to pop up under the radar here in Orlando and Daytona. I regularly get 50 down / 15 up on the beach. DC-HSDPA still delivers 14 down / 2 up on-peak usage. Both good enough

  • Stillwating

    My pleasure to post my slow 4G Hpa speeds, will see where that gets us…

  • TheVorlon

    Why is the new TmoNews pushing Sensorly when the old TmoNews reported that the carriers are referencing user tests from the Root Metrics app?

    • philyew

      Seems like you missed the article(s) in between when TM rejected Root Metrics results as being both outdated and slanted towards the carriers that paid for them.

      TM now prefers crowd-sourced studies such as Speedtest.

      • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

        RootMetrics is both crowd-sourced and crew-tested. The reports are crew-tested, but the maps are crowd-sourced.

        • philyew

          It was the crew-tested reports that TM took issue with.

  • an0nim0

    If they really want me to participate, they should stop counting Sensorly speed tests against my bandwidth cap (like T-Mobile did with RootMetrics last year); Sensorly can use upwards of 100 megs per test… I’m not blowing my allotment on that.

    • Whine Moar…

      We really feel so very badly for you. I mean really…what was TMobile thinking?

      Were they thinking if you wanted to badly enough you could get an unlimited plan through them?

      Were they thinking that maybe others in your area might have unlimited and use this?

      What a slap in the face, right? I mean; how could they possibly consider this if it doesn’t include and cater to *you*??? The nerve…

    • Singleweird

      unlimited data is 10-20 bucks more. get it.

  • Jay J. Blanco

    I’ve been using Sensorly for 2 years. Lol

  • Jason Crumbley

    North Las Vegas is doing pretty crappy right about now. LTE with sub HSPA+ speeds.

  • Deez Nutz

    Now if they can get better signal penetration in buildings. I was in a furniture store in the basement level of a mall and my wife’s Verizon iPhone 4s was able to make and receive calls no problem while I had zero reception (not even 2g or whatever is the lowest possible signal). I guess that’s the tradeoff for saving $30/mo.

    • besweeet

      That’s their plan by early next year if you live in one of their 700A spectrum-covered areas.

    • Singleweird

      TMO is 3.4 billion dollars poorer because theyre fixing that.

  • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

    Sensorly requests too many permissions, some of dubious usefulness for a speed test. I’ll stick to RootMetrics instead, which uses just the right amount of data to get the measurements and doesn’t request as many permissions.

    • Singleweird

      wait you DONT have unlimited data?

      • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

        No. For $30 I get 5GB and extra $50 to get unlimited data is just not worth it when I seldom use even half of that. I certainly don’t intend to blow it off measuring the speed.

        • Jason

          if you don’t even use 2.5gbs why are you worried about how much data a speedtest app is going to use? LOL

          I agree permissions are intrusive but thats why you run a privacy manager

          Your not blowing your left over data anymore efficently by just letting the month expire and data cap reset….

  • Logan S

    Don’t bother with LTE. Let’s talk Edge or GPRS. From DC metro area, where LTE is abundant, drive out 30 minutes to an hour, and one would get Edge or GPRS or nothing, on major highway such as I-66 or I-81!! Millions of cars drive on this route. Shame on T-mo for not spreading out far enough from the metro area. Plenty of us urbanites go on road trips, you know.

    So, always have a backup connectivity and don’t rely on T-mo powered smartphone even for short trips – no more online maps, no more streaming music unless you stay very close to urban areas. Don’t bother running Sensorly, obviously.

    • Nick

      I’ve noticed this on T-Mobile for a long time. If I drive 10 minutes west of where I’m at, I have GPRS……That’s right GPRS. With Verizon I have LTE almost EVERYWHERE I go. This is only about 1 hour outside of Chicago.

      • Jay J. Blanco

        T-Mobile whole footprint will be lte soon. So that won’t be a issue in summer 2015

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          So that is an issue in summer 2014.

        • superg05

          they said half of current edge

    • philyew

      You obviously missed the recent announcement that TM will be bringing LTE to their full 2G footprint by the middle of next year.

      • Logan S

        You obviously missed what the article said, “But for the first time, they’ll also be taking in to account real-user tests.” That means NOW, not “in the middle of next year.”

        My point is, why bother “driving around the country” with Sensorly if there is hardly LTE coverage just 30 minutes out of a major market area?

        • philyew

          Since the Sensorly exercise is completely independent of TM, the point is that it will get an array of results for ALL carriers from the managed exercise AND from real user tests submitted from the app.

