Deutsche Telekom Says T-Mobile USA Staff Cuts Not Related To AT&T Talks

With the FCC restarting the clock that continues the approval process for AT&T’s takeover of T-Mobile USA, Deutsche Telekom is defending recent job cuts and insisting the AT&T deal has nothing to do with said job cuts. In the past few months Deutsche Telekom has cut almost 2,600 jobs at T-Mobile USA call centers calling that a natural “fluctuation” in their staff count.

“We have not carried out any measures to cut jobs ahead of the planned T-Mobile USA sale to AT&T,” a Deutsche Telekom spokesman said late on Friday. In the past 12 months the workforce has been reduced by 2,000 but that is in line with normal fluctuations.” The U.S. unit employs 36,000 people at present.

This brings us back to our end of July editorial about T-Mobile USA customer service having taken a turn for the worse partially due to longer than usual hold times. I guess now we know at least part of the reason why. If any employees have any insight as to these recent job cuts and how these 2,600 employees were chosen for job cuts email us and let us know. We’re interested in hearing your thoughts.

Reuters

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  • not_true_tmonews

    You guys are overreacting! Call center turnover is commonly high anywhere but I do give some credit to the uptick of customers calling in just to gripe and chew out a rep that has no control over the proposed merger. So it’s adding stress plus lowered sales expectations makes one unhappy customer service rep.  As a former corporate engineer for one of the cdma providers, I can tell you that this one particular corporation would freeze job postings in a moments notice for quarters on end just on mere speculation they would not have a good quarter.

    Not seeing this at T-mobile. There’s been some engineers voluntarily leaving but nothing to do with the merger. Its still competitive business as usual. Actually been hiring quite a few engineers so I would have to discount this article as media hype.

    • Jamac600

      Tell that to the 290 people in my call center who have been fired. Its media hype to you because it is not your ability to provide for your family on the line….its ours as employees! The job losses are real and are being driven by TMO. The people being fired are not people who are not doing their job but rather casualties of a sinister plan to squeeze every dollar out of the US market from TMO customers and TMO employees prior to the merger. Call it what you want….but it is REAL.

      • not_true_tmonews

        that’s because you are a call center employee. Study up and get a more stable, respectable position and stop complaining about being treated like a call_center CEO when your actually just the fry cook reading from a script in Streamline.

        I’ve been there and done call center work. So I know all about the pressure to keep ACD stats to the aggressive goals or risk getting terminated. I’m just as vulnerable as you but perhaps my retention bonus is a bit bigger (5k), but from my understanding all TMO employees receive some sort of separation pay. I also have some corporate peers who b*tch and moan and fight management every step of the way. It will be those who make unwanted noise who will be put in bad light when it comes time to review their hostile behaviors just because a “proposed” merger takes place. So far, not ONE single TMO process has changed since the merger announced – it’s all head games and gossip driving down the fictional morale issue.

        • Kim Jong-il

          Streamline? Streamline? you STILL use Streamline? What the hell shouldn’t you be using T-community? Oh, that’s RIGHT your NOT the “fry cook” although you HAVE worked in that area before. Perhaps, then you might want to reflect on how the “Front line” have to take the brunt of customers calling in, CONSTANT price plan changes, a Move from VOC (Voice of customer) to VOB (Voice of biz), change from Customer service TO Customer service AND sales, constant “aggressive” changes on ACD, and whatever else can roll downhill. 

          *I* was let go (and NO I’m NOT vindictive), From T mo, and when I was, I was told “your are LOSING us money”. Oh really, Hey when I went thru training, I was told that we TOOK care of our customers, not try to get them off the phone as quick as possible, but actually FIX their problems. Regardless if the issue is the phone (as stated above), the rate plan, overages, or even features that the customer NEVER wanted OR added (Hi 30 day’s FREE web). 

          I’ve read what ItsMichaelNotMike, has said about how the reality is that AT & T really does NOT need extra call centers, regardless of how many T mobile customers convert/stay with AT & Tmobile, and I agree, it’s a simple numbers game. The only thing that AT & T wants is A. The bandwidth, and B. to remove another competing company. The “added customers” is just icing on the cake. 

          Say what you will, about how everyone has panicked, and how everything is untrue, it’s totally within your right, just as it is for others to give their opinions. Time will tell who is right, who is wrong, or hell who knows perhaps the truth lies somewhere in the middle of the two opinions. 

          Your BFF,

          Kim Jong-il

      • not_true_tmonews

        that’s because you are a call center employee. Study up and get a more stable, respectable position and stop complaining about being treated like a call_center CEO when your actually just the fry cook reading from a script in Streamline.

        I’ve been there and done call center work. So I know all about the pressure to keep ACD stats to the aggressive goals or risk getting terminated. I’m just as vulnerable as you but perhaps my retention bonus is a bit bigger (5k), but from my understanding all TMO employees receive some sort of separation pay. I also have some corporate peers who b*tch and moan and fight management every step of the way. It will be those who make unwanted noise who will be put in bad light when it comes time to review their hostile behaviors just because a “proposed” merger takes place. So far, not ONE single TMO process has changed since the merger announced – it’s all head games and gossip driving down the fictional morale issue.

  • Pauly

    T-Mo CS has gotten worse.  I think everyone notices now.

    Now during the day I’m getting sent to the Philippines for almost everything.  I’m not prejudiced over their race but they are hard to understand and they are too literal with everything. They can’t think externally and be flexible with resolution.  Whatever it says on their script books is what they’ll tell you  or offer. 

    The activation dept which appears to be almost 100% off shore is just as bad as Prepaid Customer Care.  You call in to do a “migration,” and they keep transferring you to the porting center.  They just don’t ‘get it,” and this is frustrating to long time customers used to the best customer service in the industry. 

    But you know what, AT&T is the same.  Everytime I call Premier support I’m transferred to a call center in the Philippines and I’m a business customer with almost 1000 lines.  

    Apparently we are directly or indirectly being accustomed to the worst wireless customer service in the industry offered by AT&T so there is no surprise.  

  • Fo so

    As a employee. I would argee it is not lay offs, most of it are people being let go becuase they do not meet the sales quota or something else which is about 60-70% of the time in my call center that I work at. The other 30% are people are leaving by choice. In regards to if call centers are or arent going to be closed no one knows becuase upper management is told tell us that we are not closing.

    However this may or may not be true , at my call center we are always hearing that you want the center to be at the 10 top so that when the meger goes through that we will be kept. Its not a fun enviroment that it was before the meger deal. Since the meger deal the call center I work in went from 700+ employees down to less than 300 and the sales quota goes up with rushing the customer at the same time.

  • T Mo fan

    THeir Customer service has gone to the pooper… Everytime I’ve called I’ve waited longer than usual, and the machine roadblock to reach a real person it’s horrible. And once I talk to someone, it’s not the friendly Tmobile person that we grew to know and get accustom with over the years. I’m transfered to some outsources customer calling center in India or something like that, where they basically sound like robots reading off teleprompts. Many times I have a very hard time understanding what they are saying. It’s way sad cause I loved Tmobile. 

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    YOU are correct.

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Don’t expect T-Mobile nor AT&T to ever admit that
    T-Mobile employee terminations have anything to do with the AT&T
    acquisition. People in here who say T-Mobile/AT&T denials are septic tanks full of hooey, you are correct.

    As I said 5 months ago, when the acquisition was announced, AT&T and
    T-Mobile would use the 12 to 18 months up to the sale date to get rid of most
    T-Mobile employees, that is, actual T-Mobile people on the payroll. I
    suspect that by the time the acquisition is approved T-Mobile will have
    less than 10,000 employees.

    While this seems shocking, it’s a fact of business life that AT&T
    does NOT need T-Mobile’s employees, infrastructure, and because of their
    nature, most T-Mobile’s customers. Think about it logically.

    Assume
    post-acquisition AT&T absorbs ALL T-Mobile’s customers (that’s not going to happen).  AT&T does NOT need much additional infrastructure to service those
    customers. I contend that AT&T’s stores, customer service centers and employees can handle an
    influx of 35,000 T-Mobile  customers. (For the sake of this argument, disregard the quality of that service, or lack of.  I’m simply saying that AT&T’s current infrastructure could service 35,000 new customers.

    But what the hell, let’s pretend to be optimistic “the glass is half full” T-Mobile employees.  Assume AT&T
    will need more stores and employees to service 35,000 new AT&T customers.  Even the most free spending AT&T bean counters know that at most AT&T might need a couple thousand additional employee to service that influx of T-Mobile customers.

