T-Mobile To Increase Regulatory Fee, Doesn’t Allow You To Exit Contract

Word has gotten out that T-Mobile has been sending out notices like the one seen in the image above regarding an upcoming increase in T-Mobile’s Regulatory Programs Fee. While plenty of you have emailed in the last 24 hours with hopes this might give you an escape from your T-Mobile contract we don’t believe that is the case.

T-Mobile’s dedicated page to Regulatory Programs Fees highlights that any change doesn’t mandate a change in the contract or a waiver of the Early Termination Fee. While in years past carriers have often allowed customers to exit their contract early due to such changes, newer contracts allow for the company to change the fees without allowing the customer an early exit. Read the full FAQ below:

Regulatory Programs Fee

Since 2004, customers have been charged a Regulatory Programs Fee on their bill. The Regulatory Programs Fee is used to help offset costs T-Mobile incurs to comply with local, state, and federal regulations, such as E911. This fee is not a government mandated charge or tax.

Regulatory Programs Fee FAQs

What is the fee for?
The fee is assessed to help offset costs of compliance with various federal, state, and local government mandates, programs, and obligations.

Does your competition charge the fee?
Other wireless operators charge a Regulatory Programs Fee, a Regulatory Cost Recovery Charge, and/or an Administrative Charge.

Can I terminate my contract without incurring an Early Termination Fee because of the Regulatory Programs Fee increase?
No. Early Termination Fees will apply if you choose to terminate because of the Regulatory Programs Fee increase.

Is this fee applied to the account or to each line on the account?
The fee is applied to each line on the account.

Is this a one time fee?
The fee is a monthly recurring fee.

Has this fee always been assessed?
A Regulatory Programs Fee has been charged since 2004, and is disclosed at the point of sale.

How much is the fee?
The fee is currently $1.41. Effective August 15, the fee will be $1.61.

I am currently exempt from this fee. Will I now be charged as of August 15?
If you are currently exempt from the Regulatory Programs Fee, you will continue to be exempt and will not be charged.

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  • Bryan

    How does one become exempt from the fee?

    • Probably if you’re using  your phone for charity work. Many churches and such are tax exempt.

      • Anonymous

        It’s not a tax or a government issued fee thus it would not be exempt for nonprofits. It is an FFC ALLOWED and carrier IMPOSED fee.

        • they incresed it .40 cents in a year and half.  it was 1.21 plus you have to understand this just means they are going to merge with att because they charge 1.61

        • they incresed it .40 cents in a year and half.  it was 1.21 plus you have to understand this just means they are going to merge with att because they charge 1.61

        • Any time AT&T gets involved, prices go up. What a horrendous deal this was.

        • they incresed it .40 cents in a year and half.  it was 1.21 plus you have to understand this just means they are going to merge with att because they charge 1.61

      • Anonymous

        It’s not a tax or a government issued fee thus it would not be exempt for nonprofits. It is an FFC ALLOWED and carrier IMPOSED fee.

    • Probably if you’re using  your phone for charity work. Many churches and such are tax exempt.

    • Probably if you’re using  your phone for charity work. Many churches and such are tax exempt.

    • Anonymous

      I just care about getting off contract!! Lol

  • Bryan

    How does one become exempt from the fee?

  • Anonymous

    If its not a government mandated thing then any change should allow ppl to exit their contract for free

  • Anonymous

    If its not a government mandated thing then any change should allow ppl to exit their contract for free

    • Anonymous

      Hope this becomes true!

    • Anonymous

      Hope this becomes true!

    • Anonymous

      Hope this becomes true!

  • Chewy106

    It’s twenty cents. Really, wanting to ditch the contract over a twenty-cent increase of a government regulated fee?

  • Chewy106

    It’s twenty cents. Really, wanting to ditch the contract over a twenty-cent increase of a government regulated fee?

    • theWayofThings

      No, they are wanting to display fake outrage so they can threaten to cancel and get free phones or discounted plans from Retention…

    • theWayofThings

      No, they are wanting to display fake outrage so they can threaten to cancel and get free phones or discounted plans from Retention…

  • Nest11

    please for 20 cents is not a big deal, besides everybody does it

  • Nest11

    please for 20 cents is not a big deal, besides everybody does it

    • Anonymous

      The point here is that we wanna get out :p

      • Anonymous

        You ain’t a man of your word, people like you borrow money and do not pay it back, people like me, buy you and your three kids food and medical bills. 

        • Anonymous

          People like u r also racist bastards that look down in people based on income and race………I’m just trying to survive and make the best out of my life

        • jarjon76

          No you’re not, your trying to wiggle your way out of a commitment you made, nothing more. Are you the type that also files frivolous lawsuits? 

        • Anonymous

          I wasn’t counting on having 1,800 less a year after my herniated back……….so I can’t really keep that promise ……

        • jarjon76

          So $2.40 a year is going to set you back to the point where you can’t afford living? Stop being a drama queen.

        • theWayofThings

          I’m still trying to figure out how calling someone dishonest makes them a “racist bastard” …..

        • theWayofThings

          I’m still trying to figure out how calling someone dishonest makes them a “racist bastard” …..

        • jarjon76

          Who knows? The guy is trying to find a loophole so he can back out of an agreement he made with T-Mobile, so I guess he’s upset he can’t find one.

        • jarjon76

          Who knows? The guy is trying to find a loophole so he can back out of an agreement he made with T-Mobile, so I guess he’s upset he can’t find one.

        • Anonymous

          This is what I would say if you talked to me and I’m being completely genuine: “I am very sorry to hear that you hurt your back. That’s awful. However, when you signed a contract with T-Mobile, it was mutually beneficial in some way; probably received a greatly discounted or free phone. It wouldn’t exactly be fair or smart business to let customers break contracts and leave T-Mobile with no way to recoup that money due to life circumstances.”

        • jarjon, you said he was “trying to wiggle your way out of a commitment you made.”  Didn’t T-Mobile make a commitment, which they are now breaking by increasing the fee?  This is not a government mandated tax; this is T-Mobile increasing the fee on all of their customers in order to affect their profitability.

          I don’t care if it’s only 20 cents, THEY are changing the deal.

          Why should they get to change the agreement without the customer having a way to say, “No thanks, I’m out of here?”

        • jarjon76

          No you’re not, your trying to wiggle your way out of a commitment you made, nothing more. Are you the type that also files frivolous lawsuits? 

        • YouKnowMe

          Where did you get racist?  Too quick to pull that tired card.

        • YouKnowMe

          Where did you get racist?  Too quick to pull that tired card.

        • Anonymous

          that is quite the opposite actually this is like you borrow money from a guy who says okay I will lend you the money at a 8 percent interest rate every month for 2 year until you pay me back but then a couple months later into the deal he decides he wants more money so he raises the rate. Its being greedy sure only a couple of cents but its the principle of it.

        • Exactly. Even if he changes it to 8.05%, he is still changing the deal. T-Mobile is the greedy one here.

    • Anonymous

      The point here is that we wanna get out :p

    • Anonymous

      The point here is that we wanna get out :p

    • Anonymous

      The point here is that we wanna get out :p

  • Nest11

    please for 20 cents is not a big deal, besides everybody does it

  • Anonymous

    Is there any possible way to get off?………I really wanna just go to a month to month carrier like metro PCs……..these contracts r getting too out of hand

    • theWayofThings

      Sure! You can get out of your contract any time you want…. just pay the early termination fee that you agreed to when you signed the contract in the first place… There ya go! Problem solved! …

      I guess, maybe you shouldn’t have signed a contract that you didn’t want to complete… live and learn… live and learn…

      • jarjon76

        Luis5int7 wants to sign contracts so he can get a discounted price on his phone. However, he’d also like to get out of his contract anytime he wants because that his “right”. Gotta love people like that.

      • You’re a moron.  “I guess, maybe you shouldn’t have signed a contract that you didn’t want
        to complete… live and learn… live and learn…”

        Maybe T-Mobile shouldn;t be changing the terms and trying to tell people they can’t get out of it.  Why do you agree with the huge company that will make serious profit off of this increase? What is wrong with your brain?

  • Anonymous

    Is there any possible way to get off?………I really wanna just go to a month to month carrier like metro PCs……..these contracts r getting too out of hand

  • Anonymous

    Is there any possible way to get off?………I really wanna just go to a month to month carrier like metro PCs……..these contracts r getting too out of hand

  • Anonymous

    Is there any possible way to get off?………I really wanna just go to a month to month carrier like metro PCs……..these contracts r getting too out of hand

  • Anonymous

    Its just that I lost myjob and temporarily disabled and I need something cheaper because I have a family of 3 to feed

    • xDeToXx

      In this economy, this isn’t totally unreasonable. Maybe you got a concussion in Iraq and can’t start your next duty station until you get a dr’s note next month. 

    • xDeToXx

      In this economy, this isn’t totally unreasonable. Maybe you got a concussion in Iraq and can’t start your next duty station until you get a dr’s note next month. 

    • xDeToXx

      In this economy, this isn’t totally unreasonable. Maybe you got a concussion in Iraq and can’t start your next duty station until you get a dr’s note next month. 

  • Anonymous

    Its just that I lost myjob and temporarily disabled and I need something cheaper because I have a family of 3 to feed

  • Anonymous

    Its just that I lost myjob and temporarily disabled and I need something cheaper because I have a family of 3 to feed

  • Anonymous

    Its just that I lost myjob and temporarily disabled and I need something cheaper because I have a family of 3 to feed

  • Anonymous

    honestly who cares. 20 cents really people? we are going to complain over this? if you can’t afford an extra 2.40 a year then you shouldn’t have a cell phone. and definitely shouldn’t have internet.

    • Anonymous

      There’s a difference when it keeps piling up till it becomes 30more a month :p

      • Anonymous

        yea? that will never happen. We are talking about 20 cents…. you are afraid its going to rise to 30 dollars? you’re an idiot.

        • Anonymous

          Its not just that everything increases a little every year

        • theWayofThings

          Yeah, everything increases a little every year… that’s called “reality”… some people just have a difficult time accepting it…

        • theWayofThings

          Yeah, everything increases a little every year… that’s called “reality”… some people just have a difficult time accepting it…

        • xDeToXx

          This year, it’s 20c. Next year it’s 50c. Then $1.20. That’s $30 a year now. If I’m a poor guy, and I make $25k/yr and my expenses are $24,090/yr that $30 is now outside of my means. 

          Most people in this country can afford 20c a line. But if you are a dad with 5 lines, that becomes $1/mo. And for poor families that $1 a month *could* break them. It shouldn’t, but eventually if *little* fees increase every year for every service (suddenly my bank goes up, and my cell phone, and my cable, and my credit card fees rise 1%. Eventually it all builds up.) 

        • Anonymous

          Thank u……finally someone who understands!

        • jarjon76

          Paranoid much?

        • Stupid much? Bend over much? Don’t understand that companies continue do this because idiots like you just accept it much?

        • theWayofThings

          If you’re so worried about that, you’re contract as of right now, at maximum under normal circumstances, is 2 years from today.. Even if it goes up .50 next year as you fear it will, that’s still a pittance… after that, as long as you don’t sign any new contracts, you can cancel on 07/14/13 and not have to worry about any more increases. Then you can merrily go find another carrier that doesn’t ever increase their fees or anything else… good luck with that… :)

        • Anonymous

          If only people understood this maybe just maybe everything wouldn’t be so expensive in comparison now. the “its only 20 more cents” thought  is the thing that allows people to take advantage and be greedy.

        • xDeToXx

          This year, it’s 20c. Next year it’s 50c. Then $1.20. That’s $30 a year now. If I’m a poor guy, and I make $25k/yr and my expenses are $24,090/yr that $30 is now outside of my means. 

          Most people in this country can afford 20c a line. But if you are a dad with 5 lines, that becomes $1/mo. And for poor families that $1 a month *could* break them. It shouldn’t, but eventually if *little* fees increase every year for every service (suddenly my bank goes up, and my cell phone, and my cable, and my credit card fees rise 1%. Eventually it all builds up.) 

        • xDeToXx

          This year, it’s 20c. Next year it’s 50c. Then $1.20. That’s $30 a year now. If I’m a poor guy, and I make $25k/yr and my expenses are $24,090/yr that $30 is now outside of my means. 

          Most people in this country can afford 20c a line. But if you are a dad with 5 lines, that becomes $1/mo. And for poor families that $1 a month *could* break them. It shouldn’t, but eventually if *little* fees increase every year for every service (suddenly my bank goes up, and my cell phone, and my cable, and my credit card fees rise 1%. Eventually it all builds up.) 

    • Anonymous

      There’s a difference when it keeps piling up till it becomes 30more a month :p

    • Anonymous

      There’s a difference when it keeps piling up till it becomes 30more a month :p

    • Anonymous

      There’s a difference when it keeps piling up till it becomes 30more a month :p

    • J. Williams

      I agree with ya.  20 cents…its not that bad.

    • Anonymous

      Its the principle of it

    • You idiots don’t realize what a small increase like this means in profit to a carrier with as many customers as T-Mobile.

      When do you tell them “Enough!”

      They count on tools like all of you to do these exact things, to just say, “Durrrrr, it’s only 2 cents.”  It’s MILLIONS to them, you idiots, and that’s why they will continue to do it if you keep dropping your pants and bending over, because it’s only 20 cents, it’s hardly gonna hurt. Idiots.

  • Anonymous

    honestly who cares. 20 cents really people? we are going to complain over this? if you can’t afford an extra 2.40 a year then you shouldn’t have a cell phone. and definitely shouldn’t have internet.

  • Anonymous

    honestly who cares. 20 cents really people? we are going to complain over this? if you can’t afford an extra 2.40 a year then you shouldn’t have a cell phone. and definitely shouldn’t have internet.

