T-Mobile Confirms New Domestic Data Roaming Plans, Posts FAQ

While it’s been up for a few days, we just got word of a FAQ in T-Mobile’s support forums highlighting the upcoming changes to their domestic roaming policy beginning on April 5th, 2012. Most importantly, this FAQ confirms our leaked information that such changes were taking place along with any material changes to the Terms and Conditions of your contract term. So why is T-Mobile making this change?

“To continue providing the most competitive pricing options in the industry, T-Mobile has chosen to introduce a domestic data roaming allotment on all data plans. Very few customers will use enough domestic data while roaming to be impacted by this change. Domestic roaming allotments are used across the wireless industry and so this is common with other carriers as well.”

It’s a quick but interesting read as T-Mobile highlights that only a very limited number of customers will actually be affected by this policy. This FAQ reminds customers that most importantly, you aren’t charged anything extra for data roaming, you’ll just be limited in how much off-network roaming you can use. For those of you who do a lot of road tripping around the country, it’s a document worth looking at.

T-Mobile

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  • Theabunai

    “Does this change impact my Rate Plan, Terms and Conditions of Service or my contract term with T-Mobile?
     
    Yes, this notice amends your Rate Plan to include the specific data roaming allotment associated with your plan and revisions have also been made to the Terms and Conditions of Service. Please consult the Terms and Conditions for more information.”

    Does this mean you can cancel your contract without ETF ??

    • Anonymous

      Probably not. The only way that would apply is if it effected you financially. Since they make it a point to say they won’t charge you any more, they closed that loophole.

      You can always try, but it’s doubtful it would work.

      • http://twitter.com/WillieFDiazSF William Diaz ?

        It affects you financially because prior to them cutting off your data and putting a defined limit, it was included in your plan under the allocation that it would be 50% of your usage. 50% can vary to more or less and technically, T-Mobile now is limiting you. They are giving you potentially less in your contract agreement, yet making you pay the same amount for less than previous.

        Changing the Terms and Conditions is only legal if BOTH parties agree, if one does not, it doesnt hold up in court.

        • Anonymous

          As a former manager I can tell you if it meant letting people out of contracts T-Mobile would not be making these changes, it would not be worth it.

          T-Mobile defines materially adverse as changing your set monthly charges, not changing what you get for that amount. For example if they changed the price of your text plan they would consider that materially adverse. This change does not affect what you will pay per month so they will not offer an etf waiver. It is similar to when they started charging a reconnect fee for partially suspended accounts, it only affected customers that did not pay their bill on time. This change will only affect customers that decide to go to roaming areas and use excessive amounts.

          Not saying I necessarily agree with it, but having been on the inside of the company I can guarantee you 100% they will not be waiving any etf’s for this change.

        • http://twitter.com/BruceCLin Bruce Lin

          How do you explain Nicholas Moore’s post.

        • Anonymous

          I explain it by the fact that I worked there and have had first hand experience with these types of changes. I also look at the fact that it would be a stupid thing to do to allow everyone out of their contract right before an all phones free sale coming up knowing how many would take advantage of it.

          This is similar to to when they changed the data cap from 10gb down to 5gb on all plans, including grandfathered. They sent out letters, many called in to be let out of their contract, no one was. I know because I took a lot of escalated calls that month.
          If you don’t believe me go ahead and call Tmobile or spend the time and money to go to small claims court. T-Mobile has plenty of precedents were the contract was upheld in the wireless carriers favor in these instances.

          Your wireless bill is the same now as it was before. You can still roam with data on a partner, the only change is if you use it excessively it will turn off until the next cycle. You’ll still be able to use gps and connect via wi fi if your phone is capable. 

        • WillieFDiaz

          There was already an excessive clause written into the contract, now they are changing the terms and limiting something that was stated and set at a varied limit on the excessive clause. That’s a change to the contract no matter how TMobile claims its not.
          Wanna go further? By TMobiles own words only 0.5% are abusing this clause, clearly TMobile didn’t enforce the excessive terms as they had the legal obligation to do so, instead they want to lock people into a contract by changing the terms and put a hard limit on things that they simply could have confronted with those excessive users. So if only 0.5% is a small number to TMobile, why are they putting this limit in place if 99.5% of people have never abused it. Its an illegal change to the terms and I would easily win in court once the judge sees the paperwork and sees TMobile doesn’t find roaming an issue, but insists know changing terms of how much I can use for the same price I pay. A downgrade in service without a downgrade in price attached to my plan is a contract change I can’t legally accept and in my state, not obligated to do so.

