TmoNews Reviews The Samsung Galaxy S III

With full disclosure in mind, I’ve had the Galaxy S III in my possession since June 20th, a day before it “launched” on T-Mobile’s network. After some traveling and busy work thanks to keeping tabs on all the Google I/O news, I’m finally reading to put thoughts to paper and bring a comprehensive review of Samsung’s flagship handset. There was plenty of excitement leading up to the Galaxy S III launch, thanks in no part to Samsung’s excellent ability to keep quiet all the real-deal details that we would finally learn on May 5th. Samsung’s Galaxy S III is already a success around the world, thanks to millions and millions of pre-orders and it’s already a success in the US, even before it launches on the nation’s top four carriers and US Cellular. If you don’t take the time to read on into the rest of the review, I’ll give a spoiler: the Galaxy S III is amazing, in almost every way, it’s fast, it’s got a beautiful screen, it’s large and in charge. The only hiccup I have with this device is the ergonomics, and I’ve already discovered that I’m well in the minority by questioning how comfortable it is to use a phone of this size for prolonged periods of time?

Specifications:

  • 4.8″ 720p (1280 x 720) Super AMOLED display
  • Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich
  • 5.38″ x 2.78″ x 0.34″
  • 4.7oz
  • HSPA+ 42Mbps connectivity
  • 1.5GHz Dual-Core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processor
  • 8 megapixel rear camera with LED flash, 4x zoom
  • 1.9 Megapixel front-facing camera
  • 2GB RAM
  •  16GB and 32GB internal storage options
  •  2100 mAh battery
  •  Wi-Fi calling
  •  Available in Metallic Blue or Ceramic White
  •  S-Voice
  •  AllShare viewing on compatible big screen TV
  •  Smartphone Mobile Hotspot

Pros:

  • Beautiful hardware
  • Excellent 4.8″ screen
  • HSPA+ 42 speed
  • Great battery life
  • Smooth TouchWiz experience

Cons:

  • TouchWiz is love/hate
  • Size of device may turn some off
  • Lots of bloatware
  • S-Voice needs a lot of work
  • Hardware button is backwards step

Hardware:

There is no question that Samsung produced a beautiful smartphone, well deserving of its flagship status. It’s a worthy followup to a worthy successor in the Galaxy S II, with Samsung taking everything that made the SII awesome and improving on it. The “plasticky” feeling of the Galaxy S III is at first, questionable based on the price and top-billing of the device, but it only takes a few moments to recognize this is one solid piece of hardware. At no point during the testing did I ever stop to think about the GSIII being plastic again. It simply never crossed my mind other than the first moment I held the smartphone. 

The first thing to grab your eyes is the screen and for good reason, at 4.8″ it takes up around 90% of the front of the device and it’s bright and vibrant. The other discernible addition to the front of the device is the single hardware key that doubles as the home key. This is a step forward, or a step back depending on your view of physical menu keys, but it’s still a notable addition to the device considering the Galaxy S II had no physical keys. The rest of the front of the device has two capacitive buttons in the form of a menu and back key, along with a front-facing camera on the top. The right side of the device sits the power button, with the top of the device belonging to the headphone jack. The left side of the Galaxy S III sports a volume rocker leaving just the bottom of the device and the MicroUSB charging port. The rear of the device shows the speaker, flash and 8 megapixel camera along with T-Mobile and Galaxy S III branding.

There is no question this is a sleek device with a super thin profile. It’s noticeably thinner than the Galaxy S II and while the screen may be 0.03″ larger, the footprint of the device itself seems to be the same as its predecessor. In other words, the screen got taller, not wider allowing for the the Galaxy S III to leave the same footprint in your hand as the Galaxy S II. That said, the thin body of the Galaxy S III meant it “felt” wider in my hand, even if this isn’t really the case. That’s not to say the phone felt bad, on the contrary, it just felt a little larger but it was definitely all in my head.

The size of the screen is the one place I may end up being on the receiving end of some flack. I’m not one for devices with a 4.8″ display, and one hand operation of the Galaxy S III posed some issues for me. Granted, I’m not a big guy and I can’t palm a basketball hence why I say I may be a minority opinion here, but on a few occasions, I wonder if the Galaxy S III was pushing the size envelope. On a similar note and don’t ask me why, the phone felt more comfortable to me operating left-handed than it did in my right hand. I’m a right-handed guy and this should make absolutely no difference whatsoever, but I felt better with the phone in my left hand. Strange? Definitely.

