T-Mobile Will Ramp Up Their International Offerings, Provide Fixed Rate Plans

This article is a little two fold, the first being the above and below images showing the beginning of a six week advertising campaign in Hispanic Markets. T-Mobile hopes to boost awareness for its International Talk & Text service by showing these markets you can call landline numbers in 56 countries using your domestic minutes bucket. We first learned about this back in November and with yesterdays investor call, emphasis was placed on creating future awareness for T-Mobile’s unique international calling plans.

This brings us to the second point of the article and that is T-Mobile plans for future international offerings. We can’t be 100% sure on what exactly this will mean but T-Mobile CMO Cole Brodman stated that moving forward later this year Flat Rate data plans will be available for international data combined with flat rate voice and plans. Customers want fixed rates and T-Mobile wants to avoid bill shock from customers who arrive back in the United States to hundreds if not thousands of dollars worth of international charges. Therefore, it will also be introducing daily, weekly and monthly plans on a flat rate scale to offer the best value among the competition for international offerings. That is incredibly ambitious and while it’s likely they’ll ultimately find the competition matching with similar offers, it’s nice to see them taking the initiative.

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  • Anonymous

    “it’s nice to see them taking the initiative.” indeed.

  • Anonymous

    Has any tried using wifi calling outside the US? Will I be charged international rates?

    • Cmedick

      If you are overseas, and are still using your Tmo phone, you can connect to a wifi network and call a domestic US number and not be charged international roaming charges. You may want to disable everything except wifi on your phone to make sure that wifi is your only connection available just to be 100% safe. Tmo does not care where the IP is originating from when you make wifi calls, just remember that is still will count against your minutes unless it is night/weekend time.

      • 4typhive

        Or, get it unlocked and buy and pre-paid sim card to make calls

        • hi!

          um, why would you do that when cmedick just explained the way to make completely FREE calls?

        • guest

          because wifi isn’t available everywhere. i have my phone unlocked and can now put in UK SIM when i next travel there. Last trip to London cost me hundreds extra on my bill and I literally limited myself to a few data syncs a day for 10 days when I wasn’t in wifi range. new plan sounds promising.

      • 4typhive

        Or, get it unlocked and buy and pre-paid sim card to make calls

      • hi!

        can it be a domestic US cell number or does it have to be a landline? Also, is the night/weekend times based on when you’re making the call (in the foreign country) or is it based on the current time in the US? Thanks!

      • Newmex0

        Have you confirmed this? I was planning to use this in Germany in a few weeks.

        • http://tmonews.com David

          Well as it stands, it wouldn’t work overseas, just calling from the US to a landline overseas.

        • http://tmonews.com David

          Well as it stands, it wouldn’t work overseas, just calling from the US to a landline overseas.

        • Brian

          I can confirm this does not cost extra. I was in Australia 2 weeks ago and it worked perfectly. As the other person said above make sure you disable everything but wifi.

        • Demonchylde

          I can confirm that you better know what you’re doing and do it right, otherwise you’ll be joining many many customers who call in saying “But I was using wi-fi to make my calls!!!” but are still staring at a $500.00 bill full of roaming charges… and if that happens, it’s basically you’re own fault… it doesn’t matter if you were trying to get around the roaming charges by using wi-fi, you still made the calls outside of the country, you are responsible… you bought the ticket… you take the ride…

      • Newmex0

        Have you confirmed this? I was planning to use this in Germany in a few weeks.

    • tmorep

      on blackberries you will not. i am not sure about android phones.

  • MIKEEEEE

    game changer.

  • MIKEEEEE

    game changer.

  • FATMAN

    WHERE’S PHILIPPINES? STUPID NOT TO INCLUDE IT ON THE LIST!

    • 4typhive

      I agree. I have to know that there is a large community in CA and Hampton Roads, VA that would absolutely love it if the PI was up there

      • tmorep

        tmobile stated that the list will be updated as time goes on. it is initially just these 60 or so countries.

    • 4typhive

      I agree. I have to know that there is a large community in CA and Hampton Roads, VA that would absolutely love it if the PI was up there

    • 4typhive

      I agree. I have to know that there is a large community in CA and Hampton Roads, VA that would absolutely love it if the PI was up there

    • 4typhive

      I agree. I have to know that there is a large community in CA and Hampton Roads, VA that would absolutely love it if the PI was up there

    • http://twitter.com/carcomptoy Jeremiah

      The Philippines probably weren’t initially included because the texting usage would just be exorbitant :p

      But as tmorep said above, there’s the $10/month unlimited plan that includes unlimited international texting. So I don’t understand what’s new and different about this one featured in the article…

  • Hurlamania

    Wished they included international sms with there messaging package like they do with there simple mobile plans.