        • Anonymous

          No I don’t want to go any further. If you truly believe T-mobile will let you out of your contract, by all means make the call. If you have the time to take a company to small claims court over a (at most) 200.00 fee for a change they made that has a 0.5% chance of affecting you at all, by all means knock yourself out buddy.

        • Poohnanny

          lol indeed, what a bunch of hoo hahs!! trying to take advantage of a clause that has obviously been looked over by hundreds of lawyers, yet people would want to spent thousands in small claims court just to have it nullified.  People can be so stupid sometimes it’s sad.

        • http://twitter.com/WillieFDiazSF William Diaz ?

          Steve - 

          I have put information below, based on the Terms and Conditions of when I signed my contracted agreement. In my state in particular, California, Terms and Conditions/Contracts can not be amended unless both parties agree to the changes. If one party does not agree, legally the new contract can not be upheld by either party. The original contract however, can remain valid through the agreed period of contact duration, unless both parties agree to nullify or void the terms. Any part of the new Terms and Conditions/Contract in question can not be imposed while the current contract is being upheld. I.E. Data could NOT be limited or disabled while roaming except where it applies to the current terms and conditions of the contract being upheld. 

          As you can see below, the statements are clear. Regardless if I actually CAN or DO roam is irrelevant as the provisions in the contract state that I am able to, I may, and I can use the data or voice networks as I chose, subject to the non-prohibited uses, and within the reasons of the statements below.

          T-Mobile must not read into their own terms and conditions properly. The terms and conditions to which your contract states

          “(B) WE MATERIALLY DECREASE THE SERVICE ALLOTMENTS WE AGREED TO PROVIDE TO YOU FOR YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE”

          Further stating that (in my particular contract I signed) 

          “We may limit or terminate your Service without prior notice if you no longer reside in a T-Mobile-owned network coverage area or if more than 50% of your voice and/or data usage is Off-Net for any three billing cycles within any 12 month period.”

        • Joseph

          Yep, if T-Mobile says it, that makes it true. First, it doesn’t. Second, the sale is BEFORE the contract changes. Third, it doesn’t. Fourth, there is no small claims court because they use mediators. Fifth, it doesn’t. Sixth, I can absolutely without question be let out of my contract. I cancelled my work contract and moved to Sprint when they changed my grandfathered unlimited plan to 5GB (exactly what you said they didn’t let). How? Well, customer service people like you are impossible to deal with and will claim (probably because you were told) to say “no” under all circumstances (I even had one swear she watched Netflix on here Android device about a year before it was released; I had said Jetflicks and she tried to mimic me). I didn’t get the answer I liked so I wrote them a letter. I was relieved of my contract. Two phones in fact. So please don’t parrot memos. They have no standing as far as contract law. The clause that is posted here is clear. Carriers take in account the very small number of people who will cancel vs. the money they will save in roaming fees. It’s that simple. For those who plan to get your contracts cancelled sans-ETF you will always get a no response. Write them a letter. That’s what I did. An actual letter in the mail.

        • TmoCSR

          if you accept the terms or sign the contract, you agree to what it says.

    • Nicholas Moore

      This excerpt is pulled out of their Terms and Conditions on their website. You may be under an older version but I doubt it is any different. You should be able to cancel your service without an ETF based on item B whether it affects you or not.

      WE CAN CHANGE ANY TERMS IN THE AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME. YOU MAY CANCEL THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (if applicable) IF: (A) WE CHANGE YOUR PRICING IN A MANNER THAT MATERIALLY INCREASES YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE(S) (the amount you agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging, which does not include overage, pay-per-use or optional services (such as 411, or downloads), or taxes and fees); (B) WE MATERIALLY DECREASE THE SERVICE ALLOTMENTS WE AGREED TO PROVIDE TO YOU FOR YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE; OR (C) WE MATERIALLY CHANGE A TERM IN THESE T&Cs OTHER THAN PRICING IN A MANNER THAT IS MATERIALLY ADVERSE TO YOU. WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH AT LEAST 30 DAYS’ NOTICE OF ANY CHANGE WARRANTING CANCELLATION OF THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (WHICH IS YOUR ONLY REMEDY), AND YOU MUST NOTIFY US WITHIN 14 DAYS AFTER YOU RECEIVE THE NOTICE, OR AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN THE NOTICE. IF YOU FAIL TO TERMINATE WITHIN THE RELEVANT TIMEFRAME, YOU ACCEPT THE CHANGES.