    Now let’s look at things realistically, which is the likelihood that post-acquisition at most about 8,000 to 10,000 customers will move from T-Mobile to AT&T. By that time AT&T will have already hired without T-Mobile to handle AT&T’s increased subscriber numbers (as opposed to within T-Mobile ).  IN other words, by the time the acquisition is official AT&T will have the infrastructure in place to handle 8,000 to 10,000 new customers, and relevant to this discussion, AT&T will not be needing most of T-Mobile’s employees.

    Bottom line on T-Mobile employee prospects to have a job with AT&T post-acquisition: By my math at least 35,000 TMOUS employees will be gone by March
    2012. (This assumes T-Mobile has 42,000 employees. My 35K number should be decreased in proportion to how many employees are currently in the Company’s employ.)

    At the behest of its blue master, T-Mobile is utilizing tactics common when a company needs to drastically thin out the herd.

    – The most painless machination is to offer the most senior employees a small severance in return for signing a
    release of all claims.  (Typically severance is one week of base pay for each year of employment, up to a max of about two months wages).

    – Another tactic is to strictly enforce all rules, policies and procedures, with no slack or mercy for violations. Five minutes late for work, you are fired.

    – Change the pay structure so it’s difficult to earn a decent wage.  Take away incentives and bonuses or make them difficult to attain.  Frustrated, the employee resigns.

    – Lower employment evaluation scores. Offer to “clean it up” if the employee resigns. Offer a positive letter of recommendation if the employee resigns.

    – For those who still refuse to leave the Company, set hard-to-meet goals, which if not met will result in termination.

    – Simply start “restructuring” (and other politically correct euphemisms such as the word now part of the American lexicon, “downsizing”) by layoffs, e.g., closing departments, divisions or regions.

    – Finally, closer to the sale date T-Mobile will en masse fire employees.

    Anyone who thinks things are otherwise than above is being naive, delusional or unrealistic.

    Yikes, it’s 2:00 am here.  Time for bed as mt Ambien is kicking in.  No time for grammar or spell check.  Apologies for errors.  And I hope I did not offend anyone. (Except the a# shats who hang in here, present company included ;)

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ASLY6MKMKHP2HSETXPT73RZNPA infantry11b

      Pretty steep drop to go from 32 million customers down to 10,000, but otherwise a sound post.

      • ItsMichaelNotMike

        LOL,  I just logged in.  I meant 10 million.  LOL… again.

    • The ATL Guy

      Are you HIGH?
      you think ATT has the ability to adsorb several million new customers without the tmobile employees?
      You really live in a fantasy land

      • Anonymous

        Yes, they can easily absorb millions of new customers without adding employees, since there are hundreds of thousands of people in India and the Phillippines who are ready to take calls as soon as the ink is dry on the outsourcing contract.

    • firebird

      Severance has already been informed to employees, and is two weeks for each year of service at the transition, and is effective up to one year after the transition – for longer term employees and higher paid employees it can be $4k and higher. Also there is a retention bonus being offered for staying through the transition, based on tenure – half at signing and half after six months. One could conceivably get both and walk away with $5-6k after it’s all done.

      • Yyevo

        Call center employees don’t get severence pay, that’s reserved for upper level management. And even if call center employees got severence, it would be 1 or 2 weeks pay @ most, not $5-6k.

        You’ve obviously never had a job.

        • Shuturface

          I’m Tech tier III care and there is a severence package for every direct t-mobile employee . dont reply if u dont know the facts.

        • Shuturface

          I’m Tech tier III care and there is a severence package for every direct t-mobile employee . dont reply if u dont know the facts.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t know any specifics about what TMobile employees have been offered in the way of severence, but your blanket statement that call center employees do not get severence pay is misinformed.

          Once upon a time, as the result of another merger (AOL Time Warner) a call center I worked in was closed, and I walked away with almost 8K in severence pay after just under four years of service. (And I wasn’t in management.)

          Of course, this was during the internet boom, and management had managed to cut a good deal for us, but my point is that it depends on the company.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t know any specifics about what TMobile employees have been offered in the way of severence, but your blanket statement that call center employees do not get severence pay is misinformed.

          Once upon a time, as the result of another merger (AOL Time Warner) a call center I worked in was closed, and I walked away with almost 8K in severence pay after just under four years of service. (And I wasn’t in management.)

          Of course, this was during the internet boom, and management had managed to cut a good deal for us, but my point is that it depends on the company.

        • SoVeryShay

          Did you work for tmobile as a call center rep? If not you can’t deny the types of benefits paid to employees. All reps, including me, were informed of severance benefits.

        • SoVeryShay

          Did you work for tmobile as a call center rep? If not you can’t deny the types of benefits paid to employees. All reps, including me, were informed of severance benefits.

    • Anonymous

      Ambien is my friend too! :)

    • Innercircle

      Do you work at T Mobile? This is almost exactly whats been happening at the call centers in the US.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_SVSI3D2IN7O7Y7NJSUDFEBMEKQ Scott L

      sounds like some of that ‘new math.’ anyone can bend the numbers to meet their hypothetical situations.

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Don’t expect T-Mobile nor AT&T to ever admit that
    T-Mobile employee terminations have anything to do with the AT&T
    acquisition. People in here who say T-Mobile/AT&T denials are septic tanks full of hooey, you are correct.

    As I said 5 months ago, when the acquisition was announced, AT&T and
    T-Mobile would use the 12 to 18 months up to the sale date to get rid of most
    T-Mobile employees, that is, actual T-Mobile people on the payroll. I
    suspect that by the time the acquisition is approved T-Mobile will have
    less than 10,000 employees.

    While this seems shocking, it’s a fact of business life that AT&T
    does NOT need T-Mobile’s employees, infrastructure, and because of their
    nature, most T-Mobile’s customers. Think about it logically.

    Assume
    post-acquisition AT&T absorbs ALL T-Mobile’s customers (that’s not going to happen).  AT&T does NOT need much additional infrastructure to service those
    customers. I contend that AT&T’s stores, customer service centers and employees can handle an
    influx of 35,000 T-Mobile  customers. (For the sake of this argument, disregard the quality of that service, or lack of.  I’m simply saying that AT&T’s current infrastructure could service 35,000 new customers.

    But what the hell, let’s pretend to be optimistic “the glass is half full” T-Mobile employees.  Assume AT&T
    will need more stores and employees to service 35,000 new AT&T customers.  Even the most free spending AT&T bean counters know that at most AT&T might need a couple thousand additional employee to service that influx of T-Mobile customers.

    Now let’s look at things realistically, which is the likelihood that post-acquisition at most about 8,000 to 10,000 customers will move from T-Mobile to AT&T. By that time AT&T will have already hired without T-Mobile to handle AT&T’s increased subscriber numbers (as opposed to within T-Mobile ).  IN other words, by the time the acquisition is official AT&T will have the infrastructure in place to handle 8,000 to 10,000 new customers, and relevant to this discussion, AT&T will not be needing most of T-Mobile’s employees.

    Bottom line on T-Mobile employee prospects to have a job with AT&T post-acquisition: By my math at least 35,000 TMOUS employees will be gone by March
    2012. (This assumes T-Mobile has 42,000 employees. My 35K number should be decreased in proportion to how many employees are currently in the Company’s employ.)

    At the behest of its blue master, T-Mobile is utilizing tactics common when a company needs to drastically thin out the herd.

    – The most painless machination is to offer the most senior employees a small severance in return for signing a
    release of all claims.  (Typically severance is one week of base pay for each year of employment, up to a max of about two months wages).

    – Another tactic is to strictly enforce all rules, policies and procedures, with no slack or mercy for violations. Five minutes late for work, you are fired.

    – Change the pay structure so it’s difficult to earn a decent wage.  Take away incentives and bonuses or make them difficult to attain.  Frustrated, the employee resigns.

    – Lower employment evaluation scores. Offer to “clean it up” if the employee resigns. Offer a positive letter of recommendation if the employee resigns.

    – For those who still refuse to leave the Company, set hard-to-meet goals, which if not met will result in termination.

    – Simply start “restructuring” (and other politically correct euphemisms such as the word now part of the American lexicon, “downsizing”) by layoffs, e.g., closing departments, divisions or regions.

    – Finally, closer to the sale date T-Mobile will en masse fire employees.

    Anyone who thinks things are otherwise than above is being naive, delusional or unrealistic.

    Yikes, it’s 2:00 am here.  Time for bed as mt Ambien is kicking in.  No time for grammar or spell check.  Apologies for errors.  And I hope I did not offend anyone. (Except the a# shats who hang in here, present company included ;)

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Don’t expect T-Mobile nor AT&T to ever admit that
    T-Mobile employee terminations have anything to do with the AT&T
    acquisition. People in here who say T-Mobile/AT&T denials are septic tanks full of hooey, you are correct.