    • tmorep

      for an additional $10 a month you get unlimited landline calling to the countries in the picture above as well as getting free unlimited international texting

      • tmorep

        *free unlimited international texting to the whole world, not just the ones in the pic. the countries in the pic are for calling.

        • Hurlamania

          I know what it is, I’m just saying it would be nice to have the international sms included in the standard messaging package as T-Mobile does with simple mobile.
          The calling is not included but the sms is.
          Thanks for the reply.

        • Hurlamania

          I know what it is, I’m just saying it would be nice to have the international sms included in the standard messaging package as T-Mobile does with simple mobile.
          The calling is not included but the sms is.
          Thanks for the reply.

        • Hurlamania

          I know what it is, I’m just saying it would be nice to have the international sms included in the standard messaging package as T-Mobile does with simple mobile.
          The calling is not included but the sms is.
          Thanks for the reply.

      • tmorep

        *free unlimited international texting to the whole world, not just the ones in the pic. the countries in the pic are for calling.

  • Ghuayu

    wow T-mobile is thinking about what we need now , no wonder i’ve been with them for over 7 years. I think T-mobile is in a right spot to be more competetive with those Big 2, special T-mobile is a multi-International company which have a huge space to be more innovative to promote their services .

  • Ghuayu

    wow T-mobile is thinking about what we need now , no wonder i’ve been with them for over 7 years. I think T-mobile is in a right spot to be more competetive with those Big 2, special T-mobile is a multi-International company which have a huge space to be more innovative to promote their services .

  • http://www.peakfitnessny.com WD

    Calls to Landlines only? I guess…it’s something but landlines are not that common in many places now since it’s so much easier to get a cellphone in many countries than a landline. Kind of a half-hearted attempt at this TMOB

  • http://www.peakfitnessny.com WD

    Calls to Landlines only? I guess…it’s something but landlines are not that common in many places now since it’s so much easier to get a cellphone in many countries than a landline. Kind of a half-hearted attempt at this TMOB

  • Rickdsf

    So why not Sweden?

  • Vibrant Addict

    I can’t wait for this!!

    WHOOO!!!!

  • Vibrant Addict

    I can’t wait for this!!

    WHOOO!!!!

  • Vibrant Addict

    I can’t wait for this!!

    WHOOO!!!!

  • Musicear

    how do request 3g :((((

  • Musicear

    how do request 3g :((((

  • Musicear

    how do request 3g :((((

  • hi!

    not sure I totally understand this but I’m pumped regardless! David! I’m normally the negative Nancy around here….what’s with the:

    “it’s likely they’ll ultimately find the competition matching with similar offers, it’s nice to see them taking the initiative.”

    I totally disagree, I think this is DT leveraging their international contacts. Sprint doesn’t even have service overseas, I don’t see them jumping on this boat. This IS/COULD BE HUGEEEE!!!

  • Iluvhatemail

    this is better news than any phone they could release. Having a flat international rate would save me a lot of money

  • Iluvhatemail

    this is better news than any phone they could release. Having a flat international rate would save me a lot of money

    • hi!

      I agree! Are they going to be completely new plans? Will this be included into the current plans, or will this be an add on service, say, an additional 1.99 a month type thing?

    • hi!

      I agree! Are they going to be completely new plans? Will this be included into the current plans, or will this be an add on service, say, an additional 1.99 a month type thing?

  • Iluvhatemail

    this is better news than any phone they could release. Having a flat international rate would save me a lot of money

  • Anonymous

    This is in line with my long-winded comments I posted a few days ago, specifically:

    “Consider getting rid of the things people don’t like about carriers, so that T-Mobile can take the high road and say ‘we don’t do that.’

    A. Eliminate overage charges. The user gets a reminder on the phone display when they are close to using up talk minutes or data plan units. Make it so the user can choose the frequency and when the reminders appear on screen.

    When the user’s limits are reached, a call goes to T-Mobile where the CSR offers the user discounted minutes or MBs to tide the person over to the new billing period….”