      • http://twitter.com/WillieFDiazSF William Diaz ?

        It really doesnt matter if it actually affects you or not. Contract is a contract, and changing the terms of the contract in any way that wasn’t explicitly stated previously completely nullifies the contract.

        • TmoCSR

          no, it does not.  read section 6 of the tmobile ToS.

    • Tbyrne

      Yes abuni. You can leave now. Thank God!!

  • Anonymous

    Ouch… :-(

  • Anonymous

    Did anyone get a notice in their latest bill? I just received my latest paperless bill and there’s no word on this change…. I wonder when they’ll start notifying customers?

    • Jehernandez4688

       Good afternoon, I just got by bill in the mail today and I did have an insert concerning this change. I did not read it because I had to get back to work, but I did get it.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry to sound behind the loop here but I was under the impression that roaming, be it voice or data, carried a charge if you used it here in the states. This is making me think there is no data roaming charge or does it depend on if TMO has a roaming agreement with which ever signal the phone picks up?  Is there a voice roaming charge?  I’ve traveled and picked up a signal by a cell company who’s parent company is Verizon.  I didn’t use the phone at all thinking I would be charged up the ying yang for a call and ended up lost for about 30min.

    • Schippma

      All of T-Mobile’s current plans and almost all legacy plans include free long distance, voice roaming, and data roaming, however, voice and data roaming are not unlimited features. T-Mobile can terminate your service if more than 50% of your data or voice services are used off-network in any 3 billing cycles in a 12 month period. However, data roaming is going to be limited going forward starting in April.

  • Jeff

    I just spoke with a customer service rep and was explicitly told that my data services would not be blocked off network after the data limit, just slowed down. She was very clear.

    • Anon

      Umm, that is incorrect information.  Working in tech support, it was clear to us that data will stop working once you reach your data limit.  Your data will start working again once reach your next billing cycle or until you are back in a T-Mobile coverage area.  I would look over the FAQ to get the correct information. 

      • Jeff

        I thought so. I even told her that the FAQ online was very clear, and she said no, I would just be slowed down. She said it three times. I was pretty sure she was blowing smoke, that’s why I posted.

    • http://twitter.com/guntrades guntrades

      Great, but that is not what they announced to their customers. and honestly, I would not rely too much on what a service desk guy/gal tells you when you have in writing that it will get blocked once the limit has been reached.

  • Jeff

    Is there any way besides trying to track it yourself to know what portion of your data usage is roaming? I spend a lot of time in the car all over the Midwest and frankly haven’t paid attention in the past as to what network I was on. I use GPS on my phone a lot however. I use anywhere from 1 to 3.5GB or more each month on a legacy Blackberry Enterprise unlimited plan and an old myFaves family plan. It looks like I’ll be limited to 100MB roaming, and I’m not sure if that would cover me or not. I travel for work and am required to have mobile email access. Having data suddenly turn off in the middle of a business trip is simply NOT an option, and will definitely result in a switch to another carrier, ETF or no. I am willing to pay more for data as I can expense a portion of my bill, but I CANNOT risk being shut off while roaming. There must be plenty of other people out there in a similar situation. If this doesn’t change, so much for trying to limit churn. I’ve been with T-Mobile since it was VoiceStream, but this will be a deal breaker. 

    • Schippma

      If you use GPS on your phone, it does not use the cellular network if you choose the option to use GPS Satelites under phone options. I use GPS all the time when I do not have a cellular connection (no service) displayed on my G2 while I travel the countryside.

      • Jeff

        I use Google maps, which depends on the data network to download the map, and won’t function without a data connection. 

        • Schippma

          You said in your OP that you use GPS and was answering that part for you. Google Maps will not work, however, without a connection as you stated.