    As I said 5 months ago, when the acquisition was announced, AT&T and
    T-Mobile would use the 12 to 18 months up to the sale date to get rid of most
    T-Mobile employees, that is, actual T-Mobile people on the payroll. I
    suspect that by the time the acquisition is approved T-Mobile will have
    less than 10,000 employees.

    While this seems shocking, it’s a fact of business life that AT&T
    does NOT need T-Mobile’s employees, infrastructure, and because of their
    nature, most T-Mobile’s customers. Think about it logically.

    Assume
    post-acquisition AT&T absorbs ALL T-Mobile’s customers (that’s not going to happen).  AT&T does NOT need much additional infrastructure to service those
    customers. I contend that AT&T’s stores, customer service centers and employees can handle an
    influx of 35,000 T-Mobile  customers. (For the sake of this argument, disregard the quality of that service, or lack of.  I’m simply saying that AT&T’s current infrastructure could service 35,000 new customers.

    But what the hell, let’s pretend to be optimistic “the glass is half full” T-Mobile employees.  Assume AT&T
    will need more stores and employees to service 35,000 new AT&T customers.  Even the most free spending AT&T bean counters know that at most AT&T might need a couple thousand additional employee to service that influx of T-Mobile customers.

    Now let’s look at things realistically, which is the likelihood that post-acquisition at most about 8,000 to 10,000 customers will move from T-Mobile to AT&T. By that time AT&T will have already hired without T-Mobile to handle AT&T’s increased subscriber numbers (as opposed to within T-Mobile ).  IN other words, by the time the acquisition is official AT&T will have the infrastructure in place to handle 8,000 to 10,000 new customers, and relevant to this discussion, AT&T will not be needing most of T-Mobile’s employees.

    Bottom line on T-Mobile employee prospects to have a job with AT&T post-acquisition: By my math at least 35,000 TMOUS employees will be gone by March
    2012. (This assumes T-Mobile has 42,000 employees. My 35K number should be decreased in proportion to how many employees are currently in the Company’s employ.)

    At the behest of its blue master, T-Mobile is utilizing tactics common when a company needs to drastically thin out the herd.

    – The most painless machination is to offer the most senior employees a small severance in return for signing a
    release of all claims.  (Typically severance is one week of base pay for each year of employment, up to a max of about two months wages).

    – Another tactic is to strictly enforce all rules, policies and procedures, with no slack or mercy for violations. Five minutes late for work, you are fired.

    – Change the pay structure so it’s difficult to earn a decent wage.  Take away incentives and bonuses or make them difficult to attain.  Frustrated, the employee resigns.

    – Lower employment evaluation scores. Offer to “clean it up” if the employee resigns. Offer a positive letter of recommendation if the employee resigns.

    – For those who still refuse to leave the Company, set hard-to-meet goals, which if not met will result in termination.

    – Simply start “restructuring” (and other politically correct euphemisms such as the word now part of the American lexicon, “downsizing”) by layoffs, e.g., closing departments, divisions or regions.

    – Finally, closer to the sale date T-Mobile will en masse fire employees.

    Anyone who thinks things are otherwise than above is being naive, delusional or unrealistic.

    Yikes, it’s 2:00 am here.  Time for bed as mt Ambien is kicking in.  No time for grammar or spell check.  Apologies for errors.  And I hope I did not offend anyone. (Except the a# shats who hang in here, present company included ;)

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Don’t expect T-Mobile nor AT&T to ever admit that
    T-Mobile employee terminations have anything to do with the AT&T
    acquisition. People in here who say T-Mobile/AT&T denials are septic tanks full of hooey, you are correct.

    As I said 5 months ago, when the acquisition was announced, AT&T and
    T-Mobile would use the 12 to 18 months up to the sale date to get rid of most
    T-Mobile employees, that is, actual T-Mobile people on the payroll. I
    suspect that by the time the acquisition is approved T-Mobile will have
    less than 10,000 employees.

    While this seems shocking, it’s a fact of business life that AT&T
    does NOT need T-Mobile’s employees, infrastructure, and because of their
    nature, most T-Mobile’s customers. Think about it logically.

    Assume
    post-acquisition AT&T absorbs ALL T-Mobile’s customers (that’s not going to happen).  AT&T does NOT need much additional infrastructure to service those
    customers. I contend that AT&T’s stores, customer service centers and employees can handle an
    influx of 35,000 T-Mobile  customers. (For the sake of this argument, disregard the quality of that service, or lack of.  I’m simply saying that AT&T’s current infrastructure could service 35,000 new customers.

    But what the hell, let’s pretend to be optimistic “the glass is half full” T-Mobile employees.  Assume AT&T
    will need more stores and employees to service 35,000 new AT&T customers.  Even the most free spending AT&T bean counters know that at most AT&T might need a couple thousand additional employee to service that influx of T-Mobile customers.

    Now let’s look at things realistically, which is the likelihood that post-acquisition at most about 8,000 to 10,000 customers will move from T-Mobile to AT&T. By that time AT&T will have already hired without T-Mobile to handle AT&T’s increased subscriber numbers (as opposed to within T-Mobile ).  IN other words, by the time the acquisition is official AT&T will have the infrastructure in place to handle 8,000 to 10,000 new customers, and relevant to this discussion, AT&T will not be needing most of T-Mobile’s employees.

    Bottom line on T-Mobile employee prospects to have a job with AT&T post-acquisition: By my math at least 35,000 TMOUS employees will be gone by March
    2012. (This assumes T-Mobile has 42,000 employees. My 35K number should be decreased in proportion to how many employees are currently in the Company’s employ.)

    At the behest of its blue master, T-Mobile is utilizing tactics common when a company needs to drastically thin out the herd.

    – The most painless machination is to offer the most senior employees a small severance in return for signing a
    release of all claims.  (Typically severance is one week of base pay for each year of employment, up to a max of about two months wages).

    – Another tactic is to strictly enforce all rules, policies and procedures, with no slack or mercy for violations. Five minutes late for work, you are fired.

    – Change the pay structure so it’s difficult to earn a decent wage.  Take away incentives and bonuses or make them difficult to attain.  Frustrated, the employee resigns.

    – Lower employment evaluation scores. Offer to “clean it up” if the employee resigns. Offer a positive letter of recommendation if the employee resigns.

    – For those who still refuse to leave the Company, set hard-to-meet goals, which if not met will result in termination.

    – Simply start “restructuring” (and other politically correct euphemisms such as the word now part of the American lexicon, “downsizing”) by layoffs, e.g., closing departments, divisions or regions.

    – Finally, closer to the sale date T-Mobile will en masse fire employees.

    Anyone who thinks things are otherwise than above is being naive, delusional or unrealistic.

    Yikes, it’s 2:00 am here.  Time for bed as mt Ambien is kicking in.  No time for grammar or spell check.  Apologies for errors.  And I hope I did not offend anyone. (Except the a# shats who hang in here, present company included ;)

  • ItsMichaelNotMike

    Don’t expect T-Mobile nor AT&T to ever admit that
    T-Mobile employee terminations have anything to do with the AT&T
    acquisition. People in here who say T-Mobile/AT&T denials are septic tanks full of hooey, you are correct.

    As I said 5 months ago, when the acquisition was announced, AT&T and
    T-Mobile would use the 12 to 18 months up to the sale date to get rid of most
    T-Mobile employees, that is, actual T-Mobile people on the payroll. I
    suspect that by the time the acquisition is approved T-Mobile will have
    less than 10,000 employees.

    While this seems shocking, it’s a fact of business life that AT&T
    does NOT need T-Mobile’s employees, infrastructure, and because of their
    nature, most T-Mobile’s customers. Think about it logically.

    Assume
    post-acquisition AT&T absorbs ALL T-Mobile’s customers (that’s not going to happen).  AT&T does NOT need much additional infrastructure to service those
    customers. I contend that AT&T’s stores, customer service centers and employees can handle an
    influx of 35,000 T-Mobile  customers. (For the sake of this argument, disregard the quality of that service, or lack of.  I’m simply saying that AT&T’s current infrastructure could service 35,000 new customers.

    But what the hell, let’s pretend to be optimistic “the glass is half full” T-Mobile employees.  Assume AT&T
    will need more stores and employees to service 35,000 new AT&T customers.  Even the most free spending AT&T bean counters know that at most AT&T might need a couple thousand additional employee to service that influx of T-Mobile customers.

    Now let’s look at things realistically, which is the likelihood that post-acquisition at most about 8,000 to 10,000 customers will move from T-Mobile to AT&T. By that time AT&T will have already hired without T-Mobile to handle AT&T’s increased subscriber numbers (as opposed to within T-Mobile ).  IN other words, by the time the acquisition is official AT&T will have the infrastructure in place to handle 8,000 to 10,000 new customers, and relevant to this discussion, AT&T will not be needing most of T-Mobile’s employees.