          Until your last sentence, your comment appeared, and indeed was, entirely unrelated to what is actually described above regarding the exercise being co-sponsored by this site. It was a standard gripe about the size of TM’s 4G footprint, expressed in terms which didn’t acknowledge that they were already committed to a program to bring LTE to their complete footprint in little over a year.

    • itguy08

      While there is plenty of EDGE out here (Looking at you Carlisle, PA and T-Mobile!) you can still navigate using online maps. It’s just slower to update. I’ve used Waze plenty of times around here and out the PA Turnpike which is also EDGE Heaven and it works fine.

      You can forget any streaming but for basic things – maps and even to look up a place to go it’s doable.

      • Logan S

        Ok, I was on Rt. 108 near Olney, Md. That’s a suburb of DC not too far out. It’s got pockets of LTE. But at that particular stretch – nada data, even though voice was fine. My S4 GPS wouldn’t lock for many minutes. Got home and fixed the xtra GPS setup, ready for standalone mode next time this kind of crap happens.

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          Since the GPS signal has nothing to do with the carrier, but with satellites in orbit. You’re probably in an area blocked by mountains or tall trees.

        • philyew

          aGPS systems on smartphones get their starter data from the network.

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          The full GPS almanac may take almost 15 minutes to get from the satellites, when getting it from the network is much faster. However, this information is only needed if GPS has been off for about a week or it’s been turned on thousands of miles from where it was last used.

          Otherwise, only the shorter ephemeris data I’d needed and takes less than a minute to get from the satellites before the position may be fixed. Then, even without the network, the GPS is capable of working in no time.

          Since the poster above was in the vicinity of his home, it’s unlikely that it was the first case and it was probably an issue with the terrain to block both cell and GPS signals.

        • philyew

          I merely responded to your statement “the GPS signal has nothing to do with the carrier”, which is not entirely accurate when it comes to aGPS systems. While the signal itself does of course emanate from the satellite, its acquisition is assisted (hence the “a” in aGPS) by the network.

          As a former Samsung Vibrant user, I learned some very painful lessons about aGPS and took time to research the issues contributing to that device’s woeful GPS performance, so yes, I’m familiar with the functions of almanac, ephemeris and network delivered data.

          Here, however, you are making some basic assumptions that cannot be supported. The OP said he was in the area of Olney, MD, but had earlier said he was a DC “urbanite”. That puts him sufficiently far away from home for any stored aGPS data most likely to be unhelpful.The route to which he referred doesn’t pass through any hills and while there are trees, there are also some wide open spaces.

          I just ran a quick test on my N5 which normally takes only seconds to get an accurate GPS lock. Having switched off network access, I flushed the aGPS data and tried to get a lock while standing in the open air. I gave up after several, fruitless minutes. Turning network access back on, it took about 20 seconds to get a lock. The network does have a very direct bearing on smartphone GPS performance.

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          It seems that Olney is merely 30mls from DC, so the data gathered before the last use should be current up to 4h. If the GPS was not disabled on the phone, Android will refresh the GPS data every couple of hours or so.

          But your test does not reflect the condition I pictured; you shouldn’t have cleared the GPS data. That was not what I assumed about the OP’s situation. If you get a fix with the network, you can still get a fix without it in no time, as long as the GPS data is current. By clearing the data, as I said, it would take about 15min to get a fix without the network.

          I actually suspect that the OP blamed the poor performance of the navigation app due to a poor connection on the GPS. So the problem was perhaps not getting a fix, but showing the location on a road map, which can be quite frustrating in a moving car, when the app is constantly trying to get new map data.

          It’s actually one frustration I have about Maps. It should be able to work offline, like Apple’s equivalent app.

        • philyew

          You may well be right that the inability to download online map data was the real problem. However, inaccurate ephemeris data will slow the acquisition of a fix and even 30 miles will result in some inaccuracy, leading to delay.

          Doing a cold start test is a worst case scenario, I agree, but it’s quite possible that was what the OP was experiencing, if he had just switched on his GPS after an extended period without use.

          The bottom line is that you cannot dismiss the network from consideration when GPS issues are encountered.

          The offline facility with Google Maps is feeble, I agree, but there are enough free and low-cost offline navigation apps for Android now for that not to be a big deal. You just have to remember to have the right maps loaded before you get out of cell coverage ;-)

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          If the ephemeris data is not current, it takes less than a minute to get it from the satellites. However, the ephemeris is orbital information about the satellites. Each sattelite stays in view for about 2h, but enough satelites to get a fix stay in view for up to 4h. Mere 30mls wouldn’t require new ephemeris data.