      • Nearmsp

        so do you have map app installed in your phone? I was not aware that one could install a map app in the phone. I thought google downloaded the map as you drove around.

  • Dlehrke

    David, can we possibly get more information as this relates to cancelling our service and ETF?

    As someone who only roams every few months on a trip. I do not want to take the risk that I’ll lose google maps in the middle of nowhere. Thanks.

    • Jeff

      Exactly. Having data access on the go is why I have a data plan in the first place: for maps, local info, email, etc. If I didn’t plan on leaving the house, I wouldn’t need a smartphone data plan.

      • Dlehrke

        Sadly, I think that this is a situation where I would really encourage some kind of class action.

        What happened to T-Mobile not being abusive to their customers. It’s like all the other carriers woke up and realized that customer service matters, and T-Mobile did the opposite.

  • Anonymous

    Does anyone know how paperless billing customers are being notified on this change?
    Also, has anyone with paperless billing been notified on this change?
    I read an earlier post that people with paper billing are receiving inserts…

  • Anonymous

    Anybody know the best route to take to get the contract nullified? I have no plans to leave, but if I can get my contract voided out, that would be awesome. From what I can tell, T-Mobile is admitting this is a change to the contract, which means no ETF if I choose to leave. It’s just that I don’t actually want to leave.

    • Schippma

      Call T-Mobile, in the IVR, state ‘contract status.’ When you speak to Loyalty, ask them to void your contract due to the new data roaming terms. You may need to cancel your service in order to void the contract but it doesn’t hurt to ask Retentions.

  • Anonymous

    Anyone try to cancel their plan and not pay ETF? No need to post details since I’m sure T-mo reads these posts :)

  • OMG PlZ STOP!

    First off, I’m sure some of the people posting on here about canceling their contract and attempting to void it by a “material change”  are probably Sprint, ATT, or Verizon posers.  Now that that is out of the way the material change that adversely affects you would have to be something that affects you in your area directly. I’ve seen this before and it does happen, however, if you live in the city and they are not adversely affecting your coverage because you live in say Dallas or some other major city then that is not constituting a material change to you directly but only when you roam.  It would be possible to cancel if you are in an area with little to no coverage from T-Mobile however if that was the case then it could also be said that by this point you would have been canceled for excessive roaming anyways (which I have seen as well) in a non native T-Mobile area.  Third but not least, you signed a contract and you agreed to those terms,  it’s people like yourselves that call in and cry to customer care “Wah Wah Wah!!!” about how T-Mobile doesn’t treat you fairly because they don’t give you another $400 subsidy on a device that cost say $600 after only 4 or 5 months of service on your current phone and you have been with the company less than a year!  I can understand giving customers who have been with us over 5 years early subsidies because they have “PROVEN THEIR LOYALTY TO THE COMPANY” but the rest of you who haven’t are just trying to take advantage of the system.  If you aren’t happy under a contract try going to Cricket paying less (if not on a Value plan on T-Mobile) and pay full price for your phones instead there, if you ask them to allow you to put your 300$ phone on payments they will simply look at you and laugh at your face along with all the other carriers!  This is a business and as such T-Mobile and DT need to make money to stay afloat as quarterly losses and customer losses as well are unsustainable in the long term.  

    • Tbyrne

      Very good points!

    • http://twitter.com/BruceCLin Bruce Lin

      Your caps and the wall of text do not make your point anymore valid than the ones who were asking questions here. The fact here is that T-Mobile IS changing the TOS. It may or may not affect you personally, but it sure does for many customers including myself. 

      • OMG PlZ STOP!

        LoL!!!!! look at those three likes on all three posts as well, must be all three Sprint, Verizon, or ATT employees liking each others status haha.  That or it’s the same person liking his own status 3 times lol…..Get over it, you signed contracts dill holes.  Try going to the other carriers especially Sprint whom canceled customers accounts before for calling too many times to customer care lol!  Or how about Cricket who gives you 200 mins of roaming? You’re crying at T-mobile why?

        • None

          And you must be a T-mobile employee.

        • http://twitter.com/guntrades guntrades

          Award for the most idiotic response today…

    • Dlehrke

      No. I’m sorry but you’re so wrong. T-Mobile has no right to dictate how I use my phone. If I signed up for a contract that included something that I don’t typically,(or even EVER) use, that doesn’t give them a right to take that service away and leave the contract intact.