The Galaxy S III is a powerful phone, there is no doubt about it, and while there is plenty of raging debate over the Snapdragon S4 vs the Exynos processor, I was hard pressed to find any slow downs in the Galaxy S III, partly thanks to the 2GB of RAM Samsung kicked in before launch. A quadrant benchmark score of 4551 outpaced the HTC One S score of 4314. How big of a real-world difference is that? It’s negligible but still, you can take comfort in knowing you’ll be hard pressed to hit the limits of what this Galaxy S III model can do.

Perhaps one of the best pieces of hardware news here is the removal battery thanks to an easy-to-remove back cover. Unlike the HTC One S and its built-in battery, you can change batteries on the Galaxy S III at will and given that T-Mobile’s hardware is the EXACT same as the rest of the US carriers supporting the device, accessories and extra batteries should be plentiful.

Software:

The Galaxy S III comes right out of the box with Android 4.0.4 and a lot of TouchWiz. Samsung added in a number of additions to the device and some of them are really great. I’ll spend hours raving about Pop-up Play and a little less time talking about S-Voice, which gave me as many right answers as it did frustratingly bad responses. When I reviewed the HTC One S, I called Sense 4 the “best-looking Android overlay now on the market.” I’m sticking to that, though TouchWiz is certainly improved over the many iterations we’ve seen in the past few years.

Your first bootup greets you with the standard TouchWiz look, including an Accuweather widget, Google search widget and another row of icons. A quick swipe to the right shows off Samsung’s Media Hub and the Galaxy S III music player right below that. Moving to the right again we’re greeted with the S Suggest widget which highlights recommended popular applications. If you go left from the home-screen, you’ll find the once Galaxy S III exclusive Flipboard application along with another set of four icons right below it. Another swipe to the left introduces some T-Mobile exclusive widgets with their standard “Bonus apps” widget on top, T-Mobile TV in the middle and a row of T-Mobile exclusive apps right below it including Visual Voicemail, Mobile Hotspot and Access T-Mobile. Needless to say, there isn’t as much bloatware on this device as we’ve seen on other devices in the past, and widgets are easy enough to flick away.

Chrome comes preinstalled and that’s no surprise, given that it’s arguably the best browser on Android and as of last week, the future default browser in Jelly Bean and future Android iterations. I’ve left the default images in the review, but my first move with the device was to install Apex Launcher, hit mycolorscreen.com and go to work personalizing the device and removing all traces of TouchWiz.

As for the overall “feel” of the software, the 2GB of RAM coupled with the dual-core Snapdragon S4 processor powered the Galaxy S III through everything I could throw at it. At no point did I ever feel calling this device “slow” was applicable, this is a powerhouse Android phone and arguably the most powerful Android device in the world.

All totaled, I counted 49 apps and I believe less than 10 can’t be removed or uninstalled.  Unlike AT&T or Verizon counterparts, the T-Mobile version of the Galaxy S III includes 50GB of Dropbox storage good for two years and you can bet I took advantage of that right away. That’s double the storage the HTC One S offers right out of the box and thanks to both those devices, I’ve reached 125GB of storage in my Dropbox account. Along with the addition of expandable microSD storage, the Galaxy S III has plenty of storage options and you should absolutely never run out of room.

Performance:

It’s hard not to take a look at the Galaxy S III and wonder how it performs in the real world. While I’ve already touched on the lack of any noticeable lag, it’s worth a separate section to talk about just how great the Galaxy S III performed day-to-day. We’d be remiss however, if we didn’t touch on the US variants of the Galaxy S III didn’t have the Exynos processor swapped out for 2GB of RAM and the Snapdragon S4. There was plenty of debate prior to release as to which processor is better day-to-day, and I’m happy to say that the Snapdragon S4 performed admirably. I haven’t had the chance to observe an Exynos unit side-by-side to see just how “real world” the difference is between the two processors, but I’m guessing it would be negligible to the untrained eye. The Exynos may be said to perform just ever so slightly better, but the Snapdragon S4 is polished and beautiful, it never stuttered or staggered when loading games, multitasking, or using the internet.