          But you’re right, I cannot dismiss the network from consideration. I stand corrected.

        • Logan S

          The ephemeris data was not current, stupid me, hence I when I got home I reconfigured my phone to keep it up-to-date as much as it can without costing much (e.g, auto update when connected to wifi or ac power).
          If network was available, then a-gps would have got me going quickly. The road was wide open, clear view of the sky, yet it’s 30-40 miles from my house where I last used the map the night before to plan the trip. I even had offline map ready, but useless if the GPS can’t pin down current location.

    • TechHog

      I love how people complain about this on completely unrelated articles, yet never show up on the articles talking about the fact that T-Mobile has already committed to doing exactly what you’ve asked and to have every tower they can migrate to LTE fully migrated by the end of next year.

      • besweeet

        It may have been appropriate if the post had a reminder of the 2G -> 3G & LTE addition project.

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          If and when they do that, years past due, I’ll give T-mobile some slack. Really soon is not now. Here and now, T-mobile sucks outside the urban perimeter of most cities. Even where I live in the suburbs I can’t quite get even 3G. We all know that and that’s why almost none of us, T-mobile customers, is a traveling salesman.

        • TechHog

          They are doing it already. This stuff takes time. It’s not as simple as flipping a switch.

        • http://rosarynovice.stblogs.com/ Augustine

          If promises mattered to me when choosing a carrier, I’d be a Sprint customer.

        • TechHog

          Then leave until it’s done. It’s that simple. They’ve already started doing it and are progressing at a good pace. They’re doing everything they can do at this point. They can’t go back in time and fix everything. Stop crying over spilled milk.

        • Scoop003

          I can say, from my own experience in the Boise area, conversion from 2g to LTE is already starting to take place. It’s obviously still needing to be fine tuned, and they could definitely use some 600mhz spectrum from the next auction to help with penetration. But just because Sprint is full of S*** doesn’t mean all the others are also. They’ve pledged to have their entire network covered in LTE by 2015, and they’re definitely making tons of progress towards that, unlike other carriers. I left Verizon for T-Mobile in August, before there was LTE here, because T-Mobile’s HSPA+ was three times faster than my Droid DNA on LTE, and I went into three different stores to test it before deciding to switch because of my hesitations about their network. To each his own, but from my experiences so far, T-Mobile has been excellent, and continues to grow their network. Hell, I just went to Ontario this weekend for work. When I was there last month, I couldn’t get LTE in the building at work, I was able to get 3 bars of an LTE signal this weekend. Just another sign to me that they’re growing their network.

        • jeremyvbk

          And where was this when sprint was deploying Network vision? Still can’t get slack until its done. Guess what Tmobile coverage sucks. It doesn’t matter what “may” happen, as it can change.

        • TechHog

          I never criticized Network Vision, so I don’t really care. My point is, don’t pretend that T-Mobile is standing still. They’ve accomplished every goal they’ve set out to do in the past year. Taking things with a grain of salt is fine. Attacking them when they are doing exactly what you want them to do is childish. It’s already started, and progress is ahead of schedule. The only thing that could kill it is the potential Sprint merger. I’ll ask one last time: what is it that you people want, and why won’t you speak with your wallets instead of b****ing here?

        • jeremyvbk

          I never pointed at you specifically. In general people complained about sprint while they were deploying. People don’t care about tomorrow. They want it now. Simple as that. What matters is thebteat are going on now, now in 2015. 2015 sprint will have a bunch more band 41 LTE out, but that doesn’t matter now.

        • TechHog

          Okay. Just don’t act like they’re not doing anything at all. That’s my point. It’s fair to not want to switch to a company until it’s done, but saying “they need to do this thing” and attacking them for it when they’re already doing it is just being stupid. I mean, what do you want them to do? Go back in time? Find a genie?

        • Singleweird

          its not 2g to 3g & LTE. its 2g to LTE.

        • besweeet

          Not necessarily. Many areas already seeing 2G upgrades are seeing a layer of 3G/HSPA+ added.

        • Singleweird

          then it will be upgraded to LTE by the deadline.

        • besweeet

          Correct.

      • Logan S

        How is it unrelated? From the article: “…. three test cars will be driving around the country, carrying several smartphones and performing tests using the Sensorly app”

        That’s exactly what I was alluding to in my comment. Driving from DC metro, just 30 minutes out. Yeah, let’s go out driving with Sensorly today! But what’s the point if what I see TODAY is mostly Edge or even GPRS?