  • bull

  • bull

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  • J. Williams

    This is nothing big, they are just letting you know.  Let it go, it’s only 20 cents.

    • And when they add another 5 cents in a few months, you say, “It’s not much, big deal.” And when it goes another dime next year, you say, “It’s not much, big deal.” And when they do the same to other fees, you say, “It’s not much, big deal.”

      When do you stop being a stupid sheep?

      • J. Williams

        Name calling, wow. This is an old topic, and you are so many days late. Go away please, thanks. Or should I call you a sheep? lol.

        Sent from my Verizon iPhone 4

  • Anonymous

    Is this even legal? lol… seems like some people want to get out of their contracts.

    • Anonymous

      yea if you read the article you would see that it is legal and in the t-mobile terms…. just like every other carrier. 

      • Anonymous

        I was just wondering, cus as mentioned in the blog that before people can get out of their contract… and now that t-mobile doesn’t allow it… sound a bit fishy. bu thanks!

        • theWayofThings

          That was probably because before, T-mobile didn’t have the correct wording in their old contracts that allowed for increasing the regulatory program fee, thus people that were still on the older contracts could cancel and have the fee waived… With contracts after that, T-mobile has reworded and sealed that loop-hole… since anyone that had a contract with the old wording is either off-contract or on a new reworded contract, that particular out is now null and void…

        • theWayofThings

          That was probably because before, T-mobile didn’t have the correct wording in their old contracts that allowed for increasing the regulatory program fee, thus people that were still on the older contracts could cancel and have the fee waived… With contracts after that, T-mobile has reworded and sealed that loop-hole… since anyone that had a contract with the old wording is either off-contract or on a new reworded contract, that particular out is now null and void…

      • It may NOT be legal, but T-Mobile is going to tell you you can’t get out of the contract, because that’s the most cost effective thing for them to do.

      • It may NOT be legal, but T-Mobile is going to tell you you can’t get out of the contract, because that’s the most cost effective thing for them to do.

  • ButterNutter

    The point isn’t that it’s $0.20 – they very well could increase it by $10.  According to these terms how are we suppose to stop them from screwing us over?

    • Anonymous

      wait till your contract is over, and go to a non contract plan…. or stop being such a worrywart and live your life.

      • Sean, you aren’t the brightest bulb in the chandelier. They could raise the price where it would cost you exactly as much to pay a termination fee — and you could do NOTHING about it.  Your answer is the answer of a child who lacks the ability to reason things out.

  • Kpc21

    Verizon did the same thing a couple weeks ago. But the out for those people wanting to cancel their contracts, was that in the contract it states that if there is a adverse price change to your current pricing structure you could cancel the contract based on that fact. However, these taxes and fee’s increase and go up all the time and most usually the carrier just absorbs the cost and doesn’t change your pricing structure, thus they do not have to allow people out of their contracts.

  • Anonymous

    While they can say this, it isn’t necessarily true. According to the own language of their contract (section 12) the RPF is a charge and not a fee:
    “You agree to pay all other Charges we assess to recover or defray governmental charges or costs we incur in connection with the Services we provide, such as Federal Universal Service, regulatory and administrative charges, or gross receipts and similar taxes, without regard to whether these governmental charges or costs fund programs that provide benefits to you or in your location. These Charges are not taxes or regulatory fees imposed directly on you, nor required by law to be billed to you, may be kept by us in whole or in part, and the amounts and what is included in these Charges are subject to change without notice.”

    This would mean that under section 5 a change to the RPF (a charge that recurs monthly and is not a tax or fee) would warrant termination of affected lines without ETF:WE CAN CHANGE ANY TERMS IN THE AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME. YOU MAY CANCEL THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (if applicable) IF:  (A) WE CHANGE YOUR PRICING IN A MANNER THAT MATERIALLY INCREASES YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE(S) (the amount you agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging, which does not include overage, pay-per-use or optional services (such as 411, or downloads), or taxes and fees);
    Further proof that the RPF is a charge and not a fee is that TMobile lists it under “Other Charges” on the bill, instead of under “Taxes & Fees”.

    The RPF is very much a recurring charge that they have changed in an adversely material way. Under the structure of the current Terms & Conditions you DO have a right to have your affected lines terminated with no ETF if you contact them within 14 days of the announced change (either yesterday or today depending). They might try to offer to pay the $.20 for each month of your contract, but that is not what you agreed to in the T&C either. If you want out, you have to the right terminate the affected lines. PERIOD. POINT. BLANK.

    It just so happens I don’t want to leave….

    • Anonymous

      Also they will try to throw this at you from section 12: “…..and the amounts and what is included in these Charges are subject to change without notice.”

      But even though it says they maintain the right to change the charges, nowhere does it say that you don’t have the right to terminate your contract because of it. In fact Section 5, says you do…..

      • theWayofThings

        Pretty sure T-mobile had a team of lawyers, that are far more skilled in contractual legalities than you are, look everything over and give the thumbs-up on this, before they made the declaration that contracts can not be voided for this increase…

        Just sayin’ big companies like to cover their bases with stuff like this… especially when they know there are many people out there, like you,  that are constantly looking for ways to get out of the commitments that they agreed to..

        If you want out of your contract, pay the ETF… it’s pretty simple…

        • Itmustbejj

          You are completely missing my point. I specifically said I don’t want out of my contract, but you couldn’t be arsed to read completely. All I want is for both parties of the contract to be held to the same accountability. I honor my end of a contract, I would expect a company to do the same.

          I am not a scammer, yes there are people who are, but there are also people with legitimate concerns here too. We live in an era where corporate responsibility is becoming absent and consumer rights are considered an afterthought. Be honest with what you are charging, honor your end of an agreement that you hold me to down to the letter. Those are not unreasonable requests.

          I’m not asking for a handout, I’m asking for some honesty and integrity from the other end of a contract which I am expected and do honor.

        • Pretty sure T-Mobile wouldn’t be the first company to tell their customers wrong information to save themselves some money.

        • Yes, the lawyers did the proper legal and noble thing… never heard of a company getting sued or ripping off customers, eh?  That’s okay, when you hit your teens, maybe you’ll experience a bit of real life.

    • Rich

      Dude, you do realize that you bolded the part that justifies T-Mo not letting anyone out of a contract, right? The increase in recurring charges pertain to your voice, data and messaging ONLY. that’s why it says “which does not include…” after. Also, it says “materially”, which generally implies a significant change.

      It’s $0.20. Get over it.

    • Rich

      Dude, you do realize that you bolded the part that justifies T-Mo not letting anyone out of a contract, right? The increase in recurring charges pertain to your voice, data and messaging ONLY. that’s why it says “which does not include…” after. Also, it says “materially”, which generally implies a significant change.

      It’s $0.20. Get over it.

    • Rich

      Dude, you do realize that you bolded the part that justifies T-Mo not letting anyone out of a contract, right? The increase in recurring charges pertain to your voice, data and messaging ONLY. that’s why it says “which does not include…” after. Also, it says “materially”, which generally implies a significant change.

      It’s $0.20. Get over it.

      • Anonymous

        Yes I do realize what I bolded. It states the change applies to monthly recurring fees and in parenthesis it clarifies it as “the amount you agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging,” which would include all recurring monthly fees for these services. It states it does not apply to taxes and fees which they made clear in section 12, the RPF is a charge and not a fee.

        Materially is subjective to the person it affects. It is up to the consumer to determine what is a materially adverse change to them. If a rep says that the change is not a material change, ask them at what amount would they consider it to be a material change and they will not be able to give you an answer. That is because the effect is subjective to the person it is affecting.

        I’m sick of people saying it’s $.20 cents. It’s $.20 cents per line per month. No that is not a make-or-break amount for most people. It is about exercising consumer rights, because they are disappearing at an alarming rate in this country.

        You say it’s “only $0.20”, well try shorting TMobile $0.20 cents on your bill and see what happens. If they hold you accountable, the street should go both ways.

        • TMOrep

          RPF stands for “Regulatory Programs Fee” so you can look at your bill sometime and you will clearly see that it says “Fee” so before you start pasting the T&C maybe you should read your bill so you don’t discredit yourself.  And I bet you probably are one that calls every month for us to tell you every charge on your bill because you are too lazy to read the bill yourself.  It’s amazing how many people call in and when we ask what charge they want to discuss we get the same response “I haven’t looked at my bill, just saw the balance on my phone.” I don’t see the point of sending bills out when few read them, oh I know, if we didn’t send them then everyone would bitch that they don’t get them, but when we send them out monthly they’re not even looked at. No matter what is ever done, some people will never be happy unless it’s given to them on a silver platter.

        • Anonymous

          LOL, yes I realize they CALL it a fee on your bill, but they also have to do it with an asterisk next to it (Regulatory Programs Fee*), because it is intentionally misleading. It is a charge and not a fee, as they outline in their T&C.

          I understand where you as a Tmo employee sit on this, it is easy to be cynical and side against consumers on this one because you are going to have to be the one that has to deal with a bunch of rude asshats that call in. But the truth is even though those people are likely being rude and misdirecting their anger towards you, they are mad at unfair policies by a company. It is compounded by the fact that TMobile used to be a company people felt good about supporting, and they are increasingly becoming shadier like the rest of the carriers.

          This is only speculation but I bet TMobile’s gradual transition into less and less friendly business practices has a greater effect on their employees than consumers. You have a thankless job from consumers and that is unfortunate, it’s even more unfortunate that you end up bearing the brunt of their frustration the more and more they feel slighted by your company.

        • Anonymous

          LOL, yes I realize they CALL it a fee on your bill, but they also have to do it with an asterisk next to it (Regulatory Programs Fee*), because it is intentionally misleading. It is a charge and not a fee, as they outline in their T&C.

          I understand where you as a Tmo employee sit on this, it is easy to be cynical and side against consumers on this one because you are going to have to be the one that has to deal with a bunch of rude asshats that call in. But the truth is even though those people are likely being rude and misdirecting their anger towards you, they are mad at unfair policies by a company. It is compounded by the fact that TMobile used to be a company people felt good about supporting, and they are increasingly becoming shadier like the rest of the carriers.

          This is only speculation but I bet TMobile’s gradual transition into less and less friendly business practices has a greater effect on their employees than consumers. You have a thankless job from consumers and that is unfortunate, it’s even more unfortunate that you end up bearing the brunt of their frustration the more and more they feel slighted by your company.

        • TMOrep

          RPF stands for “Regulatory Programs Fee” so you can look at your bill sometime and you will clearly see that it says “Fee” so before you start pasting the T&C maybe you should read your bill so you don’t discredit yourself.  And I bet you probably are one that calls every month for us to tell you every charge on your bill because you are too lazy to read the bill yourself.  It’s amazing how many people call in and when we ask what charge they want to discuss we get the same response “I haven’t looked at my bill, just saw the balance on my phone.” I don’t see the point of sending bills out when few read them, oh I know, if we didn’t send them then everyone would bitch that they don’t get them, but when we send them out monthly they’re not even looked at. No matter what is ever done, some people will never be happy unless it’s given to them on a silver platter.

        • OKDave

          No, a “material change” is up to the determination of a court of competent jurisdiction. It’s deliberate legal verbiage, in the same vein of “substantial performance” of a contract. 

      • xDeToXx

        $0.20 is a materially adverse change. Granted, it isn’t a significant change and most people can find that much money just walking down the street every month. But it is still a materially adverse change, in that it raises your bill whether you accept it or not. 

      • xDeToXx

        $0.20 is a materially adverse change. Granted, it isn’t a significant change and most people can find that much money just walking down the street every month. But it is still a materially adverse change, in that it raises your bill whether you accept it or not. 

      • Battlestar

        Get over yourself. An increase is an increase. If fees are raised on the government end, that’s for tmobile to sort out. Let them charge the extra $.20 to new customers or whatever the hell.  Don’t give me the verbal garbage that its “just twenty cents dude, accept it. Honor the Contract!”

        Yet by your half logic, the entity changing the contract should skate on those principles simply because its a fifth of a buck a month.  Clown.

        • According to T-Mobile, “This fee is not a government mandated charge or tax.” That means it’s up to T-Mobile to decide when it goes up.  This is definitely legal reason to abandon the contract.

      • Battlestar

        Get over yourself. An increase is an increase. If fees are raised on the government end, that’s for tmobile to sort out. Let them charge the extra $.20 to new customers or whatever the hell.  Don’t give me the verbal garbage that its “just twenty cents dude, accept it. Honor the Contract!”

        Yet by your half logic, the entity changing the contract should skate on those principles simply because its a fifth of a buck a month.  Clown.

      • Battlestar

        Get over yourself. An increase is an increase. If fees are raised on the government end, that’s for tmobile to sort out. Let them charge the extra $.20 to new customers or whatever the hell.  Don’t give me the verbal garbage that its “just twenty cents dude, accept it. Honor the Contract!”

        Yet by your half logic, the entity changing the contract should skate on those principles simply because its a fifth of a buck a month.  Clown.

    • Rich

      Dude, you do realize that you bolded the part that justifies T-Mo not letting anyone out of a contract, right? The increase in recurring charges pertain to your voice, data and messaging ONLY. that’s why it says “which does not include…” after. Also, it says “materially”, which generally implies a significant change.

      It’s $0.20. Get over it.

  • Sticknittotheman

    It’s easy to break your contract with Tmobile or any other mobile provider.  Set yourself up on the auto charge to a credit card…then cancel that card and advise them you are terminating the contract.  They can’t assess a termination fee to a canceled card.  What are they gonna do…..sue you for a couple hundred bucks?  The’ll mail delinquency notices to you for a year and then wipe it from their books as unrecoverable.  Just sayin’

    • end1

      They’ll send the amount owed to a collections agency, and put it on your credit. So, every time someone checks out your credit (banks, car, apartments, etc) , theyll see T-Mobile has a collection against you.