The bottom line is that there is little reason to think the Galaxy S III won’t handle everything you could throw at it, and we’re confident that when Samsung and T-Mobile bring Jelly Bean to the SIII, it’ll run as smooth as “Project Butter” can allow.

Camera:

Update: I’m putting together a separate post with camera and video samples. 

The Galaxy S III camera is easily one of the best we’ve ever tested and that’s definitely saying something. Coming on the heels of our last review, the HTC One S and it’s camera, the Galaxy S III has a lot to live up to as a top billed smartphone on T-Mobile. With a 8 megapixel camera, f/2.6 lens and the ability to lock exposure and focus when holding down the shutter, the Galaxy S III performs very well. There is almost no shutter lag and it’s performance is easily on part with the HTC One S.

The Galaxy S III includes what feels like some now de-facto standards for Android cameras including scene mode, macro focus, face detection, white balance, autofocus, panorama mode, HDR, burst shot, smile shot, anti-shake, and a timer. These days, Android smartphone cameras seem to have the same set of robust options as the point and shoot crowd of digital cameras.

If we have one caveat on the Galaxy S III camera, it was video mode and the continuous autofocus of the camera. It was subtle, but noticeable to us while filming and while autofocus is a feature we don’t mind in video, on some videos it appeared to try autofocusing more than necessary. The rear camera features 1080p video, with the front-facing camera capturing in 720p. The Galaxy S III camera sits at the head of Samsung’s current cache of phones by far.

As I compare to the HTC One S, I also compare all smartphone cameras these days to the iPhone 4S, my favorite smartphone camera on the market. The Galaxy S III, like the HTC One S comes close, but still doesn’t get “there.” In this regard, it’s all personal preference and my choice of the iPhone 4S camera as the “best” in my own personal smartphone staple has little to do with OS and more to do with the resulting shots as they appear on my screen. All that being said, if I removed the iPhone 4S from the available choices, the Galaxy S III and HTC One S both provide great shots for a smartphone camera and the list of available features on the SIII mean you’ll have plenty of options at your disposal to capture the “perfect” image. You’ll likely never be let down by the SIII camera so long as your expectations for a smartphone camera don’t reach DSLR quality. I was more than pleased with color results, indoor and outdoor quality along with low-light shots. I’m not a professional shooter, so phrases like “purple-fringing” and various exposures and white balance are a foreign language to me. I judge photos by looking at them on my computer and if they look good, I’m happy. In that regard, the Galaxy S III was more than impressive.

Speed:

Unfortunately, I managed to delete some early tests of the Galaxy S III I took right when I received the phone, but tests I took today thankfully introduced the same set of awesome results I’ve become accustomed to in my area. Speeds exceeding 20+ Mbps on T-Mobile’s 42Mbps are normal for me inside my house and around the Palm and Broward county areas of South Florida. In fact, of the tests I took today, only one registered a speed below 20Mbps.

While I wish I had the first set of test results to compare, the results from the second round of speed tests tell me everything I need to know, the Galaxy S III is a speed demon. I’ve long thought of the Galaxy S Blaze 4G as the resident “top dog” on T-Mobile’s HSPA+ 42Mbps network, but I believe it’s now been dethroned by the Galaxy S III. This is definitely the fastest device I’ve used on T-Mobile’s network and the most consistent. This device grabs hold of a signal and never lets go. It’s an easy recommendation on the speed front.

Call Quality and Battery:

Call quality was excellent, the speaker is loud and the signal holds on for dear life. I could absolutely end this entire section on call quality right there. The Galaxy S III is a knockout device that easily shows all that the T-Mobile network can do and does it with great call clarity.

Battery life on the Galaxy S III was again, very good. The 2,100mAh battery-powered the device through a single day, though I’d be pretty close to empty by midnight. The Galaxy S III is billed as having 8 hours max talk time, 300 hours max standby time and I’d say I got pretty close to 8 hours of total use. It’s always hard to determine a perfect review of battery life as I tend to us the phone more than I would in everyday life as I test out the bevy of features. Still, I have no concerns over powering through the day on the SIII. If you’re worried, thanks to Samsung leaving the SIII untouched across the globe, picking up extra batteries and chargers are easy to make sure you never have to worry about running out of juice.