        The article doesn’t say anything about doing this next year, mind you.

        • TechHog

          You said “shame on T-Mobile” for not doing something that they’re actively working on…

          I really don’t understand what you expect them to do. Suddenly get the entire country covered in LTE right this moment?

        • Logan S

          No, but I can still say “shame on T-mo” for being late in the game. Sadly, on those occurences, I called to the back seat and asked my son to turn on his hotspot on his.. Sprint phone.
          Hey, I’m no fan boy of any providers, so I don’t defend them. I used to work for one of them. It’s fair game to criticize them while still having reasonable expectations.

        • TechHog

          They didn’t have the money for this until after the breakup fee, and even then taking care of metro areas first obviously makes more sense. I don’t understand how you expect T-Mobile to be able to do everything Verizon and AT&T can do with far less money and spectrum, but okay.

  • John

    I get 72Mbps here at La mirada, CA!

    Not bad, not bad at all…

    • ⓜ@®!ⓞ G@®CI@ ™

      75Mbps in my gym Covina Ca and 65Mbps at my house in South Gate

    • Omar Boyer

      East la 90022 ,60 dwn, 15 up o_0 I never seen speeds this high on tmobile before I even have screenshot to prove it!! Go down to montebello speeds still in the 55-60 range I guess tmobile really has fastest lte cuz my friend on att lte gets up to 10 dwn tops, verizon 25 dwn tops.

  • pezman726

    Awesome. Let me go get this app for my Windows pho….aw man. Nevermind.

  • CJ

    That app is fake, where I live and work it said I have no lte from no network and that’s not true.

    • Singleweird

      the app is fake? what?

  • Paul

    This was yesterday evening. When driving the speeds vary based on what part of town I’m in, time of day in reference to tower congestions, and such.
    These are from my apartment and the center and right are from the night when fewer people are on the tower(s) near me.
    During rush hour I average 20-30 Mbps when driving from work to home, and vice versa. Otherwise, I average 60-90 Mbps from my couch, which depends on the time of day.
    http://www.paulstrength.com/ScreenSpeed.gif

  • Guest

    I tested all evening after work into the evening. During rush hour I’ll average 20-30Mbps on my commute. At home I average 70-90Mbps from my couch.
    Of course, the speeds are reflective of tower traffic and such.
    http://www.paulstrength.com/ScreenSpeed.gif

    • Chris

      Holy crap highest I see is like 30Mbps in Detroit…

      • Paul

        Yeah, I’m in a 2×20 market, Dallas area.

        • Joe P

          I’m in Arlington, right by Six Flags. I tend to get 25-40 down and 8-15 up from where I live.

  • Nick Ramacciato

    6.37 Mbps download, 1.39 Mbps upload. They call this “4G” in New Rochelle, NY. I find it to be so funny, how I get 4G LTE in other places but not in my own city. Such a shame..

    • jWgIzMo

      i’m with you Nick. Mine are terrible in Virginia

    • Luis Espinal

      Same here I never get LTE in NR!

  • Guest

    Here’s what I got last night in Frisco Texas, just north of Dallas. I don’t think there’s a lot of people on my tower. I average 70-90Mbps in my apartment, and 25-35Mbps on my communte.
    www dot paulstrength dot com/ScreenSpeed dot gif
    I’m running the trip portion of the app and speed testing where I can.

    • Startswithaj

      I’m a little jealous. I was getting 30-35 in Lodi, CA(which is a little south of Sacramento). Tonight though it’s more like 20-25. :(

      • Paul

        It depends on the time of day and the tower location. The tower near my apartment is probaly lighter on traffic. The closer I get to large groups of people, like malls or bars, the speeds slow a bit.

  • notyourbusiness

    Figures this app isn’t available for Windows Phone. I would love to give it a try on my Lumia 925. Does it count if I run it on my unlocked AT&T HTC One? I’ve gotten good speeds on T-Mo with it, even in my house.

  • Mike

    Too Bad this app sucks. Lol

  • TMo_Spencer

    I use the Nokia Lumia 925 and I recently ran a speed test and was hitting about 57mbps in Arlington TX just South West of Dallas.

  • jWgIzMo

    Speed here in Hampton VA SUCK i get 6.92 down and 9.83 up in my house. In town center 8.96 and 10.97 respectively