    The idea behind this is that while the other carriers are increasing rates and eliminating services, T-Mobile has the opportunity to set itself apart from the competition, not as the “low rate” or “value” carrier, but instead something like:

    “The Anti Bill Shock Carrier” or “The Honest Carrier” or “The ‘In Your Corner’ Carrier” or “The No Hidden Fees Carrier.”

    Those are silly phrases but you get the idea.

    While other carriers are in unison going in the same direction, hiking up rates and basically charging more for less, T-Mobile can dramatically advertise going in the opposite direction by implementing consumer/user friendly policies and stabilizing current rates.

    As I said before, T-Mobile should get rid of overage charges (or at least give consumers multiple ADVANCE warnings that they run the risk of going over talk or data limits) and simply eliminate early termination fees.

    It was just on that national news this morning that carriers are increasing rates. Think of the free media coverage if the other part of this story was that T-Mobile made a “no price increase pledge,” eliminated early termination penalties and instituted a warning system to prevent “bill shock.”

    This is the opportune time for T-Mobile to become known as “the customer’s friend” instead of simply “the cheapskate’s carrier.”

    Heck, that’s a good commercial, now that I think about it:

    [Scene] Al “Scarface” Pacino lookalike is sitting at his desk in his mansion. Camera closes in. Al is holding a T-Mobile handset.

    [Scarface] With Cuban slang accent “Say hello to your new friend.”

    [Scene] Scarface holds up a T-Mobile phone in one hand then stands up. He then grabs a pointer and starts talking in polished English. He then walks over to an easel that has easy-to-read charts that has on each page the great things T-Mobile is doing to become the consumer’s friend.

    [Scene] At the end of the spot, Carly walks into the shot, Al “Scarface” takes her arm and they happily walk out his home-office door. His cell phone rings and he can be seen taking the call. (All this an homage and play on the violent ending in the movie Scarface, instead having a T-Mobile happily ever after ending.)

    You get the idea.

  • Anonymous

    This is in line with my long-winded comments I posted a few days ago, specifically:

    “Consider getting rid of the things people don’t like about carriers, so that T-Mobile can take the high road and say ‘we don’t do that.’

    A. Eliminate overage charges. The user gets a reminder on the phone display when they are close to using up talk minutes or data plan units. Make it so the user can choose the frequency and when the reminders appear on screen.

    When the user’s limits are reached, a call goes to T-Mobile where the CSR offers the user discounted minutes or MBs to tide the person over to the new billing period….”

    The idea behind this is that while the other carriers are increasing rates and eliminating services, T-Mobile has the opportunity to set itself apart from the competition, not as the “low rate” or “value” carrier, but instead something like:

    “The Anti Bill Shock Carrier” or “The Honest Carrier” or “The ‘In Your Corner’ Carrier” or “The No Hidden Fees Carrier.”

    Those are silly phrases but you get the idea.

    While other carriers are in unison going in the same direction, hiking up rates and basically charging more for less, T-Mobile can dramatically advertise going in the opposite direction by implementing consumer/user friendly policies and stabilizing current rates.

    As I said before, T-Mobile should get rid of overage charges (or at least give consumers multiple ADVANCE warnings that they run the risk of going over talk or data limits) and simply eliminate early termination fees.

    It was just on that national news this morning that carriers are increasing rates. Think of the free media coverage if the other part of this story was that T-Mobile made a “no price increase pledge,” eliminated early termination penalties and instituted a warning system to prevent “bill shock.”

    This is the opportune time for T-Mobile to become known as “the customer’s friend” instead of simply “the cheapskate’s carrier.”

    Heck, that’s a good commercial, now that I think about it:

    [Scene] Al “Scarface” Pacino lookalike is sitting at his desk in his mansion. Camera closes in. Al is holding a T-Mobile handset.

    [Scarface] With Cuban slang accent “Say hello to your new friend.”

    [Scene] Scarface holds up a T-Mobile phone in one hand then stands up. He then grabs a pointer and starts talking in polished English. He then walks over to an easel that has easy-to-read charts that has on each page the great things T-Mobile is doing to become the consumer’s friend.

    [Scene] At the end of the spot, Carly walks into the shot, Al “Scarface” takes her arm and they happily walk out his home-office door. His cell phone rings and he can be seen taking the call. (All this an homage and play on the violent ending in the movie Scarface, instead having a T-Mobile happily ever after ending.)

    You get the idea.

    • hi!