Galaxy S III Extras:

From its introduction back in early May, the Galaxy S III was billed as having some device specific extras that would really help raise the profile upon launch. Among those are S-Voice, Popup Play, S-Beam, and Allshare. While I’ve only had time and opportunity to test the first two, I’ve heard plenty of positive news about the second two. 

S-Voice is one of those things that we want to love, did love in some regard and in others, knew right away it needed a lot more work. I have to wonder how I may have talked about S-Voice if I had written and posted this review pre-Google I/O but that isn’t the case and Google Now has easily stolen the Android voice assistance show. Comparatively, S-Voice looks like a beta compared to Google Now and that’s not to say it’s completely bad, but it definitely has a lot of maturing to do before I’d put them on equal playing fields. The question I have now is, where does Samsung take S-Voice from here? Google Now is a feature included by default in Jelly Bean and it’s going to be a feature almost every Android user will want. Samsung won’t be able to keep it out in favor of S-Voice, the negative feedback roar from their user base would be heard in space. Samsung has a lot of work cut out if they want to keep users focused on S-Voice over Google Now, but for the moment I have no idea how they are going to do that.

All that said, S-Voice performed well for me when I threw it some basic questions, not so well when I tried to raise the game. Simple questions like “How tall is Michael Jordan,” or “What’s the worlds tallest building” yielded no results. I asked S-Voice to convert 12 pounds to ounces and it had no idea what I was asking. It did however nail the capital of Florida. S-Voice is one of those things Samsung should emphasize is still a work in progress, because features like S-Voice, Google Now and Siri are terrific things to have on a smartphone and voice assistance is likely going to play a larger role in our future.

As for Pop-up Play, which allows for watching a movie or video while checking email, surfing the web or sending a message worked exactly as described. In fact, I couldn’t help but be impressed by how cool it was, even if it’s really just a novelty feature. Is this “real” multitasking on a smartphone? Maybe, but it’s certainly cool. Pop Up Play only works with video that plays in Samsung’s native video player, so it won’t work with something you might watch on a third-party program, but that doesn’t take away from how distracted I was while watching videos and sending emails. A very cool feature.

Conclusion:

If we take price out of the equation for the moment, the Galaxy S III is easily the first smartphone on T-Mobile you should look at. When we kick price back in, the HTC One S becomes a more attractive option, especially if you loathe TouchWiz, or are fearful of the Samsung’s size and don’t care to spend that much more money. Samsung offers great bang for the buck however, its beautiful screen, amazing T-Mobile network speeds and superb camera make it a tremendous value, even if it’s priced higher than the competition. There is little question that once you put the Galaxy S III in your hand, it’s going to be tough to put it down, so consider yourself warned.

 

 

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  • Get_at_Me

    the gs3 does have expandable storage

    • http://twitter.com/007KCz 007KC

      yes, I think it has sdcard slot

  • Needspeed64

    No expandable memory?

    • Drax

      The Galaxy S3 has a microsd slot that you can use to increase storage.  Should support the 64GB variety

      • Needspeed64

        I am just pointing out the Cons that David had listed in his review.

        Might want correct that.

        • http://tmonews.com David

          It’s already been corrected.

  • BigMixxx

    Fabulous phone. Imma wait until I see what other options are coming…

  • TheReder

    Where’s the price difference? If you’re a savvy enough consumer, you know to buy this beauty from a third party outlet. Given the equal ground in price, GSIII is hands down the phone to own on T-Mobile.

    • Dumbazz

      PREACH IT! 
      These whiners need to give it a rest. 

    • CrankyBear

      I bought mine from Costco, $250 (before taxes and upgrade fee) with no mail in rebates.

  • biggerguysf

    It’s a great phone, but one I’ll probably end up getting from Sprint.  As a longtime TMO customer, I was appalled that my cost for the 16gb version would be 329, not 279.  That is my full discount for upgrade, which is ridiculous.  The 32gb would be 379… over 450 after taxes and shipping.  They gotta be kidding!  The lack of support for their upcoming LTE network is the icing on the cake unfortunately.

    I look forward to checking out this phone on another network.