    Bottom line on T-Mobile employee prospects to have a job with AT&T post-acquisition: By my math at least 35,000 TMOUS employees will be gone by March
    2012. (This assumes T-Mobile has 42,000 employees. My 35K number should be decreased in proportion to how many employees are currently in the Company’s employ.)

    At the behest of its blue master, T-Mobile is utilizing tactics common when a company needs to drastically thin out the herd.

    – The most painless machination is to offer the most senior employees a small severance in return for signing a
    release of all claims.  (Typically severance is one week of base pay for each year of employment, up to a max of about two months wages).

    – Another tactic is to strictly enforce all rules, policies and procedures, with no slack or mercy for violations. Five minutes late for work, you are fired.

    – Change the pay structure so it’s difficult to earn a decent wage.  Take away incentives and bonuses or make them difficult to attain.  Frustrated, the employee resigns.

    – Lower employment evaluation scores. Offer to “clean it up” if the employee resigns. Offer a positive letter of recommendation if the employee resigns.

    – For those who still refuse to leave the Company, set hard-to-meet goals, which if not met will result in termination.

    – Simply start “restructuring” (and other politically correct euphemisms such as the word now part of the American lexicon, “downsizing”) by layoffs, e.g., closing departments, divisions or regions.

    – Finally, closer to the sale date T-Mobile will en masse fire employees.

    Anyone who thinks things are otherwise than above is being naive, delusional or unrealistic.

    Yikes, it’s 2:00 am here.  Time for bed as mt Ambien is kicking in.  No time for grammar or spell check.  Apologies for errors.  And I hope I did not offend anyone. (Except the a# shats who hang in here, present company included ;)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ASLY6MKMKHP2HSETXPT73RZNPA infantry11b

    The reality behind this is that the cuts themselves are indirectly related to the AT&T merger.  They began making anti rep policies after the announcement, that made reps quit.  Once those reps began quitting the hiring freeze started, and naturally the support roles are the ones that were cut.  These things are all just the writing on the wall.  

  • Cptmagic

    The T-mobile acquisition by AT&T creates a nationwide monopoly of GSM service. It is anticompetitive. All one has to do is look at the behaviors of both parties post-announcement to see that. What this does show is that DT’s management has failed to make a significant impact in the market and is looking to gracefully exit to save face and their investment. If this deal goes through does anybody seriouly believe that the GSM MVNOs like Simple Mobile won’t be harmed with T’s ability to charge monopoly rents on their infrastucture? Not to mention the disruption of many customers who will lose great service contracts (which are liabilities to the “new” AT&T) when they get released as part of the divestitures. Yesterday T-mobile called thanking me fo being a customer and wanted to let me know of great deals on service. it wasn’t until they went through their decisioning engine that they discovered they really couldn’t offer me anything better than what I had! Now what does that tell me? Two things: (1) Their customer analytic marketing process is broke, and (2) they’re running all the CSRs through this gauntlet as a precursor to more RIF’s under the euphemism of “merger synergies”. If, by chance I do get spun-off and I am forced into a lesser deal my current US Congresscritter (who supports the acquisition-c’mon folks, stop using the term Merger and call a spade a spade) will lose my vote next year.

    • The ATL Guy

      It’s not a monopoly.
      You will be allowed to leave ETF free and there are other choices not to mention prepaid.Companies get bought and sold it’s part of life.
      Some of the posters on this forum can’t handle change but it doesn’t mean it’s at&t’s fault you can’t handle change

      • Know your roll

        If you read his first sentence again you will see that its says monopoly of GSM which is true. There may be other companies but there will not be a GSM company that can compete with them. Its not about being able to leave without an ETF its about AT&T controlling what GSM phones come to the US. Know what your talking about before you comment on something.

        • The ATL Guy

          Again this red herring is not the definition of a monopoly in the sense of preventing the sale.

        • The ATL Guy

          Again this red herring is not the definition of a monopoly in the sense of preventing the sale.

      • Realcool2000

        If one company controls all the gsm networks than that is a monopoly.

        • The ATL Guy

          What is your point?
          This isn’t the definition of a monopoly that will prevent the sale.
          Following your logic no company should introduce a new technology or add to existing technology because they would be the only company to do so.

        • The ATL Guy

          What is your point?
          This isn’t the definition of a monopoly that will prevent the sale.
          Following your logic no company should introduce a new technology or add to existing technology because they would be the only company to do so.

        • eyeno

          May not technically be a monopoly, but take a look at Rogers in Canada.  They rule the GSM market there and their plans suck

    • Goukisan

      monopoly of what????? being GSM or CDMA or two cans and a string have nothing to do with a monopoly. You have MANY choices in cellular service. The tech used behind that service is not related to any monopoly. People love to throw around words they learned on tv as a child. If  we only had one cellular service left nationally then yes its a monopoly but just because they are going to be the only GSM based phone service does not make any business monopoly. You have other choices. 

  • alt-mobile

    I think we all should watch the show Outsourced together :)

    That is all..

  • guess

    TMonews needs to be careful with the verbage used in their stories. There has been no announced layoffs. The reality is hiring has slowed down. There is a very big difference in staff cuts vs not hiring new employees. If TMonews would like to be considered an accurate and reliable site artcicles like this should be more carefully worded

  • guess

    TMonews needs to be careful with the verbage used in their stories. There has been no announced layoffs. The reality is hiring has slowed down. There is a very big difference in staff cuts vs not hiring new employees. If TMonews would like to be considered an accurate and reliable site artcicles like this should be more carefully worded

    • http://tmonews.com David

      I think it would behoove you to look at the story from which ours is written. We merely used the same language Reuters did and would you criticize Reuters, one of the most respected publications in the world. So…research before criticize.

    • http://tmonews.com David

      I think it would behoove you to look at the story from which ours is written. We merely used the same language Reuters did and would you criticize Reuters, one of the most respected publications in the world. So…research before criticize.

      • http://tmonews.com David

        Type your reply…

    • Kerry

      I have a good friend who managed several different stores and did very well. He was recently laid off, and it want because he was under performing.

      Months after the merger he had been given so notice of his projected severance package in case the merger goes through.

      This is all smoke and mirrors, but its merger preparation.

    • Kerry

      I have a good friend who managed several different stores and did very well. He was recently laid off, and it want because he was under performing.

      Months after the merger he had been given so notice of his projected severance package in case the merger goes through.

      This is all smoke and mirrors, but its merger preparation.

      • SoVeryShay

        Every employee received a letter about severance. That same letter also included bonuses for employees that chose to stay with the company after the acquisition. Tmobile has never had to do layoffs, but I won’t deny the claims about getting rid of bottom performers.

        • Innercircle

          Call it what you want. Tmo is laying off. Their metrics system has always been BS. They manipulate it to their benefit. For example, avoiding bonus payouts and now severance packages.

        • ww88ww

          If it had to do with bottom performers, why are most execs and leadership still sticking around?  Not a place where promotion is based on aptitude,that’s for sure.

  • Cmwunderle1

    I had to call tmobile yesterday because the warranty replacement they sent was bad. I was transferred around like a bad penny. Never received such bad service from them as yestrrday. As you can tell, this phone texting is very.unresponsive. Adds periods and misspells. All the time. Last mytouch 4g had display upside down and when turned to try to get it to right itself. I woul get vertical lines and the screen would flash like an old tv and shut.off. Csr refuse to send another replacement . Said i.had to go through.htc for warranty replacrment. Never heard of this. Just replace the.pos you sent me.

  • Cmwunderle1

    I had to call tmobile yesterday because the warranty replacement they sent was bad. I was transferred around like a bad penny. Never received such bad service from them as yestrrday. As you can tell, this phone texting is very.unresponsive. Adds periods and misspells. All the time. Last mytouch 4g had display upside down and when turned to try to get it to right itself. I woul get vertical lines and the screen would flash like an old tv and shut.off. Csr refuse to send another replacement . Said i.had to go through.htc for warranty replacrment. Never heard of this. Just replace the.pos you sent me.

    • Anonymous

      They don’t want to replace the phone because their jobs are on the line. The metrics they need to meet in order to not get fired include a low handset exchange percentage.

      Magenta is busy firing all the “bottom performers” and not hiring anyone new. They can call this “fluctuation” if they like. It’s a clever way around the words “layoffs” and “cutbacks” and “having to pay unemployment benefits to the people we canned.” Basically they define certain metrics, and then fire the people who place in the bottom percentage of those metrics.

      The end result, for customers, is that the reps you talk to are so scared about losing their jobs that they put all their focus on making the right kinds of numbers, and customer service goes out the window. Reps are no longer encouraged to put the customer’s needs first – it’s all about keeping call time low, not exchanging phones, and increasing the customer’s monthly bill.