      I get to use my contract and various allotments however I want to.

      These company posters are really getting old. T-Mobile should just save the money they are paying people like you to post here, it’s not flying.

    • Aaron

      I am a T-Mobile customer for over ten years and will more than like stay regardless of my ability to cancel due to this change. But contract law is clear. I can cancel regardless of whether or not I can prove it has actually adversely affected me. I don’t need to prove that, for example, I would have used the data while roaming but didn’t/couldn’t because of the change. You are correct. I signed a contract (well, actually, I never signed anything) and I will abide by the terms of the contract that T-Mobile and I agreed upon. However, they changed those terms. Therefore, the contract, as it was signed (which includes the fact that they may have subsidized my phone) is no longer valid. They made the change. Not me. To be upset when people want to cancel a contract that is well within their rights is ridiculous. How many years did I pay for unlimited data when using a 2G phone and not be able to take advantage of it? As soon as phones were released that were able to utilize the data the carriers realized their mistake and couldn’t wait to limit us. That was their right and they were willing to lose a certain number of contracts as a result. I imagine they’ve crunched the numbers here as well. There will always be those looking for any way out (just as carriers do when you use too many roaming minutes, data, or whatever else). Most will not even care. One of my lines hasn’t had a contract in almost eight years and I’m still here. If I really wanted to leave I’d go. But T-Mobile changed the contract. Remember that. 

      • TmoCSR

        sorry to burst your bubble there but just because Tmobile changes something doesnt make it a breach of contract.

        section 6 of the ToS – “6. Our Rights to Make Changes. This provision, which
        describes how changes may be made to your Agreement, is subject to
        requirements and limitations imposed by applicable law, and will not be
        enforced to the extent prohibited by law. Your Service is subject to our
        business policies, practices, and procedures, which we can change
        without notice. WE CAN CHANGE ANY TERMS IN THE AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME.
        YOU MAY CANCEL THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION
        FEE (if applicable) IF: (A) WE CHANGE YOUR PRICING IN A MANNER THAT
        MATERIALLY INCREASES YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE(S) (the amount you
        agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging, which does not
        include overage, pay-per-use or optional services (such as 411, or
        downloads), or taxes and fees); (B) WE MATERIALLY DECREASE THE SERVICE
        ALLOTMENTS WE AGREED TO PROVIDE TO YOU FOR YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING
        CHARGE; OR (C) WE MATERIALLY CHANGE A TERM IN THESE T&Cs OTHER THAN
        PRICING IN A MANNER THAT IS MATERIALLY ADVERSE TO YOU. WE WILL PROVIDE
        YOU WITH AT LEAST 30 DAYS’ NOTICE OF ANY CHANGE WARRANTING CANCELLATION
        OF THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (WHICH
        IS YOUR ONLY REMEDY), AND YOU MUST NOTIFY US WITHIN 14 DAYS AFTER YOU
        RECEIVE THE NOTICE, OR AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN THE NOTICE. IF YOU FAIL
        TO TERMINATE WITHIN THE RELEVANT TIMEFRAME, YOU ACCEPT THE CHANGES.”

        • eYe

           I see  what you did there… guess what…. (and this is just my situation, not saying it applies to anyone else)
          I have 5 lines sharing 1000 minutes/month, free mobile2mobile and data on 2 lines.  Both my wife and I have to travel for our jobs every now and then.  She is only out once every couple of months but I’m out every other week. 
          My previous usage shows around 300 MB of roaming per month, her’s unknown.  Neither one of  us can be left without data at any given point of time… especially out of town, so 2 of our lines are affected.
          Now, if her and I do leave T-mobile and leave 3 other lines with T-mo… all of the sudden I pay more for the services and we don’t get to talk to each other using mobile2mobile minutes so other 3 lines are affected as well. 
          This may or may not hold up but I’m certainly going to give it a try… I’ve been with T-mo for 12 years and, eventhough the thought crossed my mind, never tried to leave.  This change WILL affect me and I’m really sick of not having decent data every time I go out of town so, I think I’m goint to Big Red.
          Good luck to everyone.