    • Johntaajacobs

      Sprint has only announce 15 markets for lte and the current gsiii is lte but no lte network. So have fun with that slow 3G and two year contract. Hope your market has lte lol

      • Dumbazz

        Ya looks like he just stepped in a foot of cow dung. 

    • Dumbazz

      Look princess. You DONT HAVE THE MONEY. That is not TMOBILES fault. The fact that you post this KNOWING that Walmart has it for $198 makes you look really douche. 
      Go to another carrier! Your monthly bill WILL QUICKLY eat away at that $50-$80 you saved. 
      Just admit that you can’t afford it instead of crying like biotch. 

      • biggerguysf

        Is there a reason why you’re being such a dick when you don’t know me, dumbass?

        • HalfwayCrook

          its was pretty funny actually, and slightly true

        • HalfwayCrook

          its was pretty funny actually, and slightly true

    • kahlayoh

      Try purchasing at tmo.com, last time I did that…I wasn’t charged for taxes or shipping

    • fixxmyhead

      sprints data network is a JOKE (have u seen the speeds). either ur retarded or dont know any better.

  • biggerguysf

    Reply to TheReder: Costco will give the best price I’ve seen (249) for existing TMO customers with eligible upgrade.

    • Scapegrace

      Walmart, $198

    • TheReder

      Walmart has it for $198.

  • Joe Allesi

    Nice latency in that speedtest. 1000+ms is bad news for real-time apps and/or tethering.

    • Trevnerdio

      True, but this is a brief glimpse. Starting off, the ping usually sucks and then it gets better the longer you’re streaming something.

    • Rudy Belova

       My amaze does that in speedtest.net’s app too. Just as often as above. But, for my amaze, its very deceiving. I have no problem doing groove ip or other voip apps and if i do a manual ping tethering, i get very very good pings. Im thinking that speedtest.net’s speedtest servers somehow have pings deprioritized on tmobile. (does that make sense?)

  • Jay_blade_88

    Wait, wait, wait… no expandable memory? The T-Mobile Galaxy SIII DEFINITELY has an SD card slot for expanding memory. So its not possible for it to be a con of the device.

    • http://benpike.net/ Ben Pike

      Funny how that bullet point just disappeared…

  • Ozzie1p

    That’s a huge bitch!

  • bwinger79

    SO.MANY.TYPOS. Cant even read the article. That said…its nice to know the Galaxy S III is noticeably thinner than the Galaxy S III. Proof read plz.

    • whiteiphoneproblems

      Given the gist of your comment, I can’t resist pointing out that you typed “Galaxy S III” twice… ;)

      [EDIT] Oh, I see now — that’s an example of a typo that you took from the article, and you were just being snide.

      • Dumbazz

        But David didnt type it like this idiot presents it. I guess this assclown has never made a single mistake in his life. 
        This guy is the type of jerk that everyone is HAPPY TO SEE LEAVE at a party. 

        • http://tmonews.com David

          I don’t know where that line appears either, I just re-read the entire review and couldn’t it. I did make some other corrections, but I couldn’t find the one in question here.

        • whiteiphoneproblems

          It’s in the 3rd paragraph under “Hardware” — you write, “It’s noticeably thinner than the Galaxy S III and while the screen may be 0.03? larger …” (I believe you meant “Galaxy S II”).

        • Dumbazz

          Its the second paragraph below the pic of the back of the SG3. 
          “It’s noticeably thinner than the Galaxy S III “

      • bwinger79

        “Galaxy S III” is correct. Here…check out Sammys site. Also nice try….but #FAIL. At least you finally got it tho….appreciate the [EDIT]. :)

        http://www.samsung.com/global/galaxys3/media.html

    • Dumbazz

      HAHAHAHA! Mr Judgmental douchenazi cant even go 3 sentences without a typo. 
      I would say if you wrote this article there would be 20x’s the typos. 
      HAHAHAHAHA! 

      • bwinger79

        With all due respect….I am not paid to write articles fuckhole. Had you understood anything I wrote, you would have understood that my typos were also intended. Nice try mental midget.

        • WW

          I believe that David isn’t paid to write (here) either.

  • Johntaajacobs

    Nice but i’ll pass. I wanna see a Sidekick Lte Lx or some other hot lte phones

    • fixxmyhead

      lol are u like 12?