      If you believe that this has nothing to do with AT&T not wanting to have to pay severance to all the people they would otherwise need to lay off once the acquisition goes through, I have a bridge to sell you.

    • ItsMichaelNotMike

      Yours is a very depressing post, simply to see such a level of customer service degradation.

      I recall the days in 2006-2007 when people on forums were elated at how T-Mobile CSRs would not hesitate to send people a replacement phone to address a defect. Now to hear that a CSR said to take it up with HTC?  That’s bad.

      Anyway, here’s some tips on how to deal with this:

      – I question if that person knew what she was  talking about.  I would call back during T-Mobile business hours so to get someone in the U.S. to help you. 

      – Since you bought the phone through T-Mobile, the warranty requires T-Mobile cover the phone, not HTC.  This sounds like you got a “trainee” working out of a warehouse that used to be owned by Ferdinand Marcos. 

      – There may be some term in the warranty that says for certain “defects” that such are not really defects so T-Mobile is not obligated to cover it (some software problems, that T-Mobile considers self-inflicted by the user).  But your symptoms sound like a manufacturing defect.

      – Perhaps the CSR did not understand English all that well and thought you were saying something that to her indicated it was not a covered defect. I’d call U.S. customer support, say the phone is simply not working (a black display) and demand a replacement. Don’t get into too much detail.  Act like a lot of customers do, “I don’t know why, but this dam-n phone you sent me is not working.”

      – Finally, warranty replacements are always suspect because the phone T-Mobile sent you is a refurbished unit, meaning at some point someone returned it, T-Mobile then supposedly fixed it (or repackaged the customer return), and then T-Mobile sent it to you.

      If it was a customer return there’s a good chance that the former user was fooling with it, messed up the phone, and was able to slip it by the store or online as a return.  Bottom line, eventually T-Mobile’s problem became your problem.

      • Anonymous

        The comment about a warehouse previously owned by Ferdinand Marcos made me laugh :) 

      • Anonymous

        Have I seen you on the Consumerist?

    • ItsMichaelNotMike

      Yours is a very depressing post, simply to see such a level of customer service degradation.

      I recall the days in 2006-2007 when people on forums were elated at how T-Mobile CSRs would not hesitate to send people a replacement phone to address a defect. Now to hear that a CSR said to take it up with HTC?  That’s bad.

      Anyway, here’s some tips on how to deal with this:

      – I question if that person knew what she was  talking about.  I would call back during T-Mobile business hours so to get someone in the U.S. to help you. 

      – Since you bought the phone through T-Mobile, the warranty requires T-Mobile cover the phone, not HTC.  This sounds like you got a “trainee” working out of a warehouse that used to be owned by Ferdinand Marcos. 

      – There may be some term in the warranty that says for certain “defects” that such are not really defects so T-Mobile is not obligated to cover it (some software problems, that T-Mobile considers self-inflicted by the user).  But your symptoms sound like a manufacturing defect.

      – Perhaps the CSR did not understand English all that well and thought you were saying something that to her indicated it was not a covered defect. I’d call U.S. customer support, say the phone is simply not working (a black display) and demand a replacement. Don’t get into too much detail.  Act like a lot of customers do, “I don’t know why, but this dam-n phone you sent me is not working.”

      – Finally, warranty replacements are always suspect because the phone T-Mobile sent you is a refurbished unit, meaning at some point someone returned it, T-Mobile then supposedly fixed it (or repackaged the customer return), and then T-Mobile sent it to you.

      If it was a customer return there’s a good chance that the former user was fooling with it, messed up the phone, and was able to slip it by the store or online as a return.  Bottom line, eventually T-Mobile’s problem became your problem.

  • Jonathan lesueur

    you should learn the track history of the FCC and DOJ.
    When Verizon bought All tel wireless one of the conditions was that they
    had to sell customers off in overlapping areas. And if this is the case of monopoly of gsm carriers AT&T would be directly competing with T
    mobile not Verizon But they are not AT&T is competing with Verizon
    not T mobile. You all  got to realize if this merger fails T mobile next
    step is to lay off more employees and raise their prices.

    • Maschwar77

      How do you figure?  T-Mobile will get a sizeable influx of cash should the merger disintegrate.  I don’t see this as a reason to lay off people.  Who knows, the T-Mobile network might get even better.

      • The ATL Guy

        DT WANTS OUT! What part of this do you not understand?

        • EYENO

          The absolute truth…DT is done with T-Mobile USA and needs the $$ from the sale to fix their own issues with network in Europe.

        • lily

          Totally – while TMO USA was a cash cow for them and assisted them in shoring up their failing landline in Europe, everything was grand. But as soon as they had to start putting some of the money generated in the US back into the US network, it was – SEE YA! To me, reading that in DT’s announcement letter was the saddest moment ever. We here in the US cared and built up a great company to work for and to be with as a customer – and now it’s being ripped apart at the seams. Is it any wonder the CS has slipped as morale is affected? We are trying to stay positive but live in reality every day. It’s a bitter pill.   

        • IT Guy

          This.  So much this. DT wants out.

          Other than AT&T, there have been exactly zero realistic bids for someone else taking over. MS is not interested. Google is not interested. Cablevision suggested a partnership of sorts, but we haven’t heard a peep from them about it since then.

          Should the AT&T deal fall through, they’ll probably start selling things off piecemeal, since nobody is interested in the whole thing. They won’t get as much money as they would have selling everything to AT&T, but that’s what the $6b is insurance against.

          DT doesn’t want a bit of cash so they can expand their operations here. They aren’t looking for partnerships that’ll bring in more revenue. The only thing they want is to recoup (as much as they can of) their investment so they can get out of the US market.

          Whether or not the the FCC & DOJ approve this sale, AT&T is still going to have the only national GSM network.

        • IT Guy

          This.  So much this. DT wants out.

          Other than AT&T, there have been exactly zero realistic bids for someone else taking over. MS is not interested. Google is not interested. Cablevision suggested a partnership of sorts, but we haven’t heard a peep from them about it since then.

          Should the AT&T deal fall through, they’ll probably start selling things off piecemeal, since nobody is interested in the whole thing. They won’t get as much money as they would have selling everything to AT&T, but that’s what the $6b is insurance against.

          DT doesn’t want a bit of cash so they can expand their operations here. They aren’t looking for partnerships that’ll bring in more revenue. The only thing they want is to recoup (as much as they can of) their investment so they can get out of the US market.

          Whether or not the the FCC & DOJ approve this sale, AT&T is still going to have the only national GSM network.

      • guest

        T-Mobile does not get the $6 Billion, DT gets the $$$

    • Jason Ward864

      Verizon does not own Alltel Wireless any longer.

  • Hrose1965

    II don’t have to worry about hold times any longer I jumped ship to ATT so far so good better coverage and no long outages was with t-mobile 11 years

  • Hrose1965

    II don’t have to worry about hold times any longer I jumped ship to ATT so far so good better coverage and no long outages was with t-mobile 11 years

    • Maschwar77

      AT&T’s 4G is a joke.  It is your loss for jumping ship.

      • The ATL Guy

        Really?
        Do you have ATT?
        Do you live in his area?

      • The ATL Guy

        Really?
        Do you have ATT?
        Do you live in his area?

      • The ATL Guy

        I think the post was pretty clear and while I can’t speak for him/her I don’t think a loss was described.
        Did att hurt you?

  • 56foryou

    So it has begun….

  • 56foryou

    So it has begun….

  • 56foryou

    So it has begun….

  • Hrose1965m

    hey all I’m saying is tmobile is not what it used to be there customer care don’t help any more and to many service outages that’s why I jumped to ATT

  • Hrose1965m

    hey all I’m saying is tmobile is not what it used to be there customer care don’t help any more and to many service outages that’s why I jumped to ATT

  • AptPupil99

    T-Mobiles customer service stinks. Their employees really don’t seem to give a **** about loyalty anymore. They are turing into AT&T already… 

    • ItsMichaelNotMike

      While every company has its bad apples, the main problem with T-Mobile is that morale is really low, to where in the end the customers suffer.

      It’s very difficult to show up to work each day and remain upbeat when you don’t know if today will be the day a manager approaches you with a pink slip. (The modern day “pink slip” is now usually a cold, impersonal, e-mail from Human Resources with attachments in PDF format.)

      And it’s really hard for formerly loyal T-Mobile employees to give a sheet about anything when DT and TMOUS executives cut their own sweetheart deals while the thousands of line employees were tossed into the sheeter.

      Loyal T-Mobile employees considered T-Mobile a career.  For personal aggrandizement top level executives ended the efforts these people put into T-Mobile. It’s no wonder that when we call customer service we slapped around.