      I like where you’re going with that. It would be a good time/way to differentiate their service. I have to disagree about the “no early termination fee” thing though. Did you not hear Verizon is getting the iPhone? We need SOME way of keeping people around, lol

      • SublimeDavid

        people would take advantage of the no term fees in a sec, there are plenty of dishonest people out there but the rest of what your saying would be a great idea. Not sure why you posted it here and not sent that to corporate, im sure they would love that one. Ive noticed also theyve unblocked Tmonews on our CP’s lol grats David!

    • hi!

      I like where you’re going with that. It would be a good time/way to differentiate their service. I have to disagree about the “no early termination fee” thing though. Did you not hear Verizon is getting the iPhone? We need SOME way of keeping people around, lol

  • Anonymous

    This is in line with my long-winded comments I posted a few days ago, specifically:

    “Consider getting rid of the things people don’t like about carriers, so that T-Mobile can take the high road and say ‘we don’t do that.’

    A. Eliminate overage charges. The user gets a reminder on the phone display when they are close to using up talk minutes or data plan units. Make it so the user can choose the frequency and when the reminders appear on screen.

    When the user’s limits are reached, a call goes to T-Mobile where the CSR offers the user discounted minutes or MBs to tide the person over to the new billing period….”

    The idea behind this is that while the other carriers are increasing rates and eliminating services, T-Mobile has the opportunity to set itself apart from the competition, not as the “low rate” or “value” carrier, but instead something like:

    “The Anti Bill Shock Carrier” or “The Honest Carrier” or “The ‘In Your Corner’ Carrier” or “The No Hidden Fees Carrier.”

    Those are silly phrases but you get the idea.

    While other carriers are in unison going in the same direction, hiking up rates and basically charging more for less, T-Mobile can dramatically advertise going in the opposite direction by implementing consumer/user friendly policies and stabilizing current rates.

    As I said before, T-Mobile should get rid of overage charges (or at least give consumers multiple ADVANCE warnings that they run the risk of going over talk or data limits) and simply eliminate early termination fees.

    It was just on that national news this morning that carriers are increasing rates. Think of the free media coverage if the other part of this story was that T-Mobile made a “no price increase pledge,” eliminated early termination penalties and instituted a warning system to prevent “bill shock.”

    This is the opportune time for T-Mobile to become known as “the customer’s friend” instead of simply “the cheapskate’s carrier.”

    Heck, that’s a good commercial, now that I think about it:

    [Scene] Al “Scarface” Pacino lookalike is sitting at his desk in his mansion. Camera closes in. Al is holding a T-Mobile handset.

    [Scarface] With Cuban slang accent “Say hello to your new friend.”

    [Scene] Scarface holds up a T-Mobile phone in one hand then stands up. He then grabs a pointer and starts talking in polished English. He then walks over to an easel that has easy-to-read charts that has on each page the great things T-Mobile is doing to become the consumer’s friend.

    [Scene] At the end of the spot, Carly walks into the shot, Al “Scarface” takes her arm and they happily walk out his home-office door. His cell phone rings and he can be seen taking the call. (All this an homage and play on the violent ending in the movie Scarface, instead having a T-Mobile happily ever after ending.)

    You get the idea.

  • Anonymous

    This is in line with my long-winded comments I posted a few days ago, specifically:

    “Consider getting rid of the things people don’t like about carriers, so that T-Mobile can take the high road and say ‘we don’t do that.’

    A. Eliminate overage charges. The user gets a reminder on the phone display when they are close to using up talk minutes or data plan units. Make it so the user can choose the frequency and when the reminders appear on screen.

    When the user’s limits are reached, a call goes to T-Mobile where the CSR offers the user discounted minutes or MBs to tide the person over to the new billing period….”

    The idea behind this is that while the other carriers are increasing rates and eliminating services, T-Mobile has the opportunity to set itself apart from the competition, not as the “low rate” or “value” carrier, but instead something like:

    “The Anti Bill Shock Carrier” or “The Honest Carrier” or “The ‘In Your Corner’ Carrier” or “The No Hidden Fees Carrier.”

    Those are silly phrases but you get the idea.

    While other carriers are in unison going in the same direction, hiking up rates and basically charging more for less, T-Mobile can dramatically advertise going in the opposite direction by implementing consumer/user friendly policies and stabilizing current rates.

    As I said before, T-Mobile should get rid of overage charges (or at least give consumers multiple ADVANCE warnings that they run the risk of going over talk or data limits) and simply eliminate early termination fees.