  • Jay_blade_88

    How is the hardware button a step backward? One of the “other” smartphones that for some reason still holds a huge market share has a hardware home button which won’t be going away anytime soon.  I think it’s a great idea because the soft keys are NEVER as accurate as they should be and often times stop working at random times.

    • http://tmonews.com David

      That’s why I wrote it’s a matter of opinion if it’s a step backwards or forwards, it’s preference.

      • rschauby

        I honestly went into this thinking I would love the hardware key but it didn’t take long to figure out I hated it. It is such a step backwards from haptic soft keys. It takes effort to press, where soft keys are simple and quick. Also, considering how many people will put a case on their phone, this small button located right at the bottom edge is damn hard to press. It is one of my biggest complaints about the phone.

      • rschauby

        I honestly went into this thinking I would love the hardware key but it didn’t take long to figure out I hated it. It is such a step backwards from haptic soft keys. It takes effort to press, where soft keys are simple and quick. Also, considering how many people will put a case on their phone, this small button located right at the bottom edge is damn hard to press. It is one of my biggest complaints about the phone.

  • Awt

    mine didn’t come with Crome pre-installed, but it is available from the Google play store……..

    • Dumbazz

      Jelly Bean will begin with Chrome stock. 

  • N1oty

    The GS3 roots easily, too.

    • Trevnerdio

      It does. I rooted mine day two

  • Jaygqitalia

    Dude you rush to write this? You messed up quite a few words on here

    • Realcool2000

      Jaygqitalia, Did you rush to talk trash? You sound like quite an ass on here….

      Dave, nice review. You mentioned that sg3 beats the one s in processor score, but sg3 is clearly slower than the one x, shown in the score pic.

      Anyway, I will now mispel hoping to annoy Jaygqitalia.

      • strikr12

        I got a score of 4950 with my gs3 beating the one x. can’t rely on benchmarks all that much really

  • Guest

    Good luck getting JellyBean

    • Napster87

      already have it :) thanks though.

    • Dumbazz

      Need a tissue princess?

      • None

        Princess line is getting old.  Please get some new material.

  • wam

    How is the signal reception? Every Samsung phones ive ever used, the reception is not great.

    • fixxmyhead

      placebo effect

      u just think that

      • None

        Maybe you are holding it wrong.

  • BahamasGeek242

    Thank you for the review.   I still think the Nexus is the only way to go when it comes to Android

  • Sancha

    I am using this phone and i like it, compared to my 4s i digin android features. 

  • http://twitter.com/Oli718 Orlando Freytes

    Thanks for that Quadrant screenshot.  My phone was only getting a score of 3000 until I realized power saving mode was on.  Once i disabled that, my phone is running at incredible speeds and GTA3 is finally running smoothly!

    • rschauby

      Same, but I got 5100 after I cleaned a few things up

    • rschauby

      Same, but I got 5100 after I cleaned a few things up

  • Psaux

    I don’t understand the hardware-button hate.  They’re great for when the digitizer IO handler gets backlogged.

    • rschauby

      It’s difficult to press given how small it is and how close to the bottom edge. And good luck pressing it easily with a TPU case or any other that protects the bottom edge of the phone.

  • Dumbazz

    Eyeing the Galaxy Nexus especially after the intro of Jelly Bean. That would also allow me to buy it outright and save some money on my monthly TMO bill. I probably wont pull the trigger for awhile though so maybe come November google will have more phones sold direct that will work with TMO! 

  • Noor Mahmoud

    Nice review! Though unfortunately I am going through the hassle of getting an international galaxy s 3. 2 important things to me have been gimped on the U.S. version. The hdmi-out performance is about half that on the us version as the international version, and the international version has the wolfson dac which my audiophilic nature must have.

    • niftydl

      I can’t believe there are so few high quality DACs on high end Android phones. I am probably going to import the European version and live with 2g until the refarm happens.

    • NotNoRmAL

      I dunno… most folks wouldn’t be able to stand the 2G speeds on TMO on the international version. Plus, there’s a lot to be said for the 1 extra GB of RAM on the US versions.