      • lily

        [Pointing up] What HE said. Amen ItsMichaelNotMike.

      • lily

        [Pointing up] What HE said. Amen ItsMichaelNotMike.

    • Angerock

      It is NOT the employees that do not care. We are given “resources” that we have to follow that have NOTHING to do with our personal feelings. When are you customers going to “get” that?

    • Angerock

      It is NOT the employees that do not care. We are given “resources” that we have to follow that have NOTHING to do with our personal feelings. When are you customers going to “get” that?

    • Stressfree

      Because its not about the customer anymore. Its about the sales, from what i was told.

  • Joseph T Mathew

    when will the meger complete…im on tmobile when will i get the benefits of the att netwwork

    • AptPupil99

      Unless you just opened a T-Mobile account, which would not make sense since you seem to like AT&T…. your contract will end before the POSSIBLE merge. 

      Have fun moving to the company with some of the WORST customer service ratings in the industry. 

    • Boshk13

      i wouldnt call them benefits, bob.

  • Anonymous

    .-.ì just got an iPad 2-32GB for $ 22.54 and my girlfriend loves her Panasonìc Lumìx GF 1 Camera that we got for $ 38.76 there arriving tomorrow by UPS. I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 40 inch LED TV to my boss for $ 657 which only cost me $ 62.81 tobuy.
    Here is the website we use to get it all from, http://shr.tn/Zl26

  • TheWayOfThings

    [B]” In the past 12 months the workforce has been reduced by 2,000 but that is in line with normal fluctuations.”[/B]

    For those who are buying this, and those who are making comments confirming this… I want to know where is the normal hiring for this time of year? Where is the ramping up of the work-force at the customer care call centers in anticipation of Show Time?

     It takes time to train new reps and get them ready for the busiest time of the year, and NORMALLY there are a LOT of training classes in full swing by now.. where are the training classes? Where are the new hires? They’re definitely not at the local call center here.. people are still getting canned and quitting left and right, and there are no replacements being hired…

    Anyone who is backing up the statement made by DT is either management or they are drones who have their heads so far up Big Magenta’s arse that they wouldn’t know the truth even if was chewing out their throats… and it is…

    The customers are going to suffer right along with the reps… Longer hold times and reduced quality of care… The busier it gets, the faster the reps are gonna be expected to handle the calls and that means less attention is going to be given to the issue at hand… throw a band-aid on a broken leg, pacify the issue as quickly as possible, then if  the rep wants to keep their job, SELL SOMETHING!!!

    • jon

      I’m not going to get into a pissing match with every loud mouth here ripping T-Mobile, calling people liars and conspirators. All I can do is speak from my own experience. Over the last 11 years voicesteam/tmobile has treated its employees like royalty. My wife has been rewarded lavishly for her hard work. We were guest at the first ever concert on “The Rock”. All expenses were paid for four or five nights. My wife received the peak achievement award. That award sent us to Maui for an all expenses paid vacation. I’m taking about the type of vacation most people save a lifetime for. I probably couldn’t do that type of vacation for less that 25k for two people. I shook hands with Neil Armstrong, who gave a great motivational speech and handed out the awards on the last night of a six night vacation. T-Mobile paid for everything. I don’t and my wife doesn’t have our heads in the sand. We fully understand what is happening here. She has been a manager for many years and this time of year is typical for a hire freeze and allowing natural attrition to occur. October, when the newest devices are released in time for Christmas, is when hiring typically picks up again. That may not happen this year, but what is happening is natural attrition. Since our family will be greatly impacted by this we understand all of the possibilities and are taking a ride it out attitude. One of two things will happen. My wife will be offered a job and a 5k bonus or she will be given a severence package that, for her, is six months. Either way my family will survive. T-Mobile has always treated my family right and we will continue to take a rational, NOT EMOTIONAL, approach to this. Some of you that throw out words like “liars” are being disingenuous at the very least. Some of you are probably not current employee (ie fired and holding a grudge) or haven’t been there long enough to understand the seasonality of your business. (ie when you hire, freeze and allow attrition)…My wife and I are taking this with a balanced attitude. I personally don’t want to see this take over happen. But at the same time, I won’t sit here kick and scream and call people liars like a two year old that is throwing a tantrum…maybe since my wife and I are managers we understand how to adapt to change. I just think people on this board are letting the emotions of this control the dialog rather than facts…okay stepping down from my soapbox now..

      • Goukisan

        your loyalty is noted…but I dont think you hear the death knell up there on the soap box

        • jon

          I’m sorry, did you say something about a death knell? The only death knell is the one the DOJ just delivered to at&ts plans. Again, there won’t be a pissing match. It will be a long journey with an unknown ending. We will “stick together” no matter what happens…but your con-descending tone and implication that I am some naive fool seems pretty ironic given todays events.

        • jon

          I’m sorry, did you say something about a death knell? The only death knell is the one the DOJ just delivered to at&ts plans. Again, there won’t be a pissing match. It will be a long journey with an unknown ending. We will “stick together” no matter what happens…but your con-descending tone and implication that I am some naive fool seems pretty ironic given todays events.

        • jon

          I’m sorry, did you say something about a death knell? The only death knell is the one the DOJ just delivered to at&ts plans. Again, there won’t be a pissing match. It will be a long journey with an unknown ending. We will “stick together” no matter what happens…but your con-descending tone and implication that I am some naive fool seems pretty ironic given todays events.

        • jon

          I’m sorry, did you say something about a death knell? The only death knell is the one the DOJ just delivered to at&ts plans. Again, there won’t be a pissing match. It will be a long journey with an unknown ending. We will “stick together” no matter what happens…but your con-descending tone and implication that I am some naive fool seems pretty ironic given todays events.

      • happilyaformeremployee

        Jon, I am a former employee, after my first year at my center, I was one of the top reps, but within six months, I was let go because of changes that were made to the quality requirements at my center. These changes were made in October and I was let go at the beginning of January being told that I was being let go for not meeting the new requirements for the last 6 months. The requirements were only 3 months old and had continued to show improvement in the new requirements with the previous couple of weeks to my departure being completely meeting them. To top it off, all of my other metrics were in the top of the center, sales, CRT, commitment to schedule, etc, and I was constantly getting very good bonuses for my sales numbers. My termination had nothing to do with quality. It had to do with reducing staff without having to go thru “layoffs”. When I left I can honestly say, I was THRILLED BEYOND BELIEF. It was like a huge weight was lifted off of my shoulders. I totally enjoyed my job, as I am still in telesales and customer service, but I have never worked for a company that treats it’s employees that poorly in my life. High pay and great benefits are no match for working for a great employer. I find it very funny. The manager that fired me asked me if I had anything to say as I was escorted out of the building. I said “I give this company 2 years to be either out of business or bought out by someone else.” 

        • jon

          My wife went through the same rough patch when switching from customer care to financial care. When she went from helping customers with issues to basically collecting money from dead beats, it was a culture shock. The way t-mobile used to make customers “happy” is to give away the farm. The thing t-mobile is trying to do is insert a selling culture. The retail company I am a manager for rolled out a similar intiative three years ago. We have done it slowly and was more subtle about it. The fact of the matter is YOU can provide world class customer service, while ALSO promoting a selling culture. I agree with you tmobile basically flipped a switch and didn’t get the buy-in from its reps and didn’t give you guys incrimental goals towards that selling culture. It sounds like you were a casualty of that agressive roll out. It sounds like you couldn’t continue to provide customer service and sell customers what they need. It’s unfortunate and I am glad you landed on your feet. I felt compelled to say something because there are millions of customers and employees that ARE happy with t-mobile. Boards like these are full of haters for one reason…people are only motivated to write or voice their opinions when they are pissed. VOC scores in my retail business impove dramatically when we have more customer participation. Since I understand this concept, I will continue to promote our family’s voicestream/tmobile experience in places where most people only post because of their displeasure….

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  • ReallyNow??

    Let T-Mobile keep screwing around. I am out of contract, and I will march right over to Sprint, especially since they have the iPhone 5 coming.

    • Littlewc27

      TMobile’s getting it too… :)

      • Goukisan

        what T-Mobile lol??????
        keep hoping

      • Goukisan

        what T-Mobile lol??????
        keep hoping

    • Littlewc27

      TMobile’s getting it too… :)

    • Littlewc27

      TMobile’s getting it too… :)

    • Littlewc27

      TMobile’s getting it too… :)

    • Goukisan

      great so a over rated phone is coming to an over rated network??? LOL you can keep it

    • Goukisan

      great so a over rated phone is coming to an over rated network??? LOL you can keep it

  • lily

    Jon nailed it. Read his comment below – he’s completely on target and his experience mirrors my experience as a 9-year employee. Call center staffing is cyclical and turnover is high, even if you’re not looking an “acquisition” in the face. Anyone who looks at this as alarming doesn’t know the business. Will I be alarmed if we don’t start staffing up in Nov/Dec? Yes. Why that time? Because in our business, CS beefs up in JANUARY as new holiday customers begin to call. Educate yourself a little before making comments. 