    It was just on that national news this morning that carriers are increasing rates. Think of the free media coverage if the other part of this story was that T-Mobile made a “no price increase pledge,” eliminated early termination penalties and instituted a warning system to prevent “bill shock.”

    This is the opportune time for T-Mobile to become known as “the customer’s friend” instead of simply “the cheapskate’s carrier.”

    Heck, that’s a good commercial, now that I think about it:

    [Scene] Al “Scarface” Pacino lookalike is sitting at his desk in his mansion. Camera closes in. Al is holding a T-Mobile handset.

    [Scarface] With Cuban slang accent “Say hello to your new friend.”

    [Scene] Scarface holds up a T-Mobile phone in one hand then stands up. He then grabs a pointer and starts talking in polished English. He then walks over to an easel that has easy-to-read charts that has on each page the great things T-Mobile is doing to become the consumer’s friend.

    [Scene] At the end of the spot, Carly walks into the shot, Al “Scarface” takes her arm and they happily walk out his home-office door. His cell phone rings and he can be seen taking the call. (All this an homage and play on the violent ending in the movie Scarface, instead having a T-Mobile happily ever after ending.)

    You get the idea.

  • Anonymous

    This is in line with my long-winded comments I posted a few days ago, specifically:

    “Consider getting rid of the things people don’t like about carriers, so that T-Mobile can take the high road and say ‘we don’t do that.’

    A. Eliminate overage charges. The user gets a reminder on the phone display when they are close to using up talk minutes or data plan units. Make it so the user can choose the frequency and when the reminders appear on screen.

    When the user’s limits are reached, a call goes to T-Mobile where the CSR offers the user discounted minutes or MBs to tide the person over to the new billing period….”

    The idea behind this is that while the other carriers are increasing rates and eliminating services, T-Mobile has the opportunity to set itself apart from the competition, not as the “low rate” or “value” carrier, but instead something like:

    “The Anti Bill Shock Carrier” or “The Honest Carrier” or “The ‘In Your Corner’ Carrier” or “The No Hidden Fees Carrier.”

    Those are silly phrases but you get the idea.

    While other carriers are in unison going in the same direction, hiking up rates and basically charging more for less, T-Mobile can dramatically advertise going in the opposite direction by implementing consumer/user friendly policies and stabilizing current rates.

    As I said before, T-Mobile should get rid of overage charges (or at least give consumers multiple ADVANCE warnings that they run the risk of going over talk or data limits) and simply eliminate early termination fees.

    It was just on that national news this morning that carriers are increasing rates. Think of the free media coverage if the other part of this story was that T-Mobile made a “no price increase pledge,” eliminated early termination penalties and instituted a warning system to prevent “bill shock.”

    This is the opportune time for T-Mobile to become known as “the customer’s friend” instead of simply “the cheapskate’s carrier.”

    Heck, that’s a good commercial, now that I think about it:

    [Scene] Al “Scarface” Pacino lookalike is sitting at his desk in his mansion. Camera closes in. Al is holding a T-Mobile handset.

    [Scarface] With Cuban slang accent “Say hello to your new friend.”

    [Scene] Scarface holds up a T-Mobile phone in one hand then stands up. He then grabs a pointer and starts talking in polished English. He then walks over to an easel that has easy-to-read charts that has on each page the great things T-Mobile is doing to become the consumer’s friend.

    [Scene] At the end of the spot, Carly walks into the shot, Al “Scarface” takes her arm and they happily walk out his home-office door. His cell phone rings and he can be seen taking the call. (All this an homage and play on the violent ending in the movie Scarface, instead having a T-Mobile happily ever after ending.)

    You get the idea.

  • Anonymous

    This is in line with my long-winded comments I posted a few days ago, specifically:

    “Consider getting rid of the things people don’t like about carriers, so that T-Mobile can take the high road and say ‘we don’t do that.’

    A. Eliminate overage charges. The user gets a reminder on the phone display when they are close to using up talk minutes or data plan units. Make it so the user can choose the frequency and when the reminders appear on screen.

    When the user’s limits are reached, a call goes to T-Mobile where the CSR offers the user discounted minutes or MBs to tide the person over to the new billing period….”

    The idea behind this is that while the other carriers are increasing rates and eliminating services, T-Mobile has the opportunity to set itself apart from the competition, not as the “low rate” or “value” carrier, but instead something like:

    “The Anti Bill Shock Carrier” or “The Honest Carrier” or “The ‘In Your Corner’ Carrier” or “The No Hidden Fees Carrier.”