      Being a property manager, I wouldn’t rent to anyone that can’t pay off their cell phone bill. 

      • theWayofThings

        Agreed… and then try to get on at any BIG cellphone company with an outstanding hit to your credit from a cellphone company on credit check… You’ll be in deposit city, if they even take you at all….

        • Sticknittotheman

          outstanding hit?  Ha!  That’s funny!

        • Sticknittotheman

          outstanding hit?  Ha!  That’s funny!

        • Sticknittotheman

          outstanding hit?  Ha!  That’s funny!

        • Sticknittotheman

          outstanding hit?  Ha!  That’s funny!

      • theWayofThings

        Agreed… and then try to get on at any BIG cellphone company with an outstanding hit to your credit from a cellphone company on credit check… You’ll be in deposit city, if they even take you at all….

      • theWayofThings

        Agreed… and then try to get on at any BIG cellphone company with an outstanding hit to your credit from a cellphone company on credit check… You’ll be in deposit city, if they even take you at all….

    • Weaselface

      They will turn your account over to collections. Pay the collection people or risk a hit on your credit.

    • Weaselface

      They will turn your account over to collections. Pay the collection people or risk a hit on your credit.

    • jarjon76

      How about this–don’t bother signing a contract if you don’t like being in one? You obviously like to cheat the system, which shows how low brow you must be.

    • jarjon76

      How about this–don’t bother signing a contract if you don’t like being in one? You obviously like to cheat the system, which shows how low brow you must be.

      • And you like doing business with a company that will change what it charges you at will, and you’ll bend over for it, which shows how unprincipled and illogical you are.

    • awesome

      Yeah this is the worst idea you could do, it doesn’t matter if your on ezpay or not you will still have to pay it, or plan on getting prepaid or pay a huge deposit on your next cellphone, not to mention your drop in credit score

    • awesome

      Yeah this is the worst idea you could do, it doesn’t matter if your on ezpay or not you will still have to pay it, or plan on getting prepaid or pay a huge deposit on your next cellphone, not to mention your drop in credit score

    • awesome

      Yeah this is the worst idea you could do, it doesn’t matter if your on ezpay or not you will still have to pay it, or plan on getting prepaid or pay a huge deposit on your next cellphone, not to mention your drop in credit score

    • awesome

      Yeah this is the worst idea you could do, it doesn’t matter if your on ezpay or not you will still have to pay it, or plan on getting prepaid or pay a huge deposit on your next cellphone, not to mention your drop in credit score

    • awesome

      Yeah this is the worst idea you could do, it doesn’t matter if your on ezpay or not you will still have to pay it, or plan on getting prepaid or pay a huge deposit on your next cellphone, not to mention your drop in credit score

    • TMOrep

      I say “Go for it” then a few months or year down the road when you go to apply for a car, home or any other loan and your credit has a bad debt from T-Mobile on it and you either don’t get the loan or you get a much higher interest rate then who will be laughing?  Not you.   I get several calls from pissed off people calling to pay off a bill from more then a couple years ago because it showed up on their credit while they were trying to get a loan to be approved.  So you can either be honest and pay now or be a deadbeat and pay more later.

      • Sticknittotheman

        I have a credit rating of 805 (Just checked yesterday), no car payments, and pay off my credit cards each month.  a Tmobile blip on my credit won’t mean dung.  Credit debt is dumb. 

  • Sticknittotheman

    It’s easy to break your contract with Tmobile or any other mobile provider.  Set yourself up on the auto charge to a credit card…then cancel that card and advise them you are terminating the contract.  They can’t assess a termination fee to a canceled card.  What are they gonna do…..sue you for a couple hundred bucks?  The’ll mail delinquency notices to you for a year and then wipe it from their books as unrecoverable.  Just sayin’

  • Anonymous

    im not really tripping but that 6.6 mill monthly and 72 mill yearly 

  • Anonymous

    im not really tripping but that 6.6 mill monthly and 72 mill yearly 

  • Anonymous

    im not really tripping but that 6.6 mill monthly and 72 mill yearly 

  • Anonymous

    im not really tripping but that 6.6 mill monthly and 72 mill yearly 

  • Stevejaye

    Pretty sad
    that someone would be crying about 20 cents. If you can’t afford the
    extra 20 cents then you really have bigger worries then a cell phone.

    • theWayofThings

      Maybe they wanted to use that .20 to start a business… LOL

    • theWayofThings

      Maybe they wanted to use that .20 to start a business… LOL

    • theWayofThings

      Maybe they wanted to use that .20 to start a business… LOL

  • Anonymous

    Where do I get my current contract? Can I find it online?
    In the past, I’ve been able to get out of contract when they increased the text messaging charges. I’ve never had texting as part of the plan. When they increased the text charges, I had 2 incoming texts @ 5 cents each the previous month. The CSR said I’ll be affected and canceled my contract.
    So they do cancel contracts for as low as 10 cents.

    • jarjon76

      You signed a contract–honor it. People like you make it difficult for us honest customers. If you don’t like being in a contract, next time don’t sign one. It’s that simple.

    • jarjon76

      You signed a contract–honor it. People like you make it difficult for us honest customers. If you don’t like being in a contract, next time don’t sign one. It’s that simple.

      • tecjunkie

        Your right to a extent. When they changed the plans a few months ago they didn’t automatically change my plan for free. Family plan from 750 minutes now 1000 minutes for same price. 

        If they can charge you more they will. If there is something in the plan that is benefiting the customer they won’t give it to you unless you ask. Much less tell you about it. I get a paper bill and never seen anything telling me of the 1000 minutes family plan for the same price.

        Now don’t get it twisted. I am not complaining. I am just simply saying if they make a “change” to the contract I agreed too, they should give me a option.  To either go or even a benefit for them to sign a new contract.

        • jarjon76

          There’s a big difference between them changing a plan and upping reg fees. This price “increase” isn’t going to affect you, whereas a plan change will. Let’s not go overboard with the comparisons. 

        • jarjon76

          There’s a big difference between them changing a plan and upping reg fees. This price “increase” isn’t going to affect you, whereas a plan change will. Let’s not go overboard with the comparisons. 

        • Anonymous

          A reg fee is just an extra fee that t-mobile wants to charge. They are not required to charge it. this is just a weasely way to raise revenue without letting people out of their contracts. This is a material change to a contract. A material change means that the terms changed. It doesn’t matter if they changed by 1 penney or $100. If you took them to court you could probably have your contract declared invalid if they apply that fee.

        • theWayofThings

          Nope… I’ll bet T-Mobile’s team of lawyers have the wording of the contract and the meaning of the terms of the contract wrapped up tight as a drum… if they did not, I doubt we’d be having this conversation right now. It would be like when they increased these fees on the old contracts, which did allow customers to cancel their contracts with no ETF… T-Mobile sealed that loop-hole…

           If you want to pay a lawyer a couple thousand dollars to do battle with T-mobile’s lawyers, rather than pay .20 per month or a 200.00 ETF, then by all means do so… but be prepared for a judgement that is not in your favor…

        • Stinkypinky

          Not unless you “OPT-OUT” within the first 7 to 30 days (depending on company and contract.)  With T-mobile it’s the 1st 15 days.  Just go to the Terms and Conditions tab at the bottom of their Homepage and click.  You can fill out the form or call the automated system number.

        • OKDave

          In all likelihood, your contract waives your right to sue, and requires all disputes to be settled via mediation. Virtually all newer, substantive retail agreements involving any type of long-term contract destroys the individuals right to seek recourse in the courts – you have to use the vendor’s hand-picked arbitrator. 

          In short: You lose.

        • Stinkypinky

          Not unless you “OPT-OUT” within the first 7 to 30 days (depending on company and contract.)  With T-mobile it’s the 1st 15 days.  Just go to the Terms and Conditions tab at the bottom of their Homepage and click.  You can fill out the form or call the automated system number.

        • Those arbitration clauses have been found to be invalid time and again, as the contract offerer is “bargaining” from a position of overwhelming strength. Some states don’t allow that arbitration BS in the first place.

        • jarjon76

          You might want to re-read you contract. After you do so, and still insist on taking them to court, I wish you all the luck in the world. You’ll need it.

        • You wish people luck and think they’ll need it, because you don’t have a clue about what you are speaking. Guaranteed, people WILL get out of their contracts over this. GUARANTEED.

        • You wish people luck and think they’ll need it, because you don’t have a clue about what you are speaking. Guaranteed, people WILL get out of their contracts over this. GUARANTEED.

        • You wish people luck and think they’ll need it, because you don’t have a clue about what you are speaking. Guaranteed, people WILL get out of their contracts over this. GUARANTEED.

        • Anonymous

          A reg fee is just an extra fee that t-mobile wants to charge. They are not required to charge it. this is just a weasely way to raise revenue without letting people out of their contracts. This is a material change to a contract. A material change means that the terms changed. It doesn’t matter if they changed by 1 penney or $100. If you took them to court you could probably have your contract declared invalid if they apply that fee.

        • If it benefits T-Mobile, it doesn’t affect the customer.  Gotcha.  Cuz T-Mobile isn’t going to make millions off this change, oh no, they sure won’t.  Idiot.

        • jarjon76

          There’s a big difference between them changing a plan and upping reg fees. This price “increase” isn’t going to affect you, whereas a plan change will. Let’s not go overboard with the comparisons. 

        • theWayofThings

          If you look at bob95825’s next post,  directly above this one, you’ll see it has nothing to do with anything other than he wants to scam and get a cheaper phone than he’s eligible for…

        • theWayofThings

          If you look at bob95825’s next post,  directly above this one, you’ll see it has nothing to do with anything other than he wants to scam and get a cheaper phone than he’s eligible for…

      • tecjunkie

        Your right to a extent. When they changed the plans a few months ago they didn’t automatically change my plan for free. Family plan from 750 minutes now 1000 minutes for same price. 

        If they can charge you more they will. If there is something in the plan that is benefiting the customer they won’t give it to you unless you ask. Much less tell you about it. I get a paper bill and never seen anything telling me of the 1000 minutes family plan for the same price.

        Now don’t get it twisted. I am not complaining. I am just simply saying if they make a “change” to the contract I agreed too, they should give me a option.  To either go or even a benefit for them to sign a new contract.

      • tecjunkie

        Your right to a extent. When they changed the plans a few months ago they didn’t automatically change my plan for free. Family plan from 750 minutes now 1000 minutes for same price. 

        If they can charge you more they will. If there is something in the plan that is benefiting the customer they won’t give it to you unless you ask. Much less tell you about it. I get a paper bill and never seen anything telling me of the 1000 minutes family plan for the same price.

        Now don’t get it twisted. I am not complaining. I am just simply saying if they make a “change” to the contract I agreed too, they should give me a option.  To either go or even a benefit for them to sign a new contract.

      • Anonymous

        How about T-Mobile honor the contract that they agreed to? They don’t have to up the fee. If they insist on charging you more, you should be released from your contract. If you don’t oporate like a business you will continually make concessions to them, but they will never make one for you. There is no honor in dealing with a mega corp.

        • jarjon76

          Actually they are holding their end of the contract. It states they can, at anytime, up reg fess and you can’t get out of your contract. Again, you signed a contract, that you should have read before signing, so honor it.

      • Anonymous

        How about T-Mobile honor the contract that they agreed to? They don’t have to up the fee. If they insist on charging you more, you should be released from your contract. If you don’t oporate like a business you will continually make concessions to them, but they will never make one for you. There is no honor in dealing with a mega corp.

      • Anonymous

        How about T-Mobile honor the contract that they agreed to? They don’t have to up the fee. If they insist on charging you more, you should be released from your contract. If you don’t oporate like a business you will continually make concessions to them, but they will never make one for you. There is no honor in dealing with a mega corp.

      • Anonymous

        How about T-Mobile honor the contract that they agreed to? They don’t have to up the fee. If they insist on charging you more, you should be released from your contract. If you don’t oporate like a business you will continually make concessions to them, but they will never make one for you. There is no honor in dealing with a mega corp.

    • Dswagg2k10

      So let’s see……. You got out of your contract(for a material change such as a text charge increase) however your currently looking for your contract which would mean… let’s see… that you are currently in a different contract. U worthless POS customer/scammer. Karma gone bite the hell out of your ass!

    • Dswagg2k10

      So let’s see……. You got out of your contract(for a material change such as a text charge increase) however your currently looking for your contract which would mean… let’s see… that you are currently in a different contract. U worthless POS customer/scammer. Karma gone bite the hell out of your ass!

    • Dswagg2k10

      So let’s see……. You got out of your contract(for a material change such as a text charge increase) however your currently looking for your contract which would mean… let’s see… that you are currently in a different contract. U worthless POS customer/scammer. Karma gone bite the hell out of your ass!

  • Anonymous

     I just want out of my contract so I can get a Sensation for $200 or less.

    • Stinkypinky

      Hey Bob go to a local Fry’s Electronics if they have one in your area.  In Atlanta we have two.  Their in store Everyday Price for the HTC Sensation 4G is $149.99.  The price just started last Friday.  I already had mine since June 18th.  I wish I would have waited a few more weeks.  But I was going to get my wife one last Saturday and they were already sold out for only having it a day and a half.  The Cellular Dept mgr. confirmed that it was the everyday price.  We are going back tomorrow to get my wife one (new stock comes in tonight).   

      • Cupcake

        Are u out of contract?  I’m not but if thats the price for everybody, then I’m gonna drive over there and grab me one.  Thanks.

      • Cupcake

        Are u out of contract?  I’m not but if thats the price for everybody, then I’m gonna drive over there and grab me one.  Thanks.

    • theWayofThings

      At least you’re honest that you want to be dishonest and scam the system and not hiding behind some fake outrage as most people around here are fond of doing…

      • People getting out of their contract is dishonest, but T-Mobile changing the contract to increase their profits is NOT dishonest… interesting…. 