    • Bullzi

      nah your wrong lily tmobile was a great place to work before but it is obvious that it changed thats why the reps morale is low ive seen sups that was with the company for longtime longer then me get fired for the most bogus reasons why would they all be lieing why so many our focus as a company changed from voice of the customer to voice of the buisness they no longer pay any attention to the quality of your call only the amount of time it takes weather or not that person calls back its horrible exp these are not lies. i still have my job but everyone in my center would prefer to be fired. its really bad.

      • Cmwunderle1

        I too know of other companies call centers that only cared how long the call took and how many calls were taken instead of quality of call. Its just wrong.

      • lily

        I’m sorry it’s like that for you Bullzi. I’ve really found that the reps’ experience varies depending on your site – local leadership plays such a key role in the morale in the center. I for one was heartbroken to see our quality program switch to just voice of the business – it was never the intent for vob to completely replace the customer experience portion evaluated. But center leaders together decided to go in that direction even when quality was trying to talk them out of it. I hear the change in the calls I listen to – our reps used to be so much more engaged and now many are completely passive with the customer. I really feel for our customers -and- for the reps who want to keep doing a good job for our customers. It’s a hard time for T-Mobile USA.

      • lily

        I’m sorry it’s like that for you Bullzi. I’ve really found that the reps’ experience varies depending on your site – local leadership plays such a key role in the morale in the center. I for one was heartbroken to see our quality program switch to just voice of the business – it was never the intent for vob to completely replace the customer experience portion evaluated. But center leaders together decided to go in that direction even when quality was trying to talk them out of it. I hear the change in the calls I listen to – our reps used to be so much more engaged and now many are completely passive with the customer. I really feel for our customers -and- for the reps who want to keep doing a good job for our customers. It’s a hard time for T-Mobile USA.

      • Stressfree

        I hear the same thing from the few fellow employees that are left in my old center. Straight Bs! It’s bad that people have to feel that way, but it is what it is.

    • ww88ww

      If this is “cyclical”, then T-Mo leaders need to put up or shut up, provide proof of this by showing similar cuts in previous years.  I won’t hold my breath.

    • ww88ww

      If this is “cyclical”, then T-Mo leaders need to put up or shut up, provide proof of this by showing similar cuts in previous years.  I won’t hold my breath.

    • Briguydj32

      The slowest months in CC are Jan, Feb, Mar…. educate yourself… 

      • lily

        Maybe if you’re in retail, but not in wireless CUSTOMER SERVICE.Every person who got a new phone over the holidays calls, a)when they get their first bill and realize they didn’t read their contract or listen to the sales rep telling them about the activation fee, b)when they can’t pay their first bill after they realize they over-used their new toy, c)when they can’t pay their first bill because Junior overused HIS new toy and Mom and Dad didn’t set up any controls, d)when they can’t figure out how to USE additional functions on their new toy because they didn’t go to the OEM site to look and it was easier to call TMO.

        • No Dice

          You are correct Lily. You will also be alarmed when you dont get that beefy influx of new employees. I worked there for 5yrs before was fired for BS and attrition in my call center was never so High. I was Managment so you can quote me on that.

        • No Dice

          You are correct Lily. You will also be alarmed when you dont get that beefy influx of new employees. I worked there for 5yrs before was fired for BS and attrition in my call center was never so High. I was Managment so you can quote me on that.

      • lily

        Maybe if you’re in retail, but not in wireless CUSTOMER SERVICE.Every person who got a new phone over the holidays calls, a)when they get their first bill and realize they didn’t read their contract or listen to the sales rep telling them about the activation fee, b)when they can’t pay their first bill after they realize they over-used their new toy, c)when they can’t pay their first bill because Junior overused HIS new toy and Mom and Dad didn’t set up any controls, d)when they can’t figure out how to USE additional functions on their new toy because they didn’t go to the OEM site to look and it was easier to call TMO.

  • Cmwunderle1

    I went online today on chat with tmobile. Replacement is on its way! Future reference…. Dont call on weekends!! Angry staff on weekends. This is my fourth return, btw, haf a bad run this past month. Only alternate phone they offered was a sidekick 4g, to me not in the same realm as the mytouch.4g. At least they replaced it.

  • guest

    Thanks for the link, but Josh is incorrect.  The 300 K ATT employees are not all Union.  Only hourly (non-management) employees are union employees.  Any T-Mobile emps that are hourly and able to keep their jobs will be unionized.  .

  • guest

    Thanks for the link, but Josh is incorrect.  The 300 K ATT employees are not all Union.  Only hourly (non-management) employees are union employees.  Any T-Mobile emps that are hourly and able to keep their jobs will be unionized.  .

  • guest

    Thanks for the link, but Josh is incorrect.  The 300 K ATT employees are not all Union.  Only hourly (non-management) employees are union employees.  Any T-Mobile emps that are hourly and able to keep their jobs will be unionized.  .

  • Firestone1984

    so i was just fired today. i was told that i was being let go because of my request for intermittent medical leave due to back problems and migraines which were also made worse by the job conditions in the call center i worked at. they stated the main reason i was being let go was because my medical condition was prohibiting me from doing the basic job functions. i believe that i was discriminated against and that my termination is due to the merger. its not just me who has been fired recently i know a lot of people who’ve been let go under very similarly shady circumstances. the call center is like a ghost town ,they have been firing people left and right at an alarming rate. everyone there is constantly stressed out and worried about loosing their jobs. everyday the place gets more and more empty.
      the reason behind the high hold times is because there is less and less people to take the increasing call volume which is constantly building up. the bottom line is that they are firing as many people as possible before the merger goes through so they do not have to pay any severance pay. if they kept the amount of employees they had last year the amount of payout for severance would have been in the millions. why would t-mobile want to pay out that kind money to their hard working employees when they can just fire you and keep it ???

    T-mobile is wrongfully terminating its employees and should be held accountable for its actions.

    • FrmRep

      I was let go for the same reasons about a month ago. Had been out on a medical leave due to a back injury. I was called into HR and was told that my only choice was to resign since my condition was preventing me from doing my job. 

      HR tries to force you into resigning. They try to force you to sign papers saying you resigned. That way you are not eligible for unemployment. I refused to sign and was told I couldn’t work.

      I was denied unemployment last week.

      • http://twitter.com/jakcrow Jak Crow

        I don’t think they can force you out for medical issues, especially if those issues arose from working there. You may want to pursue a workers comp case against them. You should also dispute the denial of unemployment, since you were forced out because you refused to “resign”, which would have prevented you from claiming unemployment as well.

        • FrmRep

          Jak, this has been T-Mobile’s standard operating procedure for some time. They don’t let people go. They force employees something they call “decision time” and try and force people to quit. If you sign the papers saying you resign you are screwed for unemployment, but if you don’t sign them they won’t let you work and then force you into a position of abandoning your job.

          They are doing this with the new jacked up metrics they are forcing reps to meet.I’ve seen what they’ve done to me to many people in the years I worked there.

          I was denied unemployment after an appeal.

        • Blah

          all i can say is…. if you perform then you are fine. If your not performing and constantly taking days off… then a call center job is not for you.

        • No Dice

          Wait till the MBE gets so low even the Top 5% banquet winners cant hit them. Post something then….

        • No Dice

          Wait till the MBE gets so low even the Top 5% banquet winners cant hit them. Post something then….

        • boobalah

          You should have hired a lawyer to attend your appeal. You know tmob always denies unemployment benefits!

        • boobalah

          You should have hired a lawyer to attend your appeal. You know tmob always denies unemployment benefits!

    • Briguydj32

      Then why did you agree? In all seriousness, T-Mobile can let anyone go, for any given reason, at any given time…. You signed a document called an “offer letter” which states the fact.

    • Briguydj32

      Then why did you agree? In all seriousness, T-Mobile can let anyone go, for any given reason, at any given time…. You signed a document called an “offer letter” which states the fact.

    • Stressfree

      I was let go as well, different situation, mine was not selling enough. Whats so crazy is the people that let you go, are always the next to get fired.

  • http://twitter.com/scottyabrown Scotty Brown

    Corporate is a ghost town… people leaving, and lay-offs.

  • 23

    I though customer care was not outsourced?? I just called at 3 pm central and got guy with a huge accent who introduced himself as a cc rep. I asked him what state he was in and said he wasnt allowed to tell me.