    Those are silly phrases but you get the idea.

    While other carriers are in unison going in the same direction, hiking up rates and basically charging more for less, T-Mobile can dramatically advertise going in the opposite direction by implementing consumer/user friendly policies and stabilizing current rates.

    As I said before, T-Mobile should get rid of overage charges (or at least give consumers multiple ADVANCE warnings that they run the risk of going over talk or data limits) and simply eliminate early termination fees.

    It was just on that national news this morning that carriers are increasing rates. Think of the free media coverage if the other part of this story was that T-Mobile made a “no price increase pledge,” eliminated early termination penalties and instituted a warning system to prevent “bill shock.”

    This is the opportune time for T-Mobile to become known as “the customer’s friend” instead of simply “the cheapskate’s carrier.”

    Heck, that’s a good commercial, now that I think about it:

    [Scene] Al “Scarface” Pacino lookalike is sitting at his desk in his mansion. Camera closes in. Al is holding a T-Mobile handset.

    [Scarface] With Cuban slang accent “Say hello to your new friend.”

    [Scene] Scarface holds up a T-Mobile phone in one hand then stands up. He then grabs a pointer and starts talking in polished English. He then walks over to an easel that has easy-to-read charts that has on each page the great things T-Mobile is doing to become the consumer’s friend.

    [Scene] At the end of the spot, Carly walks into the shot, Al “Scarface” takes her arm and they happily walk out his home-office door. His cell phone rings and he can be seen taking the call. (All this an homage and play on the violent ending in the movie Scarface, instead having a T-Mobile happily ever after ending.)

    You get the idea.

  • Mr. V

    Having just returned from 6 months in Europe, I really wish all the T-Mos (USA, UK, NL, DE, everyone under DT) could make use of their common parent to provide truly international services. The first thing I had to do when I landed in Amsterdam was swap out my home SIM (Tmo USA) for a prepaid Dutch SIM (Tmo NL) so I could stop getting charged $1.25/min for INCOMING calls from friends (in Europe incoming calls are generally free). Tmo USA CSR had already unlocked my phone before I left so I don’t know if other country’s Tmo SIMs would have worked and didn’t want to chance it. Then left on my Tmo NL number, my US friends needed to be informed of my new number and start paying $0.35/SMS to text me (with my US sim, US friends would text me for free, and receiving the SMS overseas would have pulled from my Unlimited bucket). My solution ended up being a Cambodian iClone phone (SciPhone I9+++) which supports Dual Sims. But really, Tmo USA and Tmo NL should have a way of linking accounts so that I can opt in for an “International T Mobile plan” that doesn’t charge me out the wazoo when I travel but always locking on to the local Tmo signals whereever I am. I know not that many customers are logging 50,000+ miles per year traveling, and I guess maybe those that do are on Verizon :(

    • Anonymous

      Yes, many T-Mobile customers are the janitors who clean up your office while you are overseas. ;)

      I am in a professional industry. Very few of my colleagues are on T-Mobile. They pay AT&T and Verizon $250 for each account and don’t think twice about it. In fact, a lot are at firms where the office pays AT&T thousands each month for cell service for each executive.

      My gf’s NYC headquartered office pays about $500,000 monthly to AT&T for cells to its executives nationwide. When she made director they made a big deal out of giving her a BlackBerry. They have a hotline to some IT guy at AT&T who jumps when her IT people call. LOL.

      They don’t concern themselves with installing updates on the Vibrant or that data went up $5 monthly.

      • Alvaro

        What does your story has to do with this news my friend?

      • SublimeDavid

        no, but if they can do things more cost effectively they will jump out of their chairs rather than their IT guys lol.

    • SublimeDavid

      You sir are the people that Tmobile is eyeing above if the above statement about International Packages Holds true, I usually tell customers to get prepaid SIM cards for the exact reason you’re explaining to prevent bill shock, Its no longer a profitable area in the wireless industry especially when you can unlock and put a diff SIM card in your phone and give your business to another carrier and I think Tmo is finally starting to see that.

  • Wirelessguest

    T-Mobile has been sitting on a gold mine that they haven’t figured out how to take advantage of: They rely on DT for interconnectivity for data roaming traffic for years. There is certainly no additional cost for carrying a US traveler’s data traffic while roaming in (for example) Germany over T-Mobile’s network there.