      • Noor Mahmoud

        T-mobile has the 1900mhz frequency in a few areas, because of the iPhone, and I think my area is one of them. Even if it isn’t, it will get it soon. 21mbps is good enough for me, and the 1gb of extra ram really does nothing at the moment considering the way android manages memory.

  • Dave Clary

    I stopped in a T-Mo store to look at the S3 because I’m thinking of putting several lines on a value plan. Unfortunately, my phone only works on T-Mo’s 2G network. It’s tempting but I can’t go back to a phone that small. So where’s the T-Mo Galaxy Note?! :-)

  • Duck Dodgers

    I was thinking my GS3 felt better in my left hand too David.  I don’t know if that is because of the on/off button or not, which I can push easier with my left then right.  But the phone does seem more comfortable in my left. Yes it is strange indeed

  • qwqwqwqw

    Just wondering, does anyone else gs3 overheat alot.

    • Duck Dodgers

      Yes my GS3 gets rather hot below the battery when I read my RSS feeds and surf the web for a period of time.

    • sharklover

      It does get warm but nothing compared to the One S. The One S could almost burn you it got so hot.

    • Abe_The_Babe

      Ya mine does get hot below the battery as well, and I’m trying to figure out when it does this. I First I thought it was from the screen being on too long but then I watched a 20 minute Ted talk and it wasn’t hot. Now I’m thinking it might be when it’s constantly trying to find reception when I’m in a building or bad coverage area..

  • Better

    why does this fun have better speeds

  • GS3

    nice review… yes the gs3 feels great in the,i’ve played with it at a store.. im getting it soon l, i was close to getting it while i was there ,but decided to hold off for a little while, im trying to time it for a special occasion .. lol..

    just wanted to mention… has anyone gotten the latestplay store update? it now has magazine subs…. i like that.. google is just too awesome… lol

  • http://twitter.com/TattonPhillips Tatton Phillips

    I have the S3 and loves it, unfortunately i am seeing lag and i use the task manager continually to clear ram and kill tasks. Im a Android noob (coming from HD2) and have no idea what roms are out there to upgrade to so i just what what the phone comes with. I must say that i love this phone and is highly impressed. 
    great call quality, great speaker, great battery life, great camera, beautiful screen ..

    btw buy if you need a case, check out INCIPIO case.

    • bleeew

      To quit an app you press the back button. If you press the home it will only leave the app in the background. It should stop most lag.
      Roms are someting you put on you phone if you dont like the touch wiz ui to put htc sense ui or just regular android with no bloatware(apps that tmobile puts in and ruins battery life and speed). The bad side of roms is that you need to be rooted. They are easy to install once you know how to use it.

    • bleeew

      To quit an app you press the back button. If you press the home it will only leave the app in the background. It should stop most lag.
      Roms are someting you put on you phone if you dont like the touch wiz ui to put htc sense ui or just regular android with no bloatware(apps that tmobile puts in and ruins battery life and speed). The bad side of roms is that you need to be rooted. They are easy to install once you know how to use it.

    • Tmo_Fan

      go to galaxys3root.com they have all cool stuff to make your phn better I cnt wait to get mines next week hurry up UPS!!!! lol good luck

    • zp

      LAG!?  F.  The android lag continues.

  • RioMann

    Thanks for the review. I just wish I could get one but the stores are still out.

    • Taron19119

      Call customer service I just got a 32gb

  • JDM

    I’ve never owned a Nokia phone, but I understand that Nokia phones offer superb reception (they pick up and hold onto signals very well). Might I ask how the SIII might compare with a Nokia phone in that department?

  • Tibaron21

    I went to the t mobile store just to look at the GS3. The second I saw that beautiful screen it was over! I looked at my HTC sensation and waived goodbye and bought the galaxy s3

  • Charles Berry

    The S3 at my local Walmart Had the S3 for 198.00 for the 16gig, where T-Mobile had it for 279.00.  I do not know why there is such a price difference, but I have seen conversation on the S3 forums on XDA stating the same.  Needless to say I bought one, I mean who wouldn’t for $80 cheaper than T-Mobile and with no rebates.