        • Jeffreyddwilliams

          Maybe you should read paragraph 6(b) again…it seems to have outweighed your intellectual limits

        • Angievel

          If you read what you pasted here, you will see that in fact T-Mobile is allowed to make changes, but that we are not contractually obliged to agree with those changes. IT IS IN FACT a breach of contract when they make a change that warrants a cancellation and they still bill the ETF. Duh. 

          1) They LIMIT service (also known as “materially decrease the service allotment)
          2) This is a term in which we are allowed to cancel without an ETF.
          3) We cancel.
          4) They bill the ETF anyway.

          It’s not that hard to figure out.

    • Tejanochris55

      Boy are you wrong.  You sound like a rep from tmobile.  I have seen my service decline and my bills keep going up.  Tmobile used to be good but I am really getting tired of dropped calls and getting shafted on my bill.

  • Radian23

    I wanted to chime in to discuss my situation and also what I was told by the rep at T-Mobile

    I currently have a sales rep position and I use my phone for work related calls and emails.  In my territory I roam quite frequently but never had a problem with this in the past as I was able to send and receive emails and place and receive calls.

    Due to this change I will likely hit the cap on my plan quite early in my billing cycle.  This will pose a serious problem in my ability to communicate with my customers.  Because of this I have pursued exiting the contract.

    It seems like a lot of people here think this is just a simple gimick to get out of your contract early.  For some of use this will have a major impact on the use of our devices.  I just wanted to post this to provide some perspective for people that may not see this as a big issue.

    I have reached out to customer service and they have noted on my account that they will waive the early termination fee.  

  • Radian23

    I also wanted to say that I wish these changes were not taking place.  I’ve felt that the amount I pay each month for service is great and the customer service that t mobile provides is heads and heels above what I’ve received from any other companies.  It’s actually quite a shame that I’ll have to select another carrier as I’ve been quite satisfied up to this point.  

  • David

    This is BS. I travel to Alaska from LA constantly as Alaska is the place of my birth and most of my family lives there.

    I have been a T-mobile customer for seven years and haven’t had a new phone in five years (I’m using an old jail-broke iphone), so I only get 2g speed even though I pay for 3/4g. Now I’m stuck in a two year contract because I’m on the value plan.

    So I’ll only get 50MB a month because Tmobile doesn’t cover that part of the map. How about this T-mobile, cover all of N. America. If you can’t, don’t penalize us.

    I pay for 2gigs. I should get 2gigs. You are about to lose my business.

    It’s not our fault you don’t cover all the major areas. If we had our way, you would. If you don’t expand your network then you have to pay for domestic roaming fees. Stop cheating the people that support you.

    David

  • none

    Just as a reminder, the network techs don’t introduce themselves to you. They don’t drive giant magenta trucks or even trucks with logos on them to be identified. Field engineers and RF engineers don’t talk to customers, they work in the background. 

  • priapism

    Now that this is official should we expect the ATT/TMO 3G Data Roaming Agreement to start around April  5th?

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/IHWQF64UYHGHOALDQAMULWCQ7Q Jesus Razo

    I just got off the phone with retentions and they said it wouldnt effect me, he said they told them during a training that if your line was required to have a data feature that this would not apply. I also mentioned what im reading and the wording sounds like ALL data plans are subject to this. Whose right and what im i supposed to do? I want out and want to go to Verizon because i need the data to keep working in my field whether im roaming or not.

    • KM

      I got major pushback from Loyalty as well. They insist that they cannot waive the ETFs and only Customer Relations can by writing to them. Total B.S. I actually had to fight with them recently about fraudulent charges on my account, and filed complaints with the FTC and FCC. I got a letter back from a customer relations executive today, so I’ll probably be contacting her.

  • Jeff

    I don’t think T-Mobile has fully planned this out or prepped customer service to answer questions, as they are giving out what appears to me to be false information. I’ve been told by 611 customer service, and by “T-Force” on Facebook that roaming data would definitely NOT be turned off at the cap, just slowed down. Then they referred me to the FAQ for more information. The FAQ explicitly states that data services will be cut off until a new billing cycle or returning to T-Mobile coverage once the cap is reached. Perhaps the folks at T-Mobile need to get their story straight? Are they flat out lying? or just very poorly informed. What gives?