      • People getting out of their contract is dishonest, but T-Mobile changing the contract to increase their profits is NOT dishonest… interesting…. 

    • theWayofThings

      At least you’re honest that you want to be dishonest and scam the system and not hiding behind some fake outrage as most people around here are fond of doing…

    • theWayofThings

      At least you’re honest that you want to be dishonest and scam the system and not hiding behind some fake outrage as most people around here are fond of doing…

    • Dswagg2k10

      You are the reason at&t are buying us out. Congrats, throwing u a party! Right after i smack the …………

  • Hdhddhddjskkkesm

    Why tmobile why must you do this to us.
    tmobile is the best carrier regardless.

  • nerdlust

    I was about to be upset then I realized it was only 20 cents per month or $2.40 per year. That’s a non issue. I will save about $20 per month the new plans.

  • SJ

    They really seem to be doing anything possible to drive loyal customers away

    • jarjon76

      20 cents a months isn’t going to “drive loyal customers away”. Are you so cheap that you’re going to cry about 20 cents? C’mon.

    • theWayofThings

      A loyal customer wouldn’t care about .20 per month… an opportunistic customer, however, will throw a hissy-fit about it… 

      • Dswagg2k10

        God bless you for this comment!

      • Dswagg2k10

        God bless you for this comment!

    • theWayofThings

      A loyal customer wouldn’t care about .20 per month… an opportunistic customer, however, will throw a hissy-fit about it… 

    • theWayofThings

      A loyal customer wouldn’t care about .20 per month… an opportunistic customer, however, will throw a hissy-fit about it… 

  • xDeToXx

    Honestly, T-Mobile is saving me $40 more than if I went to Sprint. They are the next closest competitor. Even if I were on a higher GB plan (I’m on the 2GB plan now) it would still save me money being with T-Mo, since I use more WiFi and less mobile data. 

    Cancelling my contract with T-Mo to get an account with any *major* carrier would cost me more money than it saved, and going with a *regional* carrier would force me to deal with even shittier phones. 

  • Soooo, at&t has already taken over T-Mobile? Good to know–I’ll have no regrets when I leave for Sprint.

    • theWayofThings

      T-mobile has increased the regulatory program fee cost before in the last couple of years… if you’ve been with T-mobile for any amount of time, you can see it in your billing history… you’ve probably just never noticed it… the only reason for your “outrage” is because you actually were told about it…

  • theWayofThings

    I’d say 90% of the people that belly-aching about this and are hoping this gives them an out on their contracts, only want to be able to call customer care and threaten to cancel for it, so that they’ll be transferred to loyalty and be given a retention offer…

    • jarjon76

      Or they want something for free. 

    • jarjon76

      Or they want something for free. 

    • jarjon76

      Or they want something for free. 

      • theWayofThings

        Yep, either by threatening to cancel or canceling and activating a new line… either way, in this instance, it’s not going to work… T-mobile’s not gonna let someone out of their contract for this with no ETF…

        • Girth Brooks

          And why should they?  They signed a contract for $XX.99 + taxes and fees.  Nowhere on anyone’s contract do they sign to a specific dollar amount every month.  If state tax goes up or gas goes up, it’s subject to everyone.  Your options are to spend or drive less to make up for it, or in this case with T-Mobile, remove “CallerTunes” or something like that.  Or just talk less and lower your plan.    

        • theWayofThings

          I totally agree… I’m just saying people will look for any excuse to get out of a contract they agreed to… it’s pretty ridiculous…

        • theWayofThings

          I totally agree… I’m just saying people will look for any excuse to get out of a contract they agreed to… it’s pretty ridiculous…

      • theWayofThings

        Yep, either by threatening to cancel or canceling and activating a new line… either way, in this instance, it’s not going to work… T-mobile’s not gonna let someone out of their contract for this with no ETF…

    • No One Special

      A Retention offer? Seriously?

      In this post-Humm environment, we – yes, I’m a Retention rep – don’t care anything about the T-Mobile customers any more. 

      If you’re not at 18 months+ in your contract, and aren’t willing to extend your contract, we are commanded to “get them off your phone” irrespective of tenure. You’ve been with T-Mobile since it was Voicestream?

      Please. 

      Call somebody who cares.

      We get bonuses on how many 18+ contract extensions we get, NOT (not anymore, anyway) on how many customers we save.

      Maybe we used to care about our customers, but in a post-Humm world, we couldn’t care less.

      (And forgive me if this has been stated before; I must’ve missed it. But believe me, I speak the truth)

      • theWayofThings

        I never said they were gonna succeed in getting a retention offer, but that’s what these customers have been trained to do back in the old days when retention used to give those offers, and that’s what they expect…. 

        I still stand by my claim that 90% of the huff-n-puff and outrage in this thread is all about hoping to get a sweet deal from your department…

        BTW, I’ve always had the utmost respect for your department… your job must be an unholy thankless pain in the ass…

        • Dummy, don’t you get it?  He is saying that THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT YOU AS A CUSTOMER.  You think that only goes for retention? It goes for EVERYTHING.  They. Do. Not. Care. About. Anything. But. THE BOTTOM LINE.

          You think there is a legit reason for the measly 20 cent increase? Sure there is, it increases their profits, which is ALL they care about at this point.

          My God you people are dumb.

      • theWayofThings

        I never said they were gonna succeed in getting a retention offer, but that’s what these customers have been trained to do back in the old days when retention used to give those offers, and that’s what they expect…. 

        I still stand by my claim that 90% of the huff-n-puff and outrage in this thread is all about hoping to get a sweet deal from your department…

        BTW, I’ve always had the utmost respect for your department… your job must be an unholy thankless pain in the ass…

      • Did ATT tell you Retn. Reps to say that? Just curiosity ! :-D

      • Did ATT tell you Retn. Reps to say that? Just curiosity ! :-D

      • Did ATT tell you Retn. Reps to say that? Just curiosity ! :-D

      • Auihsd

        This is actually why I’m leaving Tmobile. I was a loyal customer from Voicestream days and for YEARS they treated me like a valued customer: I got extra “loyalty” minutes in my account for years, then when I went over they would let me backdate a contract change and up my minutes to get me out of hundreds of dollars of fees, then before they launched an unlimited everything plan they offered it to loyal customers for $49.99….. now I call and I’m treated worse than if I were a brand new customer. I’ve moved my plan to $5/mo emergency and am waiting for Sept when I will terminate.

        • jarjon76

          In other words you want, want, want and are upset because you’re not getting just that. Figures.

      • Dswagg2k10

        Clearly your management needs a talking too, b/c my manager will hand me my a** if my save rate is not at least 84 percent(yes I’m a retention rep). And the only reason, you dush bag, we are concentrating on contracts is b/c we realized(as we always do after making dumb ass mistakes) that offering non contracted options was dump. Thats why we are losing so many customers, they want to jump ship as soon as they see something sparklely. 

        Been at tmobile for 6+ years and a reten rep 5+, yes I’m over most customers b/c they be doing the most, however T-mobile is the best company I’ve ever worked for. So this “No One Special” spazz and kiss my ***. B/c of you, today I’m going to get a call from somebody reading this post talking bout “your own reps said your CEO don’t give a s**t about you unless your 18+ and getting a contract.” Let me find you >_<

        P.S. I think this a secretly a Sprint Rep or hell CEO LOL. Goodday

        • No One Special

          My save rate is at 87% this month, an average of 84% for the past six months – did those stats in ANY way affect my realignment raking? Absolutely NOT – so don’t take a better-than-thou position.

          And don’t forget: I’m a retention rep, so I’m gonna have to listen to the same customer BS as you; however, the truth needs to be told. And that truth is, if you can’t give me an 18+ contract extension, no matter what your history or tenure with T-Mobile, you have no traction, and nowhere to stand.

          And by the way, it’s “Douche” not “Duch”. 

      • Dswagg2k10

        Clearly your management needs a talking too, b/c my manager will hand me my a** if my save rate is not at least 84 percent(yes I’m a retention rep). And the only reason, you dush bag, we are concentrating on contracts is b/c we realized(as we always do after making dumb ass mistakes) that offering non contracted options was dump. Thats why we are losing so many customers, they want to jump ship as soon as they see something sparklely. 

        Been at tmobile for 6+ years and a reten rep 5+, yes I’m over most customers b/c they be doing the most, however T-mobile is the best company I’ve ever worked for. So this “No One Special” spazz and kiss my ***. B/c of you, today I’m going to get a call from somebody reading this post talking bout “your own reps said your CEO don’t give a s**t about you unless your 18+ and getting a contract.” Let me find you >_<

        P.S. I think this a secretly a Sprint Rep or hell CEO LOL. Goodday

  • theWayofThings

    I’d say 90% of the people that belly-aching about this and are hoping this gives them an out on their contracts, only want to be able to call customer care and threaten to cancel for it, so that they’ll be transferred to loyalty and be given a retention offer…

  • theWayofThings

    I’d say 90% of the people that belly-aching about this and are hoping this gives them an out on their contracts, only want to be able to call customer care and threaten to cancel for it, so that they’ll be transferred to loyalty and be given a retention offer…

  • theWayofThings

    I’d say 90% of the people that belly-aching about this and are hoping this gives them an out on their contracts, only want to be able to call customer care and threaten to cancel for it, so that they’ll be transferred to loyalty and be given a retention offer…

  • theWayofThings

    I’d say 90% of the people that belly-aching about this and are hoping this gives them an out on their contracts, only want to be able to call customer care and threaten to cancel for it, so that they’ll be transferred to loyalty and be given a retention offer…

  • RAWshadTX

    I remember when I got a text about Texas taxing my ass for some sort of fee. I was like… Muthafuckas charging me more in a recession back then. But now I work at T Mobile. Employee discount! Besides, regulatory fee is only 20 cents more and yall know yall ain’t going no where else lol. Sprint? Please.

  • RAWshadTX

    I remember when I got a text about Texas taxing my ass for some sort of fee. I was like… Muthafuckas charging me more in a recession back then. But now I work at T Mobile. Employee discount! Besides, regulatory fee is only 20 cents more and yall know yall ain’t going no where else lol. Sprint? Please.

    • Oh, sweet Baby Jesus! Please tell me you don’t do anything important there.

      • RAWshadTX

        You sound mad, are you mad? You’ll be okay.

        • AGuest

          I say let’s pass a fee on TMO employees. Then, when you become AT&T employees I say let’s lower your salary. What’s a little change…then, if you are a Texas TMO converted AT&T employee I say let’s double the fees….sounds fair. After all, you’re from Texas, you aren’t going anywhere…

        • AGuest

          I say let’s pass a fee on TMO employees. Then, when you become AT&T employees I say let’s lower your salary. What’s a little change…then, if you are a Texas TMO converted AT&T employee I say let’s double the fees….sounds fair. After all, you’re from Texas, you aren’t going anywhere…

        • TMOrep

          FYI, we as employees pay this Reg fee just the same as everyone else.  We aren’t exempt from it at all and don’t get any discount on it either.  If anything, companies need to have a tax for stuck up rude snobs like AGuest.  I talk to jerks on the phone daily that have some snotty remark about us reps that have much harder jobs then most people can imagine since we have to put up with smart a**es.  We need to tax those people double.   If you’re nice to us you will get more from us then if you treat us like dirt and act all high and mighty, which I assure you that you are NOT.

        • TMOrep

          FYI, we as employees pay this Reg fee just the same as everyone else.  We aren’t exempt from it at all and don’t get any discount on it either.  If anything, companies need to have a tax for stuck up rude snobs like AGuest.  I talk to jerks on the phone daily that have some snotty remark about us reps that have much harder jobs then most people can imagine since we have to put up with smart a**es.  We need to tax those people double.   If you’re nice to us you will get more from us then if you treat us like dirt and act all high and mighty, which I assure you that you are NOT.

        • Let’s be honest, as an employee, you pay $10 a month (assuming you have a data package) with true unlimited data and I’ve never been dinged for tethering. I’ll take the tax in stride because frankly, I’m getting a freaking deal on the plan.

        • Girth Brooks

          If my salary gets lowered 20 cents a month, I could care less.

        • RAWshadTX

          AGuest sounds like the type of guy that do Pilates, moist ass loser. Hate to tell you but we as the employees still get tax. Discounts for 10 dollars a month plus the insurance for 8. Reps get the craziest and wildest customers. Most people will never understand this, the job is an acquire taste, retail ain’t no joke, but its def won’t be my career.

        • Anonymous

          We do pay regulatory program fees.

        • Anonymous

          We do pay regulatory program fees.

    • Oh, sweet Baby Jesus! Please tell me you don’t do anything important there.

    • Oh, sweet Baby Jesus! Please tell me you don’t do anything important there.

  • RAWshadTX

    I remember when I got a text about Texas taxing my ass for some sort of fee. I was like… Muthafuckas charging me more in a recession back then. But now I work at T Mobile. Employee discount! Besides, regulatory fee is only 20 cents more and yall know yall ain’t going no where else lol. Sprint? Please.

  • RAWshadTX

    I remember when I got a text about Texas taxing my ass for some sort of fee. I was like… Muthafuckas charging me more in a recession back then. But now I work at T Mobile. Employee discount! Besides, regulatory fee is only 20 cents more and yall know yall ain’t going no where else lol. Sprint? Please.

  • RAWshadTX

    I remember when I got a text about Texas taxing my ass for some sort of fee. I was like… Muthafuckas charging me more in a recession back then. But now I work at T Mobile. Employee discount! Besides, regulatory fee is only 20 cents more and yall know yall ain’t going no where else lol. Sprint? Please.

  • Anonymous

    Is is listed under other charges? Yes, but it’s listed as a fee and that’s all it needs to say in order to be considered one. As for those of you thinking that it “materially increases” your monthly recurring charge, you are wrong. To be considered materially increased means that it substantially increases your bill (or in this case your monthly recurring charge). Even if not including all other charges, taxes, fees, etc, your bill is likely at least $49.99 month (unless you happen to have the $39.99 500 minutes no text, no data plan). If we just took the $49.99+the current $1.41 it would be $51.40 and with the increase it would be $51.60.

    Even only taking that into account, that is only a 0.38% increase and you consider that “substantial?” Is it increased to “a great or significant extent (which is what substantially would mean)?” No. Period. This is also assuming you could successfully argue that it increases your monthly recurring charges that are clearly stated as voice, data, and messaging. Either way you slice it, you either eat the $0.20 or cancel and pay the full ETF. I personally think it tastes just fine so I shall consume it and continue on my merry way.

    • ImWithStupid

      If you take the fee itself, all alone, going from 1.41 to 1.61, the percentage increase (of the fee) is not .38%.  It then becomes a material change.

    • Materially means “in substance.”  It is an actual increase. It exists. It is material. The amount matters not.

  • Anonymous

    Is is listed under other charges? Yes, but it’s listed as a fee and that’s all it needs to say in order to be considered one. As for those of you thinking that it “materially increases” your monthly recurring charge, you are wrong. To be considered materially increased means that it substantially increases your bill (or in this case your monthly recurring charge). Even if not including all other charges, taxes, fees, etc, your bill is likely at least $49.99 month (unless you happen to have the $39.99 500 minutes no text, no data plan). If we just took the $49.99+the current $1.41 it would be $51.40 and with the increase it would be $51.60.

    Even only taking that into account, that is only a 0.38% increase and you consider that “substantial?” Is it increased to “a great or significant extent (which is what substantially would mean)?” No. Period. This is also assuming you could successfully argue that it increases your monthly recurring charges that are clearly stated as voice, data, and messaging. Either way you slice it, you either eat the $0.20 or cancel and pay the full ETF. I personally think it tastes just fine so I shall consume it and continue on my merry way.

  • Anonymous

    Is is listed under other charges? Yes, but it’s listed as a fee and that’s all it needs to say in order to be considered one. As for those of you thinking that it “materially increases” your monthly recurring charge, you are wrong. To be considered materially increased means that it substantially increases your bill (or in this case your monthly recurring charge). Even if not including all other charges, taxes, fees, etc, your bill is likely at least $49.99 month (unless you happen to have the $39.99 500 minutes no text, no data plan). If we just took the $49.99+the current $1.41 it would be $51.40 and with the increase it would be $51.60.

    Even only taking that into account, that is only a 0.38% increase and you consider that “substantial?” Is it increased to “a great or significant extent (which is what substantially would mean)?” No. Period. This is also assuming you could successfully argue that it increases your monthly recurring charges that are clearly stated as voice, data, and messaging. Either way you slice it, you either eat the $0.20 or cancel and pay the full ETF. I personally think it tastes just fine so I shall consume it and continue on my merry way.

  • Top

    This is why I will never enter a contract with T-Mobile (or any other company with similar policies).  Because according to the Q&A above, part of their contract states that they can change what you have to pay (fees) at any time.  I’m not entering into any contract where I would be contractually obligated to pay any amount that the company dictates at any time.  The only exception would be if they afford me the same privilege to change the amount I pay to them every month at MY whim.  After all, I had to buy a new transmission last month, so my budget is very tight right now… that’s 80 cents less for T-Mobile each month due to my operating expenses… I’m sure they would have no problem with that.  Oh, and electricity costs are up, so it costs me another 50 cents a month to charge my cell phone.  I’m sure T-Mobile will accept lower payments from all customers to accommodate THEIR increasing operational costs.

  • TheHonestCorner

    Does T-Mobile publish detailed financials as to where all this money is actually spent so we can validate that this is not just another money grab?  Let’s do the math… ~34 million customers * .20 cents per month * 12 months in a year = $81,600,000.00 that they will make off of this fee hike per annum.  That’s ON TOP of the over HALF BILLION dollars that they already collect from these fees ( 34 million * 1.41 * 12 ).  Do they really spend over a half billion dollars every year on this stuff?  Show me the detailed financials.

    • TheHonestCorner

      Realized that these fees are PER LINE, which may not be the same as PER CUSTOMER, so the actual number may be significantly more.  Also, it is unclear the exact amount effectively paid by each prepaid customer (as included or additional fees), and if that affects any figures.  That could lower the figure or raise it.

      The amount that T-Mobile collects with these fees is potentially massive: It is reasonably possible that EACH AND EVERY YEAR T-Mobile collects in these fees alone MORE MONEY than Sprint paid to BUY the entire company of Virgin Mobile USA ($483 Million).  That’s each and every year… not a one time fee.

    • TheHonestCorner

      Realized that these fees are PER LINE, which may not be the same as PER CUSTOMER, so the actual number may be significantly more.  Also, it is unclear the exact amount effectively paid by each prepaid customer (as included or additional fees), and if that affects any figures.  That could lower the figure or raise it.

      The amount that T-Mobile collects with these fees is potentially massive: It is reasonably possible that EACH AND EVERY YEAR T-Mobile collects in these fees alone MORE MONEY than Sprint paid to BUY the entire company of Virgin Mobile USA ($483 Million).  That’s each and every year… not a one time fee.

    • I like how the idiots who keep saying, “It’s only 20 cents, pay it” have nothing to say when it’s pointed out just HOW MUCH T-Mobile is making from these increases.

  • Completebs

    These fees should just be part of the cost of the plan.  It is horrible to add them as extras.  When we buy new mattresses, they don’t charge us additional fees because they had to comply with all sorts of regulations.  Every business has to comply with all sorts of regulations.  But other industries don’t sink this low and add line items that nickel and dime you in order to boost their profits.  This is just a B.S. way of selling a plan for one cost, and having it really cost us another amount.  Complete B.S.  Oh, and this is hardly the first time they have raised these B.S. fees.  So don’t think of it as a one-time hike, think of it as a regular price increase on your “contracted” rate.

    • Of course they could make it part of the monthly charge, but then they wouldn’t be able to advertise a lower rate.  It’s like the airlines advertising a fare with a * after it that says the price is one way but you have to buy two segments (round trip.)  They think they’ve deceived you just like charging $39.99 since that’s really not $40 is it? :)

      • TheBuckleys

        Someday companies will learn that nobody likes playing any of these games.  It’s why so few companies have loyal customers these days.  Or loyal employees for that matter.  Just a rush for a quick buck instead of long term relationship building.  It makes the employees and the customers unhappy.  Just look at this postings here as a prime example… a bunch of unhappy employees and customers.

        • jarjon76

          And you sound like a customer that is a joy to do business with. It works both ways, pal.

        • I just figured you out — you work there. You are a customer hating hag who is tired of having customers who know more about their plan call you to straighten out the mess you’ve made of their accounts.

  • Completebs

    These fees should just be part of the cost of the plan.  It is horrible to add them as extras.  When we buy new mattresses, they don’t charge us additional fees because they had to comply with all sorts of regulations.  Every business has to comply with all sorts of regulations.  But other industries don’t sink this low and add line items that nickel and dime you in order to boost their profits.  This is just a B.S. way of selling a plan for one cost, and having it really cost us another amount.  Complete B.S.  Oh, and this is hardly the first time they have raised these B.S. fees.  So don’t think of it as a one-time hike, think of it as a regular price increase on your “contracted” rate.

  • Tortionist

    I understand that this is a matter of principle and such, but 20 cents a line? Please…. I can find that in my car on any given day. It’s 20 cents, just eat the cost and be glad you’re still paying less than what you would be with other carriers.

  • TheBuckleys

    We stopped doing business with companies that have consumer-unfriendly practices like this.

    Yes, this means that we don’t have cable or satellite, we don’t have a gym contracts, we don’t do business with certain insurance companies, etc.  We just got sick and tired of this sort of crap, that we said “Fine, we’ll keep our money and treat ourselves to a nice dinner instead”.  We also found that it saved us a bunch of money, and simplified our lives.  We now don’t even have a single monthly recurring bill!

    Treat us like crap = don’t get our money.

    If more people follow this philosophy, companies will have a greater financial motivation to stop this sort of crap.  (And maybe business ethics in general will improve as a side effect by realizing that they are treating others better and how good it feels.)

    So if you don’t like this, we strongly encourage you to not do business with companies such as T-Mobile that choose to utilize consumer-unfriendly behaviors.

    • Aj

      If you have no monthly recurring bills, why are you concerned to be in this forum?

      • Some people are concerned with more than just their little sphere of life. It’s called “broadening your horizons.” and you may want to try it some day. Maybe you won’t be so close-minded and ignorant.

    • YouKNowMe

      No gym.  No cable.  Fat & Bored?

    • YouKNowMe

      No gym.  No cable.  Fat & Bored?

    • theWayofThings

      “We now don’t even have a single monthly recurring bill!”

      Really? no monthly recurring bills?  What? do you live in an RV using  solar panels for electricity,  leeching wi-fi from people who pay for it, so you could make this post? 

      You keep talking about crap.. sounds like you’re full of it… Say whatever you want, I’m not buying it…

      • TheBuckleys

        We have no recurring monthly bills, and are not concerned whether or not you are “buying it”.

    • theWayofThings

      “We now don’t even have a single monthly recurring bill!”

      Really? no monthly recurring bills?  What? do you live in an RV using  solar panels for electricity,  leeching wi-fi from people who pay for it, so you could make this post? 

      You keep talking about crap.. sounds like you’re full of it… Say whatever you want, I’m not buying it…

    • jarjon76

      Yet here you are whining and moaning, on the internet no less. Hypocrisy is SO cool!

  • Richard Christopher Cardenas

    Funny, when I got this notice, I threw it out and didn’t think anything of it! Like the last time I saw one a year or so ago! Who caresss about twenty cents? And this is coming from a broke guy haha

  • Respawn

    Haha!  It’s $0.20 people. TWENTY CENTS!

    If you’re that desperate, go work your corners for an extra quarter. Or stand by vending machines all day. You’re bound to get something eventually.

  • Michael Le Gere

    It’s really funny reading the comments on this page… “It’s only 20 cents!” “Haha, its nothing!” etc.  

    Yeah it’s 20 cents…20 cents farther away from the ethical starting point, which companies like T-Mobile have been able to successfully lure you away from over the years by distracting you with colors and candy.  

    You give up 20 cents, what have you got to show for it but missing 20 cents. What about the next 20 cents?  It’s so easy to dismiss what they are doing or what I am saying..but this type of behavior by these companies is exactly what is wrong with this world.  This behavior is adding to the disparity between rich and poor, and the rise of a corporation run society.  

    Giving up your freedom, liberties and money, for 20 cents?  Pathetic.  We aren’t free when we run the predetermined mouse maze that’s provided for us by corporate America.  “I bought an iPod touch with my own money cause I wanted too!” Um you bought that iPod as a slave to man, because he wanted you to. 

    But I digress, and get off my soap box, it’s late.

    • jarjon76

      Geez, it’s just a phone, relax. 

  • Anonymous

    Wow.. When did they start calling a tax a subsidy?

  • Tortionist

    I think that some of the people on here have the point that they waste more than 20 cents a month on other things like energy drinks, soft-drinks, lap-dances, some apps that are not worth it, etc. I would much rather waste 20 cents a month than be a hyper consumer that has to keep up with the Jones’ and get the newest phone, car, Rolex watch, etc. This is how you stay poor or bogged down in serious debt, not by 20 cents a month. What does a person have to show for all the wasted money on soda, but fat or eventually heartburn, which will cost more than 20 cents a month. I do understand the ethical implications here, although I don’t necessarily agree that this is what causes the widening disparity between the rich and the poor. That’s caused by several things IE; hyper-consuming and spending, not budgeting, little to no investments,  not being frugal, not caring much about financial literacy, our government constantly raising taxes, divorce, going to jail, having kids when too young and not ready, and even inflation. All of these things are what cause the disparity between the rich and the poor, not 20 cents a month. you either deal with it from T-Mobile, or you leave. I don’t like it either, but i’ll deal with it. There’s other things I don’t like either, like higher taxes, higher gas prices, higher medical insurance premiums, etc., but I deal with it. That’s life. I’ve learned(after 30+ years) how to be frugal, plan a budget, and not pay full price for most things. this is why I am middle class and not poor. Anyone can do it if they really want to. It takes time, but it’s well worth it, not having to wonder where your next meal is coming from. I was there once, one step above homeless, little to no food, no car, phone, etc. It’s not fun. If you keep a job for a few years and plan accordingly, you can have a much better life. A life where even though 20 cents a month is unethical, it’s not going to break the bank and since you can’t do much about it you deal with it, especially if you know you don’t have to stay with a certain phone company. A cell phone is not a need. people got by without them in the 1980’s and early 90’s and much earlier. If all else fails get a land-line(use email, etc) and take that money you would have spent on cellphones and invest, just food for thought. 

    • Kyle

      Very well spoken. I agree!

    • Anonymous

      What the hell is wrong with you? thats not what this article is about at all.

      • Tortionist

        What the hell is wrong with you? The article was about all this and much more. It’s not just about one little thing. Everything is interwoven and works together in one way or another, or did that go over your head?  This was actually meant to be a response to Michael Le Gere. That’s my bad for not doing it that way. I do apologize for that.

  • YouKNowMe

    If you android maniacs would just go back to feature phones, you could afford this 20 cents.

    • milan

      where’s the fun in that?

    • milan

      where’s the fun in that?

  • Josephhoop

    The ability to cancel a contract after a fee change wasn’t within T-mobile’s capacity to offer. In reality, the reason you are ‘allowed’ to cancel a contract after a fee change is because it is a change that isn’t mutually beneficial. In contract law, the fees being charged are a part of the agreed upon contract. If there is a change that is beneficial to both parties, then the contract is still in effect, but updated.