  • 23

    I though customer care was not outsourced?? I just called at 3 pm central and got guy with a huge accent who introduced himself as a cc rep. I asked him what state he was in and said he wasnt allowed to tell me.

  • 23

    I though customer care was not outsourced?? I just called at 3 pm central and got guy with a huge accent who introduced himself as a cc rep. I asked him what state he was in and said he wasnt allowed to tell me.

  • 23

    I though customer care was not outsourced?? I just called at 3 pm central and got guy with a huge accent who introduced himself as a cc rep. I asked him what state he was in and said he wasnt allowed to tell me.

  • 23

    I though customer care was not outsourced?? I just called at 3 pm central and got guy with a huge accent who introduced himself as a cc rep. I asked him what state he was in and said he wasnt allowed to tell me.

    • Briguydj32

      they’re not allowed to say… and there are people in this country with accents…. huge ones…. ass

      • Mean Mugger

        Umm they are allowed to say… ASS. And i to am to the point of thinking that they are already outsourcing CC positions, whether they are telling reps if that’s true or not I don’t know. I used to be a CSR and I recently called in for a friend, it was 1pm PT, and I talked to a rep who was definitely from the Philippines.  At first i thought I was in flex pay so I asked if I was speaking with the flex dept or if I had a flex account which he confirmed “no you have a regular post paid account” I asked what state he was in and was told they are not allowed to say,  so I asked what site number he was at and again was told he was not allowed to say, finally I just asked for his rep ID as any rep id will always start with the reps site number, and to my surprise it was not a site number I have ever heard of, so unless T-mobile has been building new sites in the 3 months since I  left I will say they have already started outsourcing CC positions.  And I would encourage any current T-mobile rep to try the same thing, call from a friends account that is not an employee, as when I call in on my old phone number that is an employee account I still 100% of the time receive in house reps. And do the same thing as for there rep id, and look that number up in the site index. i would be curious to see the results.

        • 23

          I’m not an ass. I have an accent myself. I’m just a tmo employee that’s taken back by my employer blatantly providing me false information. It is our policy to be allowed to say what state we are in. And we were also told regular post paid accounts or customer care was 100% US. And that they were not outsourcing. So when this guy won’t even tell me where he is at plus clearly sounds line he’s from the Philipines. I was just dumbfounded.

        • Blah

          well if your an employee like myself then you should really find out the facts then from your support right? we still have a contract with the flexpay reps in the Philipines and we have to stick to the contract with them until it is over… since we no longer activley offer flexpay the only department to put them in was customer care until the contract is over. so instead of being dumbfounded…. ask questions so you get your facts.

        • 23

          Well I did ask and they told they didn’t know. This was the reason for my post here since as you know this page gives us updates faster than we get them at tmo. If you would not have assumed I hadn’t already asked then you would’ve already known that fact.

        • STILL NO DICE!

          THATS WHERE THOSE POSITIONS WILL STAY TOO!  Douche (not a typo) Telecom couldnt care less. They trying to get the biggest bottom line from now till the merger goes through. Greedy much???  Jokes on them. Good job DOJ! What do they care about American jobs? As much as I care about German jobs? 0!

        • Letspartybigfoot

          Who cares if a rep is in the US or not. I doesn’t make them any more or less capable of helping you with your reason for calling. And ultimately that’s what a caller wants to accomplish. Its annoying when customers won’t give people with accents a chance and automatically assume they are incapable or incompetent. Foolish hardheaded americans.

        • Letspartybigfoot

          Who cares if a rep is in the US or not. I doesn’t make them any more or less capable of helping you with your reason for calling. And ultimately that’s what a caller wants to accomplish. Its annoying when customers won’t give people with accents a chance and automatically assume they are incapable or incompetent. Foolish hardheaded americans.

        • Greyfoxxero

          I’ll see your “Foolish hardheaded americans” and raise you a “Language Barrier”.

      • ItsMichaelNotMike

        From what I can determine over the years, no matter the company, when asked, employees in the U.S. reveal where they are located.  But if the CSR is NOT located in the U.S., the CSR or representative has told me what your say “we are not allowed to say.”  (That pretty much is an admission by the CSR he or she is not located in the States.)

        You can test this out. Ask a person with a thick accent where he or she is located, they will tell you “we are not permitted to give out that information.” Ask someone WITHOUT an accent where he or she is located, they will always say at least what state they are in.

        For years I have asked T-Mobile employee WITHOUT accents where they were, they have not hesitated to tell me, some even say the city, but all have said which state they are in.  After that we have chatted about the weather where they are, etc.

        In contrast, every time I have asked a T-Mobile CSR with a thick accent where they were, they told me they could not give out that information.

        Of course the silliness of all this is why, as YOU say, “they’re not allowed to say.”  What’s the logic behind that?  Do tell. What, is there some kind of security concern that customers might find out in which state T-Mobile has customer service centers?  LOL.

        We all know that the “they” who are not allowed to reveal where they are located are the CSRs located outside the U.S.

        And the only reason “they” are not allowed to reveal that information is because T-Mobile does not want U.S. customers to know the CSR is outside the U.S. All kinds of problems can develop on the CSR admitting he or she is not in the U.S.  For example, that will confirm the CSR is most likely reading from a script, that he has minimal knowledge, and that that is the reason the customer is getting lousy service.

        Also, if the CSRs revealed they are not in the U.S. I suspect a large proportion of customers would get angry and either demand a U.S. CSR or hang up and call back until they got one.

        Sidenote:  Your statement also begs the question, why is it that U.S. employees reveal where in the U.S. they are situated?  I guess all those employee are breaking T-Mobile rules when spilling the beans and telling T-Mobile secrets.  Sheesh… it’s a sad day when only furriners live by the T-Mobile mantra… “loose lips sink ships.” 

      • ItsMichaelNotMike

        From what I can determine over the years, no matter the company, when asked, employees in the U.S. reveal where they are located.  But if the CSR is NOT located in the U.S., the CSR or representative has told me what your say “we are not allowed to say.”  (That pretty much is an admission by the CSR he or she is not located in the States.)

        You can test this out. Ask a person with a thick accent where he or she is located, they will tell you “we are not permitted to give out that information.” Ask someone WITHOUT an accent where he or she is located, they will always say at least what state they are in.

        For years I have asked T-Mobile employee WITHOUT accents where they were, they have not hesitated to tell me, some even say the city, but all have said which state they are in.  After that we have chatted about the weather where they are, etc.

        In contrast, every time I have asked a T-Mobile CSR with a thick accent where they were, they told me they could not give out that information.

        Of course the silliness of all this is why, as YOU say, “they’re not allowed to say.”  What’s the logic behind that?  Do tell. What, is there some kind of security concern that customers might find out in which state T-Mobile has customer service centers?  LOL.

        We all know that the “they” who are not allowed to reveal where they are located are the CSRs located outside the U.S.

        And the only reason “they” are not allowed to reveal that information is because T-Mobile does not want U.S. customers to know the CSR is outside the U.S. All kinds of problems can develop on the CSR admitting he or she is not in the U.S.  For example, that will confirm the CSR is most likely reading from a script, that he has minimal knowledge, and that that is the reason the customer is getting lousy service.

        Also, if the CSRs revealed they are not in the U.S. I suspect a large proportion of customers would get angry and either demand a U.S. CSR or hang up and call back until they got one.

        Sidenote:  Your statement also begs the question, why is it that U.S. employees reveal where in the U.S. they are situated?  I guess all those employee are breaking T-Mobile rules when spilling the beans and telling T-Mobile secrets.  Sheesh… it’s a sad day when only furriners live by the T-Mobile mantra… “loose lips sink ships.” 

      • NO DICE

        We are allowed to say just not specific regions or Cities. I KNOW THIS…

  • Briguydj32

    nobody got fired or let go.. these jobs were open requisitions that t-mobile decided to not fill… which makes sense with a looming merger, because the customer care training program is 8 weeks long… That’s a pretty big investment to make.

  • Briguydj32

    nobody got fired or let go.. these jobs were open requisitions that t-mobile decided to not fill… which makes sense with a looming merger, because the customer care training program is 8 weeks long… That’s a pretty big investment to make.

  • http://twitter.com/jakcrow Jak Crow

    Maybe you can drive CWA to stop being a schlep for the telcos going forward.

  • http://twitter.com/jakcrow Jak Crow

    Maybe you can drive CWA to stop being a schlep for the telcos going forward.

  • Steelers0131

    Unions will do you no good if the company no longer exists. They cannot stop a buyout.

  • Steelers0131

    Unions will do you no good if the company no longer exists. They cannot stop a buyout.

  • Steelers0131

    Unions will do you no good if the company no longer exists. They cannot stop a buyout.