  • KM

    I did this just now as well. I also contacted Dot Kellog via phone, as she was working on a case I filed against T-Mobile with the FCC and FTC.

  • Tbyrne

    But now where are you going to go? AT$T? Veri$on? $print? Money doesn’t grow on trees as you’ll soon find out.

    • Jeffreyddwilliams

      You’re right…and cutting off my off-network downloads, like when I GPSor D/L mail  on my phone near Yellowstone NP, is irreversible…besides, for the same price as T-Mobile charges me for unlimited calling I can get the Sprint 450 which only counts when I call a land-line during the  peak hours of 6 a.m. – 7 p.m. M-F; and I get unlimited high speed downloads v. 200MB 

    • Jeffreyddwilliams

      And I am so glad you are standing up for corporate greed; this move was strictly a cost-saving measure at the expense of an estimated “10 thousand” customers. I cannot wait till one day you find yourself off-network and your phone refuses to let you download anymore off-network content till the start of your next billing cycle.  Then you will have wished you had cancelled your contract within the 14 days as per the TOS. 

  • Jeffreyddwilliams

    And by the way, I STRONGLY suggest you personally sue T-Mobile via small claims court in lieu of joining a class-action suit.  A class-action will get you a 20% off coupon on your next accessory or a $25 check while the lawyers make millions.  To file a small claims action simply contact your individual state’s Secretary of State (SOS) and find out who is T-Mobile’s “representative”.  The SOS will give you a name and address where you can send a handwritten letter informing T-Mobile of your intent to bring suit in small claims within 30 days of receipt of the letter.  Make sure you send the letter certified to T-Mobile’s state representative.  In some sates you can access the state SOS website and find this information on your own. After 30 days, if you get no, or an unsatisfactory, answer then head down to the county court house, pay your $35 dollars, and watch Judge Judy to know how to present your case and what/how much damages you seek.  Damages such as cost of your phone with T-Mobile, ETFs, activation cost on your new carrier, difference in monthly bill for the remainder of your T-Mobile Contract; so when I switch to Sprint I will sue for the difference between 69.00 per month and 99.00 per month for the 14 months I had remaining on my T-Mobile contract.

    This only applies if T-Mobile refuses to waive ETFs and you actually cancel your service and sign up for a new service with a different vendor; until then you have no standing.

    If this fails then join the soon to be class-action; of course nothing is guaranteed no matter what you do but you stand a better chance of T-Mobile buckling after receiving a letter notifying them of your intent to bring legal action than listening to their CSR people lying to you on whether you can leave T-Mobile without paying ETFs, or whether the change affects you, or you do not qualify because you didn’t  hit the off-network limit last month (this is what they quoted me…).

    A contract is a contract; T-Mobile expected me to abide by a contract for two years and I expected the same.  T-Mobile reneged on their promise IAW paragraph 6(B) thus leaving me 14 days to say good-bye or be stuck with off-network download limits…I said GOODBYE  

    • Jeffreyddwilliams

      And no, I don’t work for any carrier.  I just hate it when someone pisses down my back and tells me it’s raining.

    • Jeffreyanton83

      I just sent an email today to the contractreview department myself.  The account services person I spoke with on the phone said it could take 14 days for me to have a reply.  How is it going for you so far?

  • http://twitter.com/guntrades guntrades

    It will affect you financially as you will need to seek alternatives to get data coverage once you got cut off by t-mobile.

  • http://twitter.com/guntrades guntrades

    They will get sued if they do not wave the fees and that will get even more expensive and their (currently quite good) reputation will go down the drain.

  • http://twitter.com/guntrades guntrades

    It is not them “letting out”, it is simply abiding to contractual terms.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/R7SVEKV54PQ5TDS2PGJKN54XXQ John

    Why are they implementing a cap on roaming? Simple – it costs a lot of money. Tmo is projected to spend $470 million to pay for roaming data coverage in 2012 and placing a cap on heavy users is expected to save about $86 million. Supposedly, this cap will only impact about 35-50K customers monthly. Expected that about 200K customers would be eligible for ETF waiver if lines are cancelled. 

  • Dave

    Does this apply to business accoutns as well?

  • THREESIXTYCLICK

    t mobile should stop spending money on tv adds and support there coustmers, BUILD TOWERS after 4 years ive had it