    Now, here is the weird part of contracts: If there is a change that is one sided, (ie. a fee increase with no new services, for example), then the contract is null and void and a new contract is created. You would then have to agree to it, usually by continuing to use your phone. This is the reason you can cancel your contract, because by their changing the fees being charged they are in effect creating a new contract without notifying you. T-Mobile cannot bar you from canceling your contract, because it’s not their rules that allow you to cancel the contact, but the law that allows you to.

  • Josephhoop

    The ability to cancel a contract after a fee change wasn’t within T-mobile’s capacity to offer. In reality, the reason you are ‘allowed’ to cancel a contract after a fee change is because it is a change that isn’t mutually beneficial. In contract law, the fees being charged are a part of the agreed upon contract. If there is a change that is beneficial to both parties, then the contract is still in effect, but updated.

    Now, here is the weird part of contracts: If there is a change that is one sided, (ie. a fee increase with no new services, for example), then the contract is null and void and a new contract is created. You would then have to agree to it, usually by continuing to use your phone. This is the reason you can cancel your contract, because by their changing the fees being charged they are in effect creating a new contract without notifying you. T-Mobile cannot bar you from canceling your contract, because it’s not their rules that allow you to cancel the contact, but the law that allows you to.

    • But but but but but their lawyers must be right and that’s why they said we can’t cancel.  Big corporations would never lie to us, would they????

  • rob

    i would like additional 20 cents from each of the 33 MILLION customer ( or how many millions accounts) have !!!

  • rob

    i would like additional 20 cents from each of the 33 MILLION customer ( or how many millions accounts) have !!!

  • Guest

    While an additional 20 cents a month won’t even make a dent in anyone’s pocket, I strongly disagree with all the people who preach the “you’ve signed a contract, now honor it” line. Personally, not only do I not care about the additional 20 cents (with taxes, my 2-line family plan is about $150 a month – 20 cents just doesn’t matter) and do not plan on getting out of my contract. However, this is a material change, plain and simple. This is not a fee mandated by the government, it’s just a fee that T-Mobile chooses to collect. I’ll honor my side of the contract. T-Mobile should honor theirs.

  • Guest

    While an additional 20 cents a month won’t even make a dent in anyone’s pocket, I strongly disagree with all the people who preach the “you’ve signed a contract, now honor it” line. Personally, not only do I not care about the additional 20 cents (with taxes, my 2-line family plan is about $150 a month – 20 cents just doesn’t matter) and do not plan on getting out of my contract. However, this is a material change, plain and simple. This is not a fee mandated by the government, it’s just a fee that T-Mobile chooses to collect. I’ll honor my side of the contract. T-Mobile should honor theirs.

    • Mark Terry II

      The point-of-sale contract specifically states that changes related to regulatory fees will not allow a customer to exit their contract without incurring an ETF. The reason ostensibly being that other agencies have the ability to incerase (or decrease) said fees, and the carrier is simply passing them along. 
      Unfair? Perhaps. But the burden is upon the consumer to decide, at the point of sale, whether or not they will honor the contract, as written. If you choose not to read the fine print, or not to question the sales personnel, then the term “caveat emptor” is applicable. regardless of whether it feels “unfair” or not. 

      • Tortionist

        I have to give you and Josephhoop high marks for the best comments thus far. They ring true. good job.

    • Mark Terry II

      The point-of-sale contract specifically states that changes related to regulatory fees will not allow a customer to exit their contract without incurring an ETF. The reason ostensibly being that other agencies have the ability to incerase (or decrease) said fees, and the carrier is simply passing them along. 
      Unfair? Perhaps. But the burden is upon the consumer to decide, at the point of sale, whether or not they will honor the contract, as written. If you choose not to read the fine print, or not to question the sales personnel, then the term “caveat emptor” is applicable. regardless of whether it feels “unfair” or not. 

    • H8stylist

      T-mobile is honoring their contract with their customers.  This is a fee that you have had on your bill for 7 years.  They didn’t just sneak it in there recently to get more money out of you.  While I wish there was a simpler way to include this charge on the bill, the fact of the matter is cost of services hardly ever (if ever) decrease, and if the cost of tmobile maintaining mandated (i.e. required) government programs increases, then the regulatory fee has to be increased to offset it.  Leaving your carrier does not avoid this fee and may not even lower the cost of your monthly cellular bill.  As previously stated, all carriers charge this fee, and all of them periodically raise it.  I just find it funny how people go up in arms that there cell bill just increased by .20, when your other day to day products you buy like gas, groceries, etc. can go up sometimes by double and don’t get as upset over it.

      I used to work for t-mobile and it always boggled my mind how many people would call in after having their cellphone service for 5 years or so, then call in irate asking why this charge is on  their bill.  

      • Tortionist

        I agree, which is why I posted earlier.

      • PhillyPhanatic

        If I’m cash strapped, I can’t tell T-Mobile I’m changing the amount of money that I pay per month. Why should they be able to tack on money to what I pay every month?

        I don’t think anyone is arguing that 20 cents is going to break the bank. The argument is that I have to honor my side of the contract, T-Mobile shouldn’t get to ignore their side of it. Whether it’s 20 cents, or $20.00, T-Mobile should not be able to change what they charge me at a whim. I also don’t see people complaining about the fee, since it’s charged by every carrier, the issue is that they are RAISING the fee and not allowing you out of your contract (which I feel they violated, by changing the terms of our agreement).

        I never signed a contract with my local gas station agreeing to pay a certain amount of money per gallon every time I fill up. That is comparing apples with oranges.

        • H8stylist

          “I never signed a contract with my local gas station agreeing to pay a certain amount of money per gallon every time I fill up. That is comparing apples with oranges.”
                          i never said they were the same thing, i was stating that costs of items we use everyday DO increase.  if you are naive enough to believe that your contract with any company will protect your cost of service from rising at any point for any reason, you are probably better off living with the ahmish, where they don’t pay for any services that fluxuate as often as electiricity, cable, cellphone, telephone, etc.

          also, if you are that upset about the regulatory fee being raised and being still held to your contract, i would suggest reading it first before signing.  tmobile’s T&C are able to be read before you even go into the store, it takes 30min to read and will save you some heartache in the end.  if you can find ANYWHERE in that contract that tmobile said they were not going to raise the cost of service at any point for any reason (not including mrc or overages), i will mail you 20.00 genius

        • H8stylist

          “I never signed a contract with my local gas station agreeing to pay a certain amount of money per gallon every time I fill up. That is comparing apples with oranges.”
                          i never said they were the same thing, i was stating that costs of items we use everyday DO increase.  if you are naive enough to believe that your contract with any company will protect your cost of service from rising at any point for any reason, you are probably better off living with the ahmish, where they don’t pay for any services that fluxuate as often as electiricity, cable, cellphone, telephone, etc.

          also, if you are that upset about the regulatory fee being raised and being still held to your contract, i would suggest reading it first before signing.  tmobile’s T&C are able to be read before you even go into the store, it takes 30min to read and will save you some heartache in the end.  if you can find ANYWHERE in that contract that tmobile said they were not going to raise the cost of service at any point for any reason (not including mrc or overages), i will mail you 20.00 genius

      • guest

        Yes, I am well aware of the fee and how long it’s been on my bill. However,
        T-Mobile is choosing to increase a NON-MANDATORY fee for no reason, other than
        to fatten their pockets. In my book, that is NOT honoring contracts. In fact,
        it’s predatory behavior toward their customers, similar to that of credit card
        providers. Ironically enough, credit card providers always allowed customers to
        close their account and opt out of the increase. In T-Mobile’s case, it’s “We’re
        gonna raise your bill, and no, you can’t get out of contract!”

         

        Again, it’s not the 20 cents. It’s the fact that T-Mobile is being unethical.
        What if it was $20?  At what point does it stop being OK for T-Mobile to nickel and dime their customers?

        • H8stylist

          tell me how you come to the fact they are increasing it only to increase their profits?  do you have any facts to back it up?  put your tin foil hat back on to keep the government from getting inside your head.

          no one can say they have any proof one way or the other outside of tmobile as a reason for them raising the fee.  

          for all you people know, the government raised the fee to carry the mandatory 911 service, and so tmobile is raising to offset it.  businesses change rates all the time, at what point do people become rational and think they are doing this for a reason instead of just trying to squeeze more money out of people.

        • H8stylist

          tell me how you come to the fact they are increasing it only to increase their profits?  do you have any facts to back it up?  put your tin foil hat back on to keep the government from getting inside your head.

          no one can say they have any proof one way or the other outside of tmobile as a reason for them raising the fee.  

          for all you people know, the government raised the fee to carry the mandatory 911 service, and so tmobile is raising to offset it.  businesses change rates all the time, at what point do people become rational and think they are doing this for a reason instead of just trying to squeeze more money out of people.

        • How about this..its a $14.18 increase on 100 dollars.

        • H8stylist

          if you had 10 lines at 10.00 that math would work out.  this is not a percentage and it’s not a tax.

        • How about this..its a $14.18 increase on 100 dollars.

        • Guest

          Why is it that apologists always cry “conspiracy theory” when someone dares question their beloved company’s unjustified fee increases? Keep drinking T-Mo’s Kool Aid, buddy.

        • H8stylist

          because that’s what it is maybe?  a conspiracy is where someone is working against you, a theory is unproven.  so what you sir are suggesting is that tmobile is raising fees to make more money off of joe public.  do you have any proof, at all, whatsoever, even a shred, a hint, or even a sniff?  no, you just have a theory……hence, conspiracy theory.  do you ever think before you talk?

        • You are wrong in both cases on what “conspiracy” and “theory” mean. 

        • Guest

          One other thing…exactly what facts DO YOU have to back up your assertion that this increase is justified?

        • Tmobile’s own words:  “This fee is not a government mandated charge or tax.”

        • Anonymous

          Yeah, we established that. It’s a fee to RECOVER the COST of COMPLYING with the GOVERNMENT. (You can quote me on that.)

      • Action

        Go back to work at ur sweet tmo company

        • H8stylist

          i never said working for tmobile was sweet, but that doesn’t stop me from pointing out that people need to act rationally instead of irrationally over a change to a fee that is used for mandatory programs.  i wouldn’t go back to work there for twice the pay, cause i would have to talk to people like you every day.

        • “This fee is not a government mandated charge or tax.”

          Love,

          Tmobile

        • H8stylist

          i never said working for tmobile was sweet, but that doesn’t stop me from pointing out that people need to act rationally instead of irrationally over a change to a fee that is used for mandatory programs.  i wouldn’t go back to work there for twice the pay, cause i would have to talk to people like you every day.

    • Anonymous

      This might help clarify. Everyone is hung up on the fee needing to be ‘manditory’ for T-Mobile to increase it. Where did that mandatory clause even come from? T-Mobile’s terms and conditions are pretty clear that 411, downloads, pay per use, taxes and fees are subject to change. While the Regulatory programs fee may not be government mandated, it is still a fee, and you still signed an agreement saying T-Mobile could increase it at any time.

      This also about sums it up (from post recent post July 2010 contract terms)

      “You agree to pay all other Charges we assess to recover or defray governmental charges or costs we incur in connection with the Services we provide, such as Federal Universal Service, regulatory and administrative charges, or gross receipts and similar taxes, without regard to whether these governmental charges or costs fund programs that provide benefits to you or in your location. These Charges are not taxes or regulatory fees imposed directly on you, nor required by law to be billed to you, may be kept by us in whole or in part, and the amounts and what is included in these Charges are subject to change without notice.”

  • Schippma

    I am a frugal person and all but really, we are crying over 20 cents? Did anyone know that Verizon increased their fee as well, however, their fee went up 3 cents per voice line per month. T-Mobile charges a hell of a lot less than Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T on voice plans, data plans, and also telecom fees. Sprint is one of the worst. I live in Michigan and my plan itself was $59.99 for one line of service but with taxes and fees, it increased to $69.88, almost $10 in taxes and fees. On my family plan with T-Mobile, my plan is $149.99 with 5 lines and with Michigan taxes and fees my bill is $169.04 (not including my corporate discount).

    T-Mobile is still a value leader among all national cell carriers and every cell carrier has this charge, one way or another.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

    • Tortionist

      Another person who gets it congrats. bro.

  • Schippma

    I am a frugal person and all but really, we are crying over 20 cents? Did anyone know that Verizon increased their fee as well, however, their fee went up 3 cents per voice line per month. T-Mobile charges a hell of a lot less than Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T on voice plans, data plans, and also telecom fees. Sprint is one of the worst. I live in Michigan and my plan itself was $59.99 for one line of service but with taxes and fees, it increased to $69.88, almost $10 in taxes and fees. On my family plan with T-Mobile, my plan is $149.99 with 5 lines and with Michigan taxes and fees my bill is $169.04 (not including my corporate discount).

    T-Mobile is still a value leader among all national cell carriers and every cell carrier has this charge, one way or another.

  • Magenta

    0.20 X 36 million X 12 months = $86.4 Million……… or A boatload of extra cash for a “cash strapped” company……….I doubt they’ve seen any cost increases and if they have, i doubt it’s to the point that it needs to be 20 cents per line

    • Thewinckle

      Look at how much it cost T-Mobile to purchase their 1700MhZ block of frequency to give us 3g.  The last auction I remember cost a few billion.  So, if you looked at that 20 cent increase being used to reclaim that debt, it would take a few hundred years to pay off the debt to the government to purchase that frequency.  ($4.5 billion for frequency bought [rough estimate]/ 86.4 million = 500+ years in the hole)

      • Thewinckle

        Sorry, math was a little off.  50 years.

      • Thewinckle, that’s the cost of doing business. You don’t raise fees to raise money in existing contracts to cover such a cost of doing business.

    • JustMe

      Do any of you people understand how much over head there is for a huge company like tmobile… so this .20 increase is not just pure profit going into the pockets of tmobile.  Its just crazy that you people have blinders on and no business seance.  You all should stick to talking about something that you maybe know a little more about.

    • JustMe

      Do any of you people understand how much over head there is for a huge company like tmobile… so this .20 increase is not just pure profit going into the pockets of tmobile.  Its just crazy that you people have blinders on and no business seance.  You all should stick to talking about something that you maybe know a little more about.

  • Magenta

    0.20 X 36 million X 12 months = $86.4 Million……… or A boatload of extra cash for a “cash strapped” company……….I doubt they’ve seen any cost increases and if they have, i doubt it’s to the point that it needs to be 20 cents per line

  • Noel

    Common now 20 cents…this should not even be a topic of discussion.

    • Noob

      How many more cents increase would make it a topic of discussion??? 

      It’s not a question if increase is as less as 3 cents(Verizon) or 20 in case of T-Mobile but if they change any clause in the contract customers should have an option of opting out or staying in.

      • Stephanie29

        Other carriers charge a regulatory fee so why would they just let you out of your contract just for a .20 increase???  The only reason I know of that a carrier will let you out of your contract w/o paying etf is if you move to an area where’s there absolutely no coverage.  

        • Anonymous

          To be honest, with T-Mobile, that’s not true anymore. I used to think, “Yeah, it makes me sense that we would let them out of contract if they move,” but no, it’s bad business. T-Mobile gives someone a 500 dollar phone at a low cost. All of a sudden, they can “move” and break contract. That’s not T-Mo’s fault that YOU are moving.

        • Stephanie29

          Well, I know when I worked for Sprint years ago customers were able to get out of their contracts if they had to relocate to an area that didn’t have coverage.  I don’t know if they still do that.  

      • Stephanie29

        Other carriers charge a regulatory fee so why would they just let you out of your contract just for a .20 increase???  The only reason I know of that a carrier will let you out of your contract w/o paying etf is if you move to an area where’s there absolutely no coverage.  

  • Noel

    Common now 20 cents…this should not even be a topic of discussion.

  • JimH

    Okay, T-Mobile, what specific “various federal, state, and local government mandates, programs, and obligations” increase on August 15, 2011 that require this increase?  You need exactly 20 cents for each affected line each month, probably indefinitely (I don’t think they have any history of ever reducing these fees), so please justify with specifics.  All such programs should be well documented and easy for us to verify.  Please enlighten us.

  • bmg314

    I don’t remember what carrier it was, but when they increased the rates for text messages to $0.20 per message over your allotment, you were allowed to claim it was a materially adverse change and opt out of your contact. So yes, there is precedent for twenty cents being material.

    • H8stylist

      you could only claim it was materially adverse if it would have affected you.  if you had a small text plan and went over those texts recently ( past two months i believe) then it affected you.  if you did not have overages, then it didn’t affect you.  and if you actually cared to read the T&C, it states in condition five that overage rates are part of the rate changes included with the etf waiver.  but, of course, you didn’t, that would be an intelligent thing to do.

      • Wrong. In that case, the contract changed from the original, and new terms that could be financially adverse to one party were affected that were not originally agreed to. It doesn’t matter if that party never sent a text, and never would, the contract had changed to make a financially adverse term to that party only, and therefore that contract became invalid,

        Where do you idiot Tmobile apologists come from??

      • Wrong. In that case, the contract changed from the original, and new terms that could be financially adverse to one party were affected that were not originally agreed to. It doesn’t matter if that party never sent a text, and never would, the contract had changed to make a financially adverse term to that party only, and therefore that contract became invalid,

        Where do you idiot Tmobile apologists come from??

  • Miro

    this fee has been grinding my gears for a long time.
    Gawdy AT&T charged us something like $0.40/month per month for each line. 
    Verizon charges $0.16 per line! 16 CENTS! 
    To top it all, we might also be paying taxes on this non fee fee!$1.41*2 lines = $2.82/monthor $33.84 a year or$67.68 over two yearsfor a fee that T-Mobile says in their contract they may completely keep to themselves and which appears to be the highest RPF of all carriers. That’s quite a bit of change for long term customers like usWhile $0.20 agreeably is nothing, there is also really no account where this money goes – Tmobile even tells you in the contract they may keep the fee in “whole or in part”!On 33 million customers just the $0.20/month per line RPF increase equals $6,600,000 a month extra or $79,200,000 a year from us in “other charges” that go who knows where. If anything, it’s at least disingenuous.

  • Miro

    this fee has been grinding my gears for a long time.
    Gawdy AT&T charged us something like $0.40/month per month for each line. 
    Verizon charges $0.16 per line! 16 CENTS! 
    To top it all, we might also be paying taxes on this non fee fee!$1.41*2 lines = $2.82/monthor $33.84 a year or$67.68 over two yearsfor a fee that T-Mobile says in their contract they may completely keep to themselves and which appears to be the highest RPF of all carriers. That’s quite a bit of change for long term customers like usWhile $0.20 agreeably is nothing, there is also really no account where this money goes – Tmobile even tells you in the contract they may keep the fee in “whole or in part”!On 33 million customers just the $0.20/month per line RPF increase equals $6,600,000 a month extra or $79,200,000 a year from us in “other charges” that go who knows where. If anything, it’s at least disingenuous.

    • Schippma

      T-Mobile also doesn’t charge an Administrative Fee, Interstate Toll Recovery Fee, etc. They just lump all of that stuff under one fee, the RPF. If you add up all the fees from other carriers, you still pay less with T-Mobile. If it helps them to provide a better network, offer low cost plans, and to gain more customers, I am all for a 20 cent increase in a fee that is MUCH LESS than any other national carrier.

      • Action

        Here comes another tmo employee defending tmo

        • Anonymous

          We have to. We’re used to talking to people like they are five-year olds…

        • Anonymous

          Can I borrow that? HAHAHAHAHA!! ^^^

        • Anonymous

          What???

        • You’re so dumb you can see when a fellow coworker is lauding you. (Tmobile employees, you can google the words “lauding definition” to find out what I said. And yes, you can even keep the quotes in when you cut and paste it).

        • Anonymous

          I knew that; I was asking him/her to elaborate. “What?” is a lot shorter of a question than I’m sure you call in to ask every week. I am a GREAT rep; a very smart one who performs highly every month.

        • You’re so dumb you can see when a fellow coworker is lauding you. (Tmobile employees, you can google the words “lauding definition” to find out what I said. And yes, you can even keep the quotes in when you cut and paste it).

        • Anonymous

          We have to. We’re used to talking to people like they are five-year olds…

    • Anonymous

      As an employee I can verify that the regulatory programs fee is subject to local, state, and federal taxes.

  • Schippma

    No, I don’t work for T-Mobile. However, I understand that fees change over time. If your state increased their state tax, I suppose you would want to break your contract too because when you signed the contract, it was set at X percent and suddenly went up. Please. Taxes change and so do fees. It even states it in your contract if you read the thing. If the government guaranteed to set a fee for carriers at a certain dollar amount that never went up, then I would expect carriers to do the same to consumers. However, we know this is not the case and is why it states in your contract that fees fluctuate based upon government mandates and programs, such as providing low-cost or free phone service to those in poverty.

    • Taxes are mandated by the government and recouped based on such. T-Mobile admits this is NOT a tax or a government regulated fee, it is a cost they chose to recoup based on them providing services. Since its T-Mobile chosing to collect something for themselves, and it is not mandated by the government as a “tax” it is a materially adverse change to the contract. My contract states $1.41 not $1.61 thus even only 20 cent increase per month $4.80 over 2 years is detrimental to my conditions I signed my contract at for 24 months.

    • Taxes are mandated by the government and recouped based on such. T-Mobile admits this is NOT a tax or a government regulated fee, it is a cost they chose to recoup based on them providing services. Since its T-Mobile chosing to collect something for themselves, and it is not mandated by the government as a “tax” it is a materially adverse change to the contract. My contract states $1.41 not $1.61 thus even only 20 cent increase per month $4.80 over 2 years is detrimental to my conditions I signed my contract at for 24 months.

  • Schippma

    No, I don’t work for T-Mobile. However, I understand that fees change over time. If your state increased their state tax, I suppose you would want to break your contract too because when you signed the contract, it was set at X percent and suddenly went up. Please. Taxes change and so do fees. It even states it in your contract if you read the thing. If the government guaranteed to set a fee for carriers at a certain dollar amount that never went up, then I would expect carriers to do the same to consumers. However, we know this is not the case and is why it states in your contract that fees fluctuate based upon government mandates and programs, such as providing low-cost or free phone service to those in poverty.

  • Schippma

    No, I don’t work for T-Mobile. However, I understand that fees change over time. If your state increased their state tax, I suppose you would want to break your contract too because when you signed the contract, it was set at X percent and suddenly went up. Please. Taxes change and so do fees. It even states it in your contract if you read the thing. If the government guaranteed to set a fee for carriers at a certain dollar amount that never went up, then I would expect carriers to do the same to consumers. However, we know this is not the case and is why it states in your contract that fees fluctuate based upon government mandates and programs, such as providing low-cost or free phone service to those in poverty.

  • A L

     Judging from the responses, T-Mobile would have been better off not mentioning anything about the fee increase, and simply just adding it to the monthly bill, because as mentioned this fee is nothing new, but people are making it seem like it’s something that T-mobile just added. Part of me thinks this “outrage” is nothing more than individuals wanting the opportunity to threaten to leave T-Mobile (i.e. get of  their contract) only to remain   provided that they can get something from the loyalty/retention dept. Solo mi dos centavos.

    • H8stylist

      people do it everytime it goes up. i think when i first started with tmobile 4 years ago it was 1.22 or something along those lines.  every time it goes up, people cry, then it dies down till it gets raised again.

    • H8stylist

      people do it everytime it goes up. i think when i first started with tmobile 4 years ago it was 1.22 or something along those lines.  every time it goes up, people cry, then it dies down till it gets raised again.

  • A L

     Judging from the responses, T-Mobile would have been better off not mentioning anything about the fee increase, and simply just adding it to the monthly bill, because as mentioned this fee is nothing new, but people are making it seem like it’s something that T-mobile just added. Part of me thinks this “outrage” is nothing more than individuals wanting the opportunity to threaten to leave T-Mobile (i.e. get of  their contract) only to remain   provided that they can get something from the loyalty/retention dept. Solo mi dos centavos.

  • Coolhikers

    I have news for all of you, YOU can get out of your contract when they update the charge on your billing.
    Your contract will be null and void once it shows on your billing.
    You must call customer care billing to address the billing.

    • Anonymous

      Umm… we’ll laugh at you. Yep.

      • You’ll laugh because you’ve been told by your owners that it’s fine for the fee to be raised. Legally, that’s a different story.

        • Anonymous

          Read the Terms and Conditions. There’s a link above.

        • Anonymous

          Read the Terms and Conditions. There’s a link above.

    • Anonymous

      Umm… we’ll laugh at you. Yep.

    • Anonymous

      Umm… we’ll laugh at you. Yep.

    • JustMe

      Yeah you go ahead and try that … we sure will address the billing ….. and yes we sure will laugh when you say you have the right to terminate with no EFT…LoL

  • Anonymous

    Interesting. Fees don’t count. Straight from the T&C:

    “WE CAN CHANGE ANY TERMS IN THE AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME. YOU MAY CANCEL THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (if applicable) IF:  (A) WE CHANGE YOUR PRICING IN A MANNER THAT MATERIALLY INCREASES YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE(S) (the amount you agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging, which does not include overage, pay-per-use or optional services (such as 411, or downloads), or taxes and fees)…”

    • Dave

      It says right there, “or taxes and fees”. You don’t have the right to cancel without ETF. Read what you quoted.

      • Anonymous

        That is what I am saying. I agree with you. Fees don’t count as far as an involuntary price increase goes, therefore contracts are still binding.

  • Anonymous

    Interesting. Fees don’t count. Straight from the T&C:

    “WE CAN CHANGE ANY TERMS IN THE AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME. YOU MAY CANCEL THE AFFECTED LINE OF SERVICE WITHOUT AN EARLY TERMINATION FEE (if applicable) IF:  (A) WE CHANGE YOUR PRICING IN A MANNER THAT MATERIALLY INCREASES YOUR MONTHLY RECURRING CHARGE(S) (the amount you agreed to pay each month for voice, data and messaging, which does not include overage, pay-per-use or optional services (such as 411, or downloads), or taxes and fees)…”

  • I want to know more about the last line.

    • Anonymous

      Certain plans are exempt from the fee. The only plan I’ve worked with as an employee that has exemptions on regulatory fees is the old suncom wireless Truth In Wireless plan (where suncom would basically waive all the taxes, I imagine the carrier paid them for you. So what you saw in the store is what you got when you walked out, no surprise $20 in tax) There are no other regular consumer plans that have a regulatory fee exemption or any way to get one on a regular plan. There may be large corporate or government accounts that also have exemptions but regular care doesn’t typically work with these plans

    • Anonymous

      Certain plans are exempt from the fee. The only plan I’ve worked with as an employee that has exemptions on regulatory fees is the old suncom wireless Truth In Wireless plan (where suncom would basically waive all the taxes, I imagine the carrier paid them for you. So what you saw in the store is what you got when you walked out, no surprise $20 in tax) There are no other regular consumer plans that have a regulatory fee exemption or any way to get one on a regular plan. There may be large corporate or government accounts that also have exemptions but regular care doesn’t typically work with these plans

  • Thewinckle

    As for the people complaining about the fee, if you wouldn’t mind not being able to take your number from carrier to carrier, or wouldn’t mind telling 911 exactly where you are when you call them on your cell phone, then your complaints are just.  But, imagine calling 911 in a dire emergency and the second question from them was “So, where exactly are you?”  What if you had no idea where you are, or your life depeneded on fast response from emergency services?  These programs are largely funded by taxes, but fees like these keep the operator, i.e. T-Mobile, able to fund these services on their end of the business.  Also, since it is law that you are able to take your number with you wherever you go, wouldn’t it seem fair that only those with a cell phone pay to be able to take advantage of that resource?  Number portability isn’t a goverment funded program, but someone has to pay for the services rendered.  Think about that when you complain about an extra 20 cents per month, or 4.80 over the life of your contract.

  • Thewinckle

    As for the people complaining about the fee, if you wouldn’t mind not being able to take your number from carrier to carrier, or wouldn’t mind telling 911 exactly where you are when you call them on your cell phone, then your complaints are just.  But, imagine calling 911 in a dire emergency and the second question from them was “So, where exactly are you?”  What if you had no idea where you are, or your life depeneded on fast response from emergency services?  These programs are largely funded by taxes, but fees like these keep the operator, i.e. T-Mobile, able to fund these services on their end of the business.  Also, since it is law that you are able to take your number with you wherever you go, wouldn’t it seem fair that only those with a cell phone pay to be able to take advantage of that resource?  Number portability isn’t a goverment funded program, but someone has to pay for the services rendered.  Think about that when you complain about an extra 20 cents per month, or 4.80 over the life of your contract.

    • Richard

      Have you ever had to call 911? They do ask where you are no matter if you are calling from cell or landline.

      • H8stylist

        but if you were in an accident ,  had no idea where you are, then they can look it up is the point.

        • Guest

          The carrier does little for location information to 911 services.  A lot of places will recieve lat/long coordinates from cell tower triangulation, but there are some still that just recieve a call back number.  This number is ran against an external database(unrelated to your carrier) for caller information such as location.  This information may not be up to date or you may be in a location not within the database, that is why the location is verified when calling.

  • Thewinckle

    As for the people complaining about the fee, if you wouldn’t mind not being able to take your number from carrier to carrier, or wouldn’t mind telling 911 exactly where you are when you call them on your cell phone, then your complaints are just.  But, imagine calling 911 in a dire emergency and the second question from them was “So, where exactly are you?”  What if you had no idea where you are, or your life depeneded on fast response from emergency services?  These programs are largely funded by taxes, but fees like these keep the operator, i.e. T-Mobile, able to fund these services on their end of the business.  Also, since it is law that you are able to take your number with you wherever you go, wouldn’t it seem fair that only those with a cell phone pay to be able to take advantage of that resource?  Number portability isn’t a goverment funded program, but someone has to pay for the services rendered.  Think about that when you complain about an extra 20 cents per month, or 4.80 over the life of your contract.

  • Anonymous

    This is my second to last post on T-MoNews since I have switched my two lines, one to Metro PCS, the other to Virgin Mobile.
    ____________________

    In regards to this article, it’s NOT 20 cents that’s the
    issue, it’s that T-Mobile’s fee is $1.61, and it will increase nibble by
    nibble over time.  These vendor side fees may not matter to you, but they do matter to me and they especially matter to T-Mobile. 

    Like others said, assume 33 million customers are paying this $1.61 monthly (there’s other fees that T-Mobile pockets too, but we won’t go into that).

    $1.61 x 33 million subscribers x 12 months = $637 million in pure profit for T-Mobile. (People are naive if they think the $637 million is anywhere close to what T-Mobile supposedly pays its employees for compliance with govt. regulations or whatever.)

    You know what else is dishonest, T-Mobile’s double and triple billing for the same fees.  This article points to T-Mobile saying that the $1.61 is, for example, to recoup the cost of T-Mobile’s compliance with 911 laws.  But my bill shows I am paying PER LINE $2.82 AND .16 for 911 related services.  See the bill here:

    You all should not be looking at that fee with
    blinders on.  The truth is that we pay a huge amount in vendor fees that
    have nothing to do with anything except generating additional profits. 

    Check out your cable TV bill.

    Check to see how much of the $4 per gallon of gas is going to fees and taxes (both to the fed and state you are in).

    Check the fees on your land line phone.

    See the fees you pay on each tire you buy.

    Check out the electronic recycle/waste fees your state and the fed charges when buying a TV or computer.

    The reality it, we are all fee’d to death.  But sure, look at this as “it’s only 20 cents so what’s the big deal and quit your whining.”  T-Mobile LOVES people who look at this as a 20 cent increase and don’t give these kind of things a second thought.

    But I have, which is one of the reasons I am switching to prepaid.  Frankly, I’m tired of paying these kinds of add-ons to advertised low monthly bills.  On my two lines I am paying $15.98 per line in fees and taxes.  I don’t know about you, but $16 monthly ($192 annually) is ABSURD.

    And as ABC News coincidentally said just last week, since most of the fees we pay are NOT imposed by the government, we should be calling the business and telling them to stop charging us.

    Sidenote: I would not believe a word T-Mobile says about this change does not allow you to cancel your contract.  In fact, check YouTube, there’s video how-to and tutorials on what you need to do to demand the carrier let you out of your contract.

    • qmc

      Mr. Michael,  you need to separate TAXES (government charges) from FEES (tmobile charges).  the “City 911” fee is charged by your CITY, to ALL phone customers, wired or wireless.

  • 20centsisnotalotevenforafrica

    T-Mobile Unlimited Talk and Text for 2 lines is 99.99. AT&T charges 149.99 for the same plan. 50 dollar difference a month. Verizon Wireless charges 149.99 also for the same plan. 50×24 months not including taxes/fees is a $1200 difference over 2 years. Your fees went up 0.20/month. Netflix went up 6.00 bucks a month. I’m just putting things into perspective. I’m a T-Mobile customer and I find most of you just completely retarded. Please switch to Boost/Tracfone. There’s a phone and it has your name on it.

    • Monkunashi

      believe it or not, its not the 20 cents people are worried about, its realizing how crappy t-mobile is and wanting out, but have to wait 2 years with service that barely works. Some people would be willing to pay the extra $50/month to not have tmobile. its not a money issue. the only reason money is mentioned is because thats generally the only legal out you have without paying $250 per line to cancel, is when they increase fees.

      • H8stylist

        atleast respond with correct information. first of all, t-mobile’s service is not crappy as has been tested multiple times by third parties.  of course there are going to people that view it this way, just as i have spoken to people with at&t, sprint, metropcs, and believe it or not verizon.  i personally have had sprint, verizon, tmobile, and metropcs.  i prefer call quality on sprint and tmobile.  verizon has more signal availability ( not read as signal everywhere ).  tmobile has the best customer service as well.  there will ALWAYS be a spot where a carrier cannot get reception while another can, don’t watch tv commercials and believe the hype.

        secondly, the grass will always be greener till you get to the other side of the fence.  sometimes all the trouble you spent getting to go to a different carrier is not all it’s cracked up to be.  is it best for you?  maybe, but only you can answer that.

        finally, the etf for leaving t-mobile is not 250.00, it’s 200.00.  i know other carriers have 250.00, but if you want to shout “tmobile sucks”, atleast get the right facts so you don’t make yourself look retarded.

      • H8stylist

        atleast respond with correct information. first of all, t-mobile’s service is not crappy as has been tested multiple times by third parties.  of course there are going to people that view it this way, just as i have spoken to people with at&t, sprint, metropcs, and believe it or not verizon.  i personally have had sprint, verizon, tmobile, and metropcs.  i prefer call quality on sprint and tmobile.  verizon has more signal availability ( not read as signal everywhere ).  tmobile has the best customer service as well.  there will ALWAYS be a spot where a carrier cannot get reception while another can, don’t watch tv commercials and believe the hype.

        secondly, the grass will always be greener till you get to the other side of the fence.  sometimes all the trouble you spent getting to go to a different carrier is not all it’s cracked up to be.  is it best for you?  maybe, but only you can answer that.

        finally, the etf for leaving t-mobile is not 250.00, it’s 200.00.  i know other carriers have 250.00, but if you want to shout “tmobile sucks”, atleast get the right facts so you don’t make yourself look retarded.

      • Eric

        Why would you be with T-Mobile if they were “crappy?” There is 14 days to try out the service (30 in Cali) and if you don’t like it you can go return your phone and not get locked into a contract. I’ve been with T-Mobile for years and they have always been great.

    • yougotpwned.

      This is one of the smartest guy/girl ever to step into a cell phone store! Goodjob!

    • yougotpwned.

      This is one of the smartest guy/girl ever to step into a cell phone store! Goodjob!

  • Aaron

    It should be noted that whether you are right or wrong (I actually have a real reason to leave sans EFT), you will have to send a letter to T-Mobile (yes, an actual LETTER) disputing the contract. The representative told me that as of February they cannot under any circumstances, even if you are clearly 100% right, cancel your contract over the phone. You must write to their corporate headquarters. It’s a good thing I have a lawyer on staff to write these letters for me.

  • Aaron

    It should be noted that whether you are right or wrong (I actually have a real reason to leave sans EFT), you will have to send a letter to T-Mobile (yes, an actual LETTER) disputing the contract. The representative told me that as of February they cannot under any circumstances, even if you are clearly 100% right, cancel your contract over the phone. You must write to their corporate headquarters. It’s a good thing I have a lawyer on staff to write these letters for me.

  • Williameasterlylll

    what the heck is these other charges i have been getting charged for years…..seems t-mobile makes a killing of me

  • Theabunai

    the .20 cents doesn’t bother me, but i would like to use it to get out of contract without ETF…  I am totally disappointed with tmobile Service in my area.. Not only HOMe but work… I get only EDGE at home and I barely get ANYTHING at work.. Not even EDGE or G… Let me address all the nut huggers out there who will say why did i stay with the contract if i knew service was bad… Well i been with Tmobile for over 15 years (when they were voicestream), I was actually able to switch carriers then since my contract was up over 5 years ago.. I DIDNT know that coverage in my area would be so terrible until i ordered a smartphone with data internet in the beggining of this year and we all know that that instills a new 2 year contract… AND what’s worse is where i live (hawaii) their MAP shows they have 3G and HSPA coverage on their map.. yet i have VIDEOS of my phone with Edge AND at time NO DATA SERVICE at my house and at work (where it has been costing me some customers and loss of money).. Now soon after receiving my phone and noticing the data was bad i called to cancel they said i couldn’t the 14 days only applies to NEW contracts… And because i got a new phone i am stuck for 2 years… I don’t see how this is fair…

  • Theabunai

    the .20 cents doesn’t bother me, but i would like to use it to get out of contract without ETF…  I am totally disappointed with tmobile Service in my area.. Not only HOMe but work… I get only EDGE at home and I barely get ANYTHING at work.. Not even EDGE or G… Let me address all the nut huggers out there who will say why did i stay with the contract if i knew service was bad… Well i been with Tmobile for over 15 years (when they were voicestream), I was actually able to switch carriers then since my contract was up over 5 years ago.. I DIDNT know that coverage in my area would be so terrible until i ordered a smartphone with data internet in the beggining of this year and we all know that that instills a new 2 year contract… AND what’s worse is where i live (hawaii) their MAP shows they have 3G and HSPA coverage on their map.. yet i have VIDEOS of my phone with Edge AND at time NO DATA SERVICE at my house and at work (where it has been costing me some customers and loss of money).. Now soon after receiving my phone and noticing the data was bad i called to cancel they said i couldn’t the 14 days only applies to NEW contracts… And because i got a new phone i am stuck for 2 years… I don’t see how this is fair…

  • If you reimburse 100 people, that’s $20. Think of the MILLONS TMo is getting from this tiny little increase.

  • If you reimburse 100 people, that’s $20. Think of the MILLONS TMo is getting from this tiny little increase.

  • If you reimburse 100 people, that’s $20. Think of the MILLONS TMo is getting from this tiny little increase.

  • Funny, TMobile states that “This fee is not a government mandated charge or tax.”

  • TujuMaster

    Okay, so I would just like to chime in here.  I can tell you that this situation is tricky if you are looking to get out of your contract.  Technically, newer contracts have this little loophole in section 13 that says that says that you basically agree to pay all surcharges even if they increase.  Section 6 also explains that, since this is listed under the taxes and fee’s section, they are not in materiel breach because they are not raising the price of your basic services. Therefore, in order for you to claim material breach, only the rate plan associated with your account may increase.  If you have one of these new contracts, then unless you can prove material hardship, unfortunately T-Mobile has you in their grip.  Yes, the regulatory fee is listed as a surcharge.  However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you are without rights.  First, different states have different laws about surcharges.  You should check with your state to see what rights you may have under law.  Second, because of this proposed merger, it is in T-Mobile’s interest to stay out of the spotlight.  My suggestion is you start letting your elected officials know about this and this new contract policy.  Sadly, the Supreme Court shot down our right to class action.  However, public opinion trumps everything so speak up if you really don’t like this.

  • Malcenterpa

    how does one become exempt from paying a reg. prog. fee?

  • ITISWHATITIS

    Well, Everybody say 20 cents. But, the bill indicates “Fee we collect and retain to help cover our cost related to funding and complying with government mandates, programs and obligations” The last word say obligation, comply what the government mandates and program. Whose FUNDING who, well the point is multiply how many customers you guys have and it will show more profit on the company’s end. example .20 x 15,000,000 = 3 million x 12 mos $ 36,000,000.00 no matter what they say it should be their cost not consumers. Consumers makes a company profits but when they are not happy company files lost then it passed to the consumers it is the corporate and the government ways. PASS THE BUCK.

  • yeah right

    what a lie ” Regulatory Programs Fee has been charged since 2004, and is disclosed at the point of sale.” I just purchased 4 phones, and this was never mentioned once.