    I landed in Frankfurt on last Wednesday. I got SMS messages showing updates to my SIM, informing me of roaming charges for voice/SMS and $15 per MByte. Then the most ironic of all I ended up on O2 Telefonica network! :)

    The best mobile experience should be about promoting the use of a mobile phone instead of forcing users to find alternatives to it, whether they are calling card companies using VoIP or Skype or Google Voice or free WiFi. All mobile companies including T-Mobile bring this upon themselves. They still think they own the only access path to communication highway for people on the go, since they own the radio spectrum. By their own greediness, they open up the world of communication to arbitrage hence Skype, Google Voice, Jajah, Fring, etc. I can understand their greediness if I happen to be traveling on a German autobahn, but in Frankfurt airport it doesn’t make sense. They better start thinking about elastic pricing based on locality. By the way this applies to home market as well.

  • Wirelessguest

    T-Mobile has been sitting on a gold mine that they haven’t figured out how to take advantage of: They rely on DT for interconnectivity for data roaming traffic for years. There is certainly no additional cost for carrying a US traveler’s data traffic while roaming in (for example) Germany over T-Mobile’s network there.

    I landed in Frankfurt on last Wednesday. I got SMS messages showing updates to my SIM, informing me of roaming charges for voice/SMS and $15 per MByte. Then the most ironic of all I ended up on O2 Telefonica network! :)

    The best mobile experience should be about promoting the use of a mobile phone instead of forcing users to find alternatives to it, whether they are calling card companies using VoIP or Skype or Google Voice or free WiFi. All mobile companies including T-Mobile bring this upon themselves. They still think they own the only access path to communication highway for people on the go, since they own the radio spectrum. By their own greediness, they open up the world of communication to arbitrage hence Skype, Google Voice, Jajah, Fring, etc. I can understand their greediness if I happen to be traveling on a German autobahn, but in Frankfurt airport it doesn’t make sense. They better start thinking about elastic pricing based on locality. By the way this applies to home market as well.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

    With my german T-Mobile sim Im able to use my minutes all over europe but sadly not in the USA on T-Mobile US which is stupid.
    With vodafone you can use your minutes and data all over europe, egypt, south africa, Japan Australia, New Zealand, Fiji Islands……

    And I think Orange offers the same for Europe, Africa and the carribean
    Plus with T-Mobile and Vodafone in all those countrys the first 60 incoming minutes are free.

    I think this will be the way to go thats the point where Sprint cant compete also Verizon cant really compete since they dont allow Vodafone to buy the needed shares to take over control and so they are not part of the Vodafone network.

    Maybe T-Mobile should ad a ‘Rule the world” in addition to the “Rule the air”

    • SublimeDavid

      Maybe T-Mobile should ad a ‘Rule the world” in addition to the “Rule the air”

      haha if they do allow the type of roaming that is currently being done in Europe *check the UK website* then I suspect they will indeed rule the world in terms of the business sector. A shark like ATT Verizon cant compare with the Battleship that will become TMobile with big Brother DT.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

    With my german T-Mobile sim Im able to use my minutes all over europe but sadly not in the USA on T-Mobile US which is stupid.
    With vodafone you can use your minutes and data all over europe, egypt, south africa, Japan Australia, New Zealand, Fiji Islands……

    And I think Orange offers the same for Europe, Africa and the carribean
    Plus with T-Mobile and Vodafone in all those countrys the first 60 incoming minutes are free.

    I think this will be the way to go thats the point where Sprint cant compete also Verizon cant really compete since they dont allow Vodafone to buy the needed shares to take over control and so they are not part of the Vodafone network.

    Maybe T-Mobile should ad a ‘Rule the world” in addition to the “Rule the air”

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

    So the plan for the near future is that the european providers are allowed to put there networks together so that there will be one T-Mobile, Vodafone, O2, Orange Network within europe and not a Telekom.de, T-Mobile.nl………

    • SublimeDavid

      Would be hard to do that as each country has its own rules and regulations. I suspect Magenta will indeed stop the long standing tradition of Tmobile USA being left alone for the most part to do its own battles and bidding though…So in a way its uniqueness will begin to dissapear and will be one brand as a whole.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

        The EU wants to cancel roaming fees within europe in 2012 so they will probably merge their networks.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