    As a side note, I absolutely love my phone.  I have been able to go upwards of 14 hrs, medium use and still had 40% left.  Just before this I had the S2 and with the ICS update, it was smooth, but when I first turned on the S3 and compared the ICS experience, and the S3 even with the new Touchwiz was absolutely a beast.  As David said, the camera is top notch and as far as Rooting, it was absolutely a breeze.  Currently there are only two or three ROM’s for the T-mobile version, but I understand that the At&t and T-mobile versions are interchangeable as long as you do not change the kernel or Modem.

    All In all I would HIGHLY recommend this phone, especially if you can find it in your local Walmart.

    • TMOTECH

      Because Wal-Mart is probably getting a better price from Samsung and /or Wal-Mart has bigger pockets to subsidize the device. Probably both due to Wal-Marts size and scope. 

    • rwc1792

       I just got it for 199.00 from Bestbuy’s rewardzone mobile store, same no hassle rebate issue.  Went with this device over the One S, size didn’t seem to be an issue.  Looking forward to putting my Vibrant out to pasture.

  • Charles Berry

    The S3 at my local Walmart Had the S3 for 198.00 for the 16gig, where T-Mobile had it for 279.00.  I do not know why there is such a price difference, but I have seen conversation on the S3 forums on XDA stating the same.  Needless to say I bought one, I mean who wouldn’t for $80 cheaper than T-Mobile and with no rebates.

    As a side note, I absolutely love my phone.  I have been able to go upwards of 14 hrs, medium use and still had 40% left.  Just before this I had the S2 and with the ICS update, it was smooth, but when I first turned on the S3 and compared the ICS experience, and the S3 even with the new Touchwiz was absolutely a beast.  As David said, the camera is top notch and as far as Rooting, it was absolutely a breeze.  Currently there are only two or three ROM’s for the T-mobile version, but I understand that the At&t and T-mobile versions are interchangeable as long as you do not change the kernel or Modem.

    All In all I would HIGHLY recommend this phone, especially if you can find it in your local Walmart.

  • Hectordones8

    lol nice but ive gotton abut the same with my galaxy S2 on the speed test were i work befor no biggie for me.

  • Hectordones8

    lol nice but ive gotton abut the same with my galaxy S2 on the speed test were i work befor no biggie for me.

  • sharklover

    Has anyone else found the wifi range is not very good on the S3? I love the S3 I think i it so much better than the HTC One S was. My only complaint is the wifi range is not very good. it is much worse than the One S and blackberries.

  • sharklover

    Has anyone else found the wifi range is not very good on the S3? I love the S3 I think i it so much better than the HTC One S was. My only complaint is the wifi range is not very good. it is much worse than the One S and blackberries.

  • Maritza323

    Got this phone from tmobile returned it cuz I had no 3g/4g service in my house in LA Only had1 BAR of slow edge Got the at&t version now I have full bars of LTE iN MY house

  • slayr

    Have had SIII for over a week. Upgrading from Vibrant is like going from a bicycle to a fancy sportscar. Calls are crystal clear, websurfing and apps are turbocharged. Photos are a little blurry but haven’t yet mastered feature. Can’t keep my hands off it. Lived up to hype and my expectations.

  • Ricky Martin

    Many people have been anticipating the Samsung Galaxy S III for some
    time. There is some criticism about the design, but Samsung hit all the
    right notes for this smartphone in terms of power and hardware. The
    Samsung Galaxy S3?s battery life isn’t quite the best, but it is one of
    the better ones

  • Arvin

    i will never buy a non nexus phone ever again gnex forever !!!!!!!! 

  • MatthewMurawski

    The way the hardware looks is a con.

  • JBLmobileG1

    Well I didn’t think I would give in to this phone from my Amaze 4G but I did. Just the other day I received a special card in the mail from Tmobile for Loyal customers which would give me $200 off any phone. Long story short I am getting the 32gb. Blue Samsung Galaxy S 3 with express shipping and tax for a little over $201. Not a bad deal if you ask me…. not to mention my actual upgrade wasn’t officially up until September. On one added note…. over the past few days I have called Tmobile about this phone and EVERY ONE of the reps were very courteous and helpful and none of them seemed to be from a call center from overseas. So I must say whoever decided to try to excuse Tmobile of moving their call centers to other countries… why not actually call Tmobile next time? Personally I believe their prepaid and old kid connect accounts may be overseas but that Is it.