    So the plan for the near future is that the european providers are allowed to put there networks together so that there will be one T-Mobile, Vodafone, O2, Orange Network within europe and not a Telekom.de, T-Mobile.nl………

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

    I still hope T-Mobile merges with Orange that would be almost perfect

    • SublimeDavid

      “they probably go the right way with what they do, all european providers use their LTE networks only as broadband ”

      - Probably what T-Mobile is going to do. They will leave the HSPA network for Cellular data or Phone Service. Besides no Need for a Phone to have 1 GB LTE im sure 652 LTEH or whatever it’s being called will be more than a enough to handle the business needs of people for quite sometime, I wont be surprised to see them have no LTE caps if the cells arent clogging up the LTE network Probably the reason Verizon has the Iphone4 for the CDMA network is because they know it would cripple their supposedly fast LTE network. As you transition customers to LTE phones Iphone will be left behind and wont affect them as much.

    • Anonymous

      They already did merge in the UK.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

        They ve built up this “everything everywhere” company which is controlling now the T-Mobile UK and Orange UK network but they are not one company yet they just share the network.

    • Anonymous

      They already did merge in the UK.

  • Alvaro

    Metro PCS has a USD $5 add on that offers unlimited calls to land lines in those countries. Tmo is not changing anything in the game. Metro PCS is the game changer; unfortunately, their reputation is so bad (People call itr “Metro piece of… “) but the service and coverage is getting better and their phones are not as good as Tmobile (also you have to pay full price). It’s good to know that Tmo is jumping in this new option launched 2 years ago by Metro.

  • SublimeDavid

    Youre wrong david they will not match T-Mobile’s power especially when they own the network they will be roaming on, that is ambitious and will drop kick ATT Verizon and Sprint right in the face, Finally DT is leveraging their International Muscles and showing ATT and Verizon who has the best coverage worldwide (LoL) its time to take those International Business People and bring them under the Magenta Wing as they are a highly profitable sector in the wireless business.

  • Guest

    so they are trying to let people know about their international plans but the will advertise in “key Hispanic Markets” why not just call it the new HISPANIC Plans, i don’t understand why we have to advertise everything in the Hispanic language, i don’t see anything for Asians or any other European countries

  • Anonymous

    Some strange people commenting here. That is great for business travelers. Finally. I fly to Europe all the time now with newer data eating phones this is a great idea. It is so expensive to roam. It used to be talk that was expensive now most phones rely on data so it costed a lot more. I like the idea you can pay add on for the time being outside the country and not be shocked. By the way ignorant Guest person clearly you think outside the US means Mexico. Open your horizon, learn , educate yourself and don’t be ignorant. Otherwise your life would be a WASTE in other human being’s world !

    • http://anne.mangopapaya.net anne

      I agree. I’m not a business traveller, but I do go abroad a lot. My MT3G is unlocked solely for travelling, but it’s quite a pain to always have to buy a local SIM just to be able to call and use the Internet for a reasonable price during a short stay. Since T-Mo is a part of a larger international company, it’s about time they use their connections. I can’t wait until they roll out their international data plan! ^_^

  • Anonymous

    Some strange people commenting here. That is great for business travelers. Finally. I fly to Europe all the time now with newer data eating phones this is a great idea. It is so expensive to roam. It used to be talk that was expensive now most phones rely on data so it costed a lot more. I like the idea you can pay add on for the time being outside the country and not be shocked. By the way ignorant Guest person clearly you think outside the US means Mexico. Open your horizon, learn , educate yourself and don’t be ignorant. Otherwise your life would be a WASTE in other human being’s world !

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3QVR3B6ETZRTOLMLTR5YWRAZFY Marcel

    Hopefully DT is finally lifting up its bum and integrates T-Mobile US fully into the T-Mobile family so that subscribers from both sides of the ocean can use their minutes and ad ons via versa. Because thats the big leverage point to gain business customers.

  • Awdf

    ta.gg/4vp

  • Awdf

    ta.gg/4vp

  • Austin4435

    Yup, they are misleading people! One day I have 10gs the next day 5gs..and they don’t tell you they change it..you just use the data you’d been using and oops..yove gone over! LAME..IM LEAVING T-MOBILE!

  • Vibrant Addict

    Just added this to my account, as NOW I definitely needed.

    So others know, since it’s not stated on the site, you use plan minutes only when calling at peak time. When calling at night and weekends you don’t take a hit on your whenever minutes. I called in to be sure about that.

    Thanks for the